All posts in “tech”

Here’s All the New Audio Gear That Sonos Just Announced

It’s exciting times for Sonos. The multi-room speaker giant just announced three new products at IFA, Europe’s biggest consumer tech trade show. There’s the Sonos Move, the company’s first-ever portable speaker; the Sonos Port, which is the next-generation version of the Sonos Connect; and there’s the Sonos One SL, a new entry-level Sonos speaker. We’ve given you a brief rundown on all three new products below.

The push for new products shouldn’t be a surprise if you’ve followed Sonos. Patrick Spence, the company’s CEO since 2017, is actively moving the company to be more open and forward-thinking, as well as pushing it to expand its product line. Since Spence took over, Sonos has released its first smart speaker, partnered with IKEA to make the most affordable Sonos speakers (Symfonisk), and now it has entered a completely new market: portable audio.

Sonos Move

The Sonos Move is the company’s first-ever portable speaker. It has built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, allowing it to be way more versatile than any other Sonos speaker to date; you can use it like a Sonos One smart speaker – yes, the Move can be integrated with either Alexa or Google Assistant – or you can use it as a portable rugged Bluetooth speaker. There’s a new three-button array on the back of the speaker that allows you to toggle between modes. The Sonos Move costs $399 and is available for preorder now; you’ll be able to pick it up in stores or buy online on September 24.

Sonos Port

The Sonos Port is the next-gen Connect ($349) you’ve been waiting for. It works the same way, hooking up to your existing stereo or receiver and turning your non-Sonos sound system into one that works just like it, but the Port adds some big things. First, it supports AirPlay 2. Second, it has 12-volt trigger, which enables the Port to automatically turn on your connected receiver when signaled through the Sonos app. And third, it’s matte black and actually looks like it will blend in with your other stereo components. The Sonos Port costs $399 and is available for preorder. A select number of models will starting on September 12, but they’ll be available everywhere starting in January 2020.

Sonos One SL

The Sonos One SL is essentially a Sonos One speaker without the built-in mics that allow you to talk to Alexa or Google Assistant. Or you can think of it as a Play:1 speaker but in the body of a Sonos One. Either way, the Sonos One SL is the company’s new most entry-level speaker – aside from the Ikea x Sonos Symfonisk speakers – and it costs $179. It’s available for pre-order right now in either white or black. Sadly, the introduction of the Sonos One SL means that Sonos will be phasing out its original Play:1 speaker.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Here’s All the New Hardware That Sonos Just Announced

It’s exciting times for Sonos. The multi-room speaker giant just announced three new products at IFA, Europe’s biggest consumer tech trade show. There’s the Sonos Move, the company’s first-ever portable speaker; the Sonos Port, which is the next-generation version of the Sonos Connect; and there’s the Sonos One SL, a new entry-level Sonos speaker. We’ve given you a brief rundown on all three new products below.

The push for new products shouldn’t be a surprise if you’ve followed Sonos. Patrick Spence, the company’s CEO since 2017, is actively moving the company to be more open and forward-thinking, as well as pushing it to expand its product line. Since Spence took over, Sonos has released its first smart speaker, partnered with IKEA to make the most affordable Sonos speakers (Symfonisk), and now it has entered a completely new market: portable audio.

Sonos Move

The Sonos Move is the company’s first-ever portable speaker. It has built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, allowing it to be way more versatile than any other Sonos speaker to date; you can use it like a Sonos One smart speaker – yes, the Move can be integrated with either Alexa or Google Assistant – or you can use it as a portable rugged Bluetooth speaker. There’s a new three-button array on the back of the speaker that allows you to toggle between modes. The Sonos Move costs $399 and is available for preorder now; you’ll be able to pick it up in stores or buy online on September 24.

Sonos Port

The Sonos Port is the next-gen Connect ($349) you’ve been waiting for. It works the same way, hooking up to your existing stereo or receiver and turning your non-Sonos sound system into one that works just like it, but the Port adds some big things. First, it supports AirPlay 2. Second, it has 12-volt trigger, which enables the Port to automatically turn on your connected receiver when signaled through the Sonos app. And third, it’s matte black and actually looks like it will blend in with your other stereo components. The Sonos Port costs $399 and is available for preorder. A select number of models will starting on September 12, but they’ll be available everywhere starting in January 2020.

Sonos One SL

The Sonos One SL is essentially a Sonos One speaker without the built-in mics that allow you to talk to Alexa or Google Assistant. Or you can think of it as a Play:1 speaker but in the body of a Sonos One. Either way, the Sonos One SL is the company’s new most entry-level speaker – aside from the Ikea x Sonos Symfonisk speakers – and it costs $179. It’s available for pre-order right now in either white or black. Sadly, the introduction of the Sonos One SL means that Sonos will be phasing out its original Play:1 speaker.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The One Tip Every Sonos Speaker Owner Should Know

If you own more than one Sonos speaker and you’ve grouped them together – whether that consists of Play:1s, Ones, Play:5s, Beams, the new Symfonisk speakers, or a combination of any of them – you might’ve noticed that, on occasion, one of the speakers will stop playing with the rest. As a Sonos owner myself, I’ve noticed this happening to my various Play:1s when grouped with a One; I’ll ask Alexa to play music and all of my speakers save for a Play:1 will play in unison.

Normally, the solution to regrouping your Sonos speakers is to go into the Sonos app, select the “Group” button and then select the specific speaker that’s not playing. It’s easy, if a little annoying.

[embedded content]

However, something that you might not have known – I didn’t until just a few weeks ago – is that there’s a quick fix for regrouping a rogue Sonos speaker. And it doesn’t involve touching your smartphone or computer. Instead, all you need to do is go over to the speaker that’s not playing, press and hold down the Play/Pause button for three seconds, it’ll automatically regroup with the other speakers and play the same music. As long as the speakers are all connected to the same Wi-Fi network, this will work.

Another good use of this “hack” is if you have a Beam, Playbar or Playbase (any soundbar connected to your TV), along with another Sonos speaker in a different room. For instance, I gifted my mom a Sonos Beam last Christmas and one of her favorite things to do is listening to the Mets game on TV while making dinner. The problem is that her Sonos Beam is in the TV room and the Play:1 is in the kitchen, and the two often get ungrouped because she’s always turning on and off the TV (and thus the soundbar). But by holding down the Play/Pause button on her Play:1, it automatically syncs with her Sonos Beam (as long as the TV is on) and she can hear the Mets game.

Magic.

This LG Fridge Is Perfect If You Love Whiskey

Do you love whiskey? Do you want a high-tech fridge? Would you like something that fulfills both these interests? Well, you can have it. The LG Fridge LRFVS3006S is a $4,399 refrigerator that makes craft ice for all you whiskey and cocktail lovers out there.

This fridge isn’t for the regular folks who think it’s just for keeping things cold. No, this is for people who know too much about the delicacy of craft ice and want something that’ll be up to the task of meeting their high standards when it comes to all things beverage. Here’s how LG describes the fridge:

“LG’s exclusive Craft Ice slow melting round ice maker automatically makes upscale craft ice at home without the work. No more time consuming molds that only produce one or two at a time. Give your beverages the perfect ice for next level entertaining, from craft cocktails & whiskey to soft drinks, lemonade, even iced coffee.”

The LG Fridge LRFVS3006S sits somewhere in the upper ranks of fancy appliances. Of course, its most iconic feature is the built-in Craft Ice maker that creates perfect spheres claimed to be the most effective way to chill a drink by maximizing surface area while melting slower than cubes or crushed ice. I know what you’re thinking. Phew! These rich folks and their fancy ice machines. Can’t you just dump regular ice cubes on your cold ones and call it a day?

Well, you can. But is it the best way to do it? Well, no, but it’s not that bad. But are you the kind of person who’ll settle for anything less? Well, you have your answer.

MORE INFO HERE

5 Settings to Change on Your Smartphone Right Now

Leaving your phone set up exactly the way it was when you got it out of the box is one option, sure — but you’re missing out on a host of little tweaks and reconfigurations that could make your mobile more productive (and enjoyable) to use. Here are a handful of the settings you should go about changing right away.

In the instructions below we’re describing the process on the latest version of iOS (iOS 12) running on iPhones, and the latest stock version of Android (Android 9) at the time of writing. If you’re using a different software version, or a different flavor of Android, the steps might vary slightly, but all the options should still be available.

1. Turn on Wi-Fi calling

If your phone is struggling to find a cellular connection but does have a strong link to Wi-Fi, it can use the latter option to send and receive calls—as long as your provider supports it (all the major US ones do).

If you’re on Android, open up Settings then tap on Network & Internet, Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi preferences and then Wi-Fi calling. For those of you on iOS, open Settings then tap Phone and Wi-Fi Calling.

|

2. Tone down the notifications

The more efficient your notification setup, the more you’ll be able to get done, with and without your phone. Both Android and iOS let you turn off notifications for certain apps, or simply silence notifications for certain apps (so they appear on screen but don’t cause a sound or vibration).

Those of you on Android need to open up Settings then tap Apps & notifications, then choose an app to adjust its notifications—some apps let you set notifications for some app events (like Facebook tags) and not others (like Facebook friend requests). On iOS, open Settings and choose Notifications, then an app—the next screen lets you set the type of notification and the associated sound, or turn alerts off completely for that app.

|

3. Identify who’s calling

When your phone starts ringing from the other side of the room, it can be helpful to have an idea of who’s calling, as it’s probably a factor in whether you want to answer the call or not. To this end, both Android and iOS let you associate particular ringtones with particular contacts in your address book.

If you’re on Android, you need to tap a contact in the Contacts app, then the More button (three dots, top right), then Set ringtone. If you’re on iOS, tap on an entry in Contacts, then choose Edit and Ringtone.

|

4. Stretch out your phone’s battery life

No matter what the make and model of your phone, it’ll come with some built-in tools for managing battery life more efficiently, which will mean a longer time between charges—it’s just a question of turning them on.

For Android users, the option you need is in Settings behind the Battery menu entry—make sure Adaptive Battery is turned on and that Battery Saver is set to intelligently operate based on your routine. For iOS users, head to Settings then Battery, and enable Low Power Mode when you’re low on juice (it also automatically asks to be enabled when you’re down to 20 percent).

|

5. Save on storage space

Both Android and iOS come with built-in tools for clearing out photos and videos from your phone once they’ve been safely backed up to the cloud. Enabling these features can mean you avoid running out of room on your handset at the most inopportune times—like when you’re trying to take a new photo.

If you’re on Android, Google Photos should be the default photo and video manager: From the app settings, choose Free up device storage and follow the instructions on screen. On iOS, your photos and videos are likely managed by the Photos app: From the iOS Settings screen, tap Photos and enable Optimize iPhone Storage (this keeps low-res copies of your original high-res files stored locally).

|

6. Give your eyes a rest

Blue light produced by the screens of our gadgets has been linked to reducing the quality of our sleep, so it’s probably not a good idea to watch hours of YouTube before bed. If you must check your phone late at night, you can at least change the display temperature so less blue light gets emitted.

To set this up, Android users should go to the system Settings then tap Display and Night Light (you can enable the effect manually or on a schedule). iOS users should open system Settings and choose Display & Brightness then Night Shift (again, the feature can be enabled manually or automatically).

|

7. Set your limits

If you want to restrict the time you spend messing about on social media apps and the web—but don’t necessarily want to go as far as removing the offending apps from your phone—then you can set daily time limits on specific apps. Of course, it’s your phone, so you can simply unset them again… but it might aid your willpower.

If you’re using Android, open up Settings and pick Digital Wellbeing then Dashboard—you can then set timers for any of the apps on your device. If you’re using iOS, you can configure timers for your apps by heading into Settings, then choosing Screen Time and App Limits.

|

8. Improve device security

You probably set up some kind of fingerprint ID or PIN code when you first set up your device, but that screen lock protection isn’t much use if someone manages to grab or access your phone before the lock is enabled—and that’s why you should pay attention to what your screen timeout window is (the number of seconds your phone waits without any screen input before locking the device).

You can set this on Android by going to Settings then choosing Display, Advanced, and Screen timeout. To set this on iOS, go to Settings and select Display & Brightness, then tap on Auto-Lock.

|

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Fenix 6X Pro Solar Is Another Solid GPS Smartwatch From Garmin

This is the Fenix 6X Pro Solar from Garmin and it totally rocks. As we pack even more features into our smartwatches, battery life starts to become a problem. At most, modern models can last anywhere between 2-7 days on a single charge. On the other hand, with some functions turned off, there are certain brands that can extend usage time up to 21 days or more.

Samsung, Huawei, and Apple are not the only major players out there. Expand your search parameters and you can find great alternatives from Fitbit or Garmin. The latter sure knows its target market as it unveils a new GPS-enabled smartwatch.

The name is already a dead giveaway because unlike most GPS-ready wearables from Garmin, it can draw power from sunlight. What love about the Fenix lineup is its ability to keep up with the active lifestyle of the user. The Fenix 6X Pro Solar embodies everything that a longtime user wants in a rugged smartwatch.

There are two variations available to fit your style. For a stealthy look, the Titanium Carbon Gray DLC with a black silicone band is perfect. IF you’re after the distinct metallic shine on your wrist, the one with the vented titanium bracelet should do nicely.

This robust GPS smartwatch keeps its 280 x 280 1.4-inch display safe under a Power Glass lens. The Fenix 6X Pro Solar itself is water-resistant up to 10 atm. The case is crafted mostly out of titanium with a mix of fiber-reinforced polymer for durability. In smartwatch mode, your getting a whopping 21 days of battery life. Meanwhile, with GPS-tracking mode activated it can manage a little over two days.

Garmin Fenix 6X Pro Solar – $999.99

Images courtesy of Garmin

Christopher Nolan and Martin Scorsese Want Your TV to Stop Ruining Their Movies

Starting in 2020, 4K TVs by Vizio, Panasonic and LG will have a new setting, called Filmmaker Mode, that’s designed to preserve the “creative intent and provide cinematic experience.” In a nutshell, Filmmaker Mode will disable every post-processing feature that modern TVs have (such as motion smoothing, noise reduction and auto sharpening), ensuring that whatever your watching, be it a show or movie, will look exactly how the filmmaker intended. It will have correct colors, aspect ratios, frame rates and so on.

The new TV setting was announced by the UHD Alliance, a coalition whose job is it to keep the high standards of everything from movie theaters to Blue-rays, and it’s supported by 140 directors and cinematographers, including a number of the industry’s biggest names, such as Martin Scorsese, Christopher Nolan and Rian Johnson. If you want to know exactly what Filmmaker Mode is and what it does, watch Christ Nolan (along with a host of others) explain exactly that in the below video.

[embedded content]

It’s obvious that Filmmaker Mode is the industry’s way of “fighting back” against consumer electronics that, in their minds, probably devalue whatever they made. It’s neat, especially for movie buffs, but there’s an issue; it appears that Filmmaker Mode will only be available on new TVs that come out in 2020; meaning your current TV will likely not ever have this setting. That said, most anybody can go into their current TV’s settings and disable Motion Smoothing and get a more accurate picture.

While Vizio, Panasonic and LG are the only current TV manufacturers that will integrate Filmmaker Mode into their new TVs, it’s likely that others will manufacturers will join on in the near future.

Pinhole Pro X Pinhole Zoom Lens

Long before digital photography, single-lens reflex and mirrorless cameras, instant film and everything else you consider to be modern imaging–we’re talking like 16th century, here–there was the camera obscura which you might know better as…

This Is Your Back-to-School Tech Gift Guide

If you offered it to them, I bet every student going back to school would take a brand new TV or lightweight laptop. The reality is, however, those big-ticket items are expensive. Plus, they probably don’t need them; their current TV or laptop is likely just fine. That said, there are a bunch of other great devices – from new headphones to bookshelf speakers, backup batteries to running wearables – that are back-to-school buys. Not only will they see a fair share of use in the dorm and around the campus, but they’ll hopefully follow them after graduation, too.

Headphones

Grado SR60e

Wired: These are still some of our favorite wired headphones. They’re affordable, comfortable, sound great and they have the signature flair and cool aesthetic that Grado is known for.

Jaybird Vista

Wireless Earbuds: If you’re looking for true wireless earbuds to use both walking to class or working out afterward, these are arguably the best ones available. They’re also considerably cheaper than the also-greaat Powerbeats Pro ($250).

Sony WH-1000XM3

Noise-Canceling: There are a lot of great noise-canceling headphones to choose from these days, but the WH-1000XM3 are still arguably the best. Plus they cost about $100 less than the new Bose Headphones 700s.

Gaming

Super NES Classic

The Affordable Classic: The Super Nintendo is one of the all-time favorite game consoles. This is a minature and modern version of that classic console, only this time it has all the games are built in, plus it works with whatever TV you currently have.

Nintendo Switch

The New Gameboy: The Switch is really a first of a kind console you can use it handheld or plug it into a TV. It’s relatively affordable and comes with a ton of fun multi-player games. Honestly, if you get them a Switch and the new Super Smash Bros game, it could might prevent some (drunken) weekend debauchery.

Oculus Quest

VR, But Actually Cool: This is Oculus’s first standalone VR headset, meaning you don’t need a compatible PC or console to use it. It’s a wire-free experience and, when playing the games, you can actually move around the room. Definietly a fun thing to have at parties.

The Essential Speakers

Roku TV Wireless Speakers

TV Speakers: These speakers will only work with Roku smart TVs – which many students probably have because most are very affordable. The speakerst themselves add a soundstage and quality that, frankly, the TV’s built-in speakers can’t compete with.

Ultimate Ears Megablast

Portable Bluetooth Speaker: This is a Wi-Fi and Bluetooth speaker. When connected to Wi-Fi, it works like an Alexa smart speaker. Or when used as a traditional Bluetooth speaker, you can take it anywhere with you.

Audioengine A2+ Wireless

Desktop Speakers: These make really great desktop or bookshelf speakers. Plus they have built-in Bluetooth so you can stream music straight from your smartphone.

Charging/Power

Anker PowerCore Slim 5000

Battery for Smartphone: This is a solid backup battery for your smartphone, plus it’s slender enough to fit comfortably in a pant pocket.

Nomad Wireless Charging Pad for iPhone and Apple Watch

Wireless Charging Pad: This is a terrific nightstand companion because it can charge a smartphone and an Apple Watch, a distinction that not many other wireless charging pads have.

Mophie Powerstation AC

Battery for Laptop: This is a beast of a portable powerbank. It has a 22,000mAh capacity, a number of ports and it’s easily small enough to still stip into a backpack. Best of all, it’s powerful enough to recharge a laptop at least once over.

TV Streamers

Roku Premiere

Portable Streaming Stick: The is the Roku’s simpliest and cheapest streaming stick that still supports 4K and HDR streaming. It turns any TV, smart or otherwise, into a Roku smart TV.

Amazon Fire TV Cube

Voice Control: This is essentially a two-in-one combo: an Amazon Echo smart speaker and a Fire TV strick, all rolled into one. Not only can it integrate your TV into a multi-room sound system, but it makes controlling your TV with your voice, easy.

Apple TV 4K

High-End Option: This is still the best streaming stick for those who have a 4K TV. There’s also the fun fact that Apple is launching its all-new streaming service this fall, Apple TV+, and you’ll likley need an Apple TV streaming box to watch it on your current TV (unless it’s a 2018 or 2019 model with the Apple TV app).

What They Didn’t Know They Needed

Mighty Vibe

The New-Age MP3 Player: This little device lets Spotify Premium subscribers download playlists and podcasts for offline listening. It’s like the “iPod Shuffle for Spotify.” If they’re a runner and they have to carry their smartphone with them to listen to music, this little clip-on gadget will change that.

Lenovo Smart Clock

Digital Alarm Clock: Not only will this smart alarm clock help them not sleep through class, but it seamless integrates with Google Calendar.

Marpac Dohm Classic

White Noise Machine: White noise machines can be godsends. Especially if they share room.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Nissan ProPilot Self-Driving Golf Ball

Nissan’s new Skyline is equipped with various driving assistants, route-driving, high-precision map data and the ability to overtake, branch and take exits–a technology they called ProPilot 2.0. In order to show off what the technology…

The Audi AI:TRAIL Quattro Is An Overlanding All-Electric SUV

Earlier this week Opel was teasing the arrival of the world’s first all-electric rally car. The Corsa-E Rally will make its official debut next month at the 2019 IAA Frankfurt International Motor Show. This piece of news is what we want to hear because it shows that EV technology is constantly evolving. Even the motorcycle industry is welcoming its own share of changes. Now that almost every carmaker is working on a battery-powered model, Audi takes us a step further with the AI:TRAIL Quattro.

You’ve probably seen a bunch of over-the-top concepts that probably won’t have any practical applications. We can’t say for sure but some of these might see action in the distant future, but not anytime soon. Audi is taking its dependable all-wheel-drive system and crafting an off-road SUV around it.

More details regarding its specifications won’t be available until trade show kicks off but there are some interesting tidbits on hand. As indicated by the name, other than the powerful electric motors, The AI:TRAIL Quattro will feature some artificial intelligence onboard. We’re hoping that autonomous driving is part of the package.

We’re not entirely sure what it does exactly, but its a safe bet that it will involve driving, navigation, and more. Right now we only have a teaser image to work with, yet we can glean a couple of things. The windows and windshield are noticeably large to give the driver and passenger exceptional visibility. Moreover, the wheels and tires are huge, which suggest that it will handle off-road terrain with ease. Audi’s AI:TRAIL Quattro is shaping up to be one cool electric SUV.

Check out Audi for more

The Canvas OLED Soundbar Is Pretty, But There’s A Catch

If you happen to have just picked up an OLED TV, we have great news for you: the Canvas OLED Soundbar is a phenomenal complementary add-on to add sonic oomph to the visual beast that is your TV.

There are only two choices for improving your TV’s sound: a soundbar or large speakers. Canvas, a project from a group of audio veterans, slides somewhere in between those categories. It looks like a massive speaker but serves as a stand for LG’s OLED TVs. It provides sound quality comparable to bigger Hi-Fi offerings, but in a form factor that’s not too outlandish or bulky. Best of all, it sounds pretty darn fantastic.

The Canvas OLED Soundbar sits flush against the TV, which gives it an uninterrupted look, unlike soundbars that sit separate from their TV counterparts. You can remove the faceplate and change it with one of a different color. Perfect for those who want their soundbar to match their furnishings. There’s also a small nook inside the cabinet to hold the rest of your home theater equipment.

Let’s get technical. The Canvas OLED Soundbar boasts two six-inch SB Acoustics drivers, which take control of the bass and mid-range soundprints. You’ll also find another pair of SC acoustics tweeters. Plus, a four-channel 200-watt amp featuring a frequency response between 30Hz and 20,000Hz.

In effect, you get a towering facade that seems like it was transformed into a glorified TV stand. But it only takes one listen to realize this isn’t the case. The Canvas OLED Soundbar is the real deal if you want top-tier audio.

BUY IT HERE

Should You Buy an OLED Laptop? Here’s What You Need to Know

Should you buy a laptop with an OLED display? The answer is yes, potentially. For those not up to speed, OLED laptops are pretty new to the scene. The first OLED laptops weren’t introduced until 2016, but they’ve hit the mainstream in 2019; a number of reputable manufacturers, such as Lenovo, Dell, Razer and Alienware, have all released laptops with OLED displays. That said, many of today’s more popular laptops are still equipped with LCD displays, including every MacBook. (Although, rumor has it that Apple is gearing up to release a 16-inch MacBook Pro with an OLED display this fall.) So, what’s the deal?

The OLED Advantage

You’ve probably used or at least seen a smartphone or a television with an OLED display. OLED, which stands for “Organic Light Emitting Diode,” is a newer display technology that boasts numerous advantages over more traditional LCD displays. The main reason why it’s taken this long to get to OLED displays in laptops? Simply, it’s a newer technology and it’s been hard to perfect.

Beautiful Picture: Just like with OLED TVs, laptops with OLED panels are able to produce brighter and more lifelike colors, with superior black levels and contrast. The reason for this is the OLED display is able to turn on and off individual pixels, as opposed to groups (or zones) of pixels like in LCD displays, making the OLED display capable of producing a more accurate image. It also makes the OLED display more efficient because it’s not illuminating extra pixels, and in fact can save energy in “dark mode” because it requires no power to show the color black.

No lag: There are other performance advantages to using an OLED display – most noticeably, better refresh rates. Traditional LCD displays require a separate LED panel for backlighting, which tends to cause lag and motion blur, but OLED displays don’t need a separate panel and therefore don’t have this lag problem. This also results in faster refresh rates and wider viewing angles.

Potentially lighter: The lack of the extra backlighting panel means that OLED displays (and thus OLED laptops) can be thinner and lighter. That’s definitely and obviously a good thing.

Watch Out For

One maker: One important detail to know is that Samsung is the only manufacturer of OLED panels for laptops. That means whether you’re buying a Lenovo, Samsung, Microsoft, Dell or HP OLED laptop – they’re all going to have a similar Samsung display.

Needs to be big: Samsung is the sole provider of OLED panels to laptop manufacturers, and Samsung is only making 15-inch panels. This means that all new OLED laptops in 2019 are 15-inch laptops. If you were thinking about getting something smaller, or possibly larger, you’re out of luck.

Burn-in: As is true with OLED smartphones and OLED TVs, burn-in is a problem. Certain pixels on an OLED panel that are used more often than other pixels, probably because they are located in a more central part of the panel, will become less bright over time and creating an uneven image. There are different types of burn-in – temporarily or permanent – but generally OLED displays don’t age as well LCDs.

Price: The main knock against OLED TVs is the price. Since OLED technology is still relatively new, it’s more expensive to manufacture. And the same is true with OLED laptops.

Who Should Buy an OLED Laptop?

The superior picture quality and faster refresh rates mean that OLED laptops are generally great for gamers. It doesn’t hurt that most of the best OLED laptops to date are actually gaming laptops, too. Still, more and more OLED laptops are getting released which are more creative and productivity-focused, too. They typically make good laptops for anybody video editors and photographers, thanks to the vibrant and accurate screen.

The Laptops

Dell XPS 15 7590

Best All-Around: The Dell XPS 15 is probably the best OLED laptop if you’re non-gamer. It’s essentially a larger, higher-end version of the Dell XPS 13, which is one of the best all-around laptops you can buy, and it’s packed out with specs, including Intel’s 9th-generation processor, up to 32GB of memory and, if you’re so inclined, up to 2TB of SSD storage. If you are a gamer, however, there is the option to deck the XPS 15 with a Nvidia GTX 1650 graphics card.

HP Spectre x360 AMOLED

Best Convertible: The HP Spectre x360 AMOLED is essentially just a spec’d out and upgraded version of last year’s HP Spectre x360. The new version has a OLED display, rather than LCD, and is ideal for watching movies and shows in beautiful 4K. It’s also powerful enough to be a fine work laptop as well. Thanks to its 360-degree hinge and touchscreen display, the HP Spectre X360 OLED can be used as either an ultra-thin laptop or tablet. As for other specs, it’s powered by Intel’s 8th-generation process, packs an Nvidia GeForce MX150 graphics card and has 1 TB of SSD storage.

Razer Blade 15

Best Gaming Laptop: That’s right, you can now buy the 15-inch Razer Blade, already one of the best gaming laptops out there, with a beautiful 4K OLED touchscreen display . It’s expensive, for sure, but it’s hella powerful and arguably delivers the most vivid colors, the fast response times, and the lowest lag of any other gaming laptops that are available right now.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

5 Great In-Ear Headphones for Hi-Fi Sound

For one of the best listening experiences, you should really think about diving into the world of high-quality hi-fi in-ear headphones. Professional musicians and audio engineers have been using these kinds of in-ear monitors (IEMs) for decades, because of their superior noise isolation and sound quality.

Audiophiles have also gotten into the mix now that IEM manufacturers have perfected the art of miniaturizing high-end drivers; consumers can now purchase custom IEMs with as many as 12 drivers at a significant price. The vast majority of universal or custom IEMs feature separate drivers for the treble, midrange and bass frequencies, too – and they’re still small enough to fit in your ears. For those with deeper pockets, planar magnetic and electrostatic driver technology are now a reality in the IEM category.

If you’re ready to dive into premium aural luxury, we’ve rounded up our favorite hi-fi in-ear headphones. Don’t want to spend several hundred dollars or even a grand? Now you don’t have to.

1More Triple-Driver IEM

1More has developed a global following for its high-performance and affordable line-up of IEMs; the entry-level Triple-Driver ($80) offers a rare combination of reference-level sound quality, build quality and one of the best smartphone in-line microphone solutions. Featuring two balanced armatures and a separate dynamic driver, the Triple-Driver IEMs offer a very neutral sounding and spacious presentation that makes them very easy to listen to for hours; on a treadmill, commuter train, or at your desk working. The sandblasted and lightweight aluminum alloy earpieces fit comfortably in your ear canal. If you are concerned about the headphone cable snagging on an item of clothing or piece of furniture, 1More has you covered with a very robust cable made from enabled copper wrapped around Kevlar fibers. These are one of the best-sounding budget IEMs we’ve heard – and they’re built to last, too.

Sennheiser IE80S

If you love the Sennheiser sound – smooth detailed highs, tight articulate sounding bass, and a very clean sounding midrange – the IE80S ($350) should be considered a bargain at their asking price. Featuring compact drivers with neodymium magnets, an adjustable tuning control on each earphone that allows you to modify the bass response, and attenuation of external ambient noise (up to 26dB), the IE80S are ideal for road warriors who need something robust and tunable. The IE80S are smartphone-friendly do not require an external DAC/headphone amplifier to impress out of the box.

AKG N40

The AKG N40 ($399) offer a number of features that make them unique in the affordable high-performance IEM category; a detachable cable, three sets of replaceable sound filters which allow you to modulate the treble, midrange and bass depending on the type of music you prefer; and innovative over-ear hooks that are not only comfortable but external vibration absorbers (useful for runners or commuters on trains) that minimize the impact of vibration on the IEM itself. The plastic earpieces are not quite as robust as those built from aluminum alloy, but the lightweight design makes them very comfortable for extended listening sessions. The N40 is one of the most transparent-sounding IEMs on the market – but to hear them at their best, we recommend using something like the AudioQuest Cobalt USB DAC/headphone amplifier.

Audeze LCD-i3

Audeze helped usher in the era of planar magnetic audiophile headphones with their award-winning LCD-series; the brand new LCD-i3 replace the iSINE20 IEMs ($449) with a number of performance enhancements which have trickled down from the flagship LCD-i4 ($2,495). Audeze has redesigned the ear hooks which now curve inward along the back of the ear making them more compatible with different shapes and sizes. The LCD-i3 offer Audeze’s trademark resolution and layers of detail for those who need to hear everything on their favorite recordings. Connectivity options have also been expanded to include cables for smartphones with 3.5mm headphone jacks, iPhone connectivity via Audeze’s Cipher Lightning cable which includes a DAC/headphone amplifier, and a wireless around-neck Cipher Bluetooth module for Android which supports aptX and aptX HD codecs.

Shure KSE 1200

Electrostatic transducers are all about transparency; that see-through level of sound quality that really makes it sound like the actual musicians are in the room with you. Where the technology loses some of its magic is in the bass – electrostatic panels need to be physically large in order to reproduce the lower octaves. Electrostatic headphones and loudspeakers also require a power source, in addition to a power amplifier. Shure has done something very unique with the KSE 1200 ($1,999); they have created a full-range electrostatic IEM that is powered by a portable power source/headphone amplifier that can fit inside your jacket. If you crave layers of detail, transparency, and the level of speed that only an electrostatic driver can reproduce, the KSE 1200 will be your sonic nirvana – but only if you drive them with sources of equal quality – you’ll be let down if you plug them into your iPhone, for example. Quality in. Quality out.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Wireless Earbuds of 2019 – Which Is Right for You?

This definitive guide to the best wireless earbuds of 2019 explores everything you need to know before buying your next pair of wireless earbuds, including what to look out for and which options are best.

Prefer to skip directly to the picks? Click here.

Editor’s Picks

Best Overall: Apple AirPods (2019)

AirPods have been the most popular wireless earbuds since late 2016, and for good reason: they pair effortlessly with any iPhone. As of early 2019, Apple launched the second-generation AirPods that are slightly better in every way. They pair faster, have better battery life and they have better mics so calls sound better. They also cost the same ($159), although you can now buy them with a charging case that wirelessly chares for $200.

|

Video: Apple Airpods (Generation 2) Review

Watch more of This Week In Gear video reviews.

Best for Running: Powerbeats Pro

What are they? The Powerbeats Pro are the best option for anybody with an iPhone and wants wireless earbuds to run or exericise with. The Powerbeats Pro are essentially redesigned adn sweatproof AirPods. They have a similar look and fit of the Powerbeats3 Wireless ($200), which are Beats’ wireless (but not true wireless) earbuds, but they also have the same H1 chip that are in Apple’s second-generation AirPods, meaning they can pair super fast with any iOS device. If you’re not worried about price, these are sweatproof alternatives to AirPods that you’ve been waiting for.

|

Best Sound Quality: Sennheiser Momentum TW

Sennheiser’s first wireless earbuds demand a hefty fee, but once you actually listen to them, you see why. The sound quality of the Momentum TW is second to none. Throw in an elegant case, an above average battery life and the ability to charge via USB-C and you have the best wireless earbuds for users who place a premium on sound quality.

|

Best Noise-Canceling: Sony WF-1000XM3

The Sony WF-1000XM3 are the true wireless versions of the company’s hugely-popular Sony WH-1000XM3 noise-canceling headphones. The two share an app, have similar features and they both sound really good, too. They’re also really the only good noise-canceling wireless earbuds that you can buy right now.

|

Introduction

The first true wireless earbuds date back to 2014, but it was the release of Apple’s AirPods in 2016 that really fired them into the mainstream. True wireless means that there isn’t any kind of cord tethering the two earbuds together, as opposed to just wireless earphones like the Powerbeats3 Wireless or Google’s Pixel Buds, and they are the next natural progression of wireless earbuds. Fewer and fewer people want wires of any type, and it’s as simple as that.

Not all true wireless earbuds are the same. In fact, now that there are so many on the market, a lot of true wireless earbuds are very different. So which ones are right for you? The answer: it depends. It depends on what you’re going to using them for. It depends on the type of smartphone you have. And it depends on how much you’re willing to pay. But the biggest factor, and you really don’t have this problem when dealing with over-ear or on-ear headphones, is that your true wireless earbuds have to fit in your ears. And fit well. You’re never going to love them if you’re constantly worried about them falling out.

Apple’s AirPods have set the benchmark for wireless earbuds up to this point. They’re fantastic wireless earbuds — and now in their second generation — and that’s why every pair that’s since been released has been labeled some sort of “AirPod rival.” But if you have an Android smartphone, or if you plan on running or working out with your wireless earbuds, AirPods might not be the best option for you. Depending on what you’re looking for, we’ve broken down all our favorite wireless earbuds and what they’re each good for.

Buying Guide

Anker Soundcore Liberty Air

What are they? The Soundcore Liberty Air are Anker’s newest wireless earbuds. They look like AirPods with their long stem but lack the H1 chip that allows AirPods to quickly pair with your iPhone or iPad. The Liberty Air comes with swappable silicon tips so, unlike AirPods, you can adjust the fit and they’re also sweat resistant. As far as features, the Liberty Air is pretty basic — but that might be exactly what you want.

When were they released? Late 2018 or early 2019; Anker tends to release several new wireless earbuds each year, so it wouldn’t surprise us if a new model was released in the near future.

Who should buy? The best thing about these wireless earbuds is that they look like AirPods and yet they come in at half the price. If you’re on a budget, these are arguably the best wireless earbuds you can buy.

Read our full review of the Soundcore Liberty Air, here.

Battery: 5 hours per charge, 20 total with case
Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.2
Sweat resistant: IPX5 waterproof
Charge: micro-USB
Key features: tap controls, available in black or white colors

|

Bose SoundSport Free

What are they? The Bose SoundSport Free is the company’s first wireless earbuds and they utilize Bose’s StayHear+ Sport earwings, which are the same as all other Bose earbuds, so you can expect them to fit securely in your ears. On the flip side, the earbuds stick out of your ears and can look a bit awkward. The deliver signature sound quality and signature punchy bass.

When were they released? September 2017. Bose has already announced that it’ll release two next-generation wireless earbuds, the Bose Earbuds 500 and Earbuds 700, by the end of 2019 and early 2020, respectively.

Who should buy? There’s no denying that these are excellent wireless earbuds, but they’ve been around for a while and Bose is expecting to release new models in the near future. If you can get a deal on them for well under $200, then they are absolutely worth it. Or if you just like deep bass.

Read our full review of the Bose SoundSport Free, here.

Battery: five hours per earbud; charging case holds an extra 10 hours
Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.1
Water Resistance: IPX4
Charge: micro-USB
Key features: quick charge of 15 minutes gives you 45 minutes of playtime; Bose Connect app has “Find My Buds” feature

|

Powerbeats Pro

What are they? The Powerbeats Pro combine the design, sweat-resistance and sound of Beats’s wireless sport earbuds, the Powerbeats3 Wireless ($200), with the true wirelessness and functionality of Apple’s second-generation AirPods.

When were they released? May 2019; so you shouldn’t expect a new model to be released in the near future. Also, it’s unlikely to see many deals.

Who should buy? If you own an iPhone and AirPods don’t fit in your ears, or you just want sweatproof alternatives to AirPods, these are exactly what you want.

Read our full review of the Powerbeats Pro, here.

Battery: 9 hours listening time (24 hours with case), 3 hours talk time (18 hours with case)
Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0
Sweat resistant: IPX4
Charge: Lightning
Key features: Apple’s H1 chip, hands-free “Hey Siri”

|

Sennheiser Momentum TW

What are they? The Momentum TW are the Sennheiser’s first-ever wireless earbuds and they are built with 7mm dynamic drivers and deliver excellent sound quality, which is exactly what the company is known for. The Momentum TW have ambient modes and allow users to adjust the EQ settings via a companion app. The last kicker is USB-C charging; you can use the same charing setup as your MacBook to also power these earbuds.

When were they released? September 2018. Don’t expect Sennheiser to release updated models anytime soon.

Who should buy? If you’re looking for the best-sounding wireless earbuds and price isn’t an issue, stop here. The Sennheiser Momentum TW boast the best sound quality of any wireless earbuds we’ve tested.

Read our full review of the Sennheiser Momentum TW, here.

Battery: four hours per earbud; charging case holds an extra 12 hours
Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0
Sweat resistant: IPX4
Charge: USB-C
Key features: companion app lets you adjust EQ

|

Klipsch T5 True Wireless

What are they? The Klipsch T5 True Wireless are the high-end audio company’s first pair of true wireless earbuds. They lack most of the “techie” features of other true wireless earbuds, and the companion app, which will allow users to tweak the EQ settings, hasn’t been released yet. But these earbuds are some of the best-sounding earbuds that we’ve tested, and they cost less than the alternatives by Sennheiser and Master & Dyanmic.

When were they released? July 2019

Who should buy? People looking for true hi-fi wireless earbuds that cost less than most of the competition. Also, they have to like the look of the Zippo-esque charging case.

Read our full review of the Klipsch T5 True Wireless, here.

Battery: 8 hours per earbud; up to 24 additional hours with the charging case
Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0
Sweat resistant: IPX4
Charge: USB-C
Key features: will work with Klipsch Connect App, works with any smartphone voice assistant

| |

Sony WF-1000XM3

What are they? The Sony WF-1000XM3 are really the first true wireless earbuds to have serious active noise cancellation. They are modeled after the company’s hugely-popular noise-canceling over-ear headphones, the Sony WH-1000XM3, and bring over similar audio qualities as well as premium features (companion app, ambient sound mode and capacative touch features) – just in a true wireless form factor.

When were they released? August 2019

Who should buy? Anybody that wants premium-sounding and feature-packed wireless earbuds. Most importantly, however, they should want the best noise-canceling wireless earbuds that money can buy (at least until Bose releases their own versions sometime in 2020).

Read our full review of the Sony WF-1000XM3, here.

Battery: 6 hours per earbud; up to 24 hours of battery life total with ANC turned on (with case)
Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0
Sweat resistant: None
Charge: USB-C
Key features: noise-canceling, adaptive sound control, Quick Attention, works with Google Assistant

| |

Master & Dynamic MW07

What are they? Master & Dynamic’s first true wireless earbuds are unlike anything else, mainly because they’re uncompromisingly luxurious. They are made of acetate (which you can buy in four different colors) and they come in a neat stainless steel charging case. There’s no proprietary app, which is ideal for anybody doesn’t want another app to deal with, and they charge via USB-C.

When were they released? October 2018; don’t expect Master & Dynamic to come out with second-generation versions in the near future. However, every few months they release a new different color acetate that you can choose from.

Who should buy? $300 is definitely expensive for true wireless earbuds, but you’re paying for more style, personality and high-end materials. If you want wireless earbuds that sound excellent and, more importantly, are unlike anything else, the MW07 has no glaring weakness.

Read our full review of the Master & Dynamic MW07, here.

Battery: 3.5-hour per earbud, 10 hours from the charging case
Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.2
Sweat Resistant: IPX4
Charge: USB-C
Key features: made of acetate and stainless steal, tactile buttons on each earbud

|

Jabra Elite 65t

What are they? The Elite 65t have powerful drivers that deliver a frequency range of 20Hz to 20kHz. They work with a companion app that allows you to tweak the EQ or turn on hear-through to hear ambient sounds. They also fit snugly in your ears and offer exceptional noise isolation. Thanks to a four-mic array (two in each earbud), calls are clear and the buttons on the earbuds are easy to use without disrupting the seal.

When were they released? January 2018; you can find some good deals on the Elite 65t and expect Jabra to release some new earbuds within the next year.

Who should buy? If you don’t want AirPods or they just don’t fit in your ears, get these. The Elite 65t work excellently and fit completely different than AirPods. The other big thing is that, with their a four-mic array, they are very good for taking calls. The only downside: with such a tight fit, wearing them for long periods of time may cause ear fatigue.

Read our full review of the Jabra Elite 65t, here.

Battery: five hours per earbud; 10 hours from the charging case
Sweat resistant: IP55
Charge: micro-USB
Key features: Sound+ app lets you customize EQ; four-mic array; works with voice assistants

|

Jabra Elite Active 65t

What are they? The Elite Active 65t are sweatproof versions of the company’s Elite 65t. They sound identical and work well for taking calls and exercising. The difference is they have a grippier exterior so that they stay in your ears when you move, plus they offer more sweat resistance.

When were they released? April 2018; you can occasionally find some good deals on the Elite Active 65t.

Who should buy? These are ideal for active professionals. If you like the style and the fit of the Jabra Elite 65t, and you’re cool paying the extra $20, which is essentially just an insurance policy against sweat, then this is a great option. Otherwise, just buy the non-active alternatives.

Read our full review of the Jabra Elite Active 65t, here.

Battery: five hours per earbud; charging case holds an extra 10 hours
Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0
Sweat resistant: IP56
Charge: micro-USB
Key features: Sound+ app lets you customize EQ; four-mic array; works with voice assistants

|

Apple AirPods (2019)

What are they? The second-generation AirPods look identically to the ones that were released in 2016, and they work almost exactly the same way — but they up the ante in quite a few ways. With the new H1 chip, they pair faster, have better battery life and better mics. And they support “Hey Siri” voice commands, so you don’t need to push any button to activate the voice assistant. Apple also now offers the option of a wireless charging case, as long as you’re willing to pay a little extra.

When were they released? March 2019; don’t expect Apple to release new AirPods anytime soon.

Who should buy? Even with the second generation wireless earbuds, AirPods still have two downsides. You need an iOS device to get the most out of them and they’re not water-resistant, so you probably shouldn’t work out with them. That said, if you have an iPhone these are by-far-and-away the best true wireless earbuds you can buy.

Read our full review of the Apple AirPods (2nd-Generation), here.

Battery: five hours per earbud; charging case holds 24 hours of total charge
Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0
Water Resistance: no
Charge: Lightning, Qi-wireless
Key features: H1 chip allows quick pairing to iPhone or iPad; optical sensors detect play/pause when you place or remove from your ears; hands-free Siri

|

Sony WF-SP700N

What are they? The Sony WF-SP700N were the company’s first true wireless earbuds. They have a sweat resistant design with rather large earwings, so they’re optimized for active individuals. Sony has since released the WF-1000M3, which are much more advanced wireless earbuds.

When were they released? Spring 2018; you should expect Sony to release newer and better versions in the near future.

Who should buy? If you can find a really good deal on these earbuds, then the WF-SP700N are worth it. However, the don’t expect noise-canceling earbuds — the noise-cancellation isn’t very good. If you’re waiting for wireless earbuds with noise-cancellation, I suggest waiting for the Bose Noise Cancelling Earbuds 700, which will be released sometime in 2020.

Read our full review of the Sony WF-SP700N, here.

Battery: 3 hours (max)
Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.1
Sweat Resistant: IPX4
Charge: micro-USB
Key features: noise-cancellation, ambient mode

|

Bang & Olufsen Beoplay E8 2.0

The above photo is of the Beoplay E8, not the updated Beoplay E8 2.0 that supports wireless charging.

What are they? The Beoplay E8 2.0 are basically the same as B&O’s first-generation product, the Beoplay E8, but the “2.0” models can wirelessly charge. They charge via USB-C and support Bluetooth 4.2 and AAC codec. They are built with advanced electro-dynamic drivers and can produce a wide frequency range (20–20,000Hz). You can adjust the EQ and sound signature via a companion app, too.

When were they released? February 2019; don’t expect new wireless earbuds from B&O in the immediate future. However, Bang & Olufsen did release a more sport-focused version, the Beoplay E8 Motion ($350), in May 2019.

Who should buy? As far as sound quality, the E8s are one of the best sounding options on this list. If you like the B&O sound and you want a case to wireless charge, then these are a good option. However, there’s no denying they are expensive and the app can be frustrating to use.

Read our full review of the B&O Beoplay E8, here.

Battery: four hours per earbud; charging case holds an extra 8 hours
Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.2
Sweat resistant: yes
Charge: USB-C
Key features: companion app lets you adjust EQ

| |

Noteable Absentees

The above selections aren’t the only wireless earbuds that you can buy. As mentioned before, more and more audio companies are coming out with their own version of wireless earbuds, so we wanted to at least mention some of the other offerings that we haven’t officially tested or written reviews on them at this time.

Jaybird Run XT

Released in early 2019, the Jaybird Run XT are the updated model of the company’s original true wireless sports earbuds, Run. They’re more waterproof and sweatproof, and they offer more sound customization options via Jaybird’s companion app. We haven’t had the chance to test the new models but are looking to do so in the near future.

Jaybird Vista

The Vista are Jaybird’s newest true wireless earbuds; there released in summer 2019. Compared to the above Run XT, they’re very similar in that they use the same app and are designed for athletes, however, Jaybird upgraded the connectivity (Bluetooth 5.0) and greatly slimmed down the profile of the earbuds and the charging case. We’ll have a review of the Jaybird Vista in the coming weeks.

Google Pixel Buds

The Google Pixels Buds aren’t technically true wireless earbuds and we’ve therefore omitted them for this list.

Samsung Galaxy Buds

These are Samsung’s second generation wireless earbuds that were released in early 2019. They are designed to work well with the Samsung Galaxy S10. Key features include wireless charging as well as USB-C. They also are relatively affordable. We have yet to test the Galaxy Buds, but they probably only make sense if you have a Samsung smartphone.

RHA TrueConnect

These are RHA’s first true wireless earbuds that they have the long stem-shape similar to AirPods, but with swapable silicon tips so you can adjust fit.

Best Earbuds Under $50

No, the 3.5mm headphone jack isn’t dead. And it won’t be for some time. Read the Story

Love Hultén’s FC-PVM Is Pure Gaming Nostalgia With Style

Love Hultén is fueling our desire for classic gaming with the release of another retro console. Meanwhile, first-party videogame companies are releasing official platforms for old-school gaming. Konami and SEGA are the most recent ones to join the fray with the TurboGrafx-16 Mini and Genesis Mini respectively. However, all of these pale in comparison to the artistic touch of the Swedish artisan. His newest custom console is the Love Hultén FC-PVM that has nostalgia written all over it.

For western gamers, the theme might be unfamiliar at first glance. This is understandable because it is a tribute to the Japanese version of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). In Japan, the console was called the Family Computer or Famicom for short.

First of all, let’s take a look at the rear of the FC-PVM to see the collection of ports for a classic interface. We’re guessing it’s for hooking it up to older television sets that use RF and RCA connectors. There’s also a bunch of other connectors, but information about those are not available at the moment. Finding an old TV that is compatible is a problem, but a built-in 9-inch Sony Trinitron PVM-9042QM display is available.

Instead of emulation, the Love Hultén FC-PVM uses genuine parts a Nintendo Famicom console. Meanwhile, the controllers are now wireless and conveniently slide and lock into special slots with a magnetic dust cover. Beneath the screen are two dials for volume and power, while the two buttons on each side of the cartridge slot are for power and reset. There’s even space on top to store up to 8 Famicom cartridges for portability. This is truly a gem of retro gaming we want to see in production.

Click here to see more

Images courtesy of Love Hultén

Terrific Tripods to Take Your Photography to the Next Level

Looking for a tripod? There’s no wonder. A tripod might be the signal most important tool for photographers and videographers, other than the actual camera, because it opens up a world of creative opportunities. It’s great for nighttime, landscape, wildlife and sports photography, or basically anything shot with a telephoto lens, plus it provides the much-needed stability for long exposures, hyperlapses and panoramas. And then there’s the relief aspect; photographers just don’t want to hold a heavy camera for that long.

So what kind of tripod should you buy? It depends on what type of photos you’re looking to take, as well as what kind of camera you’re shooting on (DSLR, mirrorless, point-and-shoot or even smartphone), but ultimately, here’s what you need to know: a big and heavy tripod is gonna do a much better job stabilizing the camera, which is why most professional studios you large full-sized tripods, but most people are willing to give up some of that stability for a tripod they can pack in bag.

Manfrotto 5-Section Compact Action Tripod

Best Tripod Under $100: Manfrotto makes some of the best and most popular tripods that you’ll find. This one, the 5-Section Compact Action Tripod, is great because it’s surpisingly durable and sturdy, plus it comes in at well under $100, making it a solid-buy for budget-conscious photographers. It has a joystick head to help you adjust the angle of your camera. And it’s really lightweight – less than three pounds – and compact. It’s an ideal tripod for photographers using an entry-level DSLR with a standard lens or a compact travel camera.

Manfrotto 500 Fluid Video Head with 190X Video Tripod

Best Video Tripod: Videographers shooting in 4K tend to need heavier, more supportive tripods because they are typically better at eliminating vibrations. This one by Manfrotto, for example, is over seven pounds and it’s sturdier than any other tripod on this list. It has a number of key features for video, too, like an innovative head with fluid cartridges on both pan and tilt axes, a leveling column and a five-pound counterbalance; all of which allow the photographer to move their camera smoothly and accurately. There are admittedly more moving parts in the system, but this Manfrotto tripod still manages to be pretty intuitive to use.

CamKix Premium 3in1 Kit

Best for Action Cameras: This is a simple, affordable and pretty great impulse buy for anybody with an action camera (or even a compact camera or smartphone). The tripod has a socket-ball mount with a locking switch that allows you to rotate the camera a full 180 degrees. And there’s a telescopic pole attachment, which you can use to achieve better height on your shots, or just use it as a glorified selfie stick. It’s worth pointing out that while compact cameras and smartphones can be attached directly to the tripod, your GoPro needs to be housed in a GoPro mount.

MeFoto Globetrotter Travel TriPod

Best Travel Tripod: As the name hints, the MeFoto Globetrotter is one of the best travel tripods. It’s compact and lightweight (less than four pounds), and it’s carbon fiber frame is strong enough to support larger systems (up to 26 pounds). It has five leg sections so you can set the camera to stand over five-feet high, and the cushioned legs actually come together to convert the tripod into a monopod, which is neat. This is an ideal travel tripod for anybody shooting DSLR or mirrorless.

Peak Design Travel Tripod

One for the Future: Peak Design’s first tripod is, as you’d expect, designed for adventurers and outdoor photographers. It’s super compact and packable, about the size of a water bottle, and everything on the tripod is designed to be efficient and intuitive. For example, there are latches instead of annoying twist locks, to quickly extend the legs; to adjust the orientation of the ball head, there’s a single adjustment ring instead of a series of knobs; and small levers let you spread the legs wider to help you take low-angle photos. It’s available in aluminum or carbon fiber, the latter being the noticeably lighter (and significantly more expensive) model.

The Peak Design Travel Tripod is available for pre-order today. It’s expected to ship in January 2020.

|

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.