All posts in “Gear”

How to Get Great Wi-Fi, Even in Your Backyard

Work and Wi-Fi go hand and hand these days — for a lot of us, anyways — and now that the weather is nicer (and you’re tired of sitting at the same make-shift-quarantine desk) you’re likely looking for more ways to work outside. Maybe out on your porch or in a park? That means extending your home’s Wi-Fi network so you can get coverage in places you normally didn’t, or creating your own mobile Wi-Fi signal that you can take with you. Here’s what you can do.

Get a Wi-Fi extender.


A Wi-Fi extender, also known as a Wi-Fi booster, is a device that plugs into the wall and repeats the wireless signal from your router. It won’t improve the signal in areas of your home that you already get Wi-Fi, as it simply extends the signal to cover more areas of the home. The good news is that a number of great Wi-Fi extenders that are affordable and easy to set up, like the Rockspace Dual-Band Wi-Fi Range Extender. If you have a dead zone in your house or directly near it, like a porch or a yard, and you want a low-cost way of curing it, a Wi-Fi extender might be your best bet.

Price: $35

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Upgrade your router.


If the issue is with your Wi-Fi’s speed and range, and you’re comfortable with spending a little more, you might want to think about upgrading your router. A lot of homeowners end up using the modem and router given to them by their internet service providers, of which they pay a monthly fee, which is an easy solution (they don’t have to mess with all those wires) but it actually might be the worse and more expensive option (especially in the long run). The Linksys MR7350 Wi-Fi 6 Router is a great option in terms of speed, coverage and enhanced technologies (like support for Wi-Fi 6).

Price: $120

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Get a mesh router system.


A mesh router system is a great option for people who want to cure multiple Wi-Fi dead zones in and around their home. You can think of them as a system of Wi-Fi extenders that all talk to each other and create a larger Wi-Fi throughout your home; one mesh hub plugs into your modem and then you place other hubs all-around your home. It’s a modular system so the great thing is you can scale up by getting more mesh points anytime you want. The other big advantage of a mesh Wi-Fi network is that it creates one signal Wi-Fi network, whereas each Wi-Fi extender makes a separate network (which can complicate the user experience). Mesh routers that support the latest Wi-Fi 6 standard, like Netgear’s Orbi system, are a bit expensive at the moment, but it’s the best way to guarantee amazing connection everywhere in your space.

Price: $398

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Get some extra cable and move your router.

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This might be the easiest solution but also one you might not want to do. Routers are ugly to look at after all, which is why most of us hide them in a cabinet, under a desk or in some out-of-the-way location in our homes. The problem is that where the router is a huge factor in its signal quality. The signal can be halted by thick walls, pipes, large appliances and any other dense objects, which is why it’s best to place them out in the open. To get better Wi-Fi on your deck, it could be as simple as buying a longer ethernet cable and an acceptance that it’s OK to see your router a few times a day.

Price: $14

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How to Factory Reset Your HomePod or HomePod mini

There are a number of reasons why you’d want to reset your HomePod or HomePod mini. If you’re selling or giving it away, you want wipe all your personal information from it. You may have moved or switched your home Wi-Fi and your HomePod just might not be responding. Or for whatever reason, your HomePod might not be working properly. All these are good reasons to factory reset the smart speaker.

You can factory reset it from the Home app on your iPhone, iPad, Mac or even iPod Touch. You can factory reset it right from HomePod or HomePod mini itself, too.

To reset your HomePod or HomePod mini using the Home app, you simply have to remove it as an accessory. To do this:

  1. Open the Home app on your iPhone.
  2. Find the HomePod or HomePod mini under “Favorite Accessories.”
  3. Press and hold on the HomePod button.
  4. Scroll down and select “Remove Accessory” at the bottom.
  5. Select “Remove.”
    1. You can also factory reset your HomePod or HomePod mini without the Home app. You just need to go to the smart speaker and follow these instructions:

      1. Unplug HomePod or HomePod mini.
      2. Wait 10 seconds and then plug it back in.
      3. Wait another five seconds, then press and hold the top of HomePod.
      4. Keep holding. The white spinning light will turn red.
      5. Keep holding. Siri will then tell you the HomePod will reset.
      6. After you hear three beeps, you can stop pressing the top of the HomePod.
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      The All-New Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Could Debut by July

      By most accounts (including ours), the new eighth-generation Chevy Corvette is a revelation — but as with the last few generations of ‘Vette, the first version out of the blocks is just the beginning. For the mid-engined C8, Chevrolet allegedly has a whole arsenal of democratic speed in the works, with an array of increasingly powerful Corvettes planned to roll out over the next few years — culminating in a super-hybrid or all-electric version.

      And now, a new report suggests we could see the first of those — the new Corvette Z06 — by July 2021, or even sooner.

      That’s the word transmitted our way via Muscle Cars and Trucks, which caught word of it via the Mid-Engined Corvette Forum. According to the forum’s co-founder, an employee at Estero Bay Chevrolet in Florida named Marcus Viega announced in a post that “July 2021 we will be able to tell you more about this amazing car. Z06 is not a project anymore!”

      (We checked, and Estero Bay Chevrolet’s dealership page does indeed reveal an employee with that name among their ranks.)

      If the employee’s report is valid, that would suggest that General Motors is planning to reveal the new Chevy Corvette Z06 by July at the latest — because, as MC&T pointed out and common sense also dictates, a dealership can’t talk about a vehicle that a manufacturer hasn’t formally unveiled yet.

      If true, it would suggest Chevrolet could be fast-tracking the new Z06 — if not for production, at least enough to give us a taste of the car soon. Last March, The Detroit News reported that GM was delaying a whole host of updates and model revisions, such as the mid-life updates of the Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra — as well as delaying “a future variant of the Chevrolet Corvette that was not slotted for 2020.”

      Given that Corvettes usually roll out in a predictable order — Stingray base model, convertible, Z06, Grand Sport, ZR1 — that suggests the new ‘Vette to which the newspaper referred was likely the Z06; and considering it was apparently worthy of being mentioned in the same breath as a bunch of updates originally planned for 2020, it seems logical to assume it would be breaching the surface not long after those vehicles, which suggests an early 2021 debut.

      A summertime debut doesn’t necessarily mean we’d be able to drive it ASAP, though. The 2020 Corvette Stingray debuted in July 2019, but it wasn’t planned to enter production until the end of that year (and wound up being delayed months longer due to a UAW strike).

      As for what we can expect from the 2022 Corvette Z06, precedent suggests it’ll be more powerful and more track-focused (and, of course, more expensive) than the base model. Reports have widely claimed it’ll use a 5.5-liter naturally-aspirated V8 with a flat plane crank like Ferrari and the Shelby GT350 use, which should rev past 8,000 rpm and make 600 horsepower or more. One thing’s for sure, though: it’ll be faster than the Stingray.

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      The Key Capsule Delivers Stealth EDC Storage

      The Key Capsule is a smart & stealthy EDC container that fits on your keyring, offering protection for small items—everything from medication to mints. Made of food-safe anodized aluminum, the waterproof screw-on lid features an integrated loop for easy connection.

      2 of the Best Sedans You’ve Never Heard of Are Being Killed Off in America

      If Rodney Dangerfield were still alive to make a list of cars that also suffer from his famous catchphrase, the Kia K900 and Cadenza would have a couple of well-deserved spots on the docket. Kia’s two largest sedans never quite caught got the respect they deserved here in the United States.

      So it’s not all that surprising that, according to Car and Driver, both K900 and Cadenza are being discontinued in the American market for the 2021 model year. But it is a little disappointing.

      If you’re having trouble remembering the last time you saw either of these Kias — or even having trouble remembering what they look like — don’t beat yourself up about it. Last year, Kia moved less than 1,600 copies of the sedans combined in the United States; even in the coronavirus-free year of 2019, the brand moved just 2020 examples of Cadenza and K900. That’s fewer cars than Lamborghini sold in America that year.

      Those low sales certainly weren’t a result of bad product, however. The K900 in particular is — or rather, was — a rather exceptional luxury sedan of the old-school tradition, trafficking more in quiet comfort, a supple ride and effortless power than in sporty handling that effectively beat the Lexus LS at its historic mission of offering a world-class flagship sedan for less than the competition.

      Closely related to the Genesis G90 beneath the skin, it originally offered a similar mix of powertrains as that model, but by the end came solely with a twin-turbo V6 making 365 horsepower and 376 pound-feet of torque and all-wheel-drive. More importantly, it came all but fully-loaded at its $60,935 base price, replete with an exquisite interior that looked worthy of a car twice the price; the sole option of note, a $4,400 VIP package, outfitted it for chauffeur duty with added rear seat features, but even so equipped, it cost roughly $30,000 less than a basic Mercedes-Benz S-Class (and, perhaps more relevant to its cancellation, almost $10K less than a base G90).

      The Cadenza was less prestigious, but still worthy of note for those rare customers still interested in large, premium-but-not-luxurious sedans like the Toyota Avalon — the type of vehicle Buick and Oldsmobile used to specialize in. Indeed, the basic layout looks an awful lot like the Avalon: a 3.3-liter naturally-aspirated V6 making 290 hp and 253 lb-ft, connected to the front wheels through an eight-speed automatic. But while the Avalon (and Nissan Maxima, the other remaining car in this segment in America) have gone for wild, aggressive looks seemingly at odds with the desires of septuagenarian buyers and Uber drivers, the Cadenza stuck with a more conservative, elegant design.

      Still, the Cadenza also suffered from being too close to a Genesis. The G70 may be smaller, but its rear-wheel-drive (or optional AWD) layout and sportier mission put it closer to the remaining, albeit diminished, heart of the entry-level luxury sedan market. It’s almost $2,000 cheaper in base form, and the very luxurious Elite trim level is just a couple grand more than the Cadenza’s top-shelf version.

      Both cars had the misfortune of being sedans in a market that now idealizes SUVs and pickup trucks instead — indeed, Kia told C/D that the change was in large part due to buyer preferences for crossovers and the like — but it seems hard not to view something else as being the primary factor behind their cancellation. In a better world where people didn’t judge books by their covers, it wouldn’t matter, but the biggest obstacle keeping both Cadenza and K900 from success was arguably the Kia logo. While the brand has made incredible strides in improving its image over the last decade, for many a buyer, the name and badge simply don’t have the cache worthy of a luxury car price — even if the product is worth it.

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      Everything You Could Possibly Want to Know About Dress Watches

      Yes — the handsome, classical type of design we call the “dress watch” is still relevant. You might like your casual styles and sporty tool watches, but it’s hard to deny the archetypal appeal of that which is simple and elegant. Spanning every imaginable price level and varying broadly in form and function, dress watches take many different shapes. So what makes the right dress watch for you?

      There’s no simple answer. If you’re a hardcore tool watch guy, you may want something inexpensive to keep in a drawer for formal occasions — or you might relish rocking a vintage Omega DeVille with jeans and a T-shirt. There are no rules, but there’s a lot to consider, from price and complications to case material and size. And there’s a lot to discover, from prestigious brands’ dress watches to independents doing great things.

      Below you’ll find the topics related to dress watches you’ll want to consider: We break down everything from Patek Philippe’s Calatrava and perpetual calendars to vintage and modern Rolex. Whether shopping or exploring, this is where you can delve in to the world of dress watches of all kinds.

      The Best Dress Watches for Men

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      From $1,000 to $20,000 and everything in between.

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      5 Classy Dress Watches Under $1,000

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      A great dress watch doesn’t have to cost as much as a car.

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      5 Questions to Ask Before You Buy a Dress Watch

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      A good dress watch can cost a pretty penny. We help steer you towards the right purchase by asking yourself these simple questions.

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      Everything You Need to Know to Buy a Rolex Datejust

      buy a rolex datejust gear patrol lead full

      Rolex; HQ Milton

      The Rolex Datejust, in continuous production since 1945, is one of the most popular watches in the world.

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      A Brief Guide to Affordable Vintage Rolex Watches

      affordable vintage rolex

      Analog/Shift

      From Air Kings to Oyster Perpetuals, these are the Rollies you can buy without taking out a HELOC.

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      A Brief Guide to Vintage Omega Watches

      vintage omega

      Those Watch Guys

      From Seamasters to DeVilles and more, vintage Omega is where you’ll find some of the greatest dress watches ever.

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      What Makes the Cartier Tank the Quintessential Dress Watch?

      watches you should know cartier tank gear patrol lead full

      Analog / Shift

      The Tank is one of the most elegant and iconic watches ever made, but it owes its significance to more than a just great design.

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      Want a Cartier Tank? Here Are Three Worthy Alternatives for Less

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      These three dress watches offer attractive alternatives to the Cartier Tank experience, with classic looks that stand out among so many round watches.

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      Why a $22,000 Entry-Level Dress Watch Is Worth Every Penny

      patek phillipe 5196r gear patrol lead full

      Hunter D. Kelley

      The Calatrava is the quintessential Patek Philippe, and perhaps even the quintessential dress watch, period.

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      Three Affordable Alternatives to the Patek Philippe Calatrava

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      The Calatrava is perhaps the platonic ideal of the dress watch — but they ain’t cheap. Here are a few watches with a similar look for much less scratch.

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      These Perpetual Calendars Are Some of the Best Watches from Patek Philippe

      guide to patek perpetual calendars gear patrol lead full

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      Patek Philippe’s complicated watchmaking is famous the world over, and their mechanical perpetual calendars are the stars of their catalog.

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      The Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Brought Two Companies Together to Form a Juggernaut of the Watch Industry

      jaeger lecoultre reverso gear patrol body 04

      Brenden Clarke

      One of the world’s most famous dress watches is celebrating a big anniversary with a brand new model.

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      Is This the Vintage-Styled Dress Watch to Rule Them All?

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      Zen Love

      We review the Rado Golden Horse 1957: a near exact reproduction of a vintage watch that hits all the right modern notes.

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      Five Of the Best Affordable Dress Watches Worth Investing In

      dress watches m2w gear patrol lead full

      Hunter Kelley

      Handsome, mechanically-powered watches from Oris, Longines, Seiko and more.

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      Jeep’s Grand Cherokee Hybrid Should Be Killer for Overlanding

      Jeep has already revealed the all-new 2021 three-row Grand Cherokee L (and its spectacular McIntosh sound system). The two-row Grand Cherokee, in turn, should arrive in a few months. But that’ll just be the start of the versions and variants for the new SUV. Jeep’s global president Christian Meunier has confirmed to Australian outlet WhichCar that the Grand Cherokee will be getting a 4xe plug-in-hybrid version — and, thankfully, it should be a seriously capable overlander.

      Jeep is testing the new Grand Cherokee in Australia, according to Meunier, and promises that it will meet the local market’s demands. That means withstanding the intense off-road demands exerted upon it by the Outback (and we’re not talking about the place with the blooming onions).

      It also means being able to tow some of Australia’s awesome off-road camping trailers. The Wrangler’s 4xe powertrain, which puts out 375 horsepower and 470 lb-ft of torque, makes it the most powerful version short of the new Hemi-powered Wrangler Rubicon 392 — and it seems like the most likely fit for the Grand Cherokee 4xe, as well. Meunier likens the 4xe powertrain to a V8, and asserts that Australian off-roaders won’t be disappointed there isn’t a diesel option.

      “Electrification really provides a lot of benefits torque-wise, acceleration-wise and towing is good,” Meunier said. “Towing is core to Jeep, so we wouldn’t compromise on it.”

      If Australians are getting a 4xe Grand Cherokee, it seems extraordinarily likely that it’s bound for America, as well. That powertrain has already been confirmed for the Wrangler and Grand Wagoneer, and it wouldn’t make sense to strip Jeep’s most exciting new engine from the brand’s most important (from a sales perspective) American vehicle.

      News about the Grand Cherokee’s excellent off-road capability should encourage American customers, as well. While there would no doubt be a “Trail Rated” version of the Grand Cherokee, serious off-road cred for the new SUV wasn’t a given.

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      The NOMOS Lambda Steel Makes a Strong Case to Be Your Everyday Watch

        For some, it may seem odd to be speaking about a luxury wristwatch at the moment. “What good is a watch few people will see?” They might say. Or, “Aren’t dress watches only for business meetings?” But those with similar thoughts have not met the NOMOS Glashütte Lambda Steel, the venerated watchmaker’s latest release and an ode to 175 years of watchmaking tradition in Glashütte.

        The benefits of a high-quality wristwatch reach far beyond the boardroom or a night out on the town. The right wristwatch can entirely alter the way that you feel — change your mood; bring new life to an old outfit; inspire confidence; and can especially bring you joy as your gaze inevitably falls upon its face throughout the day. The NOMOS Lambda Steel is just such a watch. We spent a week with the Lambda Steel strapped to our wrist — and we wish we had more time.

        From the Brand

        “Fine watchmaking, now presented in a stainless steel case: The special edition Lambda model combines 175 years of Glashütte tradition and high-tech precision with modern, everyday wearability. This special edition, limited to 175 pieces, is regulated according to chronometer standards. All this makes Lambda an unmistakably unique item, a watch for life.”

        nomos lamda

        Gear Patrol Studios

        What We Like

        For our tester, right from the start there was a lot to like about the Lambda Steel. First and foremost, it offers the same high-quality, hand-wound, in-house movement as the rest of the Lambda model family that is cased in gold and rose gold, a watch that retails closer to $20,000. The DUW 1001 movement is regulated to chronometer standards which for those who aren’t familiar, means that it’s exceedingly accurate.

        But that can all be told from looking at the spec sheet. What really impressed our tester was what came upon closer inspection, and by strapping the watch to the wrist. Immediately noticeable is the watch’s near-goldilocks case size of 40mm. For most wearers, this will be right in the sweet spot — as it was for our tester. But if you often wear a smaller or larger watch, the Lambda Steel strikes a nice middle ground and can truly work for everyone (even those with smaller wrists if you swap out the Horween genuine shell cordovan strap).

        A close second in terms features immediately noticeable on the Lambda Steel is the high-gloss enamel dial. Enamel dials are somewhat of a calling card for high-end luxury watches. It’s an incredibly labor-intensive process to create one, yet nothing quite compares to the color of an enamel dial. As a result, they typically command a much higher price tag than the $7,500 that the Lambda Steel can be had for. In order to achieve the enamel finish on the Lambda Steel, NOMOS uses a high-gloss lacquer to coat the dials in several layers. After the application of each layer, the dial is polished before the next layer is applied. The result is a light transparency in the surface of the dial, which resembles enamel.

        But what really brings this wristwatch over the top is its incredible yet simple attention to detail. Our tester was immediately drawn to the typeface utilized on the dial in calling out “Gangreserve 84 Stunden” — denoting the watch’s 84-hour power reserve. It’s an unmistakably Bauhaus-inspired design, and one that lives up to the movements promise of combining aesthetics with everyday function. Most would notice this detail after a cursory inspection of the watch. But perhaps its most whimsical detail is easily missed in such an inspection.

        By taking a close look at the movement through the exhibition caseback, hand-carved on the balance cock are the words “Mit Liebe in Glashütte Gefertigt,” which translates to “Lovingly Produced in Glashütte.” That level of care and passion comes through in the entirety of watch — whether you’re the owner or simply an admirer.

        nomos lamda

        Gear Patrol Studios

        Who It’s For

        In the eyes of our tester, the Lambda Steel is for virtually everyone — so long as you aren’t often finding yourself piloting a plane or exploring the depths of the Mariana Trench. It hits all the right touch points of a high-quality watch well-worth investing in.

        Verdict

        If you appreciate good design, a slim profile and a watch that will run for 84 hours on the dot without needing to wind it, the Lambda Steel makes a strong case to be your everyday watch. It will often make you smile as you steal glances at it throughout the day, whether it be the Bauhaus typeface, enamel dial or impressive power reserve sub-dial and complication that belies its horological prowess.

        BUY NOW: $7,500

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      7 of the Best Essential Oils to Put in Your Diffuser

      Not all essential oils are created equally. Many, especially lower cost ones, feature a laundry list of ingredients — you could call them fillers — that are added in to reduce manufacturing costs. While they’re cheaper, sure, you need more to get the same effect. In other words, you’re getting less diffuse time for your money.

      The oils on this list do not harbor fillers. These small but mighty concentrated bottles of oil require only a few drops in a diffuser to create a huge impact. Use drops sparingly and a single bottle can easily stretch over a couple months.

      Public Goods Eucalyptus Essential Oil


      Public Goods puts all of its focus into its products, meaning the brand cares less about marketing and branding (though the minimalist packaging is definitely in) and more about the stuff you put in and on your body. Its essential oils are pure and clean — whatever is on the label is 100-percent what’s inside. Eucalyptus oil has a sinus-clearing effect making it perfect for winter colds or spring allergies. It’ll lift your mood and get you ready for the everyday hustle.

      Price: $7

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      Thrive Market Organic Frankincense Essential Oil


      Thrive Market’s essential oils are USDA-certified organic, non-GMO and $10. It’s hard to beat the price, and it’s also hard to find an essential oil with that many qualifications that doesn’t break the bank. Frankincense — common in Africa, India and the Middle East — has a warm and tree-like smell that evokes the feeling of a late-night stroll through the woods.

      Price: $10

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      Homedics Pine Essential Oil


      Yearning for a feel of the outdoors while cooped up in your city home? Use a few drops of pine essential oil for a fresh woodsy smell that’ll have you swearing you just walked past a pine forest despite a concrete jungle outside your window.

      Price: $12

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      Muji Energy Oil


      Anyone who’s had the pleasure of finding themselves in a Muji store knows what its essential oils can do — turn an otherwise ordinary retail space into a store you’re comfortable lounging in a beanbag in. The Energy scent is a blend of peppermint, sweet basil, lemongrass and rosemary, and it is ideal for giving you that extra lift you might need before you’ve had your morning coffee.

      Price: $15

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      Plant Therapy Chamomile Oil


      Plant Therapy isn’t worried about branding, image or your perception of the company. It’s worried about delivering 100 percent pure bottles of essential oil sans fillers. This chamomile oil is best used when you’re in need of a bit of tension relief.

      Price: $20

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      Vitruvi Nightcap Blend


      Vitruvi won’t claim that its Nightcap blend of essential oils will put you to sleep, but it will definitely get you primed and ready for a snooze. It’s spicy thanks to ginger and black pepper with just a hint of mood-boosting blood orange. Skip the boozy nightcap for one that won’t lead you to wake up with a hangover.

      Price: $28

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      Aesop Isabelle Oil


      Aesop has made its name through mixing incredible branding with equally incredible products. Its line of essential oils is no different. The ingredient list for the Isabelle oil is wonderfully short — spearmint leaf oil, rosemary leaf oil and sage oil. As you might expect, this is a very herby, earthy-scented oil. Use it to clear your head, or try another of Aesop’s oils in citrus or something a bit more spice-forward.

      Price: $39

      SHOP NOW

      Assistant Editor, Home and Design Will Price is Gear Patrol’s home and drinks editor.
      Tyler Chin is Gear Patrol’s Associate Staff Writer.

      This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

      Royal Enfield’s New Continental GT 650 Is a Bloody Good Time

      What is it?

      A nod to the stripped-down cafe racers that zipped around London in the 1960s, the 2021 Royal Enfield Continental GT 650 is a new bike with throwback style and a warmly rumbling heart — an air-cooled, 648cc parallel twin engine.

      Is it new?

      Yup, but it’s been in the works for a minute. Royal Enfield announced its first twin-cylinder bikes since 1970 — the INT 650 and the Continental GT 650 — in the fall of 2018. The third editions of both bikes hit dealers this past fall, and we finally got some seat time in November 2020.

      What makes it special?

      If I may be shallow for a moment, one thing that really stands out about this bike: its looks. The compact curves, bubbly gas tank and shiny chrome are simultaneously gorgeous and delightfully retro. They combine to recall a simpler time, when we didn’t need fancy electronics, touchscreens and GPS to saddle up and hit the open road. You know a bike has nailed that vibe when multiple people ask how old your bike is — and are gobsmacked when you tell them it’s new.

      This Continental isn’t all-show-no-go, though. While a 648cc engine may seem small for a brand like Harley-Davidson or Indian, it’s actually Royal Enfield’s larger classically styled bike. Headquartered in Chennai, on the Bay of Bengal in eastern India, the brand is best known for the iconic Bullet — a single-cylinder bike available with 350 or 500 ccs. (Chasing the Bullet, a charming, evocative 22-minute documentary about the brand, is free to watch on YouTube, but I digress.)

      Royal Enfield’s engineers put a lot of time and thought into crafting the perfect little-big engine — one with flexible power delivery, packing plenty of pop both out of the gate and at higher speeds. The twin purrs so beautifully, I found myself giddily grinning the moment I first heard it.

      royal enfield continental gt

      Royal Enfield

      I’d be remiss not to mention one other distinguishing feature: brand-new, this bike starts just under $6,000. No matter your predilections, that’s one hell of a value play.

      How does it ride?

      Despite the old-school styling, the Continental is designed to be ridden aggressively. It’s still a café racer, after all. That became abundantly clear as soon as I swung a leg over the 31-inch-high bump stop seat; the racing-style clip-on handlebars and slightly set back foot pegs immediately put you in a leaned-forward position, and the back of the gas tank is scooped out, letting you tuck your knees in to become even more aerodynamic.

      Thankfully, the bike has the goods to live up to the promise of this geometry. Yes, the engine is just over a third the size of the one in the first bike I reviewed for Gear Patrol, the 2019 Indian Chieftain Limited. But at 435 pounds, it’s also just over half the weight.

      Translation: the power-to-weight ratio is refreshingly snappy. Within minutes of rolling out of a Brooklyn garage, I was swooning over the way it sprang to life every time I twisted the throttle. Very torque-y, if that can be a word.

      royal enfield continental gt

      Royal Enfield

      The light weight, small size, smooth Brembo ABS disc brakes and tight, responsive steering also make this bike incredibly nimble. Even with those stalk-y, stock-y mirrors, I found it easy to dart and dodge through congestion. That’s enormously satisfying when you’ve got somewhere to be — and/or a passenger you’re kinda-sorta-maybe trying to impress with your riding prowess.

      It’s less sexy to talk about, but the bike’s proportions lead to some impressive gas mileage — up to 70 mpg, which means its 3.3-gallon tank can take you far beyond the city lights. That said, you might not want to venture that far afield: without a windshield or gas gauge, the Continental is clearly much more at home on urban streets than sprawling highways.

      On another note, a couple of small beefs. First, the suspension (4.5 inches of travel in front, 3.5 inches in back) is decent, but not overly forgiving. It can definitely beat you up a bit on excessively bumpy or potholed roads.

      Second, I’m not exactly a big dude, and yet the shifter peg felt weirdly small and flimsy. Like many classically styled bikes, this one only tells you when you’re in neutral, not any of the other gears. I tend to like that quirk, but in this case, I struggled to get a feel for which of the six speeds I was in, due to the way this little peg jumped around whenever I pressed it down or flicked it up. A good shifter should be a mix of solid and flexible; this one leans a bit too far toward the latter.

      royal enfield continental gt

      Royal Enfield

      Anything else stand out?

      One thing I will always love about café racers is their nice, long seats. In my experience, it’s super-comfortable for passengers — quite preferable to the goofy, frog-like position a sport bike often puts that person in.

      And it’s handy for transporting cargo, too. While testing this bike, I had to transport a couple of large duffel bags to a coat drive across town. Throwing one over my shoulders and Rok-strapping the other to the back half of the seat made this seemingly arduous task into a sweet little joyride. Just another reminder that vintage-looking bikes can be pretty damn practical, too.

      What’s it cost?

      The Black Magic and Ventura Blue gas tank models start at $5,999, while the Dr. Mayhem and Ice Queen editions start slightly higher — $6,249. All models come with a three-year unlimited mile warranty and roadside assistance.

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      Herman Miller Face Masks and 6 More Home and Design Releases

      Welcome to Window Shopping, a weekly exercise in lusting over home products we want in our homes right the hell now. This week:

      Herman Miller Design For Freedom Face Mask

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      When you wear a mask, you’re doing good. It’s a fact. Wearing Herman Miller’s new face mask does double the amount of good. Made in partnership with the non-profit organization Grace Farms Foundation, the Design for Freedom face mask raises funds to support the initiative of the same name, which attempts to combat the pervasive use of forced labor, or modern slavery, in architecture and design. The mask takes design cues from the roof of the River building, which looks different throughout the day because of light and weather, at the Grace Farms Foundation in Connecticut. The mask will reflect light differently depending on the environment it’s in. It’s also ethically made from materials that meet ecological and social criteria.

      Price: $30

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      The Sill Petite Knock Out Rose

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      If you’re struggling to come up with a Valentine’s Day gift idea, flowers are usually the way to go. But when the bouquet is overdone, opt for the whole plant. Order the Petite Knock Out Roses from The Sill, one of the best places to buy plants online, for a gift that keeps on giving. No more overspending for roses because they’ll grow in your home for whenever you need them.

      Price: $46+

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      Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams White House Chocolate Chip

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      Joe Biden’s love of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams is well known. President Biden’s Instagram account follows just 103 accounts, and Jeni’s Ice Cream and its founder, Jeni Britton Bauer, are two of those accounts. In celebration of the 46th president and his go-to ice cream order, White House Chocolate Chip is a mix of chocolate chip ice cream and chocolate-covered waffle cone pieces. It’s a fairly ordinary and classic combination — especially compared to some of Jeni’s more out-there flavors like goat cheese with red cherries — but sometimes simple is best.

      Price: $12

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      Loud Grandma CBD Chilli Crisp Oil

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      Chili oil is the best condiment you’re probably not using. That’s OK, because now you know. And whether you’re a chili oil newbie or one who has a jar in every room of your home, you need to get Loud Grandma CBD Chilli Crisp Oil on your radar and then onto everything you eat. Loud Grandma is like the ubiquitous Lao Gan Ma one can find in most Asian supermarkets except it’s made using Pot d’Huile’s hemp-infused olive oil. Calvin Eng of Brooklyn’s much-hyped restaurant and bakery Win Son helped to come up with the concotion that is Loud Grandma. This chili oil has so much going for it — like how it’s savory, spicy, numbing, tingly, crunch — that you’ll need to heap spoonful after spoonful to fully grasp all the complexities in the perfectly designed jar. And if you’re looking for a hot sauce instead of a chili oil, Pot d’Huile’s Hot Sloth is another condiment you’ll slather on everything.

      Price: $29

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      General Admission x Mister Green Wake and Bake Set


      When design-conscious smokers get together to epitomize the phrase “wake and bake,” you get this ingenious mug and ashtray set. General Admission and Mister Green are two Los Angeles-based clothing stores that have been doing way more than just clothing. Both brands bring their eye for well-designed clothes to home goods, and the Wake and Bake Set is just one part of their collaboration, of which I need one of everything.

      Price: $115

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      Flan x Sullivan Street Bakery

      cookie scarf

      Flan

      Jim Lahey is baking royalty. The James Beard Award-winning baker is the founder of Sullivan Street Bakery, a New York City institution with a location in Miami. Hopping on the merch bandwagon, Sullivan Street Bakery worked with Flan, a clothing brand that combines humor with food, to create a two-piece collection with proceeds going to support the bakery. While the branded t-shirt is out of stock, you can still grab the Chocolate Chip Cookie scarf. It manages to elicit memories of the sweet treat without looking like tacky paraphernalia.

      Price: $70

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      Amass Riverine

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      Amass has its gin and vodka, and now it’s entering the non-alcoholic spirits market. Less is more does not apply to Riverine. As a brand that focuses on botanicals, Amass masterfully mixes 14 different ingredients — ranging from sumac to lemon peel — to craft a booze-free drink to help you get through Dry January.

      Price: $35

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      Tyler Chin is Gear Patrol’s Associate Staff Writer.

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      Goering’s Man in Paris: The Story of a Nazi Art Plunderer and His World

      Appointed by infamous Nazi commander Hermann Göring to Hitler’s art looting agency in Paris, Bruno Lohse went on to become one of the most notorious art plunderers of the war. He trafficked more than thirty thousand artworks, including masterpieces he later tried offering to museums around the world. After his death in ’05, dozens of paintings by Renoir, Monet, and Pissarro, were found in his Munich vault. This book tracks a strange and nefarious life indeed.

      A Famous Tire Company Has Invented a Hack to Make Motorcycle Riding Easier

      Michelin is known primarily for three things: its tires, its restaurant guides and its iconic Michelin Man mascot, an anthropomorphic tire stack known initially as “Bibendum” in France. But as Motorcycle.com has discovered, the company has a new patent that could revolutionize the world of motorcycling — and make them far more comfortable to live with.

      Many motorcycles don’t have a reverse gear. It’s not a huge problem for smaller, lightweight bikes, but for heavier ones, walking the bike around for low-speed maneuvers (like backing up to a gas pump or parking space, or loading a motorcycle onto a trailer) can be a pain.

      Michelin’s solution, simply enough, calls for a roller powered by a tiny electric motor. The roller would press against the wheel with the flick of a handlebar-mounted switch, delivering up to three lb-ft of torque, moving the bike at about 0.6 mph. It’s not a lot of oomph, but enough to make it much easier to walk the bike around.

      The roller would use a rechargeable 3.6-volt lithium-ion battery pack, fit under the fender or mudguard on the rear wheel and mount to the swingarm. The entire unit would easily attach and be self-contained and designed to fit several different bikes, making it a compelling third-party accessory.

      Of course, a patent does not mean the idea will go into production — automotive engineers come up with a whole bunch of wacky ideas that are interesting but never make it into vehicles. This one, though, feels simple, practical and very easily attainable.

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      16 of the Best Made in America Outdoor Brands

      There’s a special pride we take in learning about craftspeople who have found a way to continue producing and making gear in America. As more and more companies move out to keep prices down, there are a few that have continued to produce as much as they can here in the US.

      The outdoor space is no different. Whether it’s a line of sneakers or a specific type of tent that is put together from start to finish, there are brands spread across the country making high-quality gear stateside — from as far west as Seattle to as far east as Biddeford, Maine.

      We pulled together a list of outdoor brands that are tried and tested, with much of their gear made right here in America. With any of these brands, you can feel proud about supporting them in your outdoor pursuits.

      Outdoor Research


      Started by Ron Gregg in 1980, Outdoor Research’s first product was a pair of insulated gaiters designed to help mountaineers climb in some of the coldest temperatures on earth. Gregg didn’t stop there, and continued innovating, designing products that anyone who spends time in the backcountry can appreciate. Since the brand’s inception, the manufacturing facility in Seattle has been a beacon of American-made quality.

      Learn More: Here

      Thule


      Thule makes everything from hard goods to soft goods, and while not all its products are made in the USA, all of its cargo boxes sold in the US are made stateside in Chicago. Back in May 2016, Thule opened a new center for all cargo box production. Thanks to this facility, Thule is more efficient and flexible when creating the boxes that help Americans everywhere travel with more gear for their adventures.

      Learn More: Here

      GoRuck


      Jason McCarthy, founder and CEO of GoRuck, creates gear and apparel that serves troops at home and abroad. Pulling from his military background, McCarthy designs rucksacks, apparel and boots. All the gear is durable, compact and tough enough to survive special forces missions. The brand name pulls meaning from movement — literally go and ruck — whether you’re moving with a rucksack or backpack. The bags are hand-made in Bozeman, Montana or Colorado.

      Learn More: Here

      Darn Tough


      Darn Tough has been making high-quality and durable socks in its Northfield, Vermont mill since 2004. Merino wool is the magic fabric that keeps these socks running for years.

      Learn More: Here

      Filson


      Filson makes some of the most handsome jackets, bags and clothing for the outdoor market in Seattle. Its luggage has caught our attention, but we’re also big fans of its rain jackets and rugged outerwear. Since 1897, C.C. Filson sold entire outfits to west-bound pioneers during the gold rush. The rugged aesthetic continues to guide the brand as it crafts durable and comfortable gear well into its 123rd year.

      Learn More: Here

      Topo Designs


      While not everything Topo Designs makes is born in the USA, the brand’s classic packs are built in Colorado. Day packs, quick packs and mountain packs are available in Topo’s signature bright colorways (and understated ones, too). One of our favorite Topo Designs products is the Accessory Bag with 1000D Cordura fabric and a sturdy YKK zipper.

      Learn More: Here

      Keen


      Keen’s EVOFIT One sandal is born and bred in the USA — more specifically, in Portland, Oregon. The sneaker/sandal hybrid is built for use in the water or on the trail, and feels like a second skin. The shoe takes its cues from nature and its technology from the Keen Innovation Lab, making it versatile and comfortable.

      Learn More: Here

      Danner


      Since 1932, Danner has crafted boots to help you conquer your next adventure — whether that’s trekking through the snow to work, hiking along tree-lined Adirondack trails, or navigating the switchback trails of the Grand Canyon. The Portland Select line of boots includes city to mountain hikers and dress boots, all made in the USA.

      Learn More: Here

      FITS


      Made in Chattanooga, Tennessee, FITS socks are built by third and fourth generation textile manufacturers. The brand’s staff-favorite socks are great for hiking, running, skiing and tactical pursuits.

      Learn More: Here

      Western Mountaineering


      Western Mountaineering, a San Jose, California-based brand that specializes in top-notch sleeping bags, has been around for more than 30 years. No matter what temperature you’re sleeping in, the bags will keep you warm from -40 degrees Fahrenheit to 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

      Learn More: Here

      Smartwool


      All of Smartwool’s performance and lifestyle socks are made in the USA. The process starts in Tennessee at the brand’s research and development lab, and then continues as the socks are knit from merino wool in both Tennessee and North Carolina. For more than 25 years, Smartwool has been making some of our favorite running socks.

      Learn More: Here

      Duckworth


      Duckworth’s wool comes from Merino sheep that live in the high elevations of the Montana Rockies. The process begins at Helle ranch in Dillon, Montana where the sheep are shorn, the fibers are graded and then sent to the Carolinas for textile production. The fleece is selected for its specific style used in everything from tees to sweatshirts.

      Learn More: Here

      ZPacks


      If you want ultra-lightweight gear that still performs at the highest level while out on the trail, head to Zpacks. Its shelters, backpacks and sleeping bags have been made in America since 2005. Joe Valesko, the founder, thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail, Continental Divide Trail and more. If you’re heading out on a long trip, Zpacks gear is a good place to start.

      Learn More: Here

      Hyperlite Mountain Gear


      Between Kennebunkport and Portland, Maine, you’ll find the town of Biddeford. There, in an old mill building, Hyperlite Mountain Gear designs and manufactures all of its outdoor gear — including shelters, tents, stuff sacks and outerwear. You’ll find lots of Dyneema — a fabric and fiber that’s 15 times stronger than steel, yet still light and waterproof and durable, especially through Maine’s winters.

      Learn More: Here

      Mystery Ranch


      In 2000, Mystery Ranch began crafting backpacks for the hunting enthusiasts, wildland fire and mountaineering folks in Bozeman, Montana. Just four years later, Mystery Ranch was approached by the Navy SEALS to create a line of custom packs for them, and thus began a long partnership. To this day, Mystery Ranch creates some of the most durable and intense packs for military and civilians alike.

      Learn More: Here

      Nalgene


      BPA-free plastic water bottles are some of the least-expensive, yet high-performing bottles on the market. Born in Rochester, New York in the 1940s, these leak-proof and lightweight bottles are still hard to beat, even after all these years.

      Learn More: Here

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      Nissan Dealers Want a New Xterra to Challenge the Bronco and Wrangler

      It’s safe to say that, much like Hansel, off-road SUVs are so hot right now. The new Ford Bronco has launched to tremendous enthusiasm, with nearly 200,000 reservations and counting as of this article’s publication. The Jeep Wrangler and Toyota 4Runner are among the nation’s best-selling vehicles; Land Rover made a wise move in reviving the Defender for modern times. Even Lexus is making noise about getting deeper into the overlanding space.

      Now, according to a report from Automotive News, Nissan dealers want the company to revive its body-on-frame off-roader of (comparatively recent) yore: the Xterra.

      The Xterra debuted in the American market for the 2000 model year as a rugged midsize off-roader. Development was simple; essentially; Nissan just converting the Frontier pickup into an SUV as cheaply as possible. Yet it was an unexpected hit in the early 2000s, no doubt in part to its catchy ads with a Lenny Kravitz soundtrack. (One GP writer desperately wanted one in high school.)

      Still, enthusiasm ebbed over the years. Nissan eventually ditched the Xterra in 2015 as low sales did not justify the expense of overhauling it to meet new safety and emissions standards.

      You can see why Nissan dealers would want such a vehicle today, though. Americans buy SUVs — and Nissan’s SUV lineup, to be frank, is a lot of sad. There’s no cool, exciting vehicle to reel buyers in. Most buyers go for a Rogue, which is a fine compact crossover; but Nissan simply doesn’t have a more compelling, capable and adventurous alternative to offer them.

      A new Xterra is a vehicle Nissan could conceivably produce without breaking the bank. After all, Nissan already sells a Terra/Xterra SUV abroad based on the Navara, its midsize pickup sold in non-U.S. markets. Or, presumably, they could develop an SUV from the new Frontier platform like they did with the old one.

      Whether a new Xterra would work, however, is open to debate. It never was the Bronco or Defender, and customers aren’t aching with nostalgia for a vehicle that went out of production a few years ago because they weren’t buying it. The rational play for Nissan would be to go for value and undercut the Bronco, 4Runner and Wrangler on price; those cars can get hilariously expensive. But doing so would dip into the Xterra’s presumed profit margin…which is likely the primary reason Nissan would want it.

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      Should You Replace Your Desktop Monitor with An OLED TV?

      If you want a big, beautiful display for your computer why not use a TV? Most TVs have an HDMI input so you can just connect it to your computer and use it exactly like an external display. And unlike most computer monitors, plenty of TV sets boast beautiful OLED displays. The good news is that this is totally possible. The bad news is that it’s not as easy as just pugging in and going about your day.

      The newer, the better

      If you’re planning on plugging your computer into any old OLED TV you’ve just got hanging around, you might want to think twice.

      If the display you’re thinking about using has less than 4K resolution, it’s going to look pretty awful at close range, especially if it’s large. Bigger might seem better, but at a viewing distance of just a few feet, a screen much bigger than 30 inches is going to mostly cause pain in your neck unless you adjust your setup to be much further away than you would be from a traditional screen.

      What’s more, older TVs typically haven’t supported the high framerates you’ll want out of a monitor. TV’s that only support the 24fps standard for movies will be prone to lag when watching videos, playing games and even moving your mouse around the screen.

      Newer TVs are solving these issues, however. There are 4K TVs, both LED and OLED, that are between 24 — 42-inches, which is a good size for monitor. Just in 2021, LG has announced plans to release a 42-inch OLED TV, which would be its smallest to date. Its previous smallest was a 48-inch OLED TV.

      use 4k tv as monitor
      Samsung Smart Monitor M7

      Samsung

      Many of today’s best 4K TVs have advanced technologies that allow them to support a high resolution picture and high refresh rates, which are vital for people looking to use their TV as a gaming monitor. The main feature to look out for support for chroma subsampling, or chroma 4:4:4. This means that the image will be uncompressed and look best while playing 4K content.

      OLED’s Achilles’ Heel

      An OLED TV might seem like an obvious choice to use as gaming monitor. The big thing you have to worry about with OLED TVs, is burn-in.

      Burn in is when previous images are “burnt into” the display so that they’re still visible you’re watching or doing something else. It’s a problem that LED displays do’t have to worry about but that OLED displays in particular are susceptible to.

      Burn-in isn’t a huge issue for people who use an OLED TV as a traditional TV because the picture is usually changing frequently enough to prevent it. If a TV is being used as a computer display, however, there will be many, many static elements like a desktop background and icon docks that will be at risk of becoming burnt in very quickly.

      You can mitigate these issues by modifying your settings to minimize static images on the display. Setting your desktop background to black, auto-hiding any icon docks, keeping your desktop completely free of clutter, and enabling very aggressive screensaver settings can all mitigate the potential risk, but it will still be there.

      The safest setup would probably be to use an OLED TV only as a second screen, devoted solely to videos, gaming, and other similiarly kinetic content.

      That, our start saving up to grab an honest-to-goodness OLED computer display.

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      Focus On The Game With Rhinomed Turbine Nasal Dilator

      A little goes a long way with the Rhinomed Turbine Nasal Dilator. It helps you keep up with your breathing when you exercise or do strenuous activities.

      This small yet helpful gear is especially good for athletes or triathletes. It is clinically proven to increase airflow by 38% and it doesn’t require a complex process to operate. It simply latches to your nostrils and stays put no matter your movements. Its ultra-soft angled ribbing on the paddles that extends around the curved arms for better grip and comfort.  Likewise, its shape follows the internal anatomy of the nose for added comfort and secure grip.

      The Rhinomed Turbine Nasal Dilator aids in breathing using an enclosed dilation mechanism that provides an individualized fit and adjusts according to the situation. It is a soft polymer stent that dilates your nose and not only increases airflow. It also reminds you to breathe naturally through your nose in a more controlled and efficient way. Best of all, it is lightweight and flexible for a comfortable experience.

      A pack of this health gear gives you three sizes: small, medium, and large, and each size is reusable up to ten times. 3-time Tour de France winner Chris Froome stands by its effectiveness and reliability. He calls it a “great piece of equipment” that helps him focus less on energy and breathing but on keeping his head in the game.

      The Rhinomed Turbine Nasal Dilator is best for non-contact sports or training. These include yoga, running, weight training, Cross Fit, and more.

      Get It Here

      Images courtesy of Rhinomed

      The Best GMT Watches

      With the possible exception of the chronograph — which, let’s face it, only we few watch nerds make use of today — if there’s a complication most beloved by aficionados and the general public alike, it would have to be the GMT. (Yes, the date window is technically a complication, and no — we’re not counting it.)

      Why, you ask? Because with the simple addition of a fourth hand on the dial and a 24-hour scale or bezel, a GMT allows you to track the time in another (or multiple) time zone(s). And in a 21st century in which plenty of people are jetting around the world multiple times a month, or keeping track of colleagues or loved ones in far-flung locales, nothing could be more convenient.

      The GMT watch used to be the purview of large, blue chip brands who had the money and manufacturing capability to either build or invest in relatively complicated movements — not so any more. While you can of course still pay close to $10,000 for a Rolex GMT Master II, the gold standard of GMT watches, today’s microbrand scene has made for an entire landscape of more affordable alternatives. (See here for particularly affordable models).

      Here, we’ve endeavored to bring you the best in GMT watches across all price categories, from under $1,000 to $10,000. And while you don’t have to spend several month’s paychecks for a decent watch, there are a few things you should know before you choose your ideal travel timepiece:

      Types of GMT Movement

      There are two real types of modern GMT movement: one with an independently adjustable local hour hand, and one with an independently adjustable GMT hand. Some consider the former (which is the system used by Rolex) to be the “true” GMT style, as in this case, you can land in a new time zone, quickly update the local time, and go about your business. An independently adjustable GMT hand, however, can be more useful if you’re stationary and tracking someone else who’s perhaps crossing multiple time zones, as you can retain your local time on the watch but easily update a secondary zone. (See here for a more detailed explanation of these two systems.)

      Independently adjustable hour GMTs tend to be rarer, and more the purview of established such as Rolex, Tudor, Omega, etc. (They also tend to make a watch more expensive). Common third party GMT movements such as the ETA 2893, Sellita SW330 and Soprod C125 tend to be of the independently adjustable GMT hand variety, and are more affordable. Which brings us to another point…

      Mechanical vs. Quartz

      It’s perfectly possible to buy a quartz GMT watch — plenty are available by tool watch manufacturers such as Luminox, Citizen, etc. (You can even but yourself a high-end quartz GMT from the likes of Grand Seiko that puts many mechanical watches to shame.) Most of these are wildly affordable and rugged and will get the job of tracking a second time zone done just fine — or better than fine. In fact, for many people, a quartz GMT may be the better route to take.


      best gmt watches movements
      Grand Seiko Caliber 8F86 Quartz Movement

      Grand Seiko

      best gmt watches movements
      Rolex Caliber 3285 Automatic Movement

      Rolex


      Two Vs. Three Time Zones

      While most GMT watches allow you to easily track two time zones (one via the main time, and a second that is calculated by using the 24-hour bezel in concert with the GMT hand), certain models can actually calculate three. The Monta Skyquest, for example, has both an external, rotating 24-hour bezel and an internal 24-hour rehaut. Thus one can calculate a first time zone using the local hands; a second by where the GMT hand is pointing on the rehaut; and a third by calculating an offset of the bezel against the GMT hand. Watches like this are rarer, but supremely useful if for some reason you need to keep track of three zones.

      Tool vs. Dress

      While the GMT watch as envisioned by Rolex was a tool watch made for pilots, today there are many varieties of GMT, including dressier varieties made by the likes of Grand Seiko, or those that are included as complications on classic models by firms such as Jaeger-LeCoultre. If you want a GMT complication in a dive watch package, there are plenty of those — if you want something to wear in the office, you can have that, too. There’s never been more choice.

      Other Travel Watch Options

      The GMT isn’t the only way to display a second time zone, however: there are world timers, which display multiple time zones at once, and there are digital watches, which allow you to scroll through multiple time zones. In short: do some research on the different systems and see which might be right for you before springing for a GMT, as they’re far from the only game in town.

      Monta Skyquest

      best gmt watches

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      This is hands down one of the most utilitarian, badass GMT watches on the market. Because it has a 24-hour scale within the rehaut — plus a rotating 24-hour bezel — you can easily use it to track three different time zones. Built like a tank and water-resistant to 304m, it can take anything you can throw at it. Wear it to work, bring it with you traveling, wear it in the water — the Skyquest is a watch that was made to be abused. It doesn’t hurt that it’s pretty damn good looking, too.

      Diameter: 40mm

      Movement: Sellita SW330 automatic

      Water Resistance: 304m

      Price: $2,190

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      Baltic Aquascaphe GMT

      best gmt watches

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      Baltic’s Aquascaphe checks so many boxes that besides being the best budget GMT, it may also be amongst the best recent GMTs, period. You get a perfectly sized 39mm case that’s only 12mm thick, three handsome bezel color options, an automatic Swiss movement, a dive-ready water resistance rating of 100m, and either a super comfortable beads-of-rice bracelet or a Tropic-style rubber strap. If you’re on a budget, just pick one of these up and move on.

      Diameter: 39mm

      Movement: Soprod C125 automatic

      Water Resistance: 100m

      Price: ~$1,105+

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      Rolex GMT Master II

      best gmt watches

      Courtesy

      The OG. Rolex’s GMT Master debuted in 1954 and accompanied Pan Am pilots on their transcontinental flights during the beginning of the Jet Age. Of course, the modern watch is fair game for anyone, so long as you can get your hands on one. It features the Rolex cal. 3285 automatic movement with independently adjustable hour hand, a 40mm case, and your choice of bezel configuration and metal. (Keep in mind that the steel versions are currently only available on Jubilee bracelets.)

      Diameter: 40mm

      Movement: Rolex cal. 3285 automatic

      Water Resistance: 100m

      Price: $9,700+

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      Farer Lander III

      best gmt watches

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      Farer’s range comprises numerous GMT watches, but to our mind, the Lander III is amongst the most simultaneously unique and wearable. Svelte at 39.5mm by just 10mm in depth, it boasts a striking blue dial that completely changes color depending on how the light hits it. It’s further got a Swiss automatic movement, a fixed bezel with inner 24-hour ring and a wide variety of straps. If you’re looking for a dressier GMT — or something a bit different — this could be the watch for you.

      Diameter: 39.5mm

      Movement: Sellita SW330 automatic

      Water Resistance: 100m

      Price: $1,445+

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      Yema Superman GMT

      best gmt watches

      Courtesy

      While the Superman GMT definitely has some Rolex vibes going on, it’s essentially a travel version of the brand’s popular dive watch, which has been around in various forms since the 1960s. With two choices of case diameter (39mm or 41mm), three bezel color choices, an automatic Swiss movement and a whopping 300m of water resistance, the Superman GMT packs quite a punch for its price. (The bezel-locking device is sort of overkill on a GMT model, but it’s true to the original Superman watches.)

      Diameter: 39mm/41mm

      Movement: ETA 2893-2 automatic

      Water Resistance: 300m

      Price: $1,499

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      Zodiac Super Sea Wolf GMT

      best gmt watches

      Courtesy

      Echoing the historical Zodiac GMT models from the 1960s, the Super Sea Wolf GMT melds a Swiss movement to a reserved black dial, a steel, rotating 24-hour bezel, 200m of water resistance and a matching steel Oyster-style bracelet. With the exception of the modern 40mm case size and a few other subtle cues, you’d be hard pressed to peg this beauty for a modern watch, it so closely resembles its historical brethren.

      Diameter: 40mm

      Movement: ETA 2893-2 automatic

      Water Resistance: 200m

      Price: $1,795

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      Grand Seiko SBGN009

      best gmt watches

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      Now if this isn’t one of the most gorgeous GMTs on the market, we’re ready to eat our collective hat. The SBGN009 is powered by a quartz movement, but it’s a Grand Seiko quartz movement, and one of the best in the world. Devoid of a rotating bezel, it’s incredibly versatile and should look great with casual wear or something more formal. And if you’re not mesmerized by that incredible dial, you may not have a soul.

      Diameter: 40mm

      Movement: Grand Seiko 9F86 quartz

      Water Resistance: 100m

      Price: $3,000

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      Bell & Ross BR V2-93 GMT

      best gmt watches

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      Just a wildly cool-looking GMT, built to Bell & Ross’s exacting standards but not outrageously priced. Powered by a Swiss automatic movement, it’s a tad on the larger side at 41mm, but with its well designed case and satin-polished steel bracelet, it’ll wear like a charm. A bright orange GMT hand and bright white lume ensure great legibility, while a cool black and grey, bi-directional bezel paired with a black dial makes for an understated look.

      Diameter: 41mm

      Movement: ETA 2893-2 automatic

      Water Resistance: 100m

      Price: $3,500

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      Tudor Black Bay GMT

      best gmt watches

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      When the Black Bay GMT debuted in 2018, it stunned the watch world. A beautiful amalgam of Rolex and Tudor watches, it provided an alternative to the stupidly expensive and hard-to-obtain GMT Master. The only problem? The Black Bay GMT has itself become difficult to obtain. Nonetheless, it includes Tudor’s in-house GMT movement, 200m of water resistance, and an awesome steel bracelet. The one rub: at 41mm wide by roughly 15mm thick, it’s a big watch, and doesn’t work well for the thin-wristed among us.

      Diameter: 41mm

      Movement: Tudor cal. MT5652 automatic

      Water Resistance: 200m

      Price: $3,725+

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      Grand Seiko SBGM221

      best gmt watches

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      Like we said, Grand Seiko knows how to craft a beautiful watch, and their dressier GMTs are amongst the best-looking on the market. The SBGM221 features a mechanical movement with a 3-day power reserve, a deep ivory dial with a blue GMT hand, an inner 24-hour track and a brown leather strap. While it features just 30m of water resistance (unlike many of the models on this list), this is clearly a GMT so beautiful that you wouldn’t dare want to get it wet, anyway.

      Diameter: 39.5mm

      Movement: Grand Seiko 9S66 automatic

      Water Resistance: 30m

      Price: $4,600

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      Rolex Explorer II

      best gmt watches

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      The other Rolex GMT. Though we prefer the Explorer II in its earlier 40mm iterations, the current reference still features your choice of black or white dial and fixed 24-hour bezel. Why a fixed bezel? The Explorer II was originally developed for spelunkers (cave divers) so that they could distinguish between day and nighttime hours in the complete darkness of a cave — not to track a second time zone. However, the modern versions feature a fully independent GMT hand, meaning you can absolutely use them for travel.

      Diameter: 42mm

      Movement: Rolex cal. 3187 automatic

      Water Resistance: 100m

      Price: $8,350

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      Patek Philippe 5524G

      best gmt watches

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      Oh, so you wanted a true baller GMT watch, did you? We got you. You want a Travel Time. Sure, the 5524G is part of the elegant Calatrava line that’s been around since the 1930s, but it ups the interest with a white gold case, pilot’s watch-style dial and typeface, a date complication contained within a subdial, two local and home day/night indicators, and of course, a GMT hand. Matched to a handsome brown leather strap, this is the GMT watch you wear once you’ve arrived.

      Diameter: 42mm

      Movement: Patek Philippe cal. 324 S C FUS automatic

      Water Resistance: 60m

      Price: $53,820

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      Audi’s e-tron FE07 Formula E race car is packing an new in-house electric powertrain

      This year, the world of motorsports will welcome the start of the first-ever Formula E competition. As you can probably guess, this will see the participation of all-electric platforms from leading carmakers around the globe. The first of many races is starting this month and among the entries, Audi is showcasing its e-tron FE07. Sources point out that the company wants consumers to consider eco-friendly alternatives for the future.

      Ahead of the competition, Audi shares a little more about its zero-emission race car. Its engineers were previously developing components alongside technology partner Schaeffler. This time, their e-tron FE07 will be packing an in-house system. It will be pushing everything to the absolute limit for exceptional performance. They’re calling it the MGU05 – an electric one-speed drivetrain with an efficiently of 95 percent.

      Lead engineer Stefan Aicher states: “We were able to directly reinvest these savings in the new MGU for the benefit of enhanced efficiency. Even so, the new MGU inverter unit weighs less than 35 kilograms. This was an exceptional achievement by the whole team.” The team is likewise confident that the e-tron FE07 will shatter all expectations come race day.

      A comparison from Audi claims that the lighter electric assembly is definitely more efficient than a regular combustion engine with the power output. Thus, it’s clear that the shift to battery power has its advantages over traditional configurations. The e-tron FE07 is shaping up to be one of the machines to closely follow during the races. So far, we’re loving the futuristic looks brought about by Formula E regulators.

      Learn more here

      Images courtesy of Audi