All posts in “Watches”

Want a Cartier Tank? Here Are Three Worthy Alternatives for Less

The Cartier Tank is about as iconic as a watch can be. It’s got the stamp of approval of countless celebrities and style icons, as well as history no watch nerd can deny. It’s a worthy timepiece to lust after, but Cartier’s prestigious name commands a premium.

The French jeweler has an entire collection of Tank watches in a range of styles. Prices begin with the Solo, which offers the essential look for $2,550 with a quartz movement (or $3,450 in the “XL” automatic version) and go up, up, up, way into the five-figures. While modern rectangular watches for men are relatively rare — and many look like Tank wannabes — there are a still several good alternatives out there.

The trick is to find a Tank surrogate that offers a similar appeal or cuts a similarly dashing profile on the wrist, but doesn’t break the bank. Here are a few great options that do just that.

Hamilton Boulton Mechanical

Granted, the Hamilton Boulton isn’t quite rectangular like the Tank — but that’s because it’s not trying to be the Tank. The Boulton was introduced in the 1940s when Hamilton was a prominent American watchmaker and elegant, elongated cases such as this were “in.” It’s been a part of the brand’s collection ever since. A quartz option is a bit cheaper, but we like it with a traditional-feeling, hand-wound movement, much as it would’ve had back in the day.
Movement: H-50 Manual
Measurements: 34.5mm x 38mm
Price: $895

Bulova Joseph Bulova Banker

There’s a rectangular model in the 2019 Joseph Bulova collection too, but it wears on the large side, so this model called the Banker seems like a better fit to replicate the Tank’s wearing experience. Even with its tonneau case, the Banker has an archetypal look and feel comparable to that of the Tank. Named for the company’s founder, this collection features Swiss automatic movements and an Art Deco style that references some of Bulova’s earliest watches.
Movement: Selitta SW200 Automatic
Measurements: 33mm x 38.5mm
Price: $995

Baume & Mercier Hampton

Though comparable in shape to the Tank, the Baume & Mercier Hampton takes a slight stylistic turn in a different direction. A longstanding collection, the Hampton was updated for 2020, and its dial design feels a bit closer to the other other most famous rectangular watch of all time: Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Reverso. This three-hand model has sizing and proportions that promise the classical look you want in a Tank alternative.
Movement: ETA 2671 Automatic
Measurements: 27.5mm x 43mm
Price: $2,450

Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

The Iconic Chronograph Watches of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s

In the years following WWII, the Jet Age, the Space Race and motor racing assailed the public consciousness. Planes, rockets and fast cars drove technological innovation, but they also exemplified the human spirit in an era when people were looking to move beyond the war’s milieu austére. Where time was a factor in the development and functions of these machines, a special watch, the chronograph, which could record time-related data, became the tool of choice for pioneers.

Pushing boundaries required more than just a way to record basic times, and soon the chronograph was rethought, and redeveloped into a specialized tool. Throughout the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, dials and bezels became more functional, movements became more evolved and the chronograph watch traveled to places and performed functions no other timekeeping complication had gone or done before.

Along the way, their complex dials and dual push pieces became associated with cocksure professionals who wore them, like Jo Siffert and Neil Armstrong. These are five of the most the iconic, game-changing chronographs of their era, which to this day remain the most fascinating and distinguished watches of all time.

1952: Breitling Navitimer

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The Pilot’s Chronograph: By 1952 pilots were already familiar with Breitling — the company built onboard chronographs for aircraft cockpits, and Breitling’s Chronomat (released in 1942) was popular in the industry. In addition to its chronograph movement, it had a slide rule that could be used for simple calculations like division, multiplication and unit conversions, making it even more popular among engineers and mathematicians.

With the help of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), Breitling created a version, the Navitimer, specifically for pilots. It kept the slide rule of the Chronomat but added a third scale and borrowed functions from the E6B flight computer. The new Navitimer made completing speed and distance calculations quicker and easier, solidifying Breitling’s place as the de-facto watch brand for aviators.

1957: Omega Speedmaster

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The Space Chronograph: When the Speedmaster launched in 1957, motorsports were becoming increasingly popular and OMEGA was the official timekeeper of the Olympic Games. So at its launch the OMEGA Speedmaster was not intended for any use outside of timing motor races and sporting events.

But in 1962, after astronaut Wally Schirra wore his own personal Speedmaster during the Mercury-Atlas 8 mission, NASA realized the chronograph’s usefulness on future missions, and decided to submit the Speedmaster along with a selection of chronographs from brands like Rolex, Breitling and Longines for testing to see what would be best suited for NASA’s needs.

After testing for durability when subjected to extreme temperature, vibrations, shock, acceleration and other harsh conditions, the Speedmaster remained accurate within five seconds per day and was chosen as the official watch. This was no doubt thanks to its shock-proof and ant-magnetic case, making it one of the most durable chronographs of its time. Its toughness and its role in space exploration made it a favorite among enthusiasts and has since cultivated one of the strongest fandoms in the industry.

1962: Heuer Autavia

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The Racing Chronograph: The Heuer Autavia started life as a dashboard timer in the 1930s, used in both racing cars and aeronautics (Autavia is a portmanteau of both “auto” and “aviation”). The original Autavia was eventually replaced by the Monte Carlo and the Auto-Rallye, but in the early ’60s when Jack Heuer was looking to revamp his range of chronographs he returned to the Autavia name.

The resulting watch was the first Heuer chronograph with a rotating bezel. In 1967 when Heuer launched a new case design, it included a tachymeter scale, and the rotating tachy made more complex measurements (like average speed over long distances) easier.

Thanks to Heuer’s reputation on the dashes of earlier rally cars, the Autavia (and later Heuer Chronos) became a hit with racers like Mario Andretti, Jochen Rindt and Jo Siffert in the ’60s and through the’70s. And while Heuer’s Monaco and Carrera are considered the brand’s greatest racing chronographs, the Autavia started that foundation.

1969: Zenith El Primero

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The Automatic Chronograph: Declaring a winner in the Zenith vs. Seiko vs. Heuer/Breitling/Hamilton-Buren/Dubois-Depraz race to create the first automatic chronograph is contentious business. Regardless, Zenith’s El Primero — first or no — was ahead of the competition in terms of innovation. While automatic watches from the other groups used a simpler modular, cam-actuated movement, Zenith opted for a more complex but much smoother column wheel movement and used a fully integrated design.

What’s more, the El Primero had a 36,000 vph high-beat movement that not only had a second hand with an appealingly smooth motion, but could record time within 1/10 of a second as well. Today the El Primero continues production as one of the very few high-beat chronographs on the market, and remains one of the most advanced chronograph movements of all time.

1971: Heuer “McQueen” Monaco

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The Avant-Garde Chronograph: After the Heuer/Breitling/Hamilton-Buren/Dubois-Depraz group completed their automatic Calibre 11, Heuer knew it would need a stunning package to launch the new movement. It secured a deal with case maker Piquerez to exclusively receive its large square cases to house the new movement, making it the first of many avant-garde chronographs to follow in the ’70s. Aside from the case design, the Monaco owes most of its notoriety to Steve McQueen, who wore a 1133B version in the 1971 film LeMans, making it one of the most well-known watches of the decade.

Now You Can Customize Your Watch to Match Your Custom Porsche

Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

Want a customized Porsche 911? You can get that through Porsche’s car configurator, and now you can get a watch to match it perfectly — or in any combination of elements you choose. A similar configurator concept is being applied to Porsche Design’s distinctive chronograph watch, resulting in up to “1.5 million possibilities,” according to the brand.

In addition to making a range of sleek products from luggage to eyewear, Porsche Design has been producing watches since the 1970s. The brand’s first and most famous watch, the Chronograph 1, forms the base of the watch customizing program.

Equipped with a 42mm titanium case and a familiar chronograph dial layout, practically everything else about its aesthetics is up to you. There are choices of bezel and hand types, for example, as well as color options (including the original Porsche color palette) for just about every element. The case’s finish, however, is available only in bead-blasted or black-coated forms — and the Porsche Design Timepieces Managing Director Rolf Bergmann says “this originated with the designer of the Porsche 911, Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, and we will never change anything about it.”

Along with the watch configurator, Porsche Design is announcing a new, COSC chronometer-certified, in-house automatic movement called the WERK 01.100 with a 48-hour power reserve. It’s visible through the watch’s case back, and there’s even the option to customize the winding rotor.

Of course, the straps are also customizable with up to 300 possible configurations, all featuring a quick-change system. Leather straps are made from the same materials used for 911 interiors, so they can be matched precisely.

Porsche Design isn’t the first to offer such customization programs, but it might be the most comprehensive yet. With the combination of options, one can effectively expect a one-of-a-kind watch — something usually associated with bespoke projects by independent watchmakers, and with significantly higher prices.

The program launches today in Europe, but will only be available to the US and fully in English from September 1, 2020 — you can try it out here. Depending on the configuration, prices will range from $6,000 to around $12,500 and delivery takes eight to 12 weeks.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

Why Do So Many Seiko Watches Have Crazy Nicknames?

The many unofficial nicknames of Seiko watches are a testament to the Japanese brand’s following and cultural presence. Bestowed by an adoring international public, perhaps no other brand except Rolex has been given a similar tribute. While some nicknames are iconic and some are obscure, this phenomenon adds to Seiko’s personality alongside its many other quirks.

Seiko’s habit of naming its products with little more than a reference number certainly contributed to these aliases proliferating online and among fans — especially during a time when the company seemed less media-savvy than it is today. While the Cocktail Time and Alpinist, for instance, are rare examples of names that come from the brand itself, there are still many popular and worthy models waiting for a name that sticks.

Monster, Turtle, Tuna, Sumo, Samurai, Shogun, Arnie, Mohawk, Spork, Ashtray, Starfish, Atlas, Sea Urchin, Speedy, Willard, Pogue, Bond, Senna, Landshark, Stingray, Bottle Cap, Big Boy, Jumbo, Knight, Zimbe, UFO… All of these (and more) are names of Seiko watches, but none of them are used by the company itself. However, the very cool By Seiko Design website includes a few entries in which actual Seiko designers discuss the public’s nicknames of certain models: here and again here.

It’s beyond the scope of this article to cover all the nicknamed Seikos out there, many of which are no longer produced (though some remain available online). Below, however, are some of the most notable and fun examples you should know about.

Turtle

The nickname “Turtle” makes sense as soon as you see this watch’s curved, shell-like case shape. The Turtle, which currently lives in the Prospex collection and is one of the brand’s most popular affordable dive watches, is the descendent of a vintage watch (which has also recently been reissued) fans call the “Willard” or “Captain Willard” for the character who wore it in the film Apocalypse Now. There’s even a “Mini Turtle” and, more recently, a “King Turtle.”

Tuna

Also called “Tuna Can,” this name applies to a wide range of Seiko dive watches that have a certain distinctive case design. With a protective outer “shroud,” the strap attaches directly to the bottom of the case, and the result is a watch that sits high on the wrist with roughly the proportions of a can of tunafish. Pretty it is not, but it’s unique, ultra capable, and has an interesting story as well.

Monster

It could be its jagged bezel, with an appearance like the bared teeth of a predator, or that the watch overall just has that aggressive, ugly-cool appeal. Whatever the origin, the “Monster” nickname is fitting for this affordable dive watch that one would feel no hesitation in beating up. Having gone through several generations and redesigns, the brand recently released an update that places it in the Prospex line and takes it in a decidedly sleeker and slightly less “monstrous” direction.

Samurai

Do you see it? Even Seiko’s own designers seem a little bewildered as to why this particular model is called the “Samurai.” Does its case shape look like a samurai’s helmet or armor? Umm… maybe? Do the hands look like samurai swords? No. Maybe it’s just “the kind of design that would evoke a feeling of Japaneseness in the eyes of foreign people,” as one of the Seiko designers suggests. Somehow or another, though, the name stuck and it now sits alongside the Turtle as one of the brand’s core affordable dive watches in its Prospex collection. As with the Turtle, there’s also a more premium “King Samurai” version as well.

Arnie

The Arnie got its name from none other than Arnold Schwarzenegger having worn it in, not just one, but multiple iconic action films. Originally hailing from the ’80s but recently rereleased, it has a solar-charged movement, a bevy of buttons and an ana-digi dial with a no-nonsense, military look.

Sumo

The traditional dive watch known as the “Sumo” looks more like… well, kinda like a Rolex. Again, it requires a stretch of the imagination to find aspects or details that appear to have any connection to the Japanese sport. Presumably, its name is due simply to its substantial girth of 45mm. In any case, the nickname adds some fun to another handsome, solid, high-bang-for-buck dive watch you can potentially wear every day for many years.

Ripley

The “Ripley” was named for the character in the 1986 movie Aliens who wore this appropriately sci-fi-looking chronograph. One of the many striking designs resulting from the collaboration between Seiko and famed automotive designer Giorgetto Giugiaro, the Ripley’s popularity saw it come back as a reissue in 2015. Quartz-powered and affordable, the Ripley can still be found at reasonable prices.

Mohawk

Rather than simply emphasizing the critical first 15 or 20 minutes on the diving bezel with another color or markers, as most dive watches do, the “Mohawk” takes a unique approach. The first third of the bezel is actually dramatically raised. This also makes it easier to grip and turn, sure, but the result is yet another totally offbeat, asymmetric, almost ugly dive watch that nobody but Seiko could pull off.

Sea Urchin

The “Sea Urchin” comes from the ultra affordable Seiko 5 Sports collection of recent decades. These are basic dive watches that, like so many others from the brand, surprise their owners with the quality, value and personality that are at the core of Seiko’s wares and present global success. You can still get one for under $200.

Starfish

The “Starfish” is reminiscent of watches from the likes of Breitling and TAG Heuer with steel bezels and “rider tabs” — but exaggerated in characteristic Seiko form. Early examples featured Kinetic movements and two-tone designs, but later versions had automatic movements and sleeker looks. The aquatic animal connection is common for dive watches, and the pointed tabs make this nickname feel natural.

Ashtray

Again named for its bezel, the “Ashtray” probably has the least appealing and most irreverent name on this list, but it’s got some killer ’80s personality. These were tough Seiko divers with titanium cases and quartz movements that look genuinely ready for action. While the bezel’s grooves don’t quite look like you could rest a cigarette in them, the name seems appropriate.

Shogun

Like the Samurai and the Sumo, the “Shogun” dive watch’s nickname suggests its “Japaneseness,” but also reflects fans’ regard for it as a “high-ranking” diver: a shogun was a military dictator in feudal Japan. With its traditional design, the Shogun watch is like a premium version of Seiko’s beloved basic divers, with features such as the well-respected 6R15 automatic movement and a titanium case.

Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

Tudor’s Beloved Dive Watch Is Now Available in Blue

Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

Following the cancellation of this year’s Baselworld, it was anybody’s guess when — or, indeed, whether or not — Rolex, Tudor and Patek Philippe were going to release their 2020 wares. Rolex and Patek, it seems, are sitting this one out, but younger sibling brand Tudor has decided to give the world what it’s been waiting for since 2018: namely, another iteration of its most perfect dive watch, the Black Bay Fifty-Eight.

The new Black Bay Fifty-Eight (ref. M79030B-0001) is now available in navy blue, a color inspired by 1960s and ’70s Tudor Submariners that were issued to the French Marine National, among other navies. It’s got the same specs we all love from the original black and”gilt” edition — 39mm x 11.9mm stainless steel case, automatic, chronometer-certified cal. MT5402 (COSC) manufacture movement with a 70-hour power reserve, 200m of water resistance, domed sapphire crystal, and an anodized aluminum bezel. A riveted steel bracelet ($3,700) completes the vintage-inspired look, though the watch is also available on a blue “soft touch” leather strap or on a blue fabric strap ($3,375).

The Black Bay Fifty-Eight in navy blue is available at Tudor authorized detailers now, though given the constricted supply of the original black model, it’s anybody’s guess whether or not customers who are new to the brand (and are more than willing to pay for a timepiece will actually be able to get their hands on one. Hopefully, this won’t be the case, as this is truly a beautiful watch, and only expands upon what has become one of the most beloved dive watches of the past decade.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Perfectly Simple: 10 Great Minimalist Watches

If there were a global ranking for tired clichés, “less is more” would probably be right near the top. In the world of watch design, however, it still rings true. Tasteful minimalism can bring out the best elements of a watch, instead of burying them in a sea of unnecessary detail; its very nature makes a watch more comfortable to wear, and more versatile in the styles it’s paired with. Above all, a well-executed minimalist watch is an artful accent, rather than a flashy main course. With that in mind, here are our picks for ten of the best.

Eone Bradley

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There aren’t too many watches made for the blind, for obvious reasons. With the Eone Bradley, however, this niche market has been making waves in the sighted world. Once you see it, you’ll understand why: this minimal, tactile approach is a completely different way of telling time, with magnetic bearings instead of hands. By engaging touch as well as sight, it’s engaging on a new, unique level.

Movement: Ronda Quartz
Diameter: 40mm
Price: $260+

Mondaine Helvetica No1 Light



Over the past 70 years, Helvetica has become the most widely used typeface in the world, and a Swiss design icon in its own right. Mondaine, famous for creating the Swiss railway clock, decided to pay tribute to a fellow design legend with the Mondaine Helvetica, which has a minimalist bent that still retains a bit of playfulness. This version, the Helvetica Light, takes the simple theme even further, and creates a beautiful design in the process.

Movement: Ronda 515 Quartz
Diameter: 38mm
Price: $285

Braun AW 10 EVO



First off: yes, that is the same Braun that makes your electric shaver. The brainchild of Braun Chief Design Officer Dieter Rams, the AW 10 EVO brings the brand’s signature functionalist aesthetic to the watch world. The integrated bracelet and lugs along with the sterile numerals give it an industrial, slightly futuristic feel on the wrist, while the unique one-piece case construction makes this a durable, streamlined choice. It might be stark, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t pretty.

Movement: Quartz
Diameter: 39mm
Price: $380

Unimatic U1-FM



Unimatic has established a unique, recognizable style that marries minimalist design and tool watches. Powered by the Seiko NH35A automatic movement, the U1-FM comes in around $800, features 300m of water resistance and offers eye-catching looks with a sterile rotating bezel (a single pip ensures it remains functional). Unimatic also offers other options, such as a black, DLC-coated case or other (less minimal) bezel iterations.

Movement: Seiko NH35A Automatic
Diameter: 40mm
Price: ~$800

Hamilton Intra-Matic

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Looking for a splash of restrained Mad Men cool on your wrist? The Hamilton Intra-Matic has you covered. Available in either a retro 38mm or more modern 42mm size, the Intra-Matic’s silver sunburst dial gives off a slick mid-century vibe. The ETA 2892-2 movement powering the Intra-Matic is impressive in itself, and its decorated rotor is on display through a wide sapphire case back.

Movement: ETA 2892-2 Automatic
Diameter: 38mm
Price: $845

Sinn 556 A



Not every minimalist design is some waifish dress watch. Minimalist watches can be tough and sporty too, as evidenced by the Sinn 556 A, which features subtle updates for 2020. A solid 200m of water resistance, a bold, super-legible dial and a generous helping of glowing green lume make this watch as functional as it is handsome. Its pared-down pilot-watch looks blend classic military themes with an ultramodern vibe, and render it a natural choice for more casual wear.

Movement: SW200-1 Automatic
Diameter: 38.5mm
Price: $1,420

Georg Jensen Koppel Automatic

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Summed up in one sentence, the Koppel is a nearly perfect expression of Danish design. Everything here is pared down, not just minimal but almost skeletal. The hands are elegantly thin needles, and you won’t find any text or numerals here. The only markers are a ring of tiny black dots, unobtrusive but still easily legible. It’s the kind of thing you expect to see on the wrist of a famous architect.

Movement: ETA 2824
Diameter: 41mm
Price: ~$1,607

Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope



The modern minimalist design movement started at the Bauhaus school in Germany in the early 20th century, and Max Bill was one of its greatest students. Responsible for one of the most famous pieces of designer furniture ever, the multipurpose Ulm Stool, Bill also laid the groundwork for a watch in 1961. It’s remained nearly unchanged since, and this 2020 version takes an appropriately minimalistic approach to its colors and details.

Movement: ETA 7750 Automatic
Diameter: 40mm
Price: $2,095

Nomos Ahoi Datum



Marine chronometers have have sported fairly consistent design language for well over a century — even after they were adopted into wristwatch form. Nomos changes this up with their gorgeous Ahoi Neomatik, featuring a simplified nautical look and gorgeous dial in this 2020 version for Doctors Without Borders. Its in-house caliber Epsilon movement is a work of art itself, richly decorated with Geneva stripes.

Movement: Nomos DUW 5101 Automatic
Diameter: 40.3mm
Price: $4,780

Ochs und Junior Moonphase

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Moonphase watches are considered by many to be some of the greatest expressions of watchmaking prowess. What they aren’t usually considered, however, is minimal — most moonphases are ornate, finely detailed pieces. The Ochs und Junior Moonphase bucks that trend in favor of a clean, simple design that also includes a novel date-indicator track. Even more impressively, it’s one of the most accurate moonphases in the world, needing readjustment every 3,478 years.

Movement: Modified ETA 2824-2 Automatic
Diameter: 39mm
Price: ~$11,817+

This Chunky Bronze Pilot’s Watch Was Made for a Globe-Circumnavigating Aviator

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“Mission Accomplished”


Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

In 2019, a 76-year old restored Spitfire aircraft flew around the world. Now, Swiss watchmaker IWC is commemorating the adventure and the IWC brand ambassador Matt Jones who made the journey (along with co-pilot Steve Boultbee Brooks) with a new pilot’s watch in a bronze case with a striking green dial and a “big date” display. It follows watches like the Timezoner Spitfire Edition “Longest Flight”, which also celebrated the voyage.

With a diameter of 46.2mm, IWC’s Big Pilot’s Watch is just that: big. Its size will be good for the large-wristed, but it has historical justification as well, referencing oversized military watches from the mid-20th century that were made large for cockpit legibility and sometimes even strapped to pilots’ thighs. The giant crown has the same origin, as this would have to be operated wearing gloves.

A notable feature of the verbosely named IWC Big Pilot’s Watch Big Date Spitfire Edition “Mission Accomplished” watch is its digital date complication. This uses two discs under the dial to change a single digit of the date at at time, allowing for a larger display — and it’s significantly more complicated than the typical single disc with 31 numbers.

Inside, the watch is powered by the IWC in-house 59235 manually wound movement offering an impressive 192 hours of power reserve — its balance wheel is visible through a window in the case back. The IWC “Mission Accomplished” watch is limited to only 500 examples and each will have a price of around $17,960.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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These Are the Best-Designed Watches of 2020, According to Experts

Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

The best-designed products of 2020 have just been announced, as judged by the Red Dot Design Award competition in Germany. The Red Dot award is one of the most recognized and prestigious achievements in design, which winners can display in marketing material to distinguish their products from the competition. There are many product categories, but among 1,700 products that won the Red Dot Product Design award in 2020 are some interesting watches. Check out a few of them (and a watch winder) below:

Nomos Tangente Sport Neomatik 42 Date

Recognized among watch enthusiasts as a design-forward brand that also offers strong value with in-house movements, German watchmaker Nomos regularly wins Red Dots. The Tangente Sport neomatik 42 Date is even distinguished among 2020 Red Dot winners by its placement in the Best of the Best. According to the Red Dot jury, “it exemplifies a shapely adaptation of the classic Nomos Tangente watch for the sports sector.”

Sinn 936

Sinn consistently proves that pared-back, humble, function-first design is visually appealing and provides a satisfying user experience. The Red Dot Award jury on the Sinn 936 chronograph: “The sporty chronograph stands out due to its robustness, its useful functions and a concise face layout, which showcases an appealing sense of clarity.”

Detomaso Viaggio Automatic

German brand Detomaso flies under-the-radar even amongst watch enthusiasts, but its Viaggio Automatic has a balanced, symmetrical take on the day-date function. The Red Dot Jury says: “The design language of the Viaggio Automatic is emotionally very appealing and implemented using high-quality materials.”

Braun BN0265

Braun clocks and watches designed by Dieter Rams are often held up as star examples of Bauhaus design, and this contemporary chronograph shows that the brand’s still got it. Red Dot Award Jury: “The modern chronograph fascinates with elaborate details. Thanks to the brand’s characteristic design language, it achieves a high recognition value.”

Laco Frankfurt GMT

German watchmaker Laco is known for its pilot watches, and this GMT expands on its historic design language with some pops of color. According to the Red Dot Award Jury: “The Frankfurt GMT merges a striking appearance with sophisticated technical features which professionally meet the requirements of a mobile lifestyle.”

Louis Moinet Memoris Titanium

Swiss independent brand Louis Moinet stands out among many of the Red Dot-winning watches for its technical, avant-garde aesthetic more common among high-end watchmaking. The main show here is the movement itself and colorful backdrop, while the time appears secondary, showing that not all good design need be minimalist. The Jury describes it having a “sculptural appearance” which “captivates with a user-friendly blend of tradition and high-tech.”

MeisterSinger Astroscope

MeisterSinger believes that a single hand to display the hour to the nearest five minutes will change your perception of time. Here, the brand combines this with a day-of-the-week display incorporating astronomical symbols. Red Dot Jury: “The functionally equipped Astroscope surprises with an extraordinary symbolic language, which matches the distinctiveness of a single-hand watch.”

Shenzhen Champs Watch Winder

Designed by a Chinese manufacturer, this watch winder hits the right design notes. According to the Jury: “The watch winder impresses with an elegant appearance, while its smart functions enable convenient management of various watch models.”

Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

Track a Second Time Zone with This Beautiful Dive Watch

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Baltic Aquascaphe SB01


Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

Baltic’s Aquascaphe continually makes it to the top of our lists of favorite dive watches. Whether in steel or bronze or in the form of a special, limited edition, it’s a watch that captures our attention.

Luckily, we now have another variant on hand. Equipped with a steel, unidirectional 12-hour bezel, the SP01 is the same Aquascaphe we know and love, but now with the added ability to quickly and easily track a second time zone. A thicker handset and larger dial indices filled with Luminova BGW9 make for increased legibility over previous models, while an orange “Baltic” logo is another vintage-inspired touch.

The SB01 is available with either a blue Tropic-style rubber dive strap for ~$583 or with Baltic’s steel beads-of-rice bracelet for$682. If you loved previous iterations of this beloved French dive watch but were waiting for a steel bezel — or, better yet, for a 12-hour bezel — now’s your chance the nab the watch of your dreams!

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

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This Automatic Pilot’s Watch Is Built in France and Costs Just $690

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Yema Flygraf Pilot


Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

On the one hand, French watchmaker Yema is known for its dive watches, but it also has strong connections with aviation. Though the brand has made watches for the French Air Force, its newest is meant for civilians and developed in collaboration with an American aerobatic pilot named Sammy Mason. With a military-inspired design powered by an automatic movement — as well as attainable pricing, at $690 — the new Yema Flygraf Pilot should have broad appeal to aviation enthusiasts and beyond.

The Flygraf Pilot has military-inspired elements of field and pilot watches from several decades ago, but the brand adds its own modern design twists: a brushed bezel and crown guards give it a contemporary tool-watch feel, and 39mm is a comfortable modern case size that’s perfect for most wrists.

Inside, the watch is powered by the brand’s own MBP1000 automatic movement. While the term “in-house” is generally contentious, Yema’s movements are among very few being produced outside Japan about which it might accurately be used — and yet, the brand is charging well below $1,000 for automatic watches. The MBP1000 has, according to Yema, been “designed, manually assembled and precisely taken care of at our Morteau (France) workshops by highly experienced French traditional watchmakers.”

Like certain other Yema pilot watches, the Flygraf Pilot has the water resistance of a dive watch at 300m, promising extra durability. Available in black dial (M1) and gray dial (M2) versions on black canvas or black leather strap., Yema is offering a strong value proposition at $690.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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This Innovative Sport Watch Is Ripe for a Comeback

Welcome to Watches You Should Know, a biweekly column highlighting important or little-known watches with interesting backstories and unexpected influence. This week: the IWC Ingenieur.

It began its life as a classical-looking timepiece notable for its resistance to magnetic fields. That might not sound particularly sexy, but the IWC Ingenieur would go on to rival some of the most iconic watches of all time, beating the technically comparable Rolex Milgauss to market, and decades later, reimagined as a sibling of Gerald Genta’s prestigious Royal Oak and Nautilus sport watches. No matter how you feel about it, this watch deserves a closer look.

The IWC Ingenieur ref. 666 was introduced in 1955 as a watch for scientists and engineers, and there wasn’t much about its looks that would tell you it was radically different from other elegantly styled watches of the time. Two elements, however, hinted at its uniqueness: the “Ingenieur” logo on the dial that incorporated an arrow reminiscent of a lightning bolt, and its size.

At around 37mm, the Ingenieur was considered large for its time, and this was in part due to a unique feature found inside its case. While other companies had tried various methods of protecting movements from magnetic fields, IWC used a non-ferrous, soft iron shield around the movement within the case. The brand had previously used the same tech in its Mark XI watch for pilots who relied on accurate timekeeping for navigation and were exposed to significant magnetism in the cockpit.

This solution meant the Ingenieur was able to withstand a significant level of magnetism: 1,000 gauss, to be specific. Upon its introduction, it was marketed to scientists (Ingenieur is German for “engineer”) whose work involved equipment that could magnetize a watch. And while the Ingenieur didn’t make a huge initial splash, it preceded the 1956 Rolex Milgauss (“1,000 gauss”) and the similarly antimagnetic 1957 Omega Railmaster.

The Ingenieur received some subtle upgrades over the subsequent years, but the 1970s brought radical changes across the watch industry, from technology to design. In the hands of Royal Oak creator Gerald Genta, the 1976 Ingenieur (ref. 1832) went from a conservatively styled watch for professionals to a bold sport watch. (This was the same year that Genta gave the world the Patek Philippe Nautilus with its lifestyle-oriented sport watch concept.)

The Ingenieur got the same integrated bracelet treatment as the Royal Oak and Nautilus, as well as a distinctive bezel with five visible screw holes. It even had a true sport-watch water resistance of 120m. This aesthetic would form the basis of the Ingenieur for many years to come, and ultimately establish a collection including a range of iterations and complications.

The current Ingenieur collection (as of 2020), however, more closely references the conservative looks of the earliest models and no longer emphasizes magnetic resistance. IWC seems to be sitting on plenty of potential for upgraded design, as so many brands have tried to replicate the Genta juju with lifestyle sport watches lately, from A. Lange & Söhne with the Odysseus to Vacheron Constantin with its Overseas to Chopard with the Alpine Eagle and Bell & Ross with its BR05… and quite a few more.

IWC is one of the only brands, however, that has the claim to a true Genta design of this style with proven success — even if it never reached the status of the Royal Oak or Nautilus. What could be more compelling in today’s market than a thoughtful take on the Genta Ingenieur? With one of IWC’s in-house movements (current time-only Ingenieurs use Sellita-based calibers) and perhaps some silicon parts to give it real antimagnetic cred, it’d be an easy win. In the meantime, vintage Ingenieur models hold plenty of interest and value.

Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

This Colorful New Dive Watch Supports a Worthy Cause

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Oris Carysfort Reef


Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

Joining a growing range of watches with an ocean conservation theme, Oris’s newest limited-edition diver is specifically dedicated to the restoration a coral reef in the Florida Keys. With the solid construction and water resistance of Oris’s well-loved Aquis dive watch, the Carysfort Reef Limited Edition features a GMT complication and sporty, colorful highlights.

In steel at 43.5mm wide, the new LE follows a similar, recently release model produced in 18k gold and priced at $19,000. Limited to 50 examples, three of them were donated directly to the Florida-based Coral Restoration Foundation, which Oris has worked with since 2014. The new models are less limited and less expensive, but still benefit the Foundation and its mission by raising awareness of the issue.

The Carysfort is similar in its specs to the Oris’s Aquis GMT, with 300m of water resistance and the Sellita SW330-1 automatic movement. While the Aquis GMT has a the bonus of a window in the caseback to view the movement, the limited edition has a solid case back engraved with a coral reef motif in relief.

2,000 examples of the Oris Carysfort Reef Limited Edition are being produced, each with a price of $3,000 on a steel bracelet or $2,800 on an orange rubber strap.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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5 Super Affordable MVMT Watches

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Field, Dress, and More


The entrée into “proper” watch collecting (whatever the hell that is) needn’t take the form of a high-end, mechanical watch. Hell, your first watch doesn’t have to be mechanical at all. It should be something that fits within your budget, something whose looks you enjoy, and something that makes you happy.

Here are five fun, affordable watches from Los Angeles-based MVMT. Whether you’re looking for a gift for a budding watch enthusiast, a weekend beater watch, or something you can travel with without worrying too much about, you can probably find an MVMT to fit the bill. (They make an automatic watch, too.)

Element Alkali Tan Price: $95

The Field Price: $95+

The 40 Rose Gold Brown Price: $120

The Rise Bristol Price: $140

Arc Automatic Price: $300
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

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Rado’s Lightweight Ceramic Watch Gets an Olive Green Treatment and a Transparent Dial

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Rado True Thinline Anima


Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

There’s a healthy chance that when you think about ceramic watches, you think of Rado. After all, the Swiss watchmaker has been a leader in ceramic technology since the early 1960s, incorporating it in their Diastar series as early as 1962. The production of modern ceramic also allows for some pretty funky colors, such as the matte olive green of the new True Thinline Anima Automatic.

Ultra-lightweight and scratch-resistant, the True Thinline Anima is equipped with a mechanical ETA A31.L02 movement and a new, skeletonized dial. Designed within a monobloc (one-piece) case, its movement features anodized aluminum bridges and plates, reducing the overall weight of the watch and making for a cool viewing experience through the transparent dial. Even the movement’s calendar wheel is skeletonized.

Measuring 40mm in diameter, the True Thinline Anima has a titanium case back, box sapphire crystal, 30m of water resistance and a matching ceramic bracelet with 3-fold titanium clasp. A limited edition of 2,020 pieces, it’s available now for $3,000.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

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This Affordable Mechanical Chronograph Watch Comes Costs Just $500

The clean and classic Gemini from boutique American brand Lorier is the company’s first chronograph watch, and it’s priced to get your attention. How many modern mechanical watches with the stopwatch function can you think of that cost under $500? Probably not that many, and the Gemini is one of the best-looking, with a retro design that’s grabs your attention. This, along with several dial options and a cool steel bracelet, make the Lorier Gemini a great option for vintage fans and mechanical watch snobs on a budget. (Just make sure to monitor the brand’s website closely, as they sell out frequently.)

Key Specs
Case Diameter: 39mm
Case Depth: 10mm (plus crystal)
Water Resistance: 50m
Movement: Sea-Gull ST19 hand-wound mechanical
Price: $499

Notable: The Lorier Gemini offers the experience of a handsome, retro-styled chronograph watch with a mechanical movement for not a ton of money. Elements like its inexpensive, manually wound movement and plexiglass help keep it affordable, but the overall impression is that of a charming watch for its price. While vintage-styled, it’s not an off-the-shelf design or knockoff of a specific vintage model. The steel bracelet, in particular, gives it a welcome sporty, contemporary touch.

Who It’s For: It can be tough being a watch enthusiast on a budget while also being snobby about quartz movements — but at these prices, quartz watches are the majority of your chronograph options. If you must have a mechanical chronograph, you could do a lot worse in terms of looks than the Gemini. Those drawn to sporty vintage chronographs — and who among us isn’t? — will appreciate the Gemini’s throwback style. At 39mm wide, it’ll also be attractive for those with a taste for vintage sizes and understated watches, as well as wearable for those with smaller wrists.

Alternatives: If it’s the sporty, 1960s chrono style you crave, and the quartz vs mechanical distinction isn’t a sticking point for you, you have affordable quartz options. Try the descriptively named 1962 or 1963 chronograph watches from Dan Henry.

With the same basic mechanical movement (though here, it could be considered in-house), the Sea-Gull 1963 chronograph is a well-known classic among affordable watches. A remake of a vintage model produced for the Chinese air force priced around $329, it offers a unique vintage look and wearing experience, as well as add-on options like sapphire crystal and a display case back.

At slightly above the Gemini’s price is the French brand Baltic’s Bicompax 001 chronograph, which offers retro looks that aren’t an homage to any specific vintage model. It, too, uses the Sea-Gull ST19 and costs around $595.

While the Maen Skymaster feels a bit more derivative in its design and is a couple hundred bucks up the price scale, it offers vintage looks and sizing — but with more premium features. With sapphire crystal and a Swiss automatic chronograph movement inside, it starts at around $760 and is about the most affordable watch you’ll find with this combination of features.

Review

The New York-based husband-and-wife team behind Lorier are watch lovers, and it shows in their products. They’ve adopted the laudable mission to “make a watch affordable enough that you wouldn’t be afraid to wear it every day and everywhere, and handsome enough you’d want to.” Until now, this mantra has materialized in automatic watches in three collections that range from more formal or sporty but feature the same basic specs. As a chronograph, the new Gemini required more substantial changes, but it remains consistent with the brand’s approach.

A chronograph essentially adds a stopwatch to the simple time-telling functionality of a watch. While the ability to time events on a chronograph can be genuinely useful in daily life, its appeal in 2020 is largely aesthetic and technical. The pushers used to activate it and the sub-dials that display the timing information result in a sporty, technical look that also recalls some of the historic roles chronographs played in the 20th century.

The Gemini appears to have the same basic 39mm-wide case (and the same handset) as Lorier’s other watches, but the brand says it was specially developed to fit the chronograph movement. It’s a well well-made case with brushed finishing offset by polished elements such as a bevel along its sides. While Lorier’s previous watches were all water-resistant to 200m, it’s surely the chronograph pushers in the case side that resulted in a rating of 50m — more than enough for daily activities and above a dress watch’s typical 30m, but don’t take the Gemini swimming.

There are a myriad options for basic automatic time-and-date watches at this price level, but chronographs are notoriously complicated and expensive — it’s typical for a Swiss chronograph to cost nearly double its otherwise equal time-only counterpart. So when you see a mechanical chronograph watch at under $500, there’s a good chance that it’s powered by the same ST19 movement that’s in the Gemini. The ST19 is made by the Chinese company Tianjin Sea-Gull, and it’s often been found to serve its users well — but quality control issues have sometimes been reported and problems are statistically more common than with more expensive movements.

The ST19 is a clone of the Swiss Venus 175 movement, apparently made by Tianjin Sea-Gull using Venus’s original tooling and blueprints after the Swiss company went bust. This is an integrated chronograph caliber (meaning it was designed as a chronograph rather than later fitted with a chronograph module), and it’s interesting to note that the ST19 uses a column wheel — a feature typically only found in higher-end chronograph watches that tends to be valued by enthusiasts for its smooth articulation and feel. The ST19 is manually wound with a power reserve of 51 hours, so users will need to regularly wind the movement by hand. Unfortunately the Gemini doesn’t feature a display case back, since the ST19 is a cool movement to look at.

It’s the aesthetics and affordability that are the Lorier Gemini’s primary selling points. The contrasting sub-dials are extremely popular vintage cues — black on white being dubbed “panda” while the opposite is “reverse panda,” in ultra-nerdy watch enthusiast culture. The three current models on offer include black, white, or blue dials, each with glossy finish. The highly domed plexiglass is another nod to those bygone decades that, conveniently, is not only the inexpensive option (compared to scratch-proof sapphire) but also happens to be appreciated by many vintage lovers for its distinctive texture.

Verdict: The Lorier Gemini is a good way for budding watch lovers to experience a mechanical chronograph without spending the considerable cash that even the next comparable model up the ladder will cost. The main draw, however, is its classic and restrained styling. Expect a nod from seasoned vintage watch enthusiasts for its design cues, but the Gemini has its own personality in spades.

Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

5 Colorful Watches to Celebrate Pride Month

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3 Affordable Watches to Wear to the Beach This Summer

<!–3 Affordable Watches to Wear to the Beach This Summer • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Summer Time


All sorts of styles and qualities can make for a good warm-weather watch, but only a subset of them are right for that quintessential, hotly anticipated summer experience: going to the beach. A beach watch should of course be able to handle salt water and sand, but it doesn’t hurt of the watch is sporty and colorful as well. Each of the four sub-$1,000 beach-ready watches below are each great options.

Seiko Prospex Samurai SRPB53

Beloved for its value, robustness and character, Seiko’s “Samurai” is up to just about any task, and will feel right at home on the sand, on the boardwalk or in the water.
Movement: Seiko 4R35 Automatic
Diameter: 44mm
Price: $495

Casio G-Shock G-Lide GWX5700SS

Made for surfers and featuring a digital tide chart, the G-Shock Glide GWX5700 is at home in the sun with its solar-charging tech, and it’s comfortable and colorful as well.
Movement: Casio Tough Solar Quartz
Diameter: 51.7mm
Price: $140

Hamilton Khaki Navy Scuba Auto

Though not rated for deep diving, the Hamilton Khaki Navy Scuba Auto’s dive watch style and fresh colors are appropriate for the beach, and its 100m of water resistance is more than enough for swimming.
Movement: Hamilton H-10 (ETA Base) Automatic
Diameter: 40mm
Price: $745

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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Three Instagram Accounts for Watch Lovers to Follow in June, 2020

Welcome to Follow Me, a monthly column showcasing our favorite watch-related Instagram accounts, from collectors to dealers and everything in between.

It’s been a while since we did a roundup of some of our favorite watch-related IG accounts. Part of the problem is that there are so many cool ones to follow, so we thought maybe we’d try something a little different: namely, a monthly selection of some of our favorite discoveries. Today we’ve got accounts from one of our favorite vintage dealers, a very talented industrial designer, and an online store with a special twist on horological ephemera. Enjoy!

@ericmwind

Eric Wind is the man. He’s been a contributor to HODINKEE and has worked for Christie’s, and he currently runs his own shop under the name Wind Vintage, selling vintage timepieces mostly from before 1980 and over $10,000. However, his IG is full of all sort of cool stuff, including the occasional more affordable watch.

@iniarchibong

Ini Archibong is a California-born, Switzerland-based designer whose works include the Galop d’Hermès, a watch collection that launched at SIHH in 2019. His IG is design-centric, not watch-centric, but this makes it all the more exciting, as it offers a window into the world of a creative who clearly has an eye for beauty, no matter the medium.

@adpatina

Nick from Ad Patina has given himself a very simple job that he executes at a very high level: to find compelling vintage watch ads from the golden age of midcentury advertising, and to save them from oblivion by selling them, either framed or unframed. We challenge you to peruse his IG without buying something.

This Colorful New Chronograph Watch Takes Its Inspiration From a Funky 1970s Design

Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

TAG Heuer is 160 years old this year. Well, sort of. Techniques d’Avant Garde purchased a majority stake in the company in 1985 — and LVMH subsequently purchased nearly the entire company in 1999 — but Heuer itself was established in Saint-Imier, Switzerland, in 1860. So, close enough.

You may recall the TAG Heuer Carrera 160 Years Silver Dial Limited Edition from earlier in the year, a watch that celebrated the 160-year milestone. Well, if the 1970s are more your bag, you’re in luck, as the storied Swiss watchmaker has decided to re-release one of their funkiest models in a continued celebration of their birthday: the Heuer Montreal.

First launched in 1972, the Montreal was actually an entire collection of automatic chronographs. One in particular, the reference 110503W, is especially rare and collectible. Rather than reissue this reference itself, TAG Heuer has decided to borrow its colorful dial colors and apply them to a 39mm Carrera, limited to just 1,000 pieces.

The original Montreal

The Carrera has proven itself somewhat of a chameleon over time, able to serve as a blank canvas upon which to experiment with different color schemes and designs, and this example is no different: Bright, airy and fun, the Montreal heritage manifests itself in a white dial with blue “azurage” sub-registers, yellow lume and accents, and red coloring on the laquered hands and minutes/seconds track.

This colorful dial is covered with a sapphire “top hat”-style crustal and housed within a polished stainless steel 39mm Carrera case. Each watch is engraved with a unique, limited edition serial number on the case back and comes equipped with a blue alligator leather strap. Powering the watch is the Calibre Heuer 02, an automatic movement with an 80-hour power reserve, a vertical clutch and a column wheel, providing for smooth pusher movement.

The 1970s Montreal collection

A fun, colorful summer watch — as well as a particularly bright livery for the often- (though not always) sober Carrera, the Carrera 160 Years Montreal Limited Edition is limited to 1,000 pieces at a price of $6,750.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Two New Vintage-Inspired Watches Revive the Classic ‘Tuxedo Dial’

<!–Two New Vintage-Inspired Watches Revive the Classic ‘Tuxedo Dial’ • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Longines Heritage Classic Tuxedo


Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

The vintage-remake craze in the watch industry has led to the rediscovery of all kinds of styles and themes from bygone eras, many of which were previously known only to dedicated collectors. The handsome new Longines Heritage Classic Tuxedo, for instance, recreates two models produced in the 1940s that featured “tuxedo dials” — and it’s easy to see why they were thusly named.

It’s not because the look is exceedingly formal, of course, but rather because of its black and white color scheme. Specifically, both watches feature a silver center section surrounded by a black ring beneath the Arabic numeral hour markers. A little larger than their historical counterparts, the first of Longines’ new watches is a simple time-only with sub-seconds at 6 o’clock and a 38.5mm-wide case; the other is a chronograph measuring 40mm wide.

Both watches use ETA-based automatic movements with silicon hairsprings and extended power reserves (64 hours for the three-hander and 54 hours for the chronograph). The chronograph features a module developed especially for Longines. As a nod to collectors’ preferences and historical accuracy, neither model features the typical “automatic” wordage on the dial, nor a date display.

Both watches will come on appropriately handsome black leather straps, with a price of $2,000 for the time-only and $3,000 for the chronograph.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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