All posts in “Gear”

Why You Should Never Bring a Spork Camping

I was seven years old when I first encountered a spork. My mom, brother and I piled into a car and drove a few towns over to reach the closest multi-screen movie theater to watch The Parent Trap (the Lindsay Lohan version, not the original with Hayley Mills). We caught an earlier showing and then headed down the street to the Kentucky Fried Chicken-Taco Bell combo restaurant, where I chose The Colonel over the chihuahua and, to accompany a side of mashed potatoes and gravy, I received a spork.

The novelty came encased in plastic, and its form was neither adequate for harvesting the final remains of potato substance from the corners of its styrofoam container nor for piercing and gripping greasy chicken. Still, I don’t recall feeling disappointed. (Hours later though, I awoke in the middle of the night and vomited.)

My next spork memory is shallower in the archives; Age: 19; Location: student center, The University of Vermont. Walking through the complex, I passed a table where environmentally minded students sold sporks as an alternative to disposable cutlery. These weren’t anything like the flimsy impotence I first used at KFC; they were colorful, curvy and made of a harder, dishwasher-safe plastic. They also weren’t really sporks, at least not according to Merriam or Webster — instead of a single tine-equipped spoon-shaped end, this “spork” had implements on both ends: one was a spoon, the other was a fork with small, insubstantial serrations on one edge — a feeble attempt at adding a knife to the equation.

I paid five dollars for this spork, and I kept it in a small pocket of my backpack. I used this spork all the time; to eat yogurt, to eat soup, to eat mac and cheese. What do these foods have in common? You eat them with a spoon, and that’s what I did, because the fork end of this utensil was nearly as useless as the disposable version of my first encounter. (Plus, twirling the thing around 180 degrees to eat with the end I had been using as a handle always seemed unhygienic.) One day, as I attempted to stir a jar of organic peanut butter, this spork snapped in half.

After that utensil fail, I swore off sporks for good. I bought an ultralight spoon for backpacking, but would often end up swiping a piece of standard flatware from the kitchen drawer before taking off on a trip. That all changed when Gerber released the Compleat, a multi-tool take on campsite cutlery.

Instead of combining fork and spoon into one ineffective jack-of-two-trades, Gerber kept them separate to perform at their individual best. The spoon is slightly angular, and perfect for probing the corners of pots and bowls; the fork is spork-reminiscent, but its longer tines keep it just forky enough for stabbing hunks of food.

Gerber Compleat

avantlink.com

$29.00

Gerber didn’t stop there, though. The Compleat also comes with a small tool that works as a bottle opener, a can opener and a vegetable peeler. And then there’s the multi-use spatula that has a rubberized edge perfect for scraping clean pots, skillets and bowls (to get that last bit of pancake batter, for instance) and a serrated side that’s surprisingly sharp (but still not as good as a knife, oh well). At the other end of this spatula is where the Compleat all comes together, literally: all three of the other utensils nest neatly together to form one compact tool.

But invert either the fork or spoon to face the spatula, and you have one final item — a pair of tongs. Now, I’m likely more enthusiastic about cutlery innovations than most, but I genuinely believe that this small additional feature makes the Compleat a real winner. Tongs are precisely the type of thing that you never want to pack; they rarely come in small sizes, and their application is specific to cooking particular foods, so you can usually get away with leaving them behind. But when you do need them — for grabbing sausages off a grill, for serving sauteed vegetables — dammit do they come in handy.

On a recent weekend, I drove to New York’s Catskill Mountains to go camping. Knowing the hike from the parking lot to the campsite was a short one, I packed with comfort in mind (tents, two hammocks and a camp chair for everyone!). But when it came time to cook dinner (burritos), I realized that I hadn’t brought a single spoon, fork or cooking utensil of any kind. But I had the Compleat stashed in a backpack, and I used nearly every one of its functions to prepare the meal. It opened a can of refried beans, it stirred pork and veggies, it retrieved a roasted pepper from the coals of our campfire, and it doled out salsa. Our small group agreed, perhaps slightly under the influence of a bottle of whiskey, that they were among the best homemade burritos we’d ever had.

Price: $29

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This Indie Brand’s Colorful New Watches Are Like Nothing We’ve Ever Seen

Don’t expect anything from Israeli independent watchmaker Itay Noy that either looks or functions like a traditional timepiece. Employing his own artistic twist on horology, Noy’s latest creations are colorful takes on existing watches that are striking both for their looks and creativity.

Both new Color Wheel watches sport a stark white face and rainbow theme expressed as the date and as the hours, respectively. It might not be obvious exactly how the Color Wheel Hour — which is based upon the Itay Noy’s Time Tone collection — works, or how the time is read simply by looking at a still image.

Once you get the hang of it, however, the watch is easy to use: the 12 large, vibrant dots are not simply markers but themselves move around the dial to indicate the current hour. (The concept is that the owner chooses the color he or she wants to represent the current hour.) Look closely, and you’ll notice there are white-on-white indices and hands to more traditionally mark the minutes (with a red dot at the tip) and seconds.

watch
Itay Noy Color Wheel Month

Courtesy

watch
Vaucher VMF 5400 Automatic Movement

Courtesy

The Color Wheel Month (Full Month collection), on the other hand, is slightly more traditional in some senses. Whereas you’ll most commonly find a date window at 3 or 6 o’clock (sometimes the dreaded 4:30) displaying the number on a disc beneath the dial, Itay Noy’s uses 15 windows.

The date itself can be read most easily at around 3:30 due to spacing that separates it from the next number, but the other even or odd days of the month can all be seen simultaneously in progressive tones of the rainbow. There are no hour markers, and a tiny seconds hand is visible around 7 o’clock.

Itay Noy not only invents these unusual concepts, but largely executes them himself at his workshop in Jaffa, Israel — from the cases and dials to in-house modules and movement modifications. The Color Wheel watches both use sourced automatic movements, with the Hour model measuring 44mm and the Month model at 40mm wide.

As every watch is individually produced, the Color Wheel collections will be limited to only 24 examples each (with its number indicated at the bottom of the dial) and must be ordered directly from Itay Noy. Prices are disclosed on request only, but expect to pay around $6,000 if you want to take one home.

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What’s Actually the Difference Between Cheap and Expensive Bookshelf Speakers?

People like good sound, obviously, but to different ends and different extremes. There’s upgrading to a soundbar or a two-channel home theater system so you can better hear dialog on TV. Then, there’s building a bonafide home hi-fi system and spending thousands on various speakers, connections, sources and other electronics.

Odds are, if you clicked on this post, you might have a set of bookshelf speakers. Maybe a $150-$300 setup, connected either an A/V receiver or a home turntable setup. Maybe you’ve also considered an upgrade. But what, exactly will that expense get you? Especially if you creep up into the $1,000 range?

According to Scott Orth, the director of audio and acoustic systems at Sound United, and a professor of Electroacoustics at the Johns Hopkins Peabody Instutite, there are a few angles from which to answer the question. First, the ojective and scientific. “The sources that you’re listening to have a certain amount of information and the better your loudspeakers are the more they can extract that information, the less error there is and the clearer it comes through and the more you get from it.” As your speaker quality improves, the better justice they do to high quality recordings. Literally. Objectively. Full stop.

But there’s also what Orth calls “the emotional side.” Higher fidelity speakers are able to extract more information, so the sound is more realistic and the experience of listening is more engaging. Simply put: the more you hear, the more emotion you feel.

high end bookshelf speakers gear patrol inline 1
Polk Audio is a 50-year-old audio company based in Baltimore. They’re best known for making affordable hi-fi speakers. The Legend Series (picture) are the “best speakers Polk has ever made.”

Polk Audio

Of course this is just a detailed way to state the obvious: A pair of lesser bookshelf speakers are going to sound worse than higher-end bookshelf speakers. How do they sound better? What specifically are you getting for your money. The truth is: it’s everything, it’s a little bit of everything.

“When you move up in price in speakers, what happens is that you are paying for not just the level of detail that you can hear, but the level of engineering that goes into the speaker,” says Michael Greco, a senior director in Polk Audio’s loudspeaker division. Better cabinets are going to be more expensive by their physical nature. They need to be heavy, thick or have bracing — anything that makes it rigid so it’s not vibrating anywhere but the transducers. The trick is to find something that’s not too heavy but still has all the properties of high stiffness and high damping to keep the panels from vibrating. “You’re buying that level of thought and that level of detail from the engineering team to give you that immersive experience.”

Size is also a big factor. According to Greco, a 6-inch driver in a small box might play loud, but it’s not going to go very low in frequency. A 5.25-inch driver in the same size box might not play as loud, but it will go low in frequency. So there’s this kind of trade-off and that’s part of what you pay for in some speakers. You’re paying for a larger box so you can have more bass. This is one of the main reasons why high-end bookshelf speakers are also bigger.

But making a bigger speaker isn’t as simple as just scaling up a small one. The larger the speaker — specifically, the speaker cabinet — the more difficult it is to keep its panels from vibrating. “A small box has less trouble than a larger one, but it’s all about the internal bracing that we do to try to keep the larger cabinets from vibrating like that,” Orth said. “So larger [isn’t always better], but this thicker is always better if you can afford to do that.” Thicker material will always be stiffer than thinner material.

high end bookshelf speakers gear patrol inline 2
The Legend Series consists of two sets of bookshelf speakers, the L100 and the L200, the latter of which are slightly bigger and higher-end.

Polk Audio

So what does that look like practically? You can find an instructive example in Polk Audio’s lineup. Take Polk’s L100 ($1,199) a significant price bump from its $120 T15s. The extra order of magnitude in purchase price gains you improvement in materials, parts and other bits of engineering that add up to an objective improvement. “The T15 goes down to maybe 90Hz and the L100 goes down into the 50Hz ranges, so there’s a lot of difference there. On the high frequencies, I think we measured the pinnacle tweeter out to 50kHz, which is where dogs and bats hear.”

Of course, the speakers are just one link in the chain of an excellent audio system, and you have to have the right equipment to properly power them — you can’t just integrate hi-end speakers into your current system and expect them to sound their best. Yet, the speakers remain the foundation, if you find this audio quality worth the premium you’ll pay for it.

“The advice that I always give people is to buy your speakers first and spend as much as you can afford,” Greco said. “And then buy the electronics second.” Electronics will change over time, while speakers tend to last, which make them an excellent foundation that will only pay dividends as you upgrade the rest of your setup.

As for how much should you spend on speakers versus the other electronics in your system, Greco says it should be an even 50/50 split — maybe 60/40 in favor of the speakers. “I don’t think you’re going to be sorry if you spend a little bit more on the speakers because, after all, that’s what you hear. It’s the speakers.”

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Today’s Best Deals: A Deal on a Staub Cocotte, 20% off Adidas Ultraboost 21 & More

Welcome to Deals of Note, where Gear Patrol captures all the best deals of the day. You can also visit GearPatrol.com/Deals for constant updates on the latest deals discovered by our team.

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Samsung welcomes its first ‘Fan Edition’ tablet: The Galaxy Tab S7 FE

Android might be the most dominant mobile operating system right now, but Apple still manages to outpace it when it comes to tablets. Samsung remains its biggest competitor right now and its latest model is the Galaxy Tab S7 FE. The South Korean tech group revisits a strategy wherein they released a more affordable version of the S20 last year.

Now, it’s the Galaxy Tab S7 that getting the “Fan Edition” treatment that drops the price in exchange for the loss of some key features of the flagship slate. We can’t help but notice that Samsung somewhat drew inspiration from the iPad Air 4.

The Galaxy Tab S7 FE will ship in four colors: Mystic Black, Mystic Silver, Mystic Green, and Mystic Pink. Much like its premium cousins, an S-Pen is bundled with the tablet. It retains the premium metal body, but there are some cost-saving changes.

It packs a 12.4-inch display but it uses a TFT panel instead of OLED. Don’t expect a buttery-smooth 120 Hz refresh rate as it is listed at 60 Hz only. 5G connectivity is still intact, but the chipset is the mid-range Qualcomm Snapdragon 750G.

The silicon is paired with 4 GB or 6 GB RAM with an internal storage size of 64 GB and 128 GB respectively. The Galaxy Tab S7 FE should still be a capable productivity device with Samsung’s DeX on board. Moreover, the optional keyboard cover will handle typing tasks reliably as well.

The battery is rated at 10,090 mAh and it supports 45W fast charging technology. The Galaxy Tab S7 FE is also great for entertainment thanks to its dual AKG-tuned speakers with Dolby Atmos audio enhancement.

Buy – $835

Images courtesy of Samsung

Ducati Drops Limited Edition Diavel for MIMO Motor Show

Ripping down the freeway in 4th gear, Ducati’s Diavel 1260 S Black & Steel will surely sound like an angry hornet & if you’re able to get a glimpse you’d see it looks like one, too. This limited-edition variant of their fiercest sport-cruiser features a stealth matte black livery highlighted by hits of vibrant yellow. It is powered by a 1,262cc Testastretta DVT engine that yields 162-hp and legendary low-end torque. Available in July.

This Electric Truck & Tent Camping Duo Is Our New Obsession

When we think of electric trucks these days, we tend to think of mighty, hulking brutes with big bodies to contain their burly batteries: the Ford F-150 Lightning, the GMC Hummer EV, the Rivian R1T. But as many a true overland enthusiast can tell you, when you’re on the trail, sometimes size can be a liability. Tight turns and narrow gaps are often unavoidable, and when they confront you, you’ll want your off-roader as teeny as possible.

Or, in other words, you’ll want something like Alpha Motor Inc.’s pint-sized AMC Wolf. And now, to further increase its droolability quotient with overlanders, Alpha Motor is teaming up with outdoor gear maker Heimplanet to create one of the coolest truck-and-tent combos we’ve ever seen.

The Wolf + Cloudbreak combination starts with the compact AMC Wolf+ pickup. At 203 inches long, it’s smaller than a Ford Ranger and just slightly larger than a Ford Maverick, yet it packs room for four people and a 65-inch truck bed. Front- or all-wheel-drive are available, along with a range of 250-275 miles.

Once you park, however, that’s when the Cloudbreak comes into play. It pops up into a commodious space that stretches over the truck’s bed, enabling you to access it for storage, sleeping or whatever else. (We presume the production version will offer some sort of additional waterproofing for that area.) On the other end, there’s what amounts to a covered patio that offers additional fresh air.

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How much will this all run you? Well, that’s still to be determined. AMC reportedly says the base version of the Wolf runs around $36,000, but seeing as how they haven’t delivered any yet, it’s all theoretical until they start reaching the streets. Still, we’re hoping this is one piece of vaporware that manages to materialize.

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The Newest Adidas Ultraboosts Are on Sale for the First Time We’ve Seen

Looking for even more great savings? Head over to Today’s Best Deals page to see all our top deals from today.


We have been obsessed with the Adidas Ultraboost ever since the model was released back in 2015. The combination of the namesake Ultraboost soles and Adidas proprietary Primeknit uppers make for a shoe that is equally adept at performance running and doing the daily HIIT — if there is one thing we love here at GP it is versatility. Not only are they exceptional in the performance world but they look damn good, making them the perfect daily drivers that can take you from dawn to dusk with ease. Right now you can pick up the most recent release, the Ultraboost 21 on sale for the very first time we’ve seen.

The Ultraboost 21 Primeblue, which is made with a recycled Parley/polyester upper, is the model on sale with the biggest size run, but there are also a few colors of the regular 21 on sale as well. No matter which you choose, know you’re getting one of our favorites at a killer discount.

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You Can Still Buy a Brand-New, Old-School Toyota Land Cruiser. Just Not in America

After production of the iconic FJ40 concluded, Toyota branched the Land Cruiser lineage into two directions. The U.S. market stuck with the four-door FJ60 wagon, which evolved into the J200 luxury yacht on sale today, but the 70 Series — the more-direct replacement for the FJ40 — never made it to the States. As such, it is perhaps the juiciest forbidden fruit for American Land Cruiser enthusiasts — at least, until we learn whether the new 300 Series version of the Land Cruiser will come to the United States.

The 70 Series has all the off-road capability of the Land Cruiser, and none of the excess and luxury features found in the American model. The truck is legendarily durable. Indeed, the design is so good, the 70 Series has been in continuous production since 1984 without being overhauled.

It doesn’t appear in places like the U.S. and Europe due to emissions standards, but you can still buy a 70 Series in much of the rest of the world. Toyota sells both SUV and pickup versions of the 70 Series in the United Arab Emirates, starting at the equivalent of $38,600. (Dubai residents can also still buy another enthusiast favorite, the FJ Cruiser, which Toyota discontinued in the U.S. in 2014.)

Australia, however, is the Land Cruiser’s biggest market. In addition to the more modern variants, you can still buy three different model variations of the 70 Series there: two two-box SUVs and a flatbed pickup truck.

Africa remains a popular destination for the Land Cruiser 70 Series, too. The nation of Gambia, for instance, offers a similar array of models to Australia. South Africa still sells pickup versions of the 79 series based on the 70 Series, including last year’s Namib edition. And you can still buy a Land Cruiser 70 Series in South American countries, like Venezuela.

While it’s a shame the J70 Cruiser never came to America, Toyota had its reasons for that. The most obvious is that Toyota already sold a spartan, incredibly durable, smaller SUV in the U.S. It’s called the 4Runner.

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Now You Can See with this Copper Keychain Flashlight

Deployed with a simple twist for on & off, the 60-lumen Pimi keychain flashlight is a smart little EDC light. Measuring just 1.3 inches, it fits perfectly on your keys, delivering handy, reliable light in a cool copper case. It’s powered by a single 10180 cell battery and is IP68 rated for dust and water resistance.

Today’s Best Deals: An Exclusive Deal at Gallantry, 15% off at Knoll & More

Welcome to Deals of Note, where Gear Patrol captures all the best deals of the day. You can also visit GearPatrol.com/Deals for constant updates on the latest deals discovered by our team.

EDITOR’S PICKS

The most rare or exceptional deals picked by Gear Patrol’s product experts.

OUTDOOR DEALS

FITNESS DEALS

STYLE DEALS

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Spalding Releases Final Run of Official NBA Balls

Marking the end of a 40-year partnership, Spalding sports is releasing its final run of NBA-endorsed Official Game basketballs. As the league’s official ball sponsor, the Spalding name made its mark in the game’s greatest moments over the last 4 decades. The final run of balls is available now—grab one before they bounce.

The Complete Guide to Persol Sunglasses: All Styles, Explained

Welcome to Brand Breakdown, a series of comprehensive yet easy-to-digest guides to your favorite companies, with insights and information you won’t find on the average About page.

Donned by pilots, race car drivers and style icons, Persol sunglasses are unquestionably cool. Few brands have withstood the test of time like Persol, which is just over a century old, earning it the right to be called a true classic. And whether it’s the Italian brand’s innovations, quality or cachet, you wouldn’t be faulted for wanting a pair for yourself.

This guide will take you through everything you need to know about the brand, from its history to terms you should know and available styles. For a more general primer on sunglasses, check out this article.

History

In the midst of World War I, Giuseppe Ratti was working as an optician for his family’s business, Berry Opticians. Pilots frequented the business and regaled Ratti of high-altitude bulldog fights as well as battles against the glaring sun. After experimenting with smoked lenses, Ratti introduced a glare-reducing pair of spectacles dubbed The Protector, designed specifically for pilots.

The glasses featured smoked crystal lenses, which Ratti had developed with the help of a German chemist, as well as an elastic band and rubber-lined frames. The Protector’s popularity took off, landing itself on the faces of race car drivers and motorcyclists while also securing Ratti contracts with the armed forces. Shortly after, the Persol name was born, a portmanteau of “per il sole” (for the sun).

In the 1920s, Ratti further developed its lenses, using silica to form its crystal lenses which were then tinted to a yellow-brown tint which is synonymous with the brand today.

Between the 1930s and 1950s was when Persol truly solidified itself as an innovative brand, first with the introduction of its now-iconic Meflecto technology. Using a complex system of cylinders inserted carefully into the stems, the Meflecto system allowed the glasses to adapt its shape to any wearer’s head, reducing pressure and increasing comfort. Persol expanded upon this now-patented concept by developing the Victor Flex system, which helped the bridge of the sunglasses fit any face shape using a series of flexible notches. The brand’s trademark Silver Arrow also came about during this time and distinguished Persol from imitators. The design was inspired by the swords of ancient warriors and, unfortunately, would be the springboard for Persol’s ad mascot, a stereotypical cartoon of a Chinese man. The arrow evolved and branched several iterations, of which the “Supreme Arrow” is most synonymous with the brand.

From the 1960s, Persol expanded its production to include work goggles used for various manufacturing throughout Italy and won dozens of patents along the way. It also secured contracts with NASA and grew in cultural relevance as celebrities like Steve McQueen were seen in movies and television sporting the brand. Though the brand found its way into Hollywood, it came at a time when eyewear wasn’t overly branded like many are today and it was the Silver Arrow that gave persistent fans the hint they needed. “They were the first to be an aspirational brand for jetsetters, where there wasn’t really such an eyewear brand before them,” says Jordan Silver, owner of NYC eyewear store Silver Linings Opticians. “Every other brand was looking at eyewear as ‘you should wear this as a medical device.’” But Persol took it to another level and the Silver Arrow was a callsign to say that you were a part of the cognoscenti.

“They’re authentic — or were authentic — because they weren’t a fashion brand going into eyewear,” Silver says. “They were an eyewear brand and eyewear brand only. They were what the rich dudes wanted to wear and so other people wanted to wear it because of them. They didn’t have to put a logo or a designer’s name or a fashion house on it.”

Far away from the silver screen, Persol continued to dominate the sports landscape, moving from pilots and race car drivers to world-class mountain climbers and explorers. From the top of Mt. Everest and through blistering deserts, Persol was the eyewear of choice to protect these extreme athletes in their harrowing excursions.

In 1995, eyewear conglomerate Luxottica purchased the Italian company and pushed the brand’s expansion. Though the revolutionary eyewear brand still produces its goods in Italy, some eyewear enthusiasts say that the brand isn’t what it once was. “By the late 50s and 60s, they were really that brand to be worn on a transatlantic flight,” Silver notes. “I think [in recent decades] they lost that, being at airport kiosks, not maintaining the exclusive distribution channels.”

They became who they are now through innovative products, selective distribution and quality. Longtime fans pine for Persol’s heyday, but the brand is still looked to as a pillar of style and quality today.

Terminology

Meflecto: Persol’s crowning achievement, the patented Meflecto technology was created by the brand and is the world’s first flexible stem design. It allows the stems to bend according to the unique shape of the wearer, via a complex system of metal cylinders embedded into the acetate stem.

Victor Flex: The three-notch bridge technology which allows the bridge to curve and flex as needed, improving fit and comfort.

Silver Arrow: Inspired by the swords of ancient warriors, the Silver Arrow is Persol’s trademark, invented in the 1930s.

Acetate: A naturally-derived plastic formed cotton pulp. Acetate is formed into a mold and the shape of the frames is carved out from this.

Crystal: Persol’s lenses are crystal lenses which are made from glass and offer the highest clarity.

Polarized: Polarized lenses are lenses which are coated with a layer of polarizing film which cuts reflections and glares.

Styles

649 Series

The 649 is Persol’s most recognized design and its most imitated. Introduced in 1957, the 649 was originally designed for Turin’s tram drivers, with large lenses to block out dust and debris. It features all of Persol’s hallmarks including the Silver Arrow, Meflecto and Victor Flex technology and is available in over a dozen different configurations. The 649 Original features an overall wider profile with thicker temples and frames while the PO9649S is a trimmed-down version with a less prominent bridge.

649 Original

649 Original

Persol persol.com

$261.00

PO9649S

PO9649S

Persol persol.com

$261.00

PO6649SM

Courtesy

PO6649SM

Persol persol.com

$377.00

714 Series

The 714 is a sleeker set of specs compared to the 649, with thinner rims and more slender stems. The brow line, while still contoured, is flatter than the 649 and features a bridge that’s more carved out. The most distinct difference is the fact that it has hinges at the stems as well as at the bridge which allow the glasses to fold into a compact form factor. This innovation made the 714 first-ever foldable sunglasses. The 714 reached peak cool and cemented itself in style history when Steve McQueen wore them in the iconic 1968 film The Thomas Crown Affair.

PO0714

PO0714

Persol persol.com

$317.00

Steve McQueen Series

714 Steve McQueen

Persol persol.com

$480.00

In homage to Mr. Cool himself, the Steve McQueen Series is an upgraded 714. Every pair of Steve McQueen’s is made with polarized lenses and features Persol’s Supreme Arrow motif not only at the hinges where the stems meet the lenses, but at the hinges within each stem. You’ll find Steve McQueen branding on the inside of the stems as well as on the compact carrying case. It’s available in several colorways, the most opulent of which is a 24k gold plated version.

Calligrapher Edition

Drawing on the art of calligraphy, this series of Persol frames is marked by design elements lifted from calligraphy pens. Each frame in the series features metal stems with elegant lines reminiscent of nibs and metal accents with ornamental striations. The Calligrapher Edition consists of a pantho and square styles as well as a circle and square double metal bridge styles.

PO3166S

PO3166S

Persol persol.com

$346.00

PO3165S

Courtesy

PO3165S

Persol persol.com

$197.50

PO3172S

Courtesy

Sunglasses, PO3172S

Persol macys.com

$254.98

PO3173S

PO3173S

Persol amazon.com

$177.98

Galleria 900 Series

For the Galleria 900 series, Persol mined their archives to bring back designs from the 1940s. Made in both optical and sunglass versions, the collection features vintage acetate patterns, shaped into somewhat compact in proportions and include the classic key bridge, Silver Arrow hinges and Meflecto temples.

PO3152S

PO3152S

Persol persol.com

$261.00

Cellor Series

The Cellor series is a take on the Clubmaster style, featuring an acetate brow line and rimless bottom half. Sunglasses in this series also feature a metal bridge and plastic nose pads.

Cellor Original

Cellor Original

Persol persol.com

$367.00

3 Lenses

The 3 Lenses series was Persol’s attempt at designing a sunglasses which fully masked the wearer’s face, before the invention of a single lens shield even existed. So, the addition of a third lens between the two eye lenses and top brow line was the solution. It has a distinct aviator silhouette and comes in two versions the PO3217S and its square sibling, the PO3223S.

PO3217S

Courtesy

PO3172S

Persol macys.com

$254.98

PO3223S

Courtesy

PO3223S

Persol persol.com

$367.00

4 Lenses

The 4 Lenses series provides wraparound coverage with an additional pair of lenses at either side of the temples. This full coverage saw use among NASA’s astronauts. The series contains two styles. The PO0005 is a rounded lens with acetate frames, Silver Arrow and Meflecto stems. On the other hand, the PO0009 model features an almost cat-eye silhouette and though it lacks the Victor Flex and Silver Arrow motif, it still has the patented Meflecto technology.

PO0005

PO0005

Persol persol.com

$172.50

PO0009

Courtesy

PO0009

Persol persol.com

$317.00

Key West Collection

As the name implies, the Key West Collection takes influence from the Florida travel destination with a distinct ’90s edge seen in its rectangular shape. The most prominent feature in this collection is the thick, metal top bar. While the first Key West style features an all-metal construction, the Key West II employs a combination of metal frames and acetate rims.

Key West

Key West

Persol persol.com

$317.00

Key West II

Key West II

Persol persol.com

$183.50

Typewriter Edition

Inspired by famous writers, the Typewriter Edition series of glasses is decidedly vintage-leaning. Each frame features rounded lenses held by acetate frames and a metal bridge. Metal accents and rivets call back to classic typewriter designs while the name of the collection is inscribed inside the arms in the unmistakable typewriter font.

PO3108S

PO3108S

Persol persol.com

$370.00

PO3210S

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PO3210S

Persol persol.com

$346.00

PO3208S

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PO3208S

Persol amazon.com

$199.99

Metal Capsule

Among Persol’s most streamlined frames, the Metal Capsule is characterized by thin frames made of metal, tipped with acetate at the end of the stems for comfort. Available in a variety of lens types and metal finishes, the collection consists of the rounded PO2445S and the semi-octagonal PO2446S.

PO2445S

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PO2445S

Persol sunglasshut.com

$172.50

PO2446S

PO2446S

Persol amazon.com

$219.99

Reflex Edition

Inspired by classic vintage cameras, the Reflex Edition taps into the inner photographer. The PO3124S feature squarish lenses with an acetate rim and bridge while the PO3046S is comparably more flashy with acetate rims, metal bridge and the Silver Arrow at both the lens hinges as well as the inside corner of each eye. Both styles feature thin, tapered metal stems tipped with acetate.

PO3124S

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PO3124S

Persol amazon.com

$129.00

PO3046S

PO3046S

Persol persol.com

$317.00

Combo Evolution

This series of sunglasses is a balanced, yet striking contrast of acetate frames and a metal bridge. While the PO3184S follows the timeless rounded panto shape, the PO3186S is in the family of square lenses. Where Persol’s 714 and 649 lean into a heftier silhouette, the Combo Evolution cuts down on the bulk.

PO3186S

PO3186S

Persol persol.com

$172.50

PO3184S

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PO3184S

Persol persol.com

$346.00

Titanium Collection

The Titanium Collection marries Persol’s Italian design with Japanese craftsmanship. Featuring premium titanium frames, the collection consists of four different shapes: Oval, Hexagonal, Double Bridge and Round. Each shape is made with titanium frames and nose pads, meticulously embellished with guilloche engraving.

PO5001ST

PO5001ST

Persol persol.com

$370.00

PO5002ST

PO5002ST

Persol persol.com

$370.00

PO5003ST

PO5003ST

Persol persol.com

$370.00

PO5004ST

PO5004ST

Persol persol.com

$370.00

Materia Collection

This collection focuses on eye-catching acetate patterns and colors and is characterized by bold stripes, blending the translucent with the opaque. The colorways range from cobalt blues to blond yellow, creamy whites and black marble.

PO3166S

PO3166S

Persol persol.com

$346.00

PO3186S

PO3186S

Persol persol.com

$346.00

PO3108S

PO3108S

Persol persol.com

$317.00

PO3199S

PO3199S

Persol persol.com

$346.00

La Casa de Papel

Persol’s maintained a close relationship with tv and film for decades. This collection was made in collaboration with the Netflix original series La Casa de Papel. The gripping action-packed show centers around a group of criminals who take over the Spanish mint to print their own money. Its main character, The Professor, is seen wearing Persol sunglasses and this limited edition series of eyewear features a double bridge acetate design with packaging made to look like a brick of gold. It comes in three renditions, one of which is gussied up with 24k gold plating.

PO3235S

PO3235S

Persol persol.com

$367.00

Persol & A.P.C.

In collaboration with French brand A.P.C., this three-piece collection takes the iconic 649 and renders it in limited-edition colorways. Two of them feature a transparent acetate frame while the clean all-white version is opaque and inspired by Kurt Cobain. All three come with non-polarized crystal gradient lenses.

PO649S

PO649S

Persol x A.P.C. persol.com

$185.00

These Are the Best New Knives of 2021, According to Experts

The COVID-19 pandemic put the kibosh on trade shows and industry conventions, which is where we typically get a first glimpse at new and upcoming products, but it’s 2021 now, and these events are back. One of the first to occur was Blade Show, a gathering put on by Blade Magazine that gathers hundreds of international exhibitors in what has become the largest knife show in the world.

Every year, the show’s highlight is the Knife of the Year Awards. A panel of anonymous judges made up of industry professionals assesses the new knives and tools on display and chooses the best of the bunch based on factors including utility, design, creativity, materials, aesthetics and feel, among other qualities. The final list of awardees reveals trends and innovations; check out the top winners below.

Knife of the Year: Fox Knives Saturn

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Fox Knives is no stranger to Blade Show’s top honors, which it also won in 2018 and 2019 with the Suru and Radius, respectively. This year’s entrant, the Saturn, features a short spear-point blade and Fox’s proprietary semi-circle lock, which works by sliding a stud around a channel in the knife’s pivot. The Saturn also took home the Imported Knife of the Year award, too.

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American-Made Knife of the Year: Case Marilla

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Case Knives has been around since the 1800s, and many of the knives it produces still have a strong Americana aesthetic. The Marilla, however, is part of a new push by the company into the modern EDC realm. The knife features a 3.4-inch drop-point blade made of S35VN steel and has an anodized aluminum handle with a textured G10 inlay for grip.

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Most Innovative American Design: V Nives Metal-Tech

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Details are still thin on V Nives’s Metal-Tech, but apparent features include an etched handle pattern that extends onto the blade itself. Its drop-point blade is equipped with an extended flipper tab that becomes a built-in guard when deployed.

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Most Innovative Imported Design: Maserin D-Dut

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The D-Dut hails from Maniago, Italy and brings with it a practical degree of multi-tool functionality. Folded into its aluminum handle are flathead and Philips head screwdrivers, plus an awl for piercing, reaming and sewing.

Price: $98

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Best Buy: We Knife Co. Civivi Elementum

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It’s rare to find a truly excellent pocket knife for $50, but Civivi seems to have nailed the formula with the Elementum. The knife has a drop-point blade made of D2 steel that’s just shy of three inches and opens smoothly on a ceramic ball-bearing pivot. It also has a liner lock for security during use, a lanyard hole and a deep-carry pocket clip. Adding to its appeal factor are G10 handles that come in a variety of colors.

Price: $50

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Collaboration of the Year: Maserin Solar

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For the Solar, Maserin teamed up with designer Sergio Consoli to create a smooth-opening flipper. The knife’s most striking feature is the arc its spine make when open, but its specs also include a titanium handle, titanium hardware and a D2 steel blade.

Price: $298

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Kitchen Knife of the Year: Benchmade Meatcrafter

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Benchmade stepped into new territory with the Meatcrafter, which is something of a cross between an outdoor-oriented fixed blade and a chef’s knife. The company developed a new sharpening method called SelectEdge that creates a smoother, longer-lasting edge that’s ideal for slicing meat.

Price: $136

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Save 15% During Knoll’s Modern Comforts Sale

Looking for even more great savings? Head over to Today’s Best Deals page to see all our top deals from today.


Knoll is one of our favorite sites to shop for modern and mid-century furniture — it is right up there with Design Within Reach and Herman Miller when it comes to making high-quality home goods. Now through June 22, it is running the Modern Comforts sale, offering 15 percent off in a number of its top categories, including living room, dining room, outdoor and office furniture.

You can get one of our favorite office chairs, the ReGeneration, at a rare discount, or you can pick up iconic patio silhouettes that go with any backyard design. If you’re looking to add to your living room, you can pick up any number of chairs and coffee tables as well.

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Bed Bath & Beyond Just Launched a Crazy-Affordable Kitchen Line

Are you sitting on one (or more) of those infamous 20-percent-off coupon for Bed Bath & Beyond right now? Well, you probably won’t need it to buy anything from the brand’s new kitchen and dinnerware line, Our Table — since everything from the collection is already so affordable. With prices starting at $5 (for a silicone whisk) and going up to $120 (for a 10-piece stainless steel cookware set), Our Table offers customers a breadth of products to help them cook, serve and eat without dipping into their savings.

Our Table offers alternatives to higher-end products that perform just as well, minus the huge markups. For example, if you’re been saving up for a Le Creuset Dutch oven, which retails for $370, you can score Our Table’s version of the same product for just $75.

“We are thrilled to announce the launch of Our Table at such a pivotal moment in time, as many of us are ready to welcome guests back into our homes after spending far too much time apart,” executive vice president and chief merchandising officer Joe Hartsig said in a press release. “The Our Table collection is designed not only with functionality in mind, but also with the hope that it will inspire our customers to expand their circle and spend time with loved ones.”

cut steak on a cutting board
Our Table offers products to help you prep, cook and serve your next meal.

Bed Bath & Beyond

To help market the launch, Bed Bath & Beyond launched a video series on its IGTV, called “From Our Table to Yours,” in which professional chefs — like Top Chef season 15 winner Joe Flamm and James Beard Award-winning television personality Vivian Howard — use Our Table products to teach viewers new recipes.

Since the start of 2021, Bed Bath & Beyond has launched six new in-house labels for every aspect of the home. In the beginning of the year, the brand released Simply Essential, a line of basics for every room; Haven, a luxury bath line; and Nestwell, a bed and bath line. Later this month, it’s planning on launching the home decor line Wild Sage and organizational collection Squared Away. Two more yet-unannounced labels are set to be released in the near future.

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Enameled Cast Iron Dutch Oven

Our Table bedbathandbeyond.com

$75.00

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Nonstick Aluminum Fry Pan

Our Table bedbathandbeyond.com

$20.00

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Preseasoned Cast Iron Fry Pan

Our Table bedbathandbeyond.com

$15.00

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2-Piece Stoneware Rectangular Bakers Set

Our Table bedbathandbeyond.com

$20.00

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Landon 16-Piece Dinnerware Set in Toast

Our Table bedbathandbeyond.com

$90.00

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