All posts in “Bugatti”

Demand for Bugatti’s Chiron Pur Sport is exceeding expectations

Bugatti’s handling-focused Chiron Pur Sport should have been one of the stars of the 2020 Geneva auto show, but the event was canceled at the last minute due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Although customers weren’t able to see the firm’s newest model in person, demand has nonetheless been exceptionally high.

Geneva is a major event for brands like Bugatti because it’s one of the last shows where customers go to spend money, not just to sit in cars and play around with the infotainment system. Members of the company’s sales and marketing team consequently had to find other ways to present the model; some potential buyers were shown the Pur Sport online, while a handful have seen it in person as it tours Europe. All have given it a warm welcome.

“Feedback from customers that have seen the car, online or in person, has been positive. It’s exceeding expectations,” a spokesperson for the company told Autoblog. Bugatti will continue showing the car to loyal customers in Europe, and it will soon set sail across the Atlantic to make its debut on American soil.

Sixty units of the Pur Sport will be built by hand in Bugatti’s Atelier in Molsheim, France. It’s the latest member of the Chiron family, which also includes the standard model introduced at the 2016 edition of the Geneva show and the record-breaking Super Sport 300+ unveiled in 2019. Frank Heyl, the company’s deputy design director, told Autoblog that customer requests play a big role in shaping the different directions his team takes the Chiron in. 

“We have customers who really demanded a more reactive, more emotional car. This was, of course, one idea. We said, ‘OK, let’s do it,’ and we started developing this car,” he said. Heyl stopped short of telling us what’s next, but his team won’t run out of ideas — and customers won’t run out of requests — anytime soon.

In the meantime, Bugatti’s team of intrepid road testers is fine-tuning the Chiron Pur Sport by putting it through its paces on various tracks, including the Nürburgring. Production is scheduled to start in the second half of 2020.

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How design follows function in the Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport and Super Sports 300+

As the successor to the world-beating Veyron, the Bugatti Chiron had big shoes to fill, and by every measure it has succeeded. With its 304-mph top-speed run last fall, the latest Bugatti hypercar has handily beaten all expectations, and Bugatti President Stephan Winkelmann has even publicly stated that the company will no longer chase speed records. One could argue that the Chiron’s work here is done, and yet it’s merely half way through its projected lifecycle. What more could it possibly accomplish?

Bugatti’s answer: Go faster on a road course. To accomplish this, the Chiron Super Sports 300+ formula would have to be cast aside for something entirely new. After all, the things that make a car fast in a straight line are only part of the equation when it comes to conquering a race track, and with that mission, the Chiron Pur Sport was born. These two models’ diverging missions necessitated distinct design. To learn more about just how differently they were formed, Autoblog attended a virtual round-table with Frank Heyl, Bugatti deputy design director, and Jachin Schwalbe, Bugatti head of chassis development.

The distinctions are most evident in their profiles, where the longtail design of the Super Sports 300+ radically alters the Chiron’s entire rear “box,” making the Pur Sport’s sharp rear cut-off seem almost inelegant by comparison. The slow, clean taper of the longtail design accomplishes the same thing aerodynamically that it does aesthetically. When the car is in top-speed mode, the rear spoiler even remains stowed.

This design significantly shrinks the low-pressure zone behind the car, reducing the resulting drag, but that absent spoiler also detracts from the Chiron’s stability. To compensate for the lack of spoiler deployment, Bugatti’s engineers altered the flow beneath the car and through the rear diffuser. Heyl describes this as “free” downforce, because there’s no corresponding penalty in drag from gains found with these underbody features.

With the Pur Sport, Bugatti went the other direction. This track-focused car gives up a ton of top speed to its sibling in exchange for nimbleness and acceleration, so being able to cut the minimum hole in the air is far less important. Think of design as a zero-sum game, Bugatti’s team says. With the Pur Sport, top speed was less of a priority, which allowed engineering and design to explore other capabilities. 

The short rear deck and pronounced rear diffuser pair with the Pur Sport’s massive rear wing to produce significantly more downforce, significantly improving the car’s high-speed handling. It may “only” hit 218 mph, but the trade-offs allow for far greater flexibility on tighter, more technical tracks. These design changes go hand-in-hand with the Pur Sport’s extensive chassis and braking system overhaul to create a total package that is more than merely a stock Chiron with 110 pounds yanked out of it. 

In the end, this divergent pair of new Chirons should provide more than enough incentive for customers to justify and/or desire plunking down a few more millions on one of the few remaining Chirons set to be made (less than 100). Basically, how and where do you want your second Chiron to be faster?

Short-tailed Bugatti Chiron Super Sport spied testing

One of our spy photographers has caught a rather odd Bugatti Chiron prototype out testing. It features no camouflage, which reveals that it seems to fuse a regular Chiron with the Chiron Super Sport 300+. And that begs the question, what is this?

The front of the car is all Super Sport 300+. It has the revised air intakes, clusters of round vents in the hood, and big vents in the fenders. But unlike that top speed challenger, this has a normal, truncated tail from the regular Chiron. In fact, everything from the front fenders back appears to be regular Chiron. The one difference is the exhaust, which consists of two oval tips that most resemble the tailpipes of the Chiron Pur Sport. But the rear fascia is definitely regular Chiron, not the revised design of the Pur Sport.

So what is it? It could simply be a mash-up of leftover Chiron parts for some kind of test mule. It could also be shortened Chiron Super Sport 300+ that will share the same 1,600-horsepower engine as the high-speed car, but without the cost of the extra aerodynamics. Whatever it is, Bugatti’s testers evidently weren’t happy about the spy photographer catching the car, as he reports the car was hurried into a trailer and security sent to confront the photographer and stop him from sharing the photos. So it seems Bugatti has something interesting coming, whether it looks exactly like this or just has this car’s underpinnings.

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Bugatti walks us through the Chiron Pur Sport’s testing process

Bugatti is emerging from weeks of lockdown loudly, and sometimes sideways. Its engineers have started testing the Chiron Pur Sport unveiled in March 2020 on the Blister Berg track nestled in Germany’s Teutoberg forest.

Blister Berg is a private track, so the team only has three days to fine-tune the Pur Sport’s chassis, steering, suspension, and gearbox — the latter isn’t the same unit that’s found in the Chiron because its gear ratios are shorter in order to deliver quicker acceleration. Engineers are also monitoring wear-and-tear items, like the tires, and keeping an eye on the model-specific engine components. That’s a lot to cram into three days, especially since Bugatti had to reduce the size of the team it sent to the track in order to comply with the social-distancing measures that remain in effect throughout much of the world. Germany’s dense, fairytale-like forest is no exception.

Luckily, sensors aren’t affected by health-related restrictions, and there’s no limit to the number Bugatti can stuff into the two pre-production prototypes tirelessly lapping the Blister Berg track. They’re monitoring a variety of parameters, including the exhaust temperature. They’re also helping engineers set up the new Sport+ driving mode that relies on gyro-based technology to make the Chiron more eager to drift. Creating this profile requires a tremendous amount of calibration work. Testers download data after each run, analyze it, and make changes if needed. Bugatti told Autoblog the Chiron can already drift, but the new mode makes it a little bit easier.

Going through this costly, time-consuming process is a way for the firm to demonstrate that its definition of performance doesn’t end at straight-line speed. It wants to show a lesser-known side of its personality.

“Bugatti has always proven it can build fast cars in terms of top speed,” the company told Autoblog, pointing to cars like the Chiron Super Sport 300+. “However, we also have a history of building cars devoted to agility. This is often forgotten or overshadowed by the incredible top speed feats. We, as did some of our valued customers we talked to about this, felt we should complete the spectrum of performance of the Chiron lineup.”

Validation testing will continue in the coming months; Bugatti will notably take the Pur Sport to the Nürburgring. Jachin Schwalbe, head of chassis development, explained every part of the car needs to work perfectly on its own, but also as part of the broader package. While that’s par for the course when it comes to developing a new car, the Pur Sport needs to work perfectly over a much larger speed range than the average car.

Pur Sport production is scheduled to begin in the second half of 2020. Sixty units will be built, and pricing starts at €3 million, a figure that makes it slightly more expensive than the Chiron. In the meantime, the company’s factory in Molsheim, France, is assembling the first examples of the limited-edition Divo introduced in 2018. Bugatti’s lineup has grown considerably in a few short years, which adds a level of complexity to its production.

“We are currently building the Chiron, the Chiron Sport, and the Divo. And, we’ll be building the Chiron Pur Sport, the Chiron Super Sport 300+, the La Voiture Noire, and the Centodieci as soon as their development has concluded. We naturally had to adjust or optimize our structures and processes, not only in the production or in R&D, but also in the design, procurement, and logistics departments — in all departments, really. We have successfully done so, and the team is proud to see the portfolio grow.”

Although it couldn’t share more details about what’s next, the company assured us it’s not idling in neutral. “We can’t disclose what we are working on, but our team doesn’t know boredom.”

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Bugatti Shares New Bugatti Divo Configurations

Bugatti recently announced that the Bugatti Divo had completed development. Customers are expected to receive the first examples later this year. To whet our appetite, the French hypercar manufacturer recently shared a new set of configurations for the French hypercar.

Customers were given the opportunity to completely customise their car with Laure Beneteau, Sales and Operations Manager at Bugatti. She works alongside three other Bugatti employees and the rest of the 15-strong customisation team, called “Bugatti sur Mesure”. 

In theory, the choice of colours is unlimited. Bugatti explains: “some customers have their own ideas, such as family crests, national flags, their own logos or special colour schemes”. Customers are able to choose the colour of body panels, decorative parts, the roof, engine covers, and other components.

Bugatti Divo Customer ConfigurationBugatti Divo Customer Configuration

Bugatti has revealed some of the more personal touches it has applied to cars over the years. These include a child’s footprints on a rear panel, the first name of a customer’s partner embroidered in the door pockets, and crystals mounted in the cockpit.

It is also possible to design individually grilles or to have logos applied to the underside of the rear wing.

Bugatti also revealed general trends by region. It sees that Asian customers tend to request more unusual colours and prefer effect paint, while the European market tends to choose more restrained tones. Customers from the USA or the Middle East, on the other hand, like to order eye-catching and extravagant colour combinations.

Bugatti Divo Development Complete – Cleared for Delivery

Earlier this week, Bugatti confirmed that development of the Bugatti Divo had come to an end. The first customer cars are due to begin deliveries later this year. The milestone marks a return to coachbuilding for the French hypercar expert.

Bugatti first unveiled the Divo at Monterey Car Week in 2018. It was the first project developed under Stephan Winkelmann’s direction.

Even before Bugatti announced the Divo, it had already sold all 40 planned production units. A staggering feat when you consider that the asking price runs to 5 million euros, net of tax. Even more impressive is Winkelmann’s confirmation that “Every Divo customer owns a Chiron” too.

The Divo is a substantially different model from the Chiron. Focused on cornering instead of outright pace, the Divo wears completely new skin. Increased downforce, improved cooling and optimised airflow, all three elements contribute to improved handling characteristics. The Divo manages 90 km of additional downforce.

While the bodywork differs from the standard Chiron, the engineering remains broadly the same. The Bugatti Divo continues to use the 8.0-litre W16 engine with 1,500 hp and 1,600 Nm of torque. 0 to 100 km/h happens in 2.4 seconds. The improvements in aerodynamics mean that top speed is limited to 380 km/h.

The chassis modifications include a change in wheel camber on the front and rear axles, harder springs and a more front-oriented balance. Bugatti shed 35 kilograms in weight.

Jacob & Co. Bugatti Chiron Tourbillon puts a mini W16 engine in motion inside a watch

In early 2019, Bugatti ended its 15-year watch partnership with Swiss watchmaker Parmigiani Fleurier and inaugurated a new collaboration with New York watchmaker and jeweler Jacob & Co. — the latter firm once known for helping define the bling-bling era in American music. When announcing the new tie-up at the global timepiece showcase Baselworld in March last year, Jacob debuted two new limited-edition watches, both based on extant Jacob models. The $545,000 Twin Turbo Furious Bugatti Edition reworked the watchmaker’s Twin Turbo Furious timepiece, and the $37,000 Bugatti Chrono Edition Limitee 100 Ans celebrated Bugatti’s 110th anniversary and was based off Jacob’s Epic X Chrono. Yet, as the partnership promised to push “the limits of what seems mechanically possible,” a new and incredible watch would be needed, so Jacob spent a year developing this, the Bugatti Chiron Tourbillon. Behind its sapphire crystal there’s an automaton suspended inside the case mimicking the movement of the Chiron’s W16 engine.  

The animated engine serves no timekeeping purpose, it’s there for show — and it’s quite the show. Pressing the pusher crown at the base of the case sets the engine in motion for about 20 seconds; a stainless steel crankshaft milled from a single ingot pushes stainless con-rods and pistons inside a sapphire crystal block, and two spinning turbochargers can be viewed through a window on the side of the case. After three runs, the engine’s barrel needs to be recharged by turning the center crown counterclockwise, then it’s ready for another three goes. The setup consists of 578 pieces, and is so tiny and complicated that it took more than three days to program the CNC machines milling the stainless steel, and the animation designer wasn’t sure it would work. Those two factoids are perhaps the best connection to the improbable wonder that is the Bugatti Chiron. 

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We meant the phrase “suspended inside the case” literally. The watch’s movement sits on four coilover dampers at the corners, allowing the movement a hint of up and down flotation which necessitated an Incabloc shock protection system. Other Bugatti-themed touches include the titanium case, the Chiron Blue hands, the watch movement’s 60-hour reserve dial that looks like a gas gauge, a window onto the tourbillion shaped like a Chiron grille, the black rubber strap, and the customization possibilities that include an owner be able to choose what color the coilovers should be.   

Jacob & Co. will make 250 of the Bugatti Chiron Tourbillion, each priced at $280,000.

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Bugatti put three generations of legendary supercars into one photo

The modern era of Bugatti has seen dozens of special-editions, limited-editions, and bespoke one-offs, but the core of the company is defined by three models that have spanned the past three decades. The EB110 marked the ’90s, the Veyron ruled the ’00s and early ’10s, and the Chiron dominated the end of the ’10s into the present. Bugatti calls the trio the “Holy Trinity” and recently brought all three supercars together for a photoshoot in Dubai. 

Against a backdrop of sweeping sands and a spiky skyline tipped by the Burj Khalifa tower, Bugatti placed a black EB110 next to black examples of a Veyron and a Chiron. It’s an awe-inspiring sight, even in photos, though it is a bit strange to see the models dressed like they’re going to a funeral rather than sporting any of the numerous iconic color schemes they’ve worn throughout the years. 

Despite the 30 years between the EB110, and the Chiron, all three vehicles are built with the same three key components: a carbon-fiber monocoque, four turbochargers, and all-wheel drive. The technologies within these three pillars have drastically changed, but the idea of what makes a true super sports car has remained the same. 

The EB110, which denotes Ettore Bugatti and his 110th birthday, debuted on his birthday, September 15, 1991, in Paris. It packs a mid-engined quad-turbo 3.5-liter V12 that has a 8,250-rpm redline. The lowest-powered EB110 had 560 horsepower, while the most powerful model made 611 horsepower. The EB110 claimed a zero-to-62-mph time of 3.3 seconds and a top speed of 218 mph. 

The Veyron entered the scene for the 2005 model year. This time around, Bugatti slapped the four turbochargers on an 8.0-liter W16, and that engine makes a whopping 987 horsepower (1,001 PS). With the added power, the zero-to-62-mph time dropped to 2.5 seconds, and the top speed increased to 253 mph, and that was before more powerful variants were released.

The Chiron, Bugatti’s current model, debuted in 2016 and continued to build on the power and speed records its relatives had set before it. The Chiron carries on with a quad-turbo 8.0-liter W16, but it now makes 1,479 horsepower. It can sprint from a stop to 62 mph in 2.4 seconds, and in 2019, Bugatti used a Chiron to reach 304.773 mph, the fastest speed for a production car ever achieved. 

To truly appreciate the greatness of these vehicles requires an in-person visit, but for now, photos will have to do. Check out the family photoshoot in the gallery above.

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Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport Revealed with $3.35 Million Price Tag

Another special edition Bugatti Chiron arrived this afternoon. The Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport is limited to 60 examples. This is the Chiron for you if you like the idea of a massive fixed rear wing!

The Pur Sport benefits from less weight and a sharper focus on downforce, its the Chiron for those winding roads. The Pur Sport gets a close-ratio transmission, high-performance tyres with a new material mix geared towards extreme grip as well as an agile chassis and suspension setup.

Whereas the Chiron Super Sport 300+ was set up to hit top speeds, the Pur Sport is set up for optimum lap times. The front gets wide air inlets and an enlarged horseshoe panel to extract air from the radiators. The splitter is lower to the ground which helps to maximise downforce.

A new split paintwork design has been developed for the Pur Sport. The bottom is a carbon fibre panel while the top half is painted with the choice of a custom centre-line and accents.

The rear is dominated by a 1.90 metre rear spoiler. Part of the 50 kg weight loss is caused by losing the hydraulic component of the Chiron’s automatic rear spoiler. A more aggressive rear diffuser is combined with a distinctive 3D-printed titanium exhaust tip.

Inside, Alcantara surfaces help reduce weight. Patterns have been lasered into the Alcantara door trim panels. All trim and controls are made exclusively of either black, anodised aluminium or titanium.

The wheels are also unique to the Pur Sport. They are magnesium and feature an optional aero blade. The rings fitted to the rim extract air outwards from the wheel. Each of the 5 lug nuts gets a special cover that reduces turbulence. The measures applied to the wheels alone save 16 kg.

Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport Rear

The chassis modifications include 65% firmer springs at the front and 33% firmer springs at the rear, an adaptive damping control strategy geared towards performance as well as modified camber values (minus 2.5 degrees). Bugatti add carbon-fibre stabilisers at the front and rear. 19 kg of weight is lost here.

On top of the usual Chiron drive modes, the Chiron Pur Sport features a new Sport + drive mode. The main difference is that the traction control system kicks into action on dry race tracks at a significantly later point. Changes to the transmission mean that the gear ratio that has been configured 15% closer together.

The 8.0 litre W16 engine still kicks out a massive 1,500 hp and 1,600 Nm of torque. Due to the higher levels of downforce, the Pur Sport tops out at 350 km/h. Bugatti hasn’t released any performance details aside from the claim that the Chiron Pur Sport accelerates from 60 to 120 km/h almost two seconds faster than the standard Chiron.

40 units of the Bugatti Divo should arrive next year with these Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport models set to be produced in the second half. 60 will be available at three million euros excluding VAT. With the 250th Chiron already leaving the factory gates, and 30 Chiron Super Sport 300+ announced, we calculate that there are a further 120 Chirons left before Bugatti’s self-imposed 500-car quota is hit.

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Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport: born to speed (and drift) through the twisties

Bugatti made automotive history in 2019 when it built a long-tail variant of the Chiron that was still accelerating when it smashed through the 300-mph barrier. With the speed record broken and set, the French company wants to prove it also knows a thing or two about handling with a new Chiron version named Pur Sport.

“It’s a lot of little details that add up to a very different driving experience. You immediately feel the car is nimbler and more agile,” explained Frank Heyl, the company’s deputy design director, in an interview with Autoblog.

Heyl’s team worked directly with Bugatti’s engineering department to create a front fascia with wider air intakes, a redesigned splitter, and a bigger grille. Out back, it’s impossible to miss the 74-inch long wing that unlocks quicker cornering speeds by adding downforce. Below it, a pair of exhaust tips 3D-printed in titanium are integrated into a taller air diffuser made with carbon fiber. There’s no way to miss the Pur Sport if it passes you on the highway.

The rear wing is fixed, and its mounts form an X-shaped insert. Heyl told us Bugatti deliberately sent the Chiron’s hydraulically-operated spoiler back to the parts bin to save as much weight as possible. It shaved a total of 110 pounds, which is far more impressive than it sounds. “You have to consider this: we’ve done everything we could to save weight on the base Chiron. We’ve put the most expensive materials inside this car, and used the most expensive solutions already. To gain another [110 pounds] was quite a challenge,” he pointed out.

The wheels received attention, too, and we’re not just talking about the design or the -2.5 camber angle. “[The two rings] suck air from the inside of the wheel to the outside, which creates downforce and improves the brake cooling by increasing airflow through the wheel,” Heyl explained. The 20-inch front and 21-inch rear wheels are made of magnesium to reduce unsprung mass by 35 pounds, and they’re wrapped by Bugatti-exclusive Michelin Sport Cup 2 R tires manufactured with a stickier compound. All told, the tweaks made at the Chiron’s four corners increase its lateral acceleration by 10%. Heyl’s equation is beginning to add up.

Alcantara upholstery largely replaces leather in the cabin. It’s lighter, and it does a better job of ensuring the driver’s butt doesn’t slide around when racing up a mountain road. Model-specific stitching on the seats and on the steering wheel, trim pieces, and miscellaneous accents further set the Pur Sport apart from the Chiron.

Bugatti then turned its attention to the chassis. The front and rear springs are 65% and 33% firmer, respectively, and the braking system is lighter thanks to the use of brake pads with a titanium base panel and different brake discs. Owners will be able to exploit the Pur Sport’s full potential by engaging a new driving mode named Sport + that wards off the traction control system’s intervention to allow a controlled drift — on a race track, of course.

“This mode enables the car to be placed on the throttle, so you can steer on the throttle a little bit more. It will allow you to go into a drift, and it will still catch you if things go wrong,” Heyl told Autoblog. If that sounds familiar, it’s because the gyro-based technology is similar to what Lamborghini offers in the rear-wheel drive Huracán.

Finally, let’s answer the question trotting through your brain: no, you won’t find more power in the engine bay. It’s the same quad-turbocharged, 8.0-liter W16 engine found in the regular Chiron, meaning it delivers 1,500 horsepower and 1,180 pound-feet of torque, but it’s bolted to a new seven-speed automatic transmission with shorter gear ratios. Engineers raised the 16-cylinder’s redline to 6,900 rpm, an increase of 200 rpm, and these seemingly small changes (along with the weight reduction) make the Pur Sport nearly two seconds quicker from 37 to 75 mph than the Chiron. Elasticity improved by 40% across the board, so it should feel strikingly quick in a straight line. The trade-off is that engineers had to limit its top speed to 217 mph due to the shorter gear ratios and the huge wing.

“Everything works together beautifully for the car to handle much better,” Heyl summed up.

Bugatti will make 60 examples of the Chiron Pur Sport, and each one costs €3 million before taxes, a sum that represents $3.3 million. Autoblog asked the company how many units are already spoken for, and we’ll update this story if we learn more. In the meantime, the French firm is preparing to deliver the first examples of the Divo.

Bugatti Chiron Sport “Edition Noire Sportive”: The 250th Chiron Revealed

It’s hard to believe that it has been almost 4 years since the Bugatti Chiron debuted. Earlier this week, Bugatti revealed its 250th Chiron, the Bugatti Chiron Sport “Edition Noire Sportive”.

The Bugatti Chiron Sport “Edition Noire Sportive” marks a staggering milestone for Bugatti. 250 cars have left the Bugatti factory with a further 150 already paid for, this means that fewer than 100 units are still available for sale.

The Edition Noire Sportive features a satin black carbon fibre body which extends into the interior, coupled with black leather. Chrome work has been blacked out and a Noire signature applied to the door jambs and under the rear spoiler.

The Bugatti Chiron Sport “Edition Noire Sportive” is one of 20 Chiron Noire’s planned for production as a limited edition run. Each costs an additional 100,000 euros on top of the normal Chiron Sport.

Otherwise, this Chiron shares its looks with the Bugatti Chiron Sport. This means that it gets the Chiron Sport’s new wheel design and four-pipe exhaust deflector as well as its carbon fibre windscreen wipers.

Under the rear bonnet sits an 8.0-litre W16 powerplant producing 1,500 hp with 1,600 Nm of torque. The Sport is 18 kg lighter than the standard Chiron.

The Bugatti Chiron Sport “Edition Noire Sportive” will be on display at the Bugatti stand at the Geneva Motor Show 2020 which starts the week after next.

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Bugatti Chiron Sport Edition Noire Sportive marks the production halfway point

For Bugatti, possibly only for Bugatti, a 1,479-horsepower coupe with a quad-turbocharged 8.0-liter W16 is just the starting point. Bugatti unveiled the Chiron in 2016 with the intent of building 500 examples, and four years later, 250 units and numerous extraordinary limited-editions have been crafted. To mark the occasion, Bugatti will show No. 250, a Chiron Sport Edition Noire Sportive, at the 2020 Geneva International Auto Show, where it all began.

Near the end of 2019, Bugatti announced two new blacked-out Chirons, one called the Chiron Noire Elegance and the other called the Chiron Noire Sportive. The Elegance model exhibits a reflective gloss, while the Sportive has a muted matte exterior. Backing up the Noire designation, the Sportive model goes completely black, with nearly nothing left to show off any sort of metallic sparkle. The Elegance, however, looks a bit more dressed up with aluminum and silver accents. Both feature Noire script graphics, including on the underside of the rear wing. The Noire models are limited to 20 examples total, and No. 250 will surely be one of the most interesting of the bunch.

The Noire Elegance and Sportive follow in the footsteps of Bugatti’s (and the world’s) most expensive release, the Bugatti La Voiture Noire. A coachbuilt homage to the Bugatti 57 SC Atlantic, the La Voiture Noire reportedly cost more than $18 million, with fees and taxes factored in. It was limited to only one example, and it was only one of numerous special launches that spawned from the Chiron.

In addition to the base Chiron, Bugatti has also released the lighter and sharper Chiron Sport, on which the car seen here is based. Then there was the Chiron-based Divo “for the bends,” and then came the Chiron Super Sports 300+ to honor the car that broke the 300-mph barrier. Other special editions included the 110 ans Bugatti Chiron to honor the company’s history and the Bugatti Centodieci that honors the Bugatti EB110 supercar. So much honor.

For only having one car in its lineup, Bugatti sure has made a lot of different vehicles, and we recently found out it could have been more. In an Autoblog exclusive, we learned Bugatti also planned two never-before-seen coupes that would have been marketed alongside the Chiron. Unfortunately, they never made it through to see production.

With 250 produced, only 250 remain, and their availability is getting increasingly more scarce. Bugatti says 150 Chirons are already spoken for, which means only 100 are left to be claimed. We fully expect some of those to debut new bespoke features, new special editions and hopefully more coachbuilding.

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Bugatti Chiron Noire is Bugatti’s Monochrome Limited Edition

A 20-strong special edition has been announced by Bugatti. The Bugatti Chiron Noire pays tribute to “La Voiture Noire”, a special Type 57 SC Atlantic created by Jean Bugatti. One of four, it is the only Atlantic which remains missing, a car which belonged to Jean Bugatti and was used in the company’s brochure, display, and as a test car.

The Chiron Noire will be available in two versions. The “Chiron Noire Sportive” will add sporting flair which the “Chiron Noire Élégance” will focus on elegance.

Bugatti Chiron Noire Rear

The Élégance model gets black exposed carbon fibre bodywork. The Bugatti “Macaron” emblem sits at the centre of the grille, made of solid silver and refined with black enamel. The callipers are also finished in black with Caractère wheels. The signature line is milled from solid metal with a matt polished aluminium finish. Both the rear-view mirror and engine cover are also finished in black carbon and polished aluminium.

Inside, the theme is dark black. Only the “Inner Signature Line” is finished in silk-matt aluminium to break the shadows. The inscription “Noire” appears on the door sills and on the outside of the centre console while a model designation badge is applied to the centre armrest.

The Chiron Noire Sportive gets a matt finish to its carbon bodywork. The exterior trim elements, the C-shaped Bugatti signature line, the wheels, front spoiler and radiator grille are all matt black. The exhaust tips are black and the engine cover too. Inside, everything is black including the inner C-line, switches, push-buttons and rotary knobs on the dashboard, steering wheel, centre console and door handles.

The 20 Chiron Noire’s will be available for the Chiron Sport at an extra charge of 100,000 euros.

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Bugatti Chiron Noire only slightly less exclusive than ‘La Voiture Noire’

Bugatti has only constructed one La Voiture Noire, the homage to the Jean Bugatti’s now-lost 57 SC Atlantic, and as far as we know, Bugatti will only build one. The Molsheim manfuacturer has come up with a way to spread the sheen of The Black Car to a few more Bugatti owners with two versions of a single special edition. The Chiron Noire Elegance and Chiron Noire Sportive are two ways to dress the hypercar up in black, the difference being that one presents a gleaming black objet to admire, the other opens two doors to a singularity and perhaps a portal to the Planet of the Apes.

The Elegance is the showy black one, all of its bodywork done in exposed carbon fiber. Two new mesh designs cover the front radiator grilles, highlighted by a Bugatti badge worked up in solid silver and black enamel. Matte polished aluminum caps the C-line swooping around the doors, tying in with the polished aluminum on the side mirrors and engine cover. Lower down, the word “Noire” on the rear fenders, scripted in black, of course, gives away the coupe’s exclusive identity, as do the black brake calipers. Inside the black leather interior, silk-matte aluminum highlights the C-line between the seats, and Noire badging decorates the center console, armrest, and door sills.

The Chiron Noire Sportive is the shadowy black one, all of its bodywork and normally metallic jewelry slathered in matte black, including the C-line and tailpipes. Bugatti appears to have dipped the interior in a tub of black, so not only is the leather the color of night, so too are all the usually aluminum parts; the C-line, the steering wheel, the center console, switchgear, buttons and knobs on the dashboard and the door handles, all of them want to swallow all the light.

Bugatti will sell only 20 of this Chrion Noire special edition, builds to begin in the second quarter of next year. Either package can be ordered for the base Chrion for three million euros ($3.3M U.S.), or added to the more expensive Chiron Sport for an additional 100,000 euros ($110,865 U.S.).

Bugatti considering electric four-seater as second model

Bugatti’s long-rumored additional model could run on electricity rather than gasoline, according to a recent report. The company is tentatively planning a downward expansion without diluting its image.

Downward is a relative term when spoken in the same sentence as Bugatti. The company isn’t interested in chasing volume with an alternative to the Volkswagen GTI. Instead, Bloomberg wrote it’s envisioning an electric four-seater priced between 500,000 and one million euros, sums that represent about $555,000 and $1.1 million, respectively. Bugatti CEO Stephan Winkelmann told the publication that convincing parent company Volkswagen to fund the model requires a “hard fight,” however.

“The industry is changing fundamentally, and we have to address what opportunities there are to develop Bugatti as a brand going forward,” he explained. Releasing a second, cheaper model would mark a dramatic shift for the prestigious automaker, which has stuck to a one-core-model strategy since its renaissance in 1998. The EV could bump its annual output from about 100 to 600 cars.

Winkelmann was the driving force behind the Urus when he ran Lamborghini, which has led to speculation that Bugatti’s second model will be an SUV. Speaking to Autoblog, a spokesperson for the company again doused cold water on the rumors. “It would not be an SUV,” we learned.

The representative stressed nothing has been decided yet, so it’s still too early to tell precisely when the second model would enter production if it receives the proverbial green light for production. Less than 100 Chiron build slots remain available, but the French company has its work cut out for the coming years. It will deliver the first of 40 planned examples of the Divo in 2020, send the one-off La Voiture Noire to its mysterious new home in 2021, and build the first of 10 Centodiecis (pictured) in 2022. Additional Chiron variants (like the record-breaking 300+) aren’t out of the question, either.

The idea of an electric Bugatti isn’t without precedence. In 1931, company founder Ettore Bugatti built a battery-powered runabout named Type 56 to drive on his property. It was never meant to be a production car, but requests from wealthy clients (including Belgian king Leopold III, who wanted one for his wife Astrid) convinced Bugatti to make 10 examples between 1931 and 1936. Four remain in 2019, including one in original condition that Autoblog got the opportunity to drive in 2018.

Bugatti EB110 Tribute Build Slots are Already Sold Out

You’ll Have to Enjoy This One from Afar

Bugatti has an EB110 Tribute car that it’s keeping a very tight lid on. There’s little information out about the car beyond the fact that it should make its first appearance at Pebble Beach. While little is known about the car, we can say that it’s a for sure vehicle.

Multiple reports have surfaced saying the car does exist and should be at Pebble Beach. A new report by The Supercar Blog says that all of the build slots for the car have already been sold. 

The unnamed source told the publication that all of the 10 cars that Bugatti will make have already been spoken for. The publication also stated that each of the cars will go for €8 million, which equates to about $8.8 million. The price is expected to only go up. The Supercar Blog reported that prices are expected to climb to €10 million, or roughly $11 million after the launch. 

Despite the fact that all of the EB110 Tribute cars are spoken for, we’re excited to see what Bugatti has in the works. When the EB110 first hit the scene it was a revelation. It has since become one of the most amazing supercars of all time. If Bugatti is going to build a tribute car, it needs to have something wholly unique. 

Bugatti Could Reveal a Special Edition at Pebble Beach

A Special, Limited Edition

The Bugatti Divo appeared at Pebble Beach during the Monterey Car Week last year. This year, the company will reveal another special edition car, according to The Supercar Blog. The publication cited an anonymous source that said the company will showcase a new model at Pebble Beach. 

The car will be sold in very limited numbers. The publication was not told how few of the special edition models would be made. The source did tell the publication that many of the build slots have already been spoken for and most of the production run are already sold. 

Of course, the new limited edition hypercar will demand a price higher than the Chiron. It will likely be a vehicle based on the Chiron, like other Bugatti special edition cars, such as the Divo. The Supercar Blog says that Bugatti has plans to release at least two new cars each year.

The stunning La Voiture Noire was the first car for this year, but there’s still room for another. That’s where this latest special edition model will come in. We will keep following this story and report on any updates that arise. Right now, information is scarce and it’s mostly speculation. 

Bugatti Chiron Centuria

If someone thinks the Bugatti Chiron needs more retooling, they’re simply crazy. Yet that’s exactly the headspace Mansory needed to be in when it built this Bugatti Chiron Centuria, which is unbelievably more formidable than its base inspiration.

A listing for the car popped up Monday on the German tuning company’s website. The mod marks the first time anyone has dared to modify the Chrino, on its own already a pretty beastly affair. But as you know in the world of cars, the best is a peak not a plateau. Mansory knew the Bugatti Chiron set a high bar. So it moved that bar even further.

In all fairness, Mansory has the credentials to back it up. It’s been renovating Bugatti cars since 2009. And here’s how it describes itself:

“No other company can boast more experience in individualization of these million-dollar luxury sports cars than the team around company founder and designer Kourosh Mansory.”

You get the idea. As of this time, it’s not exactly clear if Mansory touched the ride’s 1,500 horsepower, 8-liter, W-16 engine. It did, however, redo the exterior. On top of a new Centuria blue paint job, the supercar now boasts bespoke carbon-fiber body panels, new side skirts, and a diffuser. It’s also got a redesigned wing, which will apparently improve the car’s aerodynamics.

Mansory also added larger intake inlets on the hood for better engine cooling. There’s a special exhaust and fully forged alloy wheels as well, complete with a turbine design and a carbon-fiber finish.

Now, on to the big question — how much?

Well, you can get the Bugatti Chiron Centuria for a cool Centuria for $4.8 million.

BUY IF YOU DARE

Photos courtesy of Mansory

Bugatti’s La Voiture Noire Snatches Up Design Award at Concorso d’Eleganza

A Warranted Accolade

Ducati’s iconic and wildly expensive La Voiture Noire appeared on exhibit at the Concorso d’Eleganza in Italy. While there, the car was awarded the Design Award. The car was designed to honor the company’s long history in making some of the finest cars out there. It was also a way to pay homage to the Bugatti Type 57 SC Atlantic, which is one of the company’s most iconic models. 

Based on the same chassis the underpins the Chiron, the La Voiture Noire is a one-off car unlike any other. The exterior feature full carbon-fiber bodywork. Every piece of bodywork is custom to set the La Voiture Noire apart from any other car on earth. The powertrain is Bugatti’s venerable quad-turbo 8.0-liter W16 powertrain. That engine is used in other Bugatti models as well and its power output is unchanged at 1,479 hp and 1,180 lb-ft of torque.

The car on display is actually a prototype. Bugatti will build the final version of it yet. According to Carscoops, the vehicle will take two years to completely finish. Then it will deliver the car to the buyer, who is unknown. Whoever purchased this car must have deep pockets, though. It’s said to cost $18.9 million with taxes included. That’s a large sum of money for a single car, even a special one-off.