All posts in “Porsche 911”

The new Porsche 911 GTS

It has been 12 years since Porsche unveiled the first 911 GTS version, the ‘Sport’ version so to say of the already incredible Porsche 911, and today they added this more dynamic version to the latest incarnation of the 911 supercar from Germany, and it comes with more power and visual styling to set it apart from the regular 911 Carrera, compared to the current 911 Carrera S and the previous-generation 911 GTS, this new version adds 30 PS to the glorious six-cylinder boxer engine for a grand total of 480 PS (353 kW).

Starting at €140,981, the new Porsche 911 GTS is available in five different versions, either as a Carrera or Carrera 4 in both closed Coupé version as well as a breathtaking Cabriolet, but also as a 911 Targa 4 GTS … yes, you’ve seen that correct, the Targa is only available as a four-wheel-drive variant, but you can get them all in either an eight-speed PDK transmission or as a seven-speed manual, the PASM, or Porsche Active Suspension Management has been fine-tuned specifically for this GTS version.

The impressive brake system from the Porsche 911 Turbo is fitted onto the GTS too, but if you really want to get the maximum out of the special 911 GTS edition you’ll have to opt for the Lightweight Design Package that is now available on this GTS for the first time, and that takes 25 kgs off the overall weight of this supercar that can be distinguished from the other 911 models by the elaborate use of black on the exterior and black Race-Tex microfibre on the interior.

Don’t let the GTS name fool you into thinking there is no turbo on this Porsche 911 version, the 3-Liter flat-six engine is still turbocharged and delivers 480 PS as mentioned above, torque comes with a maximum of 570 Nm, the resulting acceleration figures are 3.3 seconds from 0 to 100 km/h with the PDK transmission, and getting back to a full stop comes courtesy of the high-performance braking system from the Porsche 911 Turbo hiding behind center-lock wheels, 20-inch for the front with a larger 21-inch wheel for the rear.

All of the Porsche 911 GTS models come with the Sport Design package as standard, showing distinctive trim for the front bumper, rear diffuser, and on the side sills. When looking at the trim around the headlight, including the daytime running light surrounds, these are darkened for the GTS, while the LED headlights with Porsche Dynamic Light System Plus (PDLS Plus) are standard too, however, the GTS does come with unique taillights.

When you would prefer lightweight carbon-fiber bucket seats, lighter glass on the side windows and the rear window, a lightweight battery, and the removal of the, mostly useless rear seats to get rid of about 25 kg of weight … go for the optional Lightweight Design Package, which also happens to come with rear-wheel-steering and some very nice aerodynamic touches.

If you don’t go for the more track-oriented Lightweight Design Package, the Porsche 911 GTS comes with Sport Seats Plus for the occupants with electric four-way adjustments, in front of the driver you’ll find a very nice GT Sport steering wheel and the famous Sport Chrono package, if you opt for the manual seven-speed gearbox, Porsche cuts 10 mm from the gear lever to allow faster gear changes … and just so you get the full acoustic experience, Porsche removed some insulation from the cabin so you can enjoy the sound from the sports exhaust better.

To make the experience complete, the central part of the seats, the steering wheel rim, the door handles and armrests, the storage compartment lid, and the gear lever all get the Race-Tex treatment, a very nice microfibre material inspired by racing, if you go for the GTS interior package you’ll get either Carmine Red or Crayon contrasted stitching, with this option you also get color-matched seat belts, GTS embroidery on the headrest, and the same shade used on the rev counter and Chrono face.

If you are looking to add one of these new Porsche 911 GTS versions to your garage, expect the first deliveries by November 2021.

Best 6-Cylinder Engines Ever Produced

In this modern automotive era, we are spoiled for choice when it comes to the wide array of supercars, hypercars and now EVs, to choose from. At this level of the game, the V12 engine is often seen as the standard bearer, while a V8 is the lowest benchmark. It’s no wonder the 6-cylinder engine often gets overlooked, despite continuing to power some of the world’s greatest sports cars and supercars. This isn’t just hyperbole. Case in point: the Porsche 911.

With the help of turbochargers, superchargers and in some cases, electric motors, 6-cylinder engines can often squeeze out just as much performance as their larger counterparts, while retaining the benefits of being more compact, lightweight and fuel-efficient. So while they aren’t typically as flashy nor headline-making as the V12s and V8s of the world, they are at the very least, an extremely versatile and dependable option to have in the engine war chest.

It’s no wonder the proliferation of the 6-cylinder engine has been democratized by auto manufacturers internationally, with the platform remaining ever-present across all continents. The Germans, Japanese and Italians are amongst those who persist with their undying trust in the 6-cylinder engine; so much so that it is still being improved and continues to power some of the best automobiles to this day.

Here’s the shortlist of 10 such engines, which we have curated:

Porsche M97.74

Porsche M97.74 engine

Appearing in the 997.2 GT3 RS 4.0, this truly special engine was the swan song for both the 997-generation (2005-2012) of Porsche 911 cars, as well as the Mezger engine design. Borrowing a number of components from the RSR race car, the 3.8L engine in the ‘regular’ 997 GT3 RS was then upgraded to a 4.0L flat-6 (hence the name) which produced 500 hp and 339 lb-ft of torque, while having an astronomical 8,500 rpm redline.

So convincing was this move, even to Porsche’s own brass, that the following two generations (991 and 992) of 911 cars would continue to employ the 4.0L naturally-aspirated engine in the GT3 lineup, proving that the ‘godfather’ RS 4.0 was also well ahead of its time.

With the proliferation of PDK transmissions, amongst other safety-centric technological advancements, many consider the M97.74 and the GT RS 4.0 it powered, to be the final rendition of the purists’ GT3 RS.

BMW S54B32

Collectively, the BMW E46 M3 (2000-2006) is one of our favorite cars here at supercars.net, and this is in no small part thanks to its S54B32 inline-6 engine. The naturally-aspirated unit is as pure as it gets from the Bavarian company, with a peak 333 hp being produced at 7,900 rpm on route to its 8,000 rpm redline. Other stand-out features include individual throttle bodies and drive-by-wire operation, further accentuating the car’s inherent rawness and driving purity.

When mated to the 6-speed manual transmission, it really doesn’t get much better than this – from BMW or any other company, for that matter. If BMW ever wanted to revert back to a more minimalist philosophy, the S54B32 and E46 M3 would be writing the playbook.

Nissan RB26DETT

Nissan RB26DETT engine

The 2.6L twin-turbocharged inline-6 from Nissan – the RB26DETT – has become something of a legend. It would take nothing short of the absolute best from the Japanese automaker to produce something worthy of powering a car amicably referred to as “Godzilla”, and the RB26DETT has never disappointed. While it was limited to 280 hp from the factory – thanks to the gentleman’s agreement between Japanese manufacturers to cap engine outputs at the time – the R34 Skyline GT-R was anything but docile, even when left untinkered.

The engine’s true capabilities were the worst kept secret in the industry, with a simple flash of the ECU (to effectively remove the restrictions) plus a few bolt-on performance modifications allowing the RB26DETT to produce much, much more.

Porsche MDH.NA

Porsche MDH.NA

Suffice to say, the 991 GT2 RS is the absolute peak of 6-cylinder performance. The GT2 RS in its entirety is more closely based on a Turbo S than it is to its closest GT relative, the 911 GT3 RS. After all, at the heart of the GT2 is a revamped version of the Turbo S engine (known as MDH.NA), while the GT3 has its own unique naturally-aspirated 4.0L power plant. The 3.8L flat-6 was fitted with larger variable-geometry turbos and was given an increase in peak boost to 22.5 psi, which is 24% higher than the Turbo S.

Larger intercoolers, a water-spray system, larger exhaust manifold primaries and redesigned pistons work in synergy with the aforementioned to provide the GT2 RS with 700 horsepower @ 7,000 rpm and 553 lb-ft of torque. Porsche has long buried the traditional notion of “turbo-lag” in its cars with VarioCam Plus and the GT2 RS is no different, making peak torque from 2,250 rpm to 4,000 rpm.

Honda C30A

Honda C30A engine

The original 1990 Acura NSX was fitted with a 3.0L naturally-aspirated V6 engine which produced 270 hp. At the time, that was more than sufficient to go shoulder-to-shoulder with any of its supercar contemporaries; particularly Ferrari, its target rival. What truly made the C30A – and as a whole, the NSX – so special, was that it broke the mold of what a supercar could and should ought to be: reliable and useable. Almost blasphemous thinking at the time, the idea of the “everyday supercar” was still a twinkle in the eye of exotic car auto makers.

The engine demanded very little, if anything, above the expected maintenance laundry list and associated costs of keeping a Honda Accord running. It was refined. It performed. It was comfortable. You could drive it whenever you wanted to. The NSX is widely recognized as one of the forefathers of the modern supercar, going on to inspire the likes of the McLaren F1. That puts it in pretty high regard, I’d say.

Alfa Romeo ‘Busso’ V6

Alfa Romeo 'Busso' V6 engine

There is no other power plant on this list which has been as long-serving or as versatile as the ‘Busso’ engine. Named after its chief designer, Giuseppe Busso, the foundation of this engine was its 60° V6 configuration. From there, a colorful variation of engines were built upon it, with displacements ranging 2.0L to 3.2L plus the use of turbochargers (or none at all) depending on the intended application of the automobile it was being fitted to. This meant you could see a Busso producing as little as 130 hp in a 1983 Alfa Romeo Alfa 6, and up to 247 hp in a 2005 Alfa Romeo 156 GTA.

Regardless of its specs, every Busso engine shares the same reputation for being remarkably smooth, having good low-end power delivery, and an incredibly unique engine note at higher rpms. Needless to say, the Busso would go on to be the centerpiece of the brand for a good 30+ years.

Nissan VR38DETT

Nissan VR38DETT engine

While there was a general expectation that the latest iteration of the GT-R would (or should) be powered by a V8 engine prior to its official release, Nissan inevitably stuck to its guns and continued the tradition of powering its flagship car with its tried and trusted 6-cylinder unit. This time, the engine would be produced in a 60° V6 configuration to ensure that the massively sized and massively powerful engine, could fit under the front hood.  In the very first R35 GT-R cars, the 3.8L twin-turbocharged V6 produced 485 hp, before being upped to 545 hp for the 2012 refresh.

Since then, the hand-crafted power plants have been continuously improved over the years, with the most powerful factory version of the car – the Nissan GT-R Nismo – producing some 600 hp. Perfectly matched with Nissan’s dual-clutch transmission and proven all-wheel drive system, the VR38DETT continues a legend while forging one of its own, all at the same time.

Jaguar JRV-6

Jaguar JRV-6 engine

It’s rather humorous that the JRV-6 would not have made it on this list if not for a gaff on the part of Jaguar, who had originally marketed and went as far as promising that the XJ220 would be delivered to its first customers with a V12 engine. Nevertheless, the eventually-fitted twin-turbocharged 6-cylinder unit was borrowed from a Group B Rally car – the Rover Metro 6R4. It was rightfully potent, and actually made more power than the naturally-aspirated V12 which was originally proposed.

Able to produce up to 542 hp, the XJ220 would even go on to become the fastest production car in the world at the time, topping out at a brow-raising 217 mph. While its credentials were proven in the real world, I’m sure many buyers were still a bit miffed at the fact that the final product came with half the number of cylinders they had put down their deposits down for.

Toyota 2JZ-GTE

Toyota 2JZ-GTE engine

The Toyota Supra was equipped with the ubiquitous 3.0L inline-6 2JZ engine in all its models. The most recognized version of the Supra – the Turbo – possessed a twin-turbocharged engine known as the 2JZ-GTE, which was specced with up to 326 hp. The two turbochargers operated sequentially and not in parallel. This essentially meant that one of the turbochargers was designed to provide near-maximum torque as early as 1,800 rpm, while the second turbine would be engaged in a “pre-boost” mode until around 4,000 rpm where thereafter both turbochargers would be spinning at full blast. This translated to better low-end throttle response, less ‘turbo lag’, increased boost at higher engine speeds, and a relatively linear delivery of power – all of which was difficult to achieve in unison, with the technology available at the time.

The 2JZ-GTE-equipped Turbo model was able to sprint from 0-60 mph in just 4.6 seconds and complete the standing ¼ mile in an impressive 13.1 seconds. Top speed was recorded at 155 mph.

Alfa Romeo 690T

Alfa Romeo 690T engine

The fact that the engine in the 2021 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTA is derived from the Ferrari F154 platform, automatically puts it in some highly esteemed company. After all, other variations of the F154 are used in the likes of cars such as the Maserati Quattroporte, Ferrari F8 Tributo and even the hybridized Ferrari SF90. While the F154 takes on a V8 configuration, the Alfa Romeo variant (known as the 690T) is a 2.9L twin-turbocharged V6 which produces 540 hp. Capable of 0-60 mph in 3.6 seconds, the 690T isn’t exactly blistering by today’s standards, but it does become an integral part of the car’s overall philosophy of balance and agility; this was probably one of the main reasons Alfa Romeo chose to go with a smaller unit rather than going the copy/paste route with the Ferrari setup.

The GTA / GTAm are about as track-ready as any production car can get when also factoring in its insanely aggressive aerodynamic and chassis upgrades.

Video: 2022 Porsche 992 Sport Classic Spied Testing

With the 992 GT3 now out, and the RS version roaming around the corner Porsche is not stopping at that. A new 2022 Porsche 992 Sport Classic has been filmed testing recently at the Nurburgring, the leaked spy shots of this mysterious Porsche 992 revealed several distinct features in the body design compared to the standard 911.

A few Porsche 911s have been filmed testing with a ducktail spoiler and Turbo model rear hunches and rear fenders equipped with air intakes, these new spy shots are slightly different and now feature a smooth rear fender with no gaping air intakes. This leads us to believe this could indeed be a new Porsche 911 Sport Classic.

In addition, the new 992 prototype also features a one of a kind double- bubble roof unlike other models seen in the past It also has a different rear and front bumper, Turbo S front facia and centre lock wheels.

The previous Sport Classic model was powered by a 3.8 litre naturally aspirated engine with an output of 408hp and 420Nm of torque. The powertrain performance of the new 992 Sport classic is still unclear but rumors have it that the vehicle will produce approximately 470hp using the 992 GT3 powertrain. Traditionally this model is also limited and we expect the numbers to be less than 1000 or slightly more.

Porsche is expected to officially reveal the new Sport Classic model either by the end of 2021 or beginning of 2022.

UK Company Takes on Singer with Bespoke Porsche 911 – From $450k

Theon Design has officially released its latest bespoke commission, the HK002, third exclusive car from the company, the second to be destined for Hong Kong and it combines OEM level design and quality.

The HK002 is based on a fully enhanced and restored Porsche 911 (type 964) which is powerful, lighter and profound to drive. The prototype has received a lot of positive feedback leading Theon Design with a plan to create more bespoke commissions for customers worldwide.

The vehicle has been named after Theo, Hawley’s youngest son who from a young age fell in love with the car built by his father. The HK002 utilizes various designs from past and present Porsche design as well as from concepts.

The body parts of the vehicle have each been built and designed using Digital scanning and in 3D design software to maximize precision and panel fit as well as ensure flexibility. Digital scanning creates moulds and formers for the body including the ‘long hood’ with arches inspired by ST and G series/964 widebody models.

In addition, the body of the HK002 is made of steel amplified by bumpers and a spoiler manufactured by an F1 supplier in carbon fiber. Full body commissions in Carbon fiber are also available on request. Most of the designs on the vehicle are electrically adjustable including the machined billet aluminum mirrors inspired by 2018’s Porsche 991 speedster concept.

The company offers a variety of engines for customers to choose from ranging from 3.6 litres to 4.0 litres, the engines are either naturally aspirated or turbocharged. The HK002 has been fitted with a naturally aspirated 3.8-litre engine with an output of 371bhp and 300lb ft of torque. In addition, the vehicle also features independent throttle bodies, Mahle barrels and pistons, custom profile camshaft, light and balanced bottom end as well as flowed and ported heads and carrillo rods.

The drive is generated to the rear wheels through a fully redesigned six-speed manual G50 gearbox from Porsche 993 model. The vehicle is lower in height compared to 964 RS with KW variant 3 dampers all around but the air-conditioning system and power steering unit is originally from the 964 model. The vehicle weighs 1248kg with a full tank fuel.

The interior design of the HK002 features Recaro front seats finished in Semi-Aniline Green leather with touches of yellow stripe and contrasting carbon compartments including the centre console which consists of carbon panels and is also wrapped in leather. The Nardi steering wheel was specifically stitched to match the interior by Nardi. Theon Design has also wrapped the fitted 964 RS strut-brace in woven leather.

Additional features and functions by Theon design on the HK002 include a reverse camera screen, hidden stereo unit and magnetic wireless charger. A modern cable operated heater is also available with an efficient heating and air conditioning unit as well. The prices for the commissions start at 300,000 pounds and the build takes approximately 18 months to finish.

Porsche 930 Turbo SE G50 ‘Flachbau’ Cabriolet

Anyone who followed the ‘World Championship of Makes’ (essentially an International championship for long-distance Sports Car racing), will remember their surprise at the shape of the new Porsche 935 when it first appeared at Mugello in March 1976. Subsequently, these ‘Flatnose’ 935s and 936s (in Group 6) were to prove very competitive in the hands of Ickx, Mass and Stommelen and during the next two seasons managed four victories in eight World Championship races and a triumph at Le Mans in each year.

However, Porsche began to worry that all these victories by the works Flatnose cars might alienate the vast number of private clients who were investing their own money in conventionally-shaped competition 911s, and decided to restrict their efforts for 1978 to an entry at Le Mans.

The distinctive look of the “Flachbau” (literally translated as Low Build) obviously retained its appeal in the minds of their road car customers and, from 1981 until early 1989, Porsche 930 Turbo buyers could specify their car in this style to special order. Just 50 ‘C16’ cars were manufactured for the UK-market, initially equipped with an uprated engine of 330bhp (from 300) mated to a 4-speed transmission. However, at the end of 1988, the uprated 5-Speed G50 gearbox was introduced, dramatically easing the peaks in power delivery by reducing the effects of ‘turbo-lag’. The factory SE also benefited from a dual-exit exhaust system, limited-slip differential, heated front seats and a sunroof.

This example is a genuine, factory-produced, C-16, Porsche 930 Turbo SE G50 Cabriolet built in 1989 under the ‘Sonderwunchprogramm’ (Special Wishes Programme). It’s superbly finished in White Pearl with a matching leather interior and has covered just 33,168 miles in the hands of three private owners prior to spending time in two of the highest-profile exclusive collections in the UK since 2014.

It’s supplied with an extensive history file detailing expenditure of over £45,000 lavished on this stunning Porsche during 2017 to ensure that it presents today in the best possible condition for an enthusiast or collector alike. The history file also contains all its previous MOTs and the service book displays sixteen service stamps helping to corroborate the indicated mileage.

With only seven C-16 examples of this specific model produced in 1989, this really is the ‘Holy Grail’ when considering a 930 and we would welcome any inspection of this rather special Porsche.

The Right Hand Drive on this specific Porsche might limit the possible market for it, but I still think Silverstone Auctions will find a buyer for this one, I personally really love this generation of Porsche, and a Slantnose Convertible is just the ultimate one … I even had a 1/18 scale model of this exact spec, white on white … but it was a LHD.

Marc Philipp Gemballa’s Off-Road Porsche 992 Turbo to Use a 750hp RUF Engine

Uwe Gemballa already partnered with Porsche specialist Alois Ruf on engine development back in the 1980s. The two families have teamed up again this time led by Uwe Gemballa’s Son Phillip Gemballa. Phillip Gemballa will launch his first project in 2021 starting a new era with his new company Marc Philipp Gemballa GmbH (not associated with Gemballa GmbH) 10 years after the passing of his father.. The engine development designed by Marc Phillip Gemballa will be under the name “powered by Ruf”.

The collaboration’s first project will be an off-road supercar dubbed “project Sandbox” based on the new Porsche 911 Turbo S from the 992 series. The project is said to be inspired by the infamous Porsche 959 ‘Dakar’ car.

The engine upgrade allows the six-cylinder boxer engine to provide an output of over 750hp and 930Nm of torque and it adheres to the latest EURO 6 emissions regulations despite the increment in power.

The exclusive edition is limited to 40 units and 10 are already spoken for before the official launch leaving 30 units only. The company will be revealing more information later this year.

Porsche 992 Turbo S Gemballa

Specs

Base vehicle: Porsche 911 Turbo S (992 series)
Engine: 6-cylinder twin-turbocharged flat-six
Power (kW): 552 kW (Series: 478 kW)
Power (hp): 750+ hp (Series: 650 hp)
Max. torque: 930 Nm torque (Series: 800 Nm torque)

The Full List of New Porsche 911 GT3 Colors

The announcement of a new 911 always gets us excited. The announcement of a new 911 GT3 is downright excitement-city for days on end. It has been two days since the announcement of the new 911 GT3 and we decided to go through the color options and see which one we would pick. Frankly, nothing crazy here in terms of color options. Shark Blue and Lava Orange are clearly the colors to choose if you want to make an entrance, but for us, we would go a little more subdued. Give us a GT3 in Agate Grey or Chalk and we will be happy forever.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Agate Grey (Metallic)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Agate Grey (Metallic)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Standard Black
Porsche 911 GT3 In Black (Standard)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Carrera White (Metallic)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Carrera White (Metallic)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Special Chalk
Porsche 911 GT3 In Chalk (Special)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Dolomite Silver (Metallic)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Dolomite Silver (Metallic)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Gentian Blue (Metallic)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Gentian Blue (Metallic)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In GT Silver (Metallic)
Porsche 911 GT3 In GT Silver (Metallic)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Guards Red (Standard)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Guards Red (Standard)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Jet Black (Metallic)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Jet Black (Metallic)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Lava Orange (Special)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Lava Orange (Special)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Python Green (Special)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Python Green (Special)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Racing Yellow (Standard)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Racing Yellow (Standard)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In Shark Blue (Special)
Porsche 911 GT3 In Shark Blue (Special)
2022 Porsche 911 GT3 In White (Standard)
Porsche 911 GT3 In White (Standard)

Watch the New Porsche 911 GT3 Crack A 06:59:93 Nürburgring Lap

Porsche have taken out the new 992 GT3 on the Nürburgring and managed to do a lap in 06:59:93 min

Porsche takes the new 911 GT3 off the leash. The seventh edition of this high-performance sports car was also developed in close collaboration with Porsche Motorsport. It transfers pure racing technology into a production model even more consistently than ever before. With a top speed of 320 km/h and 318 km/h with PDK it is even faster than the previous 911 GT3 RS. It accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 3.4 seconds. It clearly isn’t just straight-line fast, because a sub 7 minute Nürburgring lap time is pretty amazing.

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2022 Porsche 911 GT3: Ultimate Guide

Introduction

Earlier today, Porsche unveiled its new 992-generation Porsche 911 GT3 via digital livestream on YouTube. First deliveries are currently scheduled to begin sometime in the later half of 2021, where it may likely be designated as a 2022 model. This new GT3 becomes the seventh iteration of one of Porsche’s most established and beloved automobiles. More importantly, it continues to embody the spirit of previous GT3 models by amalgamating all that is awesome about the 911 – and the Porsche brand – in a single road car.

The first Porsche bigwig introduced by presenter Sarah Elsser to offer insight into the project, was Dr. Frank-Steffen Walliser – former Porsche-Motorsport chief and current VP of the 911 model line. Dr. Walliser began by speaking candidly about the pressures associated with perpetually improving the GT3, but felt that the development team has fulfilled this goal with hard work; all of this, while facing the monumental challenge of navigating stricter emissions regulations and an industry-wide transition to EVs.

Andreas Preuninger – Director of Porsche’s GT program – was the next appear, first by driving the GT3 from behind the curtains and onto the stage, while making sure to throw in a few revs of the engine to excite the viewers. Once out of the car, he immediately reiterates the tremendous undertaking that was required to create the 992 GT3 , stating that it was “…the most complex, demanding task over the last three and a half years…” but asserts that “…the end product is the most extreme and exciting GT3 ever made.”

Finally, testimonials by Porsche racing legends Jörg Bergmeister, Lars Kern and Walter Röhrl really hit home just how incredible the car is, from sources that are as credible as it gets. All of them were particularly impressed by how much an improvement the car was compared to its predecessors, justifying the earlier proclamations made by Walliser and Preuninger.

Below are some key takeaways from the presentation.

Presentation Synopsis

Walliser: He talks about improving the naturally-aspirated engine, aerodynamics, chassis and suspension for the 992 GT3. Aside from the obvious technical features needed to make the GT3 better than ever, Walliser displays his deep-rooted understanding of driving enjoyment, depicting how important it was to preserve the spirit of the GT3 car from previous years, and “…bring this baby to life”.

To him, the GT3 is the 911. This is something he says “…can be immediately understood when driving in the countryside, or at the race track. That is the essence of the GT3 and what has made it so special over all the years.”

Getting back into the technical side of things, Dr. Walliser would go on to iterate that while the new GT3 has a bigger footprint, the extensive use of lightweight materials throughout have kept the weight the same as its predecessor. He glosses over a number or items, such as a carbon-fiber roof, carbon-fiber hood and ultra-thin glass, which Preuninger would go into a bit more detail later on.

Preuninger: When speaking about the technical details of the GT3, Preuninger starts by mentioning the 4.0L naturally-aspirated engine with a 9,000 rpm redline, which carries over from its predecessor with some improvements. The 510 PS (502 hp) engine he says, is “…one of the most emotionally involving engines out there.”

But the enhancements don’t stop there. “Bigger wheels, bigger brakes, wider rims.” In normal circumstances, this means more weight, which he addresses by stating “It’s a little bigger…a little bit more competent. It needed some lightweight trickery to keep the weight down, and that is dispersed all over the car. So, all boxes ticked.”

How is this achieved? He points to the carbon-fiber hood, roof and rear wing mentioned earlier by Walliser. Also introduced were some things that weren’t shown up close, such as a super lightweight battery, lighter wheels, carbon-fiber cross members, lightweight interior appointments, etc.  The weight reduction was very much an exercise of shedding “5 kg here, another 1 kg there, 3 kg somewhere else, and so on”.

The end result is a weight of just 1,435 kg, hitting the “sweet spot for a driver’s car and perfect track tool for the weekend.” Essentially, the 992 GT3 has achieved the same weight as its predecessor, but is loaded with a lot more technology. For the first time, a double wishbone suspension configuration is used in the front of the car. One of the most visually notable changes is the swan-neck rear wing derived from the 911 RSR competition car, which further emphasizes the link between Porsche’s race cars and its road cars. “What works on a race car, works on a street car, doesn’t it?”

Bergmeister: “Obviously, as a race car driver, when you get in a street car you have to lower your expectations. But on that car especially, I was shocked, how good it is… it’s so close to a race car, it’s really, really impressive.” As part of a response during the Q&A session, Bergmeister remarked that the GT3 impressed him most in the high speed sections of the Nürburgring, and that it was comparable to the 991.2 GT3 RS. “It hardly pitches when you brake, transition phases are very neutral. It has more downforce. It is the best street car we’ve ever driven in our lives“.

The 992 GT3 achieved a sub-7-minute (6:59.927) lap time at the Nürburgring. This is an absolutely insane, 17-seconds-faster than its predecessor and essentially the same time as the 991.2 GT3 RS, backing up all statements made by Bergmeister, Kern and Röhrl. This also sets the tone for the soon-to-follow GT3 RS – will a 6:40 lap time be possible?! Shortly after the livestream, Porsche uploaded onboard footage at the Nordschleife with Lars Kern behind the wheel, as well as the official ad for the car.

Engine & Performance

  • Engine Type & Size: 4.0L naturally-aspirated flat-6
  • Horsepower: 502 hp @ 8,400 rpm
  • Torque: 346 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm
  • Transmission: 7-speed PDK, 6-speed manual
  • 0-60 mph: 3.2 seconds (PDK), 3.7 seconds (manual)
  • Top Speed: 197 mph

Porsche has continued the use of the naturally-aspirated 4.0L 9A1 flat-6 power plant in the 2022 Porsche 911 GT3. The only key differences between the engine used in the race car and the one used in the 992 GT3, are the exhaust system and ECU. Otherwise, the two engines share virtually all the same components, such as individual throttle bodies. As such, the new GT3 needed no “sound engineering” and inherently sounds amazing. With its astronomical 9,000 rpm redline, the GT3 produces 502 hp @ 8,400 rpm and 346 lb-ft of torque @ 6,250 rpm. 

The GT3 will continue using the 7-speed PDK transmission, instead of a version of the 8-speed used in the rest of the 992 line-up. In essence, this saves weight (40 lbs) and makes for a better synergy with the GT3 and its intended application. But if you’d like a more hands-on approach, Porsche will offer the new GT3 with an optional 6-speed manual transmission as well.

Purists, rejoice! Walliser said that we shouldn’t count on the GT3 going electric or even hybrid, anytime too soon. It is much more likely that Porsche will transition to using synthetic fuels for motorsport and its GT line of production cars, before even considering going full-on EV. This aligns with Porsche’s intention to keep the naturally-aspirated engine alive for as long as possible – regulations and emissions standards will serve as the eventual ultimatum.

Chassis & Handling

Aerodynamics & Weight Reduction

The new 992 GT3 spent more than 160 hours across 700 simulation sessions in the wind tunnel. It generates 50% more downforce than its predecessor, and up to 150% more downforce in its “high downforce” setting. For the first time, the GT3 features an adjustable front diffuser and a fully closed rear diffuser, which on its own generates 60 kg of downforce at top speed. This means that now, both front and rear aerodynamic components are fully adjustable and can be manually set to one of four positions.

Its low weight of just 1,435 kg is achieved with a myriad lightweight components. This is includes a carbon-fiber hood, roof and rear wing, along with other items such as a super lightweight battery, lighter wheels, ultra-thin glass, carbon-fiber cross members, and lightweight interior appointments. Essentially, the 992 GT3 has achieved the same weight as its predecessor, but is loaded with a lot more technology.

Suspension & Chassis Control Systems

Porsche’s seventh iteration of the GT3, shows an unwavering dedication to the precision that has influenced the GT line of cars since day one. Inspired by the 2013 911 RSR competition car, the 2022 911 GT3 will receive a new front suspension setup consisting of unequal-length control arms instead of conventional struts, making it the first time a double wishbone suspension configuration is used in the front of a GT3. This will provide better tire contact through turns and during moments of compression and rebounding. Porsche’s new adaptive dampers are capable of adjusting every 10 milliseconds, which means the spring rates have doubled without affecting the ride quality of the GT3.

There are three available driving modes: Normal, Sport and Track ,which all provide varying degrees of driver-aid involvement and chassis settings. Aside from providing the most firm, performance-biased setup with the least amount of computer-control, initiating Track mode also changes the instrumentation and displays to “Track View”. This compiles all pertinent information to the immediate field-of-view of the driver. Important details such as oil temperature, oil pressure, tire pressures and shift indicators, are all in plain sight and easily visible.

Brakes & Tires

Porsche will continue to offer the GT3 standard with cast-iron rotors and Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires. Likewise, upgrading to carbon-ceramic brakes and Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2R tires, remain as options.

Design, Styling & Interior

Overall, the silhouette of the new 911 GT3 remains a largely familiar one – and that’s not a bad thing.  In fact, this is probably great news for Porsche and GT3 enthusiasts, who would contend that there was never anything wrong with the previous GT3 in the first place. One of the most visually notable changes is the “swan-neck” rear wing derived from the 911 RSR competition car, which further emphasizes the link between Porsche’s race cars and its road cars.

The Club Sport Package (roll cage, 4-pt harnesses) will be a no cost option. However, this will probably only be for the European markets. This package was not available on past iterations in North America due to safety regulations. I anticipate that the aftermarket will step-up to fill the void with some quality products, though.

The Touring trim was confirmed by Preuninger, and there’s no reason this won’t be available state-side once again. Though he believes the standard trim is the most complete representation of the GT3, he acknowledges the appeal of the GT3 Touring for the “gentleman” crowd, who want something a bit more understated. He goes on to affirm that the Touring trim is very popular, and will therefore make a definite return for the 992.

Walliser also announced that Paint to Sample (aka, custom paint colors) will be available for the GT3 line-up. The program will commence sometime later this year. On the subject of paint, the new GT3 will be available in 14 standard colors when orders are open. 

Galleries

Image Gallery

“The emotions and the joy of driving. That’s why we desire the car from the heart to the stomach” – Andreas Preuninger

Official Videos

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Video Review Gallery

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Official Press Release

02/16/2021

Porsche takes the new 911 GT3 off the leash. The seventh edition of this high-performance sports car was also developed in close collaboration with Porsche Motorsport. It transfers pure racing technology into a production model even more consistently than ever before.

The double wishbone front axle layout and sophisticated aerodynamics with swan neck rear wing and striking diffuser originate from the successful GT race car 911 RSR and the 375 kW (510 PS; 911 GT3: Fuel consumption combined 13.3 – 12.4 l/100 km, CO2 emissions combined 304 – 283 g/km) four-litre six-cylinder boxer engine is based on the drivetrain of the 911 GT3 R, tried and tested in endurance racing. The acoustically impressive, high-revving engine is also used practically unchanged in the new 911 GT3 Cup. The result is a brilliant driving machine: efficient and emotional, precise and high-performance – perfect for the circuit and superb for everyday use.

The distinctive strength of the 911 GT3 lies in the sum of its characteristics. With a top speed of 320 km/h (911 GT3 with MT: Fuel consumption combined 13.3 l/100 km, CO2 emissions combined 304 g/km) and 318 km/h with PDK (911 GT3 with PDK: Fuel consumption combined 12.4 l/100 km, CO2 emissions combined 283 g/km) it is even faster than the previous 911 GT3 RS. It accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 3.4 seconds. Porsche also offers the new model with a six-speed manual transmission for a particularly puristic driving experience.

Aerodynamics from motor racing

The sophisticated aerodynamics benefit from the experiences gained from motor racing and generate significantly more downforce without noticeably affecting the drag coefficient. In the performance position, the manually set wing and diffuser elements significantly increase the aerodynamic pressure for high cornering speeds.

This is the new 911 GT3

This is, however, reserved strictly for outings on the circuit, as it is there that the 911 GT3 can play all its trump cards. During final testing, it lapped the Nuerburgring-Nordschleife, traditionally the ultimate proving ground for all sports cars developed by Porsche, over 17 seconds quicker than its predecessor. Development driver Lars Kern took just 6:59.927 minutes for a full 20.8-kilometre lap. The shorter 20.6-kilometre track, which had previously served as a benchmark, was completed by the 911 GT3 in 6:55.2 minutes. Running on the optionally available Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 R tyres, the new model consistently delivered its performance over several laps in the expert hands of Porsche brand ambassador Jörg Bergmeister. For Bergmeister, it is “by far the best production car” that the experienced professional driver has ever driven in the “Green Hell”.

Despite a wider body, larger wheels and additional technical features, the weight of the new GT3 is on a par with its predecessor. With manual gearbox it weighs 1.418 kilograms, with PDK 1.435 kilograms. The front bonnet made of carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), lightweight glass windows, optimised brake discs and forged light-alloy wheels ensure weight discipline, as does the cover for the rear seat compartment. The lightweight sports exhaust system reduces the weight by no less than ten kilograms. With infinitely electrically adjustable exhaust flaps, it harmonises a highly emotional sound experience with the Euro 6d ISC FCM (EU6 AP) emissions standard. The combined consumption of the 911 GT3 is 13.3 litres/100 km (PDK 12.4).

Cockpit of the new 911 GT3 has racing genes

Its racing genes are expressed in practically all the details of the new 911 GT3. The cockpit is in line with the current model generation. A new feature is the track screen: at the touch of a button, it reduces the digital displays to the left and right of the central rev counter, which reaches up to 10,000 revs, to information such as tyre pressure indicator, oil pressure, oil temperature, fuel tank level and water temperature, which are essential when driving on the circuit. It also includes a visual shift assistant with coloured bars to the left and right of the rev counter and a shift light derived from Motorsport.

The interior of the new 911 GT3

Especially for the Porsche GT models, customers are increasingly requesting customised equipment. For this reason, the Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur range is also available for the new 911 GT3 and is supplemented by GT 3-specific options such as a lightweight roof made of exposed carbon fibre. Other highlights include exterior mirror tops made of carbon, darkened LED matrix main headlights and matching Exclusive design rear lights with an arc of light with no red components. Guards Red or Shark Blue painted wheel rims enhance the black alloy wheels. In the interior, equipment details such as the dials for the rev counter and Sport Chrono stopwatch, seatbelts and trim strips set elegant accents in the body colour or other desired colour.

As exclusive as the 911 GT3 itself is the individual chronograph that Porsche Design offers exclusively to customers of the high-performance sports car. Like its motorised role model, it boasts a dynamic design, consistent performance and high-quality workmanship. Its housing reflects its Motorsport genes. Just like the connecting rods of the GT3 engine, it consists of robust, lightweight titanium. The timepiece is powered by an individual winding rotor reminiscent of the wheels of the 911 GT3. The coloured ring of the dial can be customised in the paint colours of the 911 GT3.

Info

The delivery of the new 911 GT3 is set for May 2021.

The 1973 Porsche 911 RSR tribute

Adding a genuine 1973 Porsche 911 RSR to your collection at this point in time will set you back several million, but there is another option … how about a 1973 Porsche 911 RSR Rebel Gulf Porsche tribute for less than $300,000?

Ok, I admit, it’s not a real ’73 RSR, but it’s also only about 10% of the price, and it comes with a bigger engine. The car in question is listed for sale at Ferraris Online and has chassis number 102808, it is the first of only three Porsche RSR ‘Art Cars’ built by Jon Gunderson, renowned for ground-up Ferrari 246 GT and 246 GTS rotisserie restorations.

Chassis 102808 comes in the classic 917 Gulf livery combining light blue and orange on the exterior … note that this Porsche RSR Tribute scheme is completely painted, there is no vinyl used anywhere, every detail is painstakingly painted by hand, even the famous Porsche crest on the hood, and this attention to detail is visible throughout this amazing looking 911.

Both the front and rear bumper have been formed manually, as is the new front hood that has a center-mounted fuel-filler, machined from a single metal piece, to fill up the 100-liter tank underneath.

The traditional ‘Ducktail’ rear wing on this RSR tribute has been made by hand too, and on the grille, the 3.5 badge indicates this car isn’t using the 2.8-liter engine found in the genuine 1973 RSR, but a completely rebuilt 3.5-liter version.

The engine inside this RSR tribute is built from the ground up as a fuel-injected Rothsport Racing 3.5L flat-six combined with a Type 915 5-speed manual transaxle with a Giken limited-slip differential … work started in 2017 and took three years to complete … to date this engine has little over 3,000 miles on her. Instead of the original 280 hp from the 2.8-liter engine, this new 3.5L Rothsport Racing version was dyno-tested after tuning by Sakata Motorsports at 355 hp.

The impressive black wheels on this Porsche RSR tribute are 15-inch Braid units. Michelin TB5 Racing Radial X tires are fitted, 215/55 R15 for the front wheels (9×15″) while wide 295/40 R15 was fitted to the rear wheels, which measure a massive 11×15 inches, they are almost square. The chassis is fitted with Elephant Racing suspension components including Poly bronze bushings, sway bars, shock mounts, and a matched set of torsion bars and Von shocks. Porsche 930 trailing arms have also been added. Porsche 930 finned brake calipers and cross-drilled and vented 930 rotors at all four corners haul it down from high speed. RSR tribute s/n 102808 was corner-balanced by Rothsport Racing after the engine was installed.

Autos International, a well-known shop for Porsche interiors, created the beautiful black interior for this tribute car combining black Alcantara and leather. The dashboard and door panels received black Alcantara while the steering wheel and adjustable Recaro RSR seats got leather wrapped around them.

Same with the built-in roll bar, black leather with contrasting orange stitching to match the seatbelts, while the headliner comes in black Alcantara, the dials consist of a single, white tachometer flanked by black auxiliary gauges, all rebuilt by Joe’s Speedometer. Weight saving is visible everywhere with thin side windows and a special wiring harness, if you look closely at the door handles, they are even cross-drilled to safe weight, while on the door panels, you’ll notice RSR leather door pulls.

Built as a passion project, no expense was spared and no budget was set, so the attention to detail is on par with the bespoke quality of a Singer, this car cost over $500,000 to build, but it’s now listed for a quick sale at $299,500.

Singer-Tuthill Porsche 911 Safari is a Project for the Books

Singer has reimagined and modified its first 1990 Porsche 911 as World Rally Championship- inspired all-terrain competition machine for a client. The client has ordered 2 cars, one in Parallax White targeting high speed desert rallying and in Corsica Red for high speed and high-grip tarmac events.

Singer in partnership with a famous Porsche 911 rally specialist Richard Tuthil have modified a Porsche 911 allowing it to compete in off-road racing and to demonstrate its vast all-terrain capabilities.

  • Engine: 3.6L twin-turbocharged air cooled flat-six engine
  • Horsepower: 450hp
  • Torque : 420lb
  • Wheels: 8×16 inches + BF Goodrich all-terrain tires

The vehicle features modifications that include an increased ride height, suspension travel and strength, sequential racing transmission with front, center and rear limited-slip differentials and it’s a permanent all-wheel drive.

The Porsche 911 Safari has been fitted with a 3.6L air-cooled flat-six engine with 450hp and 420lb of torque as well as carbon fiber body panels suited for quick replacement and easy underbody access.

The wheels on the Porsche are forged aluminium 8×16 inches with BF Goodrich all-terrain tyres whereas the brakes are 4-piston monobloc steel disc brakes coupled with a hydraulic handbrake.

Singer-Tuthill Porsche 911 Safari wallpaper

Other specialised specifications include a long-range fuel tank, full FIA roll cage, rehydration system for driver and navigator, race wheels and tyres on the front trunk area and rear storage area and Bespoke competition seats with FIA certification.

Price information has not been provided.

2021 992 Porsche 911 Turbo Review

The 992 Porsche 911 Turbo S took the world by storm in 2020 with many hailing it as the best 911 Turbo S ever to be unleashed my the team in Stuttgart. The numbers are bombastic. 650bhp, 800Nm, 0-100 in 2.7, a top speed of 330km/h and a price tag starting at £155,970 before options. Impressive, but is it necessary? This is a super-GT car that is more likely to find itself on the a morning commute with a child in the back than going flat out on the Nordschleife.

Porsche know this and offer a Turbo with the ’S’ knocked off the rear end. A Porsche Turbo, without the S, is still a speed and numbers freak, but not to the same extent as the biggest baddest S model. That being said, 580bhp, 750Nm, 0-100 in 2.8, a top speed of 320km/h and a £134,400 are certainly not modest, by any measure. 70bhp, 50Nm, 0.1 to 100, 21km/h at the top end and £22k are all that separate the two. Visually you’ll have to be a proper Porsche nerd to tell the two apart, especially now that S and non-S can be specced with the same wheels and badges on the rear deck. To my knowledge, the only badges that cannot be hidden are on the screens, door sills or the extendable front splitter. Debdage it and don’t let anyone in and they’ll never know you’re not in an S. The other telltale sign is the yellow brake callipers that are standard on the Turbo S to denote the PCCB ceramic brakes, but you can option identical brakes and callipers on the Turbo.

Can the Turbo show itself to be just as well rounded and the S? I flew to Germany to the Porsche Experience Centre, Hockenheim to find out. I will forever love Porsche for never messing around on launch events. I had almost an hour on track with the Turbo to gather my thoughts on how the car performed and I learnt a lot. Initial impressions are dominated by the tremendous and unrelenting force that the rear mounted 3.7-litre flat-six twin turbo engine send to all four wheel via an eight-speed PDK gearbox.

Why anyone would need the extra 70 horses, I’m not quite sure. The what the power in sent to the wheels along with the sublime PDK shifts means the Turbo launches itself from one apex to the next. Slowing down is just as impressive an experience as the car I am in is fitted with the PCCB brakes which cost around €10,000(!) and bring the 1,640 kilogram 911 to a halt with tremendous force and feel in the pedal – the confidence is unparalleled. The same can be said for the chassis, too. Th example I was piloting featured the firmer 10 mm lower PASM Sports suspension designed to enhance the agility of the new 911 Turbo. There was not a hint of roll in the body and through the fast Hockenheim GP sweeping bends the body composure was mighty. The adjustability on the limit was so soft, approachable and confidence inspiring.

This really is one of the finest allrounders on sale today. It is refined, quiet and comfortable on the road and an absolute joy to drive on circuit. That being said, it is not as focused as something like a McLaren 570S or Lamborghini Huracan, but they are not worthy of mention in the same breath when considering a daily driver. The 992 Turbo really is the Swiss Army Knife of the automotive world. It is perfectly at home in city traffic, crossing a continent or pounding around a racetrack. There really is no substitute. The Turbo offers a more affordable package than the Turbo S and one that, in the real world, left me wanting nothing more.

The New Porsche 992 Turbo Is The Outgoing Turbo S Reborn!

Hot on the heels of the 911 Turbo S, Porsche has revealed the ‘standard’ Porsche 911 Turbo.

Alongside its S counterpart, the Porsche 992 Turbo is one of the most anticipated models in the revamped range. The 992 Turbo makes such progress that acceleration, power and torque are on par with the previous generation 911 Turbo S.

Compared to the previous generation, the Porsche 992 Turbo gets a 40 hp power boost. In total, its 3.8 litre, six-cylinder boxer engine now produces 580 hp and manages a 100 km/h sprint in just 2.8 seconds.

Power is routed through an eight-speed PDK transmission. Options such as a sports or lightweight package, sports suspension and sports exhaust system are available for the first time.

Visually, it is no different to the Turbo S. It measures 45 millimeters more at the front and 20 millimeters more at the rear. LED headlights with PDLS Plus are standard and adaptive aerodynamics are incorporated into the bodywork.

Two new option packs are available. The lightweight package reduces vehicle weight by 30 kilograms, making use of light full bucket seats, the elimination of the rear seats and reduced insulation.

Porsche 911 Turbo Interior

The sport package includes the sport design package as well as other applications in black, carbon elements and an exclusive rear light design.

The Porsche 992 Turbo is available to order from July 16. The Coupé costs 180,811 euros including VAT in Germany. The Cabriolet is priced at 194,035 euros.

Range Topping Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe and Cabriolet Debut

One of the biggest launches not to happen at Geneva this year is the Porsche 911 Turbo S. The first of the true performance 911’s, this is the one people have been waiting for. Let us tell you, it does not disappoint!

The new Porsche 911 Turbo S has been revealed, but we are yet to hear anything about the lesser Turbo. You will be pleased to hear that Porsche has not downsized, the Turbo S gets a new version of the iconic 3.8-litre boxer engine. It includes two VTG turbochargers, which deliver 650 hp, 70 hp more than its predecessor. Torque is now rated at 800 Nm and the eight-speed PDK helps translate those figures into a 2.7 second 100 km/h sprint. Top speed is unchanged at 330 km/h.

The new engine gets a redesigned charge air cooling system, new turbochargers and electrically adjustable wastegate flaps. Piezo injectors improve responsiveness, as does a new intake system. The air filters are now situated in the rear wings with four intakes overall.

The Porsche 911 Turbo S gets larger with an increase of 45 mm at the front axle and 20 mm at the rear axle. The modified track widths, developed aerodynamics and new mixed-size tyres contribute to its dynamics. The track is now 42 mm wider at the front axle and 10 mm wider at the rear axle.

The adaptive aerodynamics include controlled cooling air flaps at the front. The larger rear wing has been designed for greater downforce. It has 20-inch tyres with unique 255/35 dimensions at the front and 21-inch 315/30 tyres at the rear.

The Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) sports chassis has been lowered by 10 mm and a sports exhaust system has been fitted with adjustable flaps. The Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel-drive system is now capable of delivering up to 500 Nm of torque to the front wheels.

At the front, the standard LED matrix headlights gets dark inserts. The tailpipes at the rear are rectangular, finished in high-gloss Black, typical of the Turbo.

Inside, the standard equipment list includes a full leather interior and carbon trim in combination with Light Silver accents. Two-tone interiors will be available through Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur as an option. The 18-way adjustable sports seats feature stitching that pays homage to the first 911 Turbo and the interior has all of the comfort and tech from the rest of the 911 range.

The Porsche 911 Turbo S will be available in Germany at a price of €216,396 including country-specific equipment and 19 per cent VAT. The Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet will be priced at €229,962.

GTSPIRIT NEWSLETTER

Porsche Revealed the Entry-Level 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet

The Most Basic Version of the Cars

The most basic version of the Porsche 911 Carrera has now been unveiled. Porsche chose to detune the twin-turbocharged flat-six engine and downgrade some of the chassis components. These cars offer very good performance and driving dynamics for a slightly lower price. 

In the base 911 Carrera, you only get 380 hp. That’s down from the Carrera S’s 444 hp. Despite this drop in horsepower, the car is still capable of making the 0-62 mph sprint in just 4.2 seconds. The base model only comes with the eight-speed PDK automatic transmission. The model’s weight is down by about 22 pounds from the Carrera S. 

The car also features 19-inch wheels at the front and 20-inch wheels at the rear. Providing the stopping power are fou-piston calipers. These are slightly smaller than the ones on the Carrera S. When you go inside the car, you’ll notice that it features essentially the same cabin as other 911s. It offers the same 10.9-inch PCM infotainment system and central rev counter with two high-definition displays. 

According to Car and Driver, the coupe version of the car will cost $98,750 and the cabriolet version costs $111,550. These cars will go on sale at the beginning of 2020.

Porsche 964 Specs & Performance Numbers

As part of our ongoing process to organize all the information on Supercars.net, we pulled together the most important specs and performance numbers into one easy to read table. For the Porsche Type 964 you will find everything from model years to top level models as well as engine type and classification, power numbers and torque figures. We also have performance numbers like acceleration times and top speed. Specs-wise we decided to focus on the length, width and weight numbers for the 964 models. Below is an outline of what we cover:

Variant Grouping / Production Years / Production Numbers / Engine /  Engine Code / Cooling Induction / Engine Capacity (cc) / Engine Capacity (liters) / Compression Ratio / Maximum Power & RPM (HP) / Maximum Power (HP) / Max Power RPM / Maximum Torque (NM) / Maximum Torque & RPM (ft lbs) / Maximum Torque (ft lbs) / Maximum Torque RPM / 0-60 mph (seconds) / 0-100 mph (seconds) / 1/4 Mile (seconds) / Top Speed (mph) / Top Speed (kph) / Length (MM) / Width (MM) / Weight (lbs) / Weight (kgs)

To see all the details simply click on the “+” button to see it for all the specs and the performance numbers. 

Porsche 964 VIN, Engine & Transmission Numbers

We decided to create this guide to VIN, Engine and Transmission numbers for the 964 Porsche because we found it hard to get access to this information online.

Our easy to use guide should help you find what you need quickly. For more information about the Porsche 964, please check out our Ultimate Guide to the Porsche 964 page. 

The first part of this appendix provides the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), engine and transmission code breakdowns. From this information it will then be possible for a potential 964 purchaser to determine the validity of the VIN when doing a pre purchase inspection.

We went to great effort to ensure our data is accurate but as always we recommend that you check elsewhere too because errors do happen and getting reliable data from that era isn’t easy. 

Porsche 964 VIN Lookup- Standard Models

Our simple to use tool will help you find the VIN and Engine number for any 964 Porsche. Choose your model year and your country to narrow down your search. Then click on the appropriate car to see the VIN and Engine numbers.  

Porsche 964 VIN Lookup – Limited Editions

Our simple to use tool will help you find the VIN and Engine number for any 964 Porsche limited edition car. Choose your model year and your country to narrow down your search. Then click on the appropriate car to see the VIN and Engine numbers.  


Porsche 964 VIN Numbers

The easiest way to correctly identify a 964 is to check the vehicle identification number (VIN). The VIN is a 17 digit international code. The VIN used by Porsche for the whole 964 series is the international 17 digit system.

There are two VINs for the 964 Porsche:

  • Rest of the world (ROW).  VIN identifies the 964 as being built to ROW specifications. Example: WPOZZZ96ZKS401786 = 1989 Carrera 4 Coupe. 
  • USA VIN (USA). The USA VIN identifies the 964 as being built to US specifications. Example: WPOCB2969RS465274 = 1994 Speedster. 

Where to Find the VIN in a 964 Porsche:

  • Rest of the world (ROW). The VIN is found on a data plate, installed in the luggage compartment attached to the right front inner fender. It is very near the right headlight assembly.
  • USA VIN (USA). The VIN is found on a plate attached to the left front A pillar and can be viewed from the outside through the windshield.

Deciphering Porsche 964 VIN Codes

Digit Code Explanation
1 W Country of origin (Federal Republic of Germany)
2 P Dr. Ing. h. c. F. Porsche AG
3 0 Passenger car
Z ROW market designation
A Coupe body style (USA)
B Targa body style (USA)
C Cabriolet body style (USA)
Z ROW market designation
A Turbo 3.3 liter (USA)
B Naturally aspirated 3.6 liter (USA)
C Turbo 3.6 liter (USA)
Z ROW marker designation
0 Seat belts only (USA)
2 Seat belts and air bags (USA)
7,8 96 First part of type number or auftragsnttmmer
Z Fill in digit for ROW
0-9 or X Test Digit
K 1989 (production model year)
L 1990
M 1991
N 1992
P 1993
R 1994
11 S Place of manufacture (Stuttgart, Germany)
12 4 Last remaining number of type or auftragsnttmmer
13 to 17*   Serial number of specific 964

*1 = RS America, 2 = US Coupe with airbags, 4 = US Targa with airbag, 6 = US Cabriolet with airbag. Digit 13 also provides version identification but can only be used for a specific model year. The numbers were changed around so a 5 in 1989 may not be the same as a 5 in 1994.


Porsche 964 Engine Number Codes

The engine number is located on the engine block, on the right side of the crankcase next to the fan housing. The engine code consists of 8 digits and is the same for all versions. Example:

  • 62K86401 is an M64/01 engine installed in a 1989 Carrera 4 (normally aspirated). 

Deciphering Porsche 964 Engine Codes

Note: Digit 4 is exclusive to Tiptronic models. In model year 1991 this number became a 5. So from this model year onwards the M64/02 engine for the Tiptronic could be identified separately. 

Digit Code Explanation
1 6 Number of cylinders
1 Turbocharged engine
2 Naturally Aspirated engine
K 1989 (production model year)
L 1990
M 1991
N 1992
P 1993
R 1994
4 to 8   Serial number of the specific engine

Porsche 964 Transmission Number Codes

The transmission number code is found on the transmission data plate. There were two codes used:

  • 12 digit code for model years 1989, 1990 and 1991
  • 12 digit code for model years 1992 onwards

Deciphering Porsche 964 Transmission Codes

Digit Code Explanation
G6400 AWD (not Switzerland, Taiwan)
G6401 AWD (Switzerland)
G6402 AWD (Taiwan)
G 5003 RWD manual (not Switzerland)
G 5004 RWD manual (Switzerland)
G 5005 RWD manual (USA only from 1992)
G 5010 RWD manual (Carrera RS series only)
G 5052 RWD manual (all)
A5001 Tiptronic 1990 and 1991 only
A5002 Tiptronic from 1992 (ROW only)
A5003 Tiptronic from 1992 (USA and Taiwan)
1990: No limited slip differential (LSD), only G50 & A50
1991: No LSD in G 50/03, G 50/04, A50
1990: LSD installed, only applicable to only G50 & A50
1991: LSD not installed in G50/52 transmission only
1992, 1993, 1994: LSD not installed in G50 & A50
1991: LSD installed in G S0/52 transmission
1992, 1993, 1994: LSD installed in G50 & A50
3 Regulated limited slip differential installed in G64
K 1989 (production model year)
L 1990
M 1991
Production model year code omitted from 1992 onwards
7 to 11   1992, 1993, 1994: Serial number of specific transmission
8 to 12   1989, 1990, 1991: Serial number of specific transmission

Porsche 911 and 718 Models to Become Even More Personalized

Get a Car Built for You

Porsche cars are some of the most customizable from the factory that you can buy. There are 39 different variants between the 911 and 718 and then there’s a long list of options to choose from. According to Autocar, plant manager Christian Friedl said the company only produces the same exact car “a maximum of two times per year.” The company wants to add even more personalization, too.

When you look at the plant that makes the 911 and 718, Porsche builds about 25,000 of those cars. With all of the different variants and special features for the cars, that’s a lot of models to be churning out. Porsche wants to take the next steps to take personalization to the next level.

porsche-718-caymanporsche-718-cayman

Friedl said Porsche will work on putting out more options for customers to choose from. this means even fewer of the cars built each year will be identical. The Porsche 911 or 718 you want will be the car you’ll get, and it’ll be a lot different than your neighbor’s Porsche. Freidel said that the company wants to build “the most personal car” out there.

This is good news for anyone who wants to have a special one-of-a-kind sports car. With Porsche the 911 and 718 already being what they are, it’s cool to see Porsche pushing the envelope. You can bet, however, that those new fancy options will come with a high price tag. You have to pay for exclusivity. 

Supercars.Net’s Comprehensive Guide To The 2019 Porsche 911 Speedster

Introduction

It has already been a few months since the ascension of the 992 Porsche 911, yet the swan song for the previous-generation 991 is only just beginning its chorus. Starring the 2019 Porsche 911 Speedster, the grand finale for the now outgone iteration is a celebration of both milestones and achievements.

The new Speedster was first unveiled as a concept during the Goodwood Festival of Speed in July 2018 – a time which also coincided with the 70th anniversary of Porsche sports cars – where they had described the philosophy behind the Speedster as simply, “a pure driving experience”. Fast forward to April 2019, where Porsche had officially green-lighted production of the Speedster at the New York Auto Show.

The Porsche 911 Speedster is the beneficiary of Stuttgart’s latest fixings, while also serving as a throwback to the Porsche 356 – the very first Speedster model. This schematic has forged a 911 with a silhouette based on the 4S Cabriolet body, carbon fibre bits borrowed off the 911 R, and front and rear bumpers from the GT3 Touring. That is not to say that there aren’t any unique offerings on the Speedster, with its shorter, more inclined windshield frame and lower fly-line being amongst its exclusive features.

As originally advertised, the car is powered by the same 4.0L, naturally aspirated, 9000 rpm unit used in the 991.2 GT3; for good measure, Porsche has kindly gone and wrung an extra 10-horsepower out of it too, just for the Speedster. They’ve also done nothing to disappoint the purists, with the same brilliant 6-speed manual transmission – offered in some 991.2 GT3 examples – mated to this legendary flat-6 boxer engine.

With just 1,948* units to be produced, the 2019 Porsche 911 Speedster is a car in its own right. It will be extremely rare. It will be undeniably unique. And with a price starting at $277,000 USD, it will be lavishly expensive.   

But most importantly, the Speedster is everything – that was, is and will be – wonderful about the Porsche 911.

*an homage to the first year that Porsche began to produce sports cars, and hence its 70th anniversary in 2018

Engine & Performance

At the heart of the Porsche 911 Speedster is a slightly tweaked version of the most current 911 GT3 engine, which now produces 502-horsepower @ 8,400 rpm and 346 lb-ft of torque @ 6,250 rpm.

The Speedster’s engine is able to extract an additional 10-horsepower from the GT3 unit, with the help of bolstered fuel injectors. Specially designed individual throttle bodies improve the engine response of the already pedal-happy 9,000 rpm redline, naturally aspirated power plant. Porsche claims that this engine is the most refined, most efficient and best performing version to come from the GT3 family.

Delivering power to the rear wheels is a 6-speed manual transmission, which like the engine, is also borrowed from the most recent iteration of the 991 GT3. This is the only transmission option available, as the manual gearbox is preferred by Porsche over the technically superior PDK in favour of a more tactile driving experience. While banging through the gears will never be as efficient as what the dual-clutch system delivers, this manual transmission is as precise and smooth as one can get; an absolute pleasure to drive with.

Overall the numbers are ultimately impressive, especially considering the Speedster’s relative lack of modern enhancements that seem to be part and parcel of what is required to make a fast car these days. The Porsche 911 Speedster is able to sprint from 0-60 mph in just 3.8 seconds – all in the absence of turbochargers, all-wheel-drive and a dual-clutch transmission.

Chassis & Handling

The Porsche 911 Speedster shares an array of suspension and handling components with the GT3 and 911 R which includes a fine-tuned adjustable sports suspension, torque vectoring system, and four-wheel steering. Overall, the Speedster sits about 5 millimetres higher off the ground than its compatriots and its spring rates offer more refinement and ride quality.

Compared to its donors, the Speedster is clearly and deliberately set up to focus more on driving pleasure rather than Nurburgring (or any other track, for that matter) lap times. The carbon ceramic brakes – 410 mm vented/perforated discs up front, 390 mm in the rear – also utilize softer compounds in favour of more user-friendly modulation and improved urbanity. The car meets the road with a set of 20” Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, which provide plenty of street-legal grip.

The first public test-drives of the Speedster took place along the winding country roads in Sardinia. The Speedster negotiated the often rough and uneven Italian terrains with absolute confidence; not only with its performance, but also its comfort and the peace-of-mind it provided the driver. The aforementioned suspension tweaks allowed the car to glide smoothly over imperfections without having to worry about scraping the undercarriage, or chipping a tooth while hopping over jarring surfaces.

Thanks in huge part to the talismanic three-pedal, 6-speed manual transmission, the Speedster feels as raw, connected and spirited as a 911 could possibly be. Minimalism is not lost on the rest of the car either, and to good effect, with a button-free steering wheel, short-shifting gear lever, and relatively spartan interior further emphasizing driving purity at its pinnacle. The Speedster still comes standard with stability control and traction control, but these can be dialed down for drivers who wish to induce a higher degree of rear slip angle, with a simple push of the “ESC OFF” switch.     

The Speedster delivers a masterclass all-around performance of 911-awesomeness, and truly is as Porsche had set it out to be – a “pure driving experience”. At the end of the day, the car should not be mistaken as a docile or watered-down version of a GT-line car, because that is simply not the case. It is just as engaging and visceral as any of the cars it is based on, with just the right amount of elegance added to make it perhaps even more appealing than the others.

Design, Styling & Interior

Aside from the aggregate of undertones which make it undeniably-911, the Speedster was designed to be different from anything else that Porsche has ever made. Most notable is essentially what gives the Speedster its name; the manual-folding, weatherproof soft-top which stores under a distinctive clamshell tonneau behind the driver. To further accommodate the design, the windshield inclines at a sharper angle while the side windows become more stocky at full extension. This gives the Speedster the lower fly-line that is attributed to its previous iterations, which becomes all the more distinguishable once seated inside the cabin.

The interior does nothing to detract from the overall design elements of the Speedster, with simplicity and function taking precedence over luxury and convenience. There is no lack of driver-focused comforts provided by amenities such as the snug, perfectly bolstered sport bucket seats and ideally-located controls; however, normally expected refinements such as door handles and PCM/climate control are replaced with door straps, or in the latter case, nothing at all.

As expected from a limited-edition Porsche, there is hardly a lack of finer details even in a spartan interior. As an option, the standard black leather interior can be complemented with red stitching, as well as having the “Speedster” designation imprinted in the headrests. This option also includes red door straps and the GT Sport steering wheel with a red centre marker. Many of the interior panels are made from carbon fibre.

Buyers who opt for the most extreme option – known as the Heritage Design Package – will get a silver and white two-tone paint job (similar to the concept), and a special livery which includes door numbers and Porsche decals on the side of the car. Also as part of the package, the brake calipers are painted black and the wheels are finished in an exclusive platinum satin finish. Cognac leather also replaces the standard black leather; and to ensure the exclusivity of it all really hits the mark, is a custom Speedster-inspired Porsche Design chronograph made specially for the lucky new owner.

Pricing gets

So here’s where things get a bit crazy but in a less than surprising fashion, really. With production numbers capped at just 1,948, the Speedster will be – for lack of a better term – ‘appropriately priced’.  This means that it won’t come cheap, and with an MSRP starting at $274,500 USD, the Speedster is about twice the cost of the GT3 on which it is based, and nearly the same price as the GT2 RS; and this is without any of the options added, which will send the price well north of $300,000 USD.

Dealers began filling orders on May 7, 2019, and with the entire allocation rumored to be already spoken for, all examples should be in the hands of their new owners by the end of this year.

Performance & Specifications Summary

Model & Price Info

Make Porsche
Model 911
Generation 991
Sub-Model Speedster
Car type Convertible
Category Limited Series Production Car
Built At Zuffenhausen, Germany
Introduced 2019
Base Price (US) $274,500
Units built 1,948

Chassis, Suspension & Powertrain

Curb Weight 1,465 kg (3,230 lbs)
Layout Rear-engined, rear-wheel drive
Body / Frame Aluminum-steel composite monocoque, carbon fiber elements
Suspension (F) MacPherson strut suspension with lightweight springs (including helper springs), anti-roll bar, fully ball-jointed mountings
Suspension (R) Multi-link axle with lightweight springs (including helper springs), anti-roll bar, fully ball-jointed mountings
Steering Electro-hydraulic; power-assisted
Brakes Carbon Ceramic Discs (410 mm front; 390mm rear); Aluminum Calipers (6-piston front; 4-piston rear)
Tires Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2
Transmission 6-Speed Manual

Engine & Output

Engine Flat-6
Displacement (Litres) 4.0L
Position Boxer, 90°
Aspiration Naturally Aspirated
Power (hp) 502 hp @ 8,400 rpm
Power (hp) / litre 125.5 hp / litre
Power (hp) / weight 0.34 hp / kg
Torque 346 lb-ft @ 6,250 rpm
Average Fuel Consumption 13.8 L / 100 km (combined)

Performance, Acceleration & Braking Stats

Top speed 193 mph
0 – 60 mph 3.8 s
0 – 62 mph 4.0 s
0 – 100 mph 8.0 s
0 – 125 mph 12.2 s
¼ mile (standing) 11.7 s
124 mph – 0 TBD
62 mph – 0 TBD

Gallery & Videos

Image Gallery

The Speedster sets itself apart from any other 911 ever made, thanks to Porsche’s modern take on a classic, and sure-to-be timeless design. Reminiscent of the circa 1948 Porsche 356 “No. 1” Roadster, the soft-top compartment lid with its double-bubble shell case is the aesthetic landmark of this very limited edition vehicle.

In my opinion, the Porsche 911 Speedster is an interesting concoction of extroversion, uncanniness and classic design elements – the formula for an ideal balance of function and form – that makes for a car worthy to represent all that is good about the 911 and by extension, the Porsche brand as a whole.

Video Review Gallery

Here are some YouTube video reviews from some of my favorite car reviewers and auto personalities. All of them provide feedback from an “everyday guy” perspective – but aren’t afraid to thrash the car around a racetrack when given the opportunity – providing commentary that is both technical and easy to absorb.

Carfection’s Henry Catchpole provides a wonderful review of the Speedster while driving through the winding roads of Sardinia, starting off with a warm-felt tribute to the 356.

[embedded content]Next, Tony Crawford, Founder of CarAdvice.com, gives his down-under take on the Speedster. Though he admits to not being a 911-phile to begin with, Tony is unapologetically swooning over the Speedster while he rows through its gears throughout the video.

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The team at Netherlands-based AutoWeek, put together this comprehensive vlog chronicling their experience with the Speedster. The subject matter technical, and the imagery is engaging.

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Last but not least is Porsche’s official cinematic for the car.

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Original Press Release

New 911 Speedster goes into production

05/07/2019 | The 911 Speedster already caused a sensation when it was presented as a concept vehicle. Now Porsche is putting the open-top two seater into production.

The 911 Speedster combines the aspiration of a puristic, driver-oriented vehicle with motor sports technology suitable for everyday use. The 911 R (2016) and 911 GT3 served as a basis for development. A high-revving 375 kW (510 PS; Fuel consumption combined 13.8 l/100 km; CO2 emissions combined 317 g/km) four-litre naturally aspirated boxer engine delivers an emotive sound experience in the cockpit. The six-speed GT transmission is shifted manually. Visually, the new Speedster establishes a bridge to its own history – to the forebear of all Porsche sports cars, the 356 “No. 1” Roadster from 1948. The limited edition of the new 911 Speedster is also reminiscent of this vehicle. Exactly 1,948 units will be manufactured from mid-2019 at the Porsche plant in Zuffenhausen, Germany.

As a concept vehicle, the 911 Speedster celebrated its world premiere in 2018 at the ceremony for the “70 Years of Porsche Sports Cars” anniversary in Zuffenhausen. Other public appearances followed at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, the Rennsport Reunion VI in Laguna Seca, California as well as the Paris Motor Show in October. Numerous Speedster elements that characterise the concept vehicle can now be found in the same or similar design on the series production model.

Taking centre stage is the aesthetically shaped convertible top compartment lid with its double-bubble streamliners – a quintessential feature of this sports car type ever since the 911 Speedster from 1988. It is the largest and most complex component to date that Porsche has used in a road model made of a single piece of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic. Two trim elements in the double bubbles make room for the roll-over protection system as need, included in the two-seater as a standard feature just like in the 911 Carrera Cabriolet.

A weight-saving roof structure replaces the basic tonneau cover of the concept vehicle. Despite its puristic design, the fabric convertible top is suitable for everyday use. Together with the shortened window frames with their lowered cowl top panels and the smaller side windows, it gives the 911 Speedster its athletic profile. The excitingly low fly line already characterised historic designs such as the Porsche 356 Speedster from 1954.

The convertible top takes no effort to operate: the central locking hook at the windscreen frame and both the side fins of the fabric roof are released at the push of a button. The large rear lid made from lightweight carbon fibre is electrically unlocked and slides back a short distance, is then positioned by hand and makes room for the fabric roof, which folds into a Z shape behind the front seats. The cover can then be closed again effortlessly once the roof has folded into position. The roof is closed again in the same way – only the roof fins on the left and right of the streamliners have to be pressed by hand into their holders until they perceptibly engage.

Rear spoiler and rear apron of the 911 GT3 Touring

Lightweight design also dictates other body components of the Speedster. The carbon-fibre composite bonnet – which weighs in two kilograms lighter than on the 911 GT3 – and the carbon-fibre composite wings are originate from the 911 R. The front apron was borrowed from the GT3, but the front spoiler lip is a completely new development. Instead of the Talbot mirrors used on the concept vehicle, the production version of the new Speedster features electrically adjustable and heated Sport Design exterior mirrors. The extending, aerodynamically tuned rear spoiler and rear apron have been adopted from the 911 GT3 Touring for the Speedster.

The interior is characterised by black leather elements for the side bolsters and head restraints of the carbon-fibre composite full-bucket seats, the armrests in the door trims and the shortened gear lever. The centre panels of the seats are upholstered in perforated leather, while the lightweight door panels with black door pulls and stowage nets reduce the overall weight.

“Speedster” logos adorn the head restraints and the visible carbon door sills as well as the central rev counter. Like the other instruments, it has black dials with white needles as well as green digits and scales – features reminiscent of its famous forebear, the Porsche 356 Speedster. A limited-edition badge on the cross structure behind the front seats shows the serial number of the 911 Speedster, which is limited to just 1,948 units.

Porsche also optionally offers the new 911 Speedster with a Heritage Design package. Created by Style Porsche and implemented by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur, this equipment version reinterprets classic elements from the 1950s and 1960s. This includes the interior colour scheme in Black and Cognac with golden details. Special “spears” paintwork in White for the front fascia and front wings is applied to the basic vehicle paintwork in GT Silver Metallic. Historic looking Motor sports decals for the doors and front lid complete the package. Owners can select their own maximum two-digit start numbers like shown in the photos. The Porsche crests and the gold-coloured logos correspond to the designs used in the 50s and 60s.

High-revving engine with 510 PS

The heart of the new Speedster is adopted from the 911 GT3. The naturally aspirated six-cylinder boxer engine with four-litre displacement is a pure GT engine. The peak power of 375 kW (510 PS) is reached at 8,400 rpm, with the maximum engine speed at 9,000 rpm. The engine delivers a maximum torque of 470 newton metres at 6,250 rpm. The new 911 Speedster accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in 4.0 seconds and reaches a top speed of 310 km/h.

Compared with the previous 911 GT3, the engine in the Speedster is fitted with two gasoline particulate filters (GPF) and complies with the emission standard Euro 6d TEMP EVAP-ISC (EU6 DG). However, the four-valve engine still manages ten PS more. This is due to improvements to detail such as the high-pressure fuel injectors with optimised spray pattern as well as a modified intake system with individual throttle valves, which enable a more spontaneous response to throttle commands. The newly developed lightweight stainless steel sports exhaust system weighs 10 kilograms less – including the two particulate filters.

Befitting its status as a driver’s car, Porsche only offers the 911 with a manual six-speed sports transmission. It features an auto-blip function which precisely and independently compensates differences in engine speed between the gears when downshifting through automatic throttle blips. Auto-blip can be activated at any time, in other words also independently from the chosen PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) variable damping system setting. A mechanical rear differential lock with asymmetric locking action rounds off sporty power transmission.

PORSCHE Infografic 911 Speedster ENPORSCHE Infografic 911 Speedster EN

The GT philosophy behind the new Speedster is also reflected in its chassis. With its sporty rear-axle steering and dynamic engine mounts, the chassis is based on the technology of the 911 GT3 and 911 R. Control systems such as Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV), Porsche Stability Management (PSM) and PASM with sports tuning and lowering by 25 millimetres have been precisely adapted to the new requirements. The open-top two-seater runs on 20-inch forged Speedster alloy wheels with central locks. The standard equipment includes PCCB brakes (Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake) with internally vented and perforated ceramic composite brake discs.

Chronograph

Porsche Design Timepieces has also produced special chronographs for the new 911 Speedster, likewise limited in number to 1,948: the Porsche Design “911 Speedster chronograph” and the “911 Speedster Heritage Design chronograph” can be ordered exclusively by future owners of a new Speedster model at Porsche Centres around the world from May 2019.

Consumption data

911 Speedster: Fuel consumption combined 13.8 l/100 km; CO2emissions combined 317 g/km

Final Verdict

As my fellow Supercars.net colleague, Nick Dellis once remarked, “The world is full of armchair commentators when it comes to cars. At Supercars.net we have a number of journalists and automotive publications we rely on when we want to get unbiased opinions from people we admire.”

Below are snippets from some of our favorite car reviewers and automotive personalities regarding the Porsche 911 Speedster As always, we ask that you support the amazing publications they release, so that the automotive community continues to benefit from the hard work and enthusiasm they put into providing us with content that we love.

Autocar – “Porsche’s fabled GT-car division turns out the 991-generation lights in spectacular fashion” – 5/5

2-porsche-911-speedster-2019-fd-hero-side2-porsche-911-speedster-2019-fd-hero-side

Richard Lane from Autocar is well-versed in Porsche nomenclature, and his review of the Speedster is both historically-centric and detail oriented.

Knowing what he knows, the Speedster was almost everything he expected – it didn’t surprise him one iota, as he remarked that “Given the ingredients, it doesn’t take a genius to work out that the Speedster must be mind-blowing on the road – and it is.”

On that same trajectory, there is no doubt that its price raises his brows somewhat. However, acknowledging all that the Speedster is set out to be, perhaps the perception of what money is gets distorted when in the realm of owning the car.

He ends off his review stating, “Were it our money, we wouldn’t hesitate, because finally Porsche knows exactly what its hip-high Speedster needs to be, and the result is breathtaking.”

The Good

  • Linear power delivery and incredible throttle response
  • Car remains rigid despite no fixed roof
  • Mechanical grip better than expected

The Bad

  • Interior feels smaller than it actually is, some visibility issues
  • Four-wheel steering system could be improved

More: Read full review

Car Magazine – “Icing on the cake” – 5/5

911 speedster911 speedster

Car Magazine’s Kyle Fortune was another one of the lucky journalists to take the Speedster for a drive in Sardinia, remarking that “It’s more about driving, and here it delivers, with mesmerising cross-country pace.”

Kyle is as infatuated as anyone else by the Speedster’s purity, even going as far as saying that “…it’s the sheer joy of the feel and feedback that make the Speedster stand out, even from the exquisite 911 R.”

His final verdict: “I want one”.

The Good

  • Ultimate driver’s car
  • Chassis uncorrupted by being roofless
  • Manual transmission is as precise and quick as they come

The Bad

  • All Speedsters have already been spoken for
  • Heritage Desig/n Pack not really worth the money

More: Read full review

Car Advice – “Does it get any better than this?” – 8.8/10

Porsche 911 SpeedsterPorsche 911 Speedster

Tony Crawford of Australian-based Car Advice is absolutely in love with the Speedster, but his pragmatism prevails when it comes to its price – and this is primarily what prevents him from giving the car closer to a 10-rating.

In his own words he summarises,

“It’s a hugely expensive car that is easily outpaced by lower-priced versions in the 911 range, and yet such a limited production run has ensured that all 1948 cars are already spoken for. And that’s by buyers that haven’t yet driven the car.

It clearly demonstrates just how low on the priority scale outright performance figures can be. In the end, the Speedster is a purebred road car and one of the most accomplished sports cars on the planet, as well as one of the most enjoyable cars ever from behind the wheel.

I never thought I’d ever say that about a 911 soft-top, but this car is a spectacular triumph in every regard bar its sky-high asking price.”

The Good

  • Six-speed manual mated to 4.0 flat-6 is a match made in heaven
  • Huge grip levels
  • Throttle response off the charts

The Bad

  • Huge price bump above a 911 GT3 Coupe
  • Racing-style bucket seats can get tiresome

More: Read full review

My Final Verdict – 4.5/5

Make no mistake that the Speedster is an absolutely fitting conclusion to the 991-generation, which by my accounts, has been the best overall iteration of the 911 so far. It truly does represent everything we have come to love, and will continue to love, about the Porsche 911.

We are now living in a time where emissions regulations heavily influence automakers’ outlooks and decision making. As a result, electric vehicles are beginning to stake claim in mainstream thought. While I am all for change and doing what is right for the future, the Speedster’s homage to how things used to be – and in an ideal world, how they could continue to be – brings a welcome smile to my face. The Speedster is truly a time capsule of what could end up being a defining era in human civilization.

The Porsche 911 Speedster is an ingenious amalgamation of the latest technologies on offer, and the more simple ingredients that have been a principle of driving enjoyment since the invention of automobiles. A 502-horsepower engine, without turbochargers. A modern transmission, with just one clutch. A state-of-the-art suspension and chassis, with an unsullied purity. The list goes on.

Perhaps the only drawback is that the Speedster’s rarity and price precludes any sense of being able to really relate with the car.  It feels like the car inhabits another plane of existence, and that seeing one in person seems unfathomable as I can only imagine them occupying spaces deep underground in private collections, shielded from the real world and the sands of time. Quoting myself earlier, ‘The Speedster is truly a time capsule…’, and this is a bit hard for me to get over.

Rivals

McLaren 600LT Spider

Ferrari 488 Pista Spider

McLaren 720S Spider

Porsche 911 GT3

Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet

Vonnen Performance – Porsche 911 Hybrid

Vonnen Performance Offers Glimpse Into What a Production 911 Hybrid Could Look Like

Here we are in the year 2019, yet even the thought of a fully-electric 911 feels sacrilege; but a hybrid, on the other hand, is certainly inevitable and likely not that far off. After all, Porsche’s own 918 Spyder has long possessed the technology which is overdue for a trickle-down into the rest of the Porsche lineup – the 911 being next-in-line.

Even before Porsche has officially committed itself to a production 911 Hybrid, California-based Vonnen Performance has already staked an unofficial claim to the pioneering of this venture with a proprietary hybrid conversion kit called Vonnen Shadow Drive (VSD). At the present time, VSD is designed solely for integration into a 991.1 naturally aspirated 911 Carrera, with future plans to expand compatibility with other makes and models.

Vonnen Shadow Drive (VSD)Vonnen Shadow Drive (VSD)

The VSD conversion is able to complement the base Carrera’s factory combustion engine, adding up to 150-horsepower and 150 lb-ft of torque without requiring an overhaul of the factory electronics systems nor with the side effect of significant weight gains. The lightweight battery, electric motor, and various system components have a combined net weight increase of just 170 pounds. The aforementioned motor recharges the battery by storing and transferring energy generated by the combustion engine and through braking forces.

Vonnen president Chuck Moreland claims that the biggest appeals of the VSD conversion are its user-friendliness, simplicity and non-disruptive nature. What this translates to is a system that can be easily accessed through a smartphone app interface, has selectable driving modes (such as ‘Track’ and ‘Overboost’), can be turned on or off completely with the touch of a button, and provides real-time monitoring and data-logging which can be uploaded to the cloud.

That is not to say that the inner-workings of the system are neither complex nor advanced, as its brain actively conducts an orchestra of information to ensure the system is performing optimally under all conditions.

Vonnen VSD smartphone appVonnen VSD smartphone app

The seamless integration not only applies to the interface-side of things but also to the most important factor – the driving experience. While providing a significant bump in power over the base Carrera’s 350-horsepower and 287 lb-ft of torque, the car maintains near-instantaneous throttle response and linear power delivery with the electric motor at play. This makes the car feel more likened to the naturally-aspirated GT3 in terms of power than say, the Turbo. Vonnen VP Bill Davis remarks, “It basically feels like you’re driving a bigger-engined car”

A PDK-equipped car is able to improve its 0-60 mph time from 4.2 seconds to 3.6 seconds with the system turned on and set at Overboost. While VSD is compatible with a manual transmission model, PDK is able to extract the full potential of the system due to having more robust mechanical components which are better suited to deal with the significant increase in torque.

Vonnen Porsche 911 HybridVonnen Porsche 911 Hybrid

There are some shortcomings that potential users will be forced to consider before purchasing and installing VSD. The first is its price – $75,000 USD installed – which is rather hefty when taking into account that a second-hand base 991.1 Carrera will be ten to fifteen grand less than the entire system itself. However, for those seeking to consume the latest fixings of technology while also maintaining a purist-appeal – something very rare indeed – the price may have less of a factor.

Then there are the mechanical drawbacks to the system such as the heat it generates. The system has a temperature failsafe of 302 degrees Fahrenheit, beyond which point it will automatically shut down to cool off. This has the potential to occur quite frequently depending on driving habits and ambient conditions; however, it should be noted that the cooling process is typically completed within one minute or less.

Acknowledging this, Vonnen continues to commit its resources to improve the cooling system so it can be pushed harder and recover more quickly, as the release date for a production-version system approaches.

Porsche 911 Hybrid Image Gallery