All posts in “style”

The Nike Space Hippie Collection Is Turning Trash into Sneaker Treasure

Whether you’re talking celebrity and athlete collaborations, material innovations or the classics, some of–most of–the best sneakers of all time have come bearing the Nike swoosh logo. As much as we’d all like to give…

These Badass Sunglasses Cost $2,000. Here’s Why

Since 2007, Black Optical has been peddling some of the finest in eyewear from the unlikely locale of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Handcrafted frames from the upper echelon of eyewear run the spectrum from Garret Leight to Barton Perreira to Eyevan and more. Among the revered lenses is the if you know, you know luxury label Jacques Marie Mage, who’s coveted eyewear is made in extremely small batches, selling out more often than restocks occur (the brand never makes the same style twice). Now, the two legendary brands have come together for two of the most eye-catching sunglasses to date.

The collab ties back to Black Optical’s American roots, using ecologically-sourced American Bison to accompany the Japanese-crafted frames. The distinctive leather features a luxe matte finish and pebbled grain which is meticulously hand-wrapped by leather artisans in Italy. While the Zepherin style goes tonal with matte black hardware, the Yves model gets glitzy with 18k gold hardware.

With details like these, you can expect these exquisite frames to come with an exquisite price tag. But with each style limited to just five pairs, you can also expect to never run into someone else with the same set.

Zepherin by Jacques Marie Mage x Black Optical $2000

Yves by Jacques Marie Mage x Black Optical $2000
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Why the Chore Coat Is a Perfect Garment

You can’t walk down the street or scroll through your portable media brick without seeing someone wearing a chore coat. Workwear’s rise in popularity helped bolster the utilitarian garment to the fore, no doubt with the help of beloved pioneer of street style photography, Bill Cunningham who was rarely seen without one. Droves flocked to flea markets and vintage stores in search of patched up and patinated relics. Workwear brands offered their takes, designer brands put forth resplendent homages, all in reverence of the garment.

But before throngs packed flea markets, before Cunningham brought the famous blue jacket with him to the runway, before it became fashionable, it was practical.

The first chore coats, known to this day as bleu de travail, were born into hard labor in 19th-Century France, made for railroad workers and engineers. Composed of moleskin or drill fabric dyed into what we recognize as French blue, early chore coats featured three (sometimes four, sometimes two) patch pockets to hold any tools required for the job at hand. They were also cut in a relaxed fit for ease of movement and layering in colder temperatures. For the warmer months, workers could flip the generous collar to protect their neck from the sun and unbutton the cuffs to roll up the sleeves.

Jamie Wong frequently stocks vintage French chore coats at her store, Raggedy Threads, a vintage store specializing in workwear and militaria. “It’s a sturdy, functional piece,” she says. “It’s an everyday jacket because there’s a lot of pockets. And, who doesn’t like jackets with pockets? I like the fact that it’s longer than a trucker jacket, especially for guys who are taller. They don’t look that good in truckers, unless they go for the high-waisted ’50s-style pants. Chore coats have better proportions for height.”

French Chore Coat by Vintage $80

Though a chore coat bears resemblance to its cousin, the hunting jacket, another staple of workwear, it’s just a few pockets removed. Hunting jackets also tend to be longer and generally made from heavier fabrics to withstand winter gaming. With hunting jackets, it feels right to drop the first half of the shirt-jacket hyphenate outright. While the DNA is essentially the same, hunting jackets are just too heavy to be worn year-round.

Even here in New York, where winters can take out the warmest-blooded of us, I find myself reaching for one. The particular chore coat I have leans more on the shirt side of the shirt-jacket spectrum, yet it’s still in the roster even in freezing temps. It’s not always the outermost layer, but once I get indoors, it’s next up to bat as soon as the arctic-rated puffer is sloughed.

Alex Robins, co-founder of New York-based brand Blluemade knows this experience. “It has to do with how people in global capitals dress,” he says. “I grew up in rural Minnesota — nobody wears chore coats. You wear your big coat and you wear your shirt. You’re in and out of your car. But in our environment in New York, we’re actually more exposed to the elements… With the variability of environments that we as New Yorkers or Parisians or people in Tokyo experience, [a chore coat] transitions functions very well as a layering element for the way that urban transit works.”

Chore Coat by Blluemade $368

Often, you’ll find it occupying the ‘overshirt’ or ‘shirt-jacket’ section of your favorite retailer’s website. It’s heavier than a button-up shirt, though not as serious as an actual jacket-jacket. But it’s not like the chore coat is having an identity crisis. Rather, the chore coat is a chameleon of a garment. It’s everything you need for any environment.

And, its versatility isn’t just limited to its utility. “There’s something interestingly unsignified about it,” Robins notes. “It’s not Americana. It’s European. When you wear one, you’re not aligning yourself with rockabilly culture or hotrod culture in a way that so many mid-century garments do. It’s kind of ambiguously signified in a way that also makes it very easy to uptake into contemporary fashion.”

Brands like Le Mont Saint Michel, Vetra and Le Laboureur stay the course, making the true French chore coat as they’ve done for decades, while contemporary labels give the classic piece a go, putting their own spin on the time-tested jacket. On either end of the chore coat spectrum lies the framework of utility. And that’s something you can wear any time.

Washed Jersey Work Jacket by Uniqlo $40

Duck Chore Coat by Carhartt $90

Vintage Chore Coat in Marine by Riverside Tool and Dye $180

Double-Faced Splitable Wool Blend Overshirt by Mr P. $740

Quilted Cotton-Canvas Chore Coat by Craig Green $840

Brown Wool Tweed Jacket by Bode $1,540
The Evergreen Allure of Gucci Loafers

Florentine fashion house Gucci made a name for itself with luggage. In the early 1900s its founder, Guccio Gucci was working as a porter in various European hotels, notably London’s Savoy Hotel, when he was captivated by the opulent bags and trunks of well-to-do hotel guests. So, when he returned to Italy and in 1921, he started his own brand of luxury luggage aimed toward the Savoy-staying globe trotters. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Secrid Cardslide Wallet Prevents Cards From Breaking Or Bending

Minimalism and style go well together in The Secrid Cardslide Wallet, a convenient way to carry your on-the-go necessities such as credit cards, cast, and more. It consists of a Cardprotector and a Slide, held together by a Moneyband. This ensures your items stay in place despite your movements.

The extendable slide lets you carry coins, keys, business cards, and other small personal items. Meanwhile, the elastic bank secures banknotes and other small paper items. This slim wallet can hold up to six cards depending on card thickness. Those with embossed letters are thicker than the regular ones which are slimmer.

The Secrid Cardslide Wallet provides convenience not only in storage but also in access. It uses a simple slide-out movement to bring the cards out in an overlapping sequence so you can easily select the right card. Simply slide the card back in to return it to its slot.

Outside of its storage features, this modular wallet provides protection against data theft through built-in RFID/NFC scanning. It is also built to last. The Slide is of high-quality polycarbonate, similar to those used in the making of bulletproof glass. Meanwhile, the casing is of high-quality aluminum construction so it is sturdy and prevents your cards from breaking or bending.

The Secrid Cardslide Wallet is a little bigger compared to its predecessor the Cardprotector albeit it is slim and lightweight. It only measures 68 x 104 x 17 mm and weighs 70 grams. It comes in six different colors inspired by European countries including Paris, London, Oslo, Amsterdam, Rome, and Berlin.

Get Yours Here

Secrid Cardslide WalletSecrid Cardslide WalletSecrid Cardslide Wallet

Images courtesy of Secrid

11 Style Essentials Every Guy Should Keep at His Desk

You’ve made your office desk nice and cozy. It’s got all the hallmarks of a good desk: a calendar, photos of your dog and loved ones, succulents. You’ve made your desk a home. But when it comes to style, is your desk equipped with everything you need to make it through the day looking your best? Probably not. If you’re caught in a pinch, left home in a rush, forgot about that important meeting, these are the style essentials for the office that you shouldn’t be caught without.

Cologne

First impressions are important. Assuming you’re well-groomed and well-dressed, the next thing someone will notice is your scent, whether it’s bad, overbearing or, style God forbid, both. If you’re not sure what to go with, read this and once you’ve settled on a scent, read this.

Hair Product

Whether it’s a particularly windy day or your hair’s enjoyed a good snooze wrapped under a hat, you’ll want to make sure your ‘do is looking right when it comes time to meet that important client (or post-work date).

Mints

Coffee and cigarettes might be a balanced New York breakfast, but not the best when it comes to conversing with your boss about a raise. Or really, any conversation with literally anyone.

Lip Balm

Not that anyone should judge you on your skin, but having lip balm at the ready is really more for your own comfort than it is for anyone else. You’ll thank yourself later when you get to the office realizing that you left your lip balm in your other pants.

Lotion

See ‘Lip Balm’ and apply the same reasoning.

Nail Clippers

Hang nails are not fun. Not for you, not for the client who’s hand you’re about to shake. Why not get this Japanese one?

Lint Brush

For pet hair, dandruff or, maybe worst of all, pilled knits, you’d do well to have a lint roller in your drawer.

Fabric Pen

If you’re anything like me, hot sauce can and will happen. And, not always in your mouth.

Umbrella

You checked the weather right before you left work, but in spite of our best efforts, the weather often has other plans.

A Full Suit/Change of Clothes

Maybe your office is super chill, or maybe your office is a suit and tie situation. Whether it’s for a surprise meeting with high-profile clients or there’s just too much hot sauce for that fabric pen to handle, an extra change of clothes could save you.

Sewing Kit

You should know how to sew a button. You never know, the button that falls off could be the one holding up your pants.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Persol’s Latest Collection of Sunglasses Is Made in Japan

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The 10 Best Style Releases of the Week

There’s no shortage of new goods rolling out of the sewing factories and onto shelves each week. Out of all the new style releases that came across our desks this week, these are the best things we saw.

Converse Patchwork Chuck 70 Sneakers

Re-issuing an archival sneaker silhouette from the 1970s using upgraded materials was probably one of the best decisions Converse has made in years. These patchwork joints might be the next.

3sixteen x Schott Jackets

A double header from specialty denim brand 3sixteen and heritage outerwear label Schott, we couldn’t pick just one.

Jacques Marie Mage White Light Sunglasses

We’re fans of Velvet Underground and we’re fans of Jacques Marie Mage, so we’re definitely fans of these sunglasses.

J.Crew Organic Cotton Half-Zip Sweater

Long live the half-zip sweater! This is by no means a style that’s hot off the factory floor, but this one’s done in organic cotton, just in time for spring.

Persol Titanium Collection

Persol’s Titanium Collection looks as good as we thought it was gonna. Made in Japan featuring titanium single-piece temples with Guilloche engraving, it’s the only thing allowed to touch my face (other those John Cale-inspired sunnies).

Salomon XT-4 Advanced

The latest season of French shoe brand Salomon has brought back its popular kicks with proprietary quicklace systems and Agile Chassis Systems for superior stability. Now, they comes with graphics.

Topman Corduroy Zip Overshirt

More zippered shirts in 2020.

Eastman Leather Clothing Tanker Boots

When Eastman Leather Company and John Lofgren come together, it’s not for nothing. These boots are reproductions of WWII boots originally designed with General Patton and are maybe just as rare.

Saman Amel Silk-Blend Shirt

It’s a polo shirt. It’s a cardigan. It’s everything.

Noon Goons Throttle Jeans

The world has enough olive drab fatigue pants and off-white painter’s pants. Noon Goons’ gives you what you really want with these all-cotton bottle green painters pants.

The Surprising New Style Trend of 2020

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Originally hugging the waists of countless hikers and backpackers, the fanny pack entered the fashion zeitgeist, migrating to the shoulders of stylish sets, slung across the body. People called them shoulder bags, cross-body bags, saccoches, side bags, even messenger bags. They were all variations on a theme, each with their slight differences. The worst was undoubtedly ‘murse’, an unnecessary portmanteau akin to metrosexual, used as a veil for phobias at worse and a dated term at best. Now, we’re fully where we need to be and we’re calling a spade a spade. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Way to Remove Salt Stains from Shoes

We’re nearing the end of winter, and before we gather our winter gear to pack away for spring, it’s worth taking proper steps to care for your shoes and boots. After all, they did just endure (and hopefully survive) a brutal season of subzero temps, rain-soaked streets and winter squalls. While road salt helps both motorists and pedestrians get a grip on their way to Point B, it’s not exactly a great solution for keeping your shoes kicking. Follow these easy steps to get your footwear back in shape.

1. Stuff ‘Em

Soaked shoes can lose their shape easily. The excess moisture makes the leather more pliable and more prone to warping. The best solution is to stuff your shoes with cedar shoe trees as they maintain the shoe’s shape while absorbing excess moisture and fending off offensive odors. If you’re treeless, the next best thing is newspaper.

Cedar Shoe Tree by Houndsbay $20

Cedar Shoe Tree by Nordstrom $20

2. Dab ‘Em

Next, remove any salt stains by dabbing them with a towel and a solution of one part white vinegar with two parts water. The vinegar helps to break up the salt and lifts it to the surface of the leather.

Cleaning Wipes by Boot Rescue $8

Saddle Soap by Fiebing’s $10

3. Condition ‘Em

Though your shoes have just gotten the salt out of their system, they’re still thirsty. They’ve been stripped of vital oils and vitamins in the process and need to be replenished before stepping out again. If you don’t, the leather can dry out and crack (neither of those things are good). Condition them with a leather lotion to restore those essential nutrients which will keep the leather healthy.

Medaille d’Or Renovateur by Saphir $28

Leather Care Kit by Otter Wax $42

4. Protect ‘Em

Now that the leather has been fed, the last step is to protect your shoes for their next outing. Leather waxes and leather protectors help provide a barrier against the elements, ensuring that your shoes can make it a few more paces before needing to go this whole routine again. Once you’ve conditioned your shoes with leather lotion, apply a leather wax/protector all around the shoes, making sure to get into the welts and stitching.

Leather Wax by R.M. Williams $20

Leather Protector by Red Wing $9
How to Winterize Your Shoes and Boots

Winter is on its way, bringing with it an onslaught of sleet to soak through your shoes and to your feet. It’s bad enough having to trudge through a frozen landscape trying to keep your human status from devolving into meat popsicle. Add to that an ever-depleting bank account riddled with receipts for winter gear. The world is indeed cruel and cold. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Surprising New Style Trend of 2020

Read the warp and weft of the 2020 fashion trends and you’ll find a handful of common threads woven throughout the runways and across designers, from the street to the atelier. Suits are back and so are the ’70s (and also the 2000s). Silhouettes are swinging back and forth all at once so that baggy is next to slim with flared in between. Crystals, embroidery and prints are touching anything and everything.

Ramping up over the past several seasons however is the purse. Yes, this is a site aimed at men. And no, we haven’t taken a detour to talk about women’s fashion.

Originally hugging the waists of countless hikers and backpackers, the fanny pack entered the fashion zeitgeist, migrating to the shoulders of stylish sets, slung across the body. People called them shoulder bags, cross-body bags, saccoches, side bags, even messenger bags. They were all variations on a theme, each with their slight differences. The worst was undoubtedly ‘murse’, an unnecessary portmanteau akin to metrosexual, used as a veil for phobias at worse and a dated term at best. Now, we’re fully where we need to be and we’re calling a spade a spade. Designers have really leaned into the aesthetic of a purse what we generally think of as a purse and they haven’t shied away from calling it just that. Acne’s version went from ‘Small Leather Crossbody Bag‘ to ‘Mini Purse Bag.’

Louis Vuitton, Spring/Summer 2020

Lemaire, Fall/Winter 2020

Dior Homme, Spring 2020

The runway shows had purses from every brand. From the workwear-infused newcomer Reese Cooper to French luxury designer Lemaire to streetwear’s savior/destroyer Virgil Abloh, purses were ubiquitous. I love it. And like I’ve said previously, why not? A core tenet of menswear has always been utility. Many canonized classics of men’s fashion were baptized in war where function was paramount. If not on the battlefield, certainly on the railroad, on the farm or anywhere hard manual labor demanded utility.

Purses are the same. They hold your stuff when you don’t want to toss your EDC in your pockets. They’re arguably more easily accessible than pockets and more modular and they’re less bulky than lugging a whole tote or backpack. It’s appeared throughout history and across every culture in one form or another for its utility. Today, they come in a range of styles from the tote to the bucket to the saddlebag and more.

Cella Near Here Bag by Nunc $80

Small Shopper Tote by Telfar $150

Black Small Leather Crossbody Bag by Acne Studios $420

Brie Bag by Alyx $740
The Style Trends to Watch for in 2020, According to the Insiders

It’s hard to make sense of what’s going on in today’s fashion free-for-all landscape. But there are some common threads woven throughout the runways (and Instagram) that you’ll likely see a lot of this year. To make sense of it all, we had industry insiders polish off the crystal ball and give us their takes on what’s to come for 2020. The clairvoyants we sought ranged from designers, trend forecasters, vintage dealers and more. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

10 Messenger Bags to Replace Your Backpack

Last updated January 2020.

Since the early 1900s, messenger bags have been used by postmen, WWII dispatchers, Pony Express couriers, telegraph messengers and telephone linemen. Now, they’re the carry of choice for 21st-century professionals. But the line’s been blurred between briefcases, shoulder bags, satchels and duffel bags. How do you tell the difference?

A messenger bag needs to be carried with a shoulder strap that allows the bag to rest relaxedly at the hip or, when in a rush, flung over the shoulder. A relatively slim profile is also a must. Today, messenger bags come in tempered cottons, ballistic nylons, waxed canvases and full-grain leathers. There’s no shortage of design choices, either. When deciding which one to buy, here’s some advice: get the one that catches your eye, fits your lifestyle and won’t slow you down.

Timbuk2 Classic Messenger Bag

When you think of messenger bags, it’s hard not to picture Timbuk2’s line of courier-centric bags. This one is a tentpole for the brand and features durable nylon canvas with a flapover design.

Herschel Supply Co. Britannia Messenger Bag

Herschel Supply Co.’s Britannia Messenger Bag is made from a tough nylon fabric, featuring a waterproof zipper and internal mesh compartments. It’s big enough to fit a 13-inch laptop and can convert to a backpack when you feel more like a student and less like a messenger.

Barbour Wax Leather Tarras

When couriering requires traversing through the countryside, Barbour’s rugged entry will get the message across safely. It features the brand’s telltale waxed canvas and tartan lining, accompanied by leather finishing, two sneaky front pockets and a main compartment.

Brooks England Barbican Bag

Since the 1880s, Brooks has been supplying cyclists with the top-shelf bags. Its Barbican bag is a staple for the brand and for good reason. The water-resistant waxed canvas is resilient and will patina beautifully along with the vegetable-tanned leather straps.

Filson Original Briefcase

Made from a burly cotton twill in a variety of classic colorways, this bag from Filson is a staple that will only get better with time. It features convenient outer pockets, laptop sleeve, two-way zipper and bridle leather straps and handles.

Knomo London Brompton Bungo RFID Leather Messenger Bag

This option melds a rustic aesthetic with modern-day functionality by pairing a soft leather exterior with an expandable nylon gusset and RFID-blocking technology.

Bleu de Chauffe Folder Vegetable-Tanned Textured-Leather Messenger Bag

Using vegetable-tanned full-grain leather with a beautiful grain, this bag will last you through several career changes and age gracefully too. It’s crafted in Bleu de Chauffe’s French atelier and maintains a slim profile, despite its rugged construction.

Shinola Slim Messenger

From Detroit’s very own Shinola, the Slim Messenger is a no-frills understated piece made with top-notch grain leather. The flap’s magnetic closure makes it a breeze to access.

Porter Tanker 3way Nylon Briefcase

Porter’s Tanker series of bags are modeled after the classic MA-1 bomber jacket and are a mainstay for the brand. This 3way Nylone Briefcase is crafted from durable lightweight nylon, can be worn three ways (as a backpack, a tote, or a crossbody) and features a bright orange lining that not only recalls the MA-1 theme, but makes it easier to find your goods.

Gucci Black Signature Messenger Bag

The smallest bag of the set and yet, with the designer label, the most expensive. It’s an heirloom piece from Gucci that your offspring will cherish and features supple buffed leather debossed with Gucci’s signature ‘Double G’ logo and comes with an outer pocket and lush suede lining.

The Best Briefcases

In the market for a new briefcase? We’ve selected the 10 best briefcases for men at any budget. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

5 Style Brands to Watch in 2020

There’s an overload of designers and brands on the market, but in the sea of menswear, we’ve spotted the lighthouses leading us to dry land. This year, these are some of the newer brands we’re excited to incorporate into our closets.

Séfr

Séfr originally began in 2012 as a high-end vintage shop, selling archival goods from designer labels like Maison Martin Margiela. The brand’s popularity grew and they’d toyed with the idea of producing their own line. With help from customer feedback, the brand initially launched a button-up shirt in two colorways that sold out quickly.

In Acne-esque fashion, the brand pivoted its focus to a full menswear collection and today boasts some of the most brow-raising fabrics anywhere. Interestingly, Séfr cites its greatest influence as womenswear, a fitting theme in today’s expanding definition of masculinity.

Reception

Reception is a brand centered around travel, food and, most of all, community. More succinctly put, its labels, which look like receipts, read, “It’s all about food and socializing.” It began with souvenir-style graphic tees silkscreened with artwork highlighting various locales and restaurants that have inspired its founder, Pierre Boiselle.

The brand has since expanded (only three seasons in) and has a full collection composed of military jackets, vintage-inspired coaches jackets, chinos and button-ups. The pieces are produced in Portugal with premium fabrics and the collection as a whole feels fresh, unstuffy and inviting. It has a clear skater attitude, in the vein of brands like Noah and Aimé Leon Dore, but with less New England prep and more LA character.

Dear Miler

The brainchild of Parsons alum Jimin Kim, Dear Miler also uses travel as the impetus for the brand, elevating classic garments with the modern traveler in mind. Think bomber jackets rendered in high-pile fleece, French-terry fabric that’s somehow upgraded to first class, and suits for the board room and for boarding 747s.

The collection focuses on garments with high-quality fabrics that are naturally wrinkle-resistant designed in a clean aesthetic that’s both comfortable and utilitarian (everything has hidden pockets). The Tribeca-based brand produces all of its goods in Kim’s native country of South Korea and its offers are as cozy as they are dressed up.

Staatsballett

Staatsballett is a New York-based brand producing all of its goods in Los Angeles. Started in 2017 by partners and Youtubers, Avery Ginsberg and Kailee Mckenzie, the brand focuses on sustainability, using materials that are locally-milled, deadstock or GOTS certified.

Though the brand’s aesthetic changes with each season, its designs straddle the line between business and play and currently fall into a kind of dressed-up shoegaze/grunge aesthetic with dashes of workwear. And just because the founders have gained their following through their online personas doesn’t mean their clothes are anything to scoff at. The brand has gotten coverage in major outlets like Grailed and Farfetch. Plus, it’s all nearly sold out.

Dashiel Brahmann

NYC-based brand Dashiel Brahmann takes a discerning approach to every season, inspired by the artists and creatives who shaped the 1960s. With experience at lauded labels like Thom Browne and Patrik Ervell, Brahmann paints his line with an intentionally sparse color palette infused with contrast stitching and silhouettes of the ’60s and ’70s. You’ll find relaxed trousers, suits, work jackets, upcycled jeans and more. All of it is elegant, all of it is cool.

The Style Trends to Watch for in 2020, According to the Insiders

It’s hard to make sense of what’s going on in today’s fashion free-for-all landscape. But there are some common threads woven throughout the runways (and Instagram) that you’ll likely see a lot of this year. To make sense of it all, we had industry insiders polish off the crystal ball and give us their takes on what’s to come for 2020. The clairvoyants we sought ranged from designers, trend forecasters, vintage dealers and more. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The 6 Best Shoes and Boots We Saw at New York’s Menswear Trade Shows

Waiting is hard. While I hit the pavement of the trade show floors and put a microscope to the runways in search of up-and-coming trends because it’s my job, the real reason I scour is that I just can’t wait to see what’s new. This season at New York’s Fall/Winter 2020 trade shows, I saw some things old, some things new, some things upcycled and some things indigo. Among the sea of goods taking up the booths, there were plenty of shoes to ogle.

Here are the just some of the shoes you’ll be seeing on feet in the not-too-distant future.

Yogi


Yogi footwear was a product of the ’90s following in the footsteps of famed yoga instructor-turned-shoe-designer Anna Kelso. Noted for producing shoes with soles that mimicked walking in sand, her brand, Earth Shoes was a hit among the granola and hippie crowd. It was passed around to different parent companies before relaunching in 2016 and is stocked in highly-respected independent boutiques like C’H’C’M, Oi Polloi and more, with collaborations with respected brands.

Viberg


When Viberg launched their most recent drop of footwear, the standout among them was its mules. This time, the mule is getting a new chassis in a variety of leathers including this one from C.F. Stead leather dubbed ‘Winter Smoke’.

Feit


Feit’s hiker boots, at the precise angle and with a negligible amount of force, is a lethal projectile. They’re also incredibly cool. This season saw the deadly duds with a slick leather jacket.

Yuketen


I always expect to see some of the craziest footwear at the Yuketen booth. Expectations were met. Known for crafting a wide range of footwear spanning from beaver fur moccasins to crepe sole loafers and chunky Americana-inspired boots, the brand consistently draws retail buyers and legions of fans thanks to the discerning eye of its designer, Yuki Matsuda. Among the ranks in the parade of footwear were boots with a capital ‘H’ hairy suede and bandana printed leather, work sneakers straight from the ’70s and more.

Reproduction of Found


Reproduction of Found specializes in replicas and riffs of military sneakers from around the world. German Army Trainers and Swedish military sneakers are normal fare for the brand, but I was drawn to some of the tech-leaning Russian hiking sneakers as well as the more formal South African derbies.

Sebago


Known for Maine-friendly moccasins and boat shoes, Sebago is shifting the sails a bit and getting funky. Among the lot were lugged loafers in classic leathers as well as eye-catching animal prints, and moccasins done up in bright color block renditions.

The Style Trends to Watch for in 2020, According to the Insiders

It’s hard to make sense of what’s going on in today’s fashion free-for-all landscape. But there are some common threads woven throughout the runways (and Instagram) that you’ll likely see a lot of this year. To make sense of it all, we had industry insiders polish off the crystal ball and give us their takes on what’s to come for 2020. The clairvoyants we sought ranged from designers, trend forecasters, vintage dealers and more. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

5 Haircare Resolutions to Make in 2020

We want you to have a good hair day. Nay, a good hair year. And to do that, you’ve got to think about making some changes. We’re not suggesting that your current hairstyle needs an edit, but in order to get the most out of it — or rather, in order for it to look its best every single day — you might benefit from a resolution or two.

And what better time to make some resolutions than in the new year? To help hone in on some universal hair-care tips, we sought expertise from barber Alex Brenard, of Blind Barber in Philadelphia. Here are five things — from hair-perfecting products to barbershop etiquette — that will have you on track for a capital-letter Good Hair Year.

1. Invest in dry shampoo

If your hair gets too glossy by day’s end — and if you’ve no time for a proper shower — then there’s an easy fix. Brenard suggests keeping a dry shampoo at the ready, both on your sink ledge or in a gym bag. “While not a substitute for a real shower with shampoo and conditioner, dry shampoo is a perfect way to refresh your locks if you can’t squeeze in a shower after a long day at work or post-gym,” he says. “It absorbs oils and odor to help you get over the hump before your next refresh.”

It’s also great for the days you don’t shampoo your hair (since it can turn hair dry and limp if you overwash). A good plan is to shampoo every few days and use dry shampoo ad hoc on the in-betweens.

Dry Shampoo by Blind Barber + Bryce Harper $22

2. Prioritize scalp health

“Remember that healthy skin yields healthy hair,” Brenard says. “Just like the rest of your skin, your scalp also gets dry and flakey, especially when the temp drops. To prevent or correct this, get a moisturizing conditioner with ingredients like avocado oil or shea butter, and use it every time you shower.” This helps nourish the scalp and the hairs, and it will remove excess grease without drying out the hair-nourishing oils produced by your scalp.

As an added tip, Brenard says to combine a few drops of tea tree essential oil with the conditioner, in the palm of your hand. “It will restore balance to your skin’s pH levels, eliminate the flakes and add a satisfying tingle to the entire experience,” he says.

Repairing Conditioner by Amika $22

Tea Tree Oil by The Body Shop $13

3. Go lower than 0 on that fade

You might be known for having the tightest, cleanest fade in town, but it’s only true if you’ve got a subzero shave. That is, you’ve got to switch from a 0-grade on the clippers to a straight razor shearing: “It’s a close as a shave gets, and it will squeeze an extra couple days out of the skin-tight look,” says Brenard. “A good barber will use some hot foam and/or hot towels throughout the process, too. The razor shave will typically cost a little extra, but it’s a nice way to treat yourself in the new year, and onward.”

4. Make your own texturizing sea salt spray

“Many people use the new year as a chance to start on a budget,” Brenard says. And cutting out one $30+ purchase might make the difference for a week. So, in place of a top-shelf texturizing spray, you can get that “just came from the beach” tousle with a couple easy ingredients at home. “You can come close to the same professional effectiveness by putting together your own mix of Epsom or Himalayan salt (1 tablespoon), up to 1 teaspoon of coconut or jojoba oil, and a few drops of essential oil of your choice, for scent,” he says. “Mix it all together with 1 cup of hot water and pour into a spritzer bottle, for your own custom salt spray at a fraction of the cost.”

5. Don’t keep your barber waiting

When prompted for one tip about the barber-client relationship, Brenard said that all clients should prioritize being on time for their appointments and being prepared: “A typical barbershop appointment is 30 minutes and if it’s a good shop, there are likely going to be clients waiting for their spot right after yours,” he says.

“To make the most of your allotted appointment time—that is, actually having your hairs cut—come in with at least a rough idea of what you want done. Pictures always help. Perhaps a past haircut you liked, or even a celebrity whose style you dig. While a good barber will be ready to consult and guide you to your ideal look, all barbers cringe a little when a client sits down and states flatly, ‘I have no clue what I want to do’. Your hairstyle is a collaboration with your barber, and all great collaborations come from clear communication.”

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

We Can’t Wait for This Upcoming Vans Collaboration to Drop

New York City designer Sandy Liang has been continuously canonballing the fashion scene with her mash-up of 90s nostalgia and, as she puts it, “Chinatown grandmas”. Her first collection debuted in 2013 and was also her senior thesis at the prestigious Parsons School of Design and her waves have since reached tidal proportions, yet to reach their crest. The brand is a medley of bright pink and glaring neons, rendered in clashing prints and funky silhouettes. It’s tacky-turned-trés-chic, it’s offbeat in the best way, it’s fun. Though the women’s brand has been a runaway hit with fashion editors and hip downtowners, it’s also gained a loyal male following.

Sandy Liang’s fleece jackets are legendary for their lush piles of poly, trimmed in cheetah print and highlighter colors and have been noted as a favorite among men. Men’s fervor for Liang hasn’t been limited to just fleece, either. Celebrated chef and kindred spirit Danny Bowien of the contemporary Chinese restaurant Mission Chinese is frequently seen sporting the brand. Now, the brand is eyeing another one of Liang’s childhood fashion mainstays.

On February 21, Sandy Liang is set to release a collaboration with the iconic sneaker brand Vans for a 13-piece collection. Featuring polos, track pants, a slew of accessories and, of course custom Vans sneakers, the collection starts at just $14. Set your calendars and bookmark both the Sandy Liang website and Vans website.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Style Trends to Watch for in 2020, According to the Insiders

It’s hard to make sense of what’s going on in today’s fashion free-for-all landscape. But there are some common threads woven throughout the runways (and Instagram) that you’ll likely see a lot of this year. To make sense of it all, we had industry insiders polish off the crystal ball and give us their takes on what’s to come for 2020. The clairvoyants we sought ranged from designers, trend forecasters, vintage dealers and more.

The ’70s and the 2000s

Fashion recycles its way through the decades, and the formative years of both baby boomers and their children are en vogue. The 1970s comeback is less disco and more Woodstock, with earth-tones and flared pants. And it’s strutting down the street alongside leather shirts and cardigans, an interesting pairing of hippie and grunge.

Jon Feldman, owner of Grand Street Local: “In the shows and from a vintage perspective, I’m seeing a lot of the ’70s come back. But, it’s not so much of the disco vibe.”

Suits, but not necessarily for a boardroom meeting

The era of the tightly tailored suiting is not what we’re talking about. Rather, streetwear is kicking itself to the curb and is headed to the tailors with a subversive eye, rendering business and formal attire in relaxed proportions and avant-garde construction. Either way, there’s still an evident move toward sophistication. The Hypebeasts are growing up.

Chris Black, writer and creative director, Done to Death: “The pendulum always swings. At the runway shows, there was a lot more suiting, a lot brighter colors. Relaxed suiting, bright colors and different materials. [Designers] are sending models down the runway in pieces that didn’t have lapels, but it was still a suit with proper buttons. A Cold Wall showed suits, Virgil showed a suit.”

Jermy Kirkland, host of the podcast, Blamo!: “Streetwear dudes are returning back to the basics. There seems to be a return to classic style and a rebellion against the super casual. Like, the new hires are dressing better than the CEOs.”

Antonio Ciongoli, designer of 18east: “I do feel the tide shifting at the top back towards tailoring and it’s been interesting to see how that plays out in the neighborhood around our studio. The vibe is very different from the soft-shouldered, Italianate silhouette that characterized the last tailored wave of the early 20-teens. It feels more rooted in vintage, which is its own trend and could — and hopefully does — stem from the realization that we should be wasting less.”

Menswear is getting sexy

Crop tops, low rise jeans. They’re back! They’re not for everyone, but then again, not even the great blue jean can say it has a 100 percent success rate.

Jon Feldman: “A few weeks ago, I bought a pearl necklace… There are a lot more risks that are being taken and I feel like there are a lot more things that are acceptable in the world nowadays.”

Purses

Fanny packs and sacoche-style cross-body bags were big trends in the past several seasons. Coinciding with the interrogation of gender-norms and a more modern masculinity, these handy accessories have gone all the way into full-fledged purses. And why not? Bags are inherently functional. Function is form. And form, function. While we’re at it, why not make it look cool, too? Whatever you do with it, just don’t call it a murse.

Chris Black: “A lot of purses for men. A lot of handbags for men… Different sizes and shapes, worn under a coat, worn out.”

Micro trends over macro trends

There have never been more fashion tribes than now. The push and pull of silhouettes from wide to skinny to wide again will always happen, but Amy Leverton says that today’s fashion landscape is so fraught with individual styles that it’s hard to pinpoint one overarching trend. Rather, there are dozens of micro trends. In contrast to basic jeans, self-made DIY brands on platforms like Instagram and Depop are customizing and upcycling denim in wildly outlandish ways — and they’re successful.

Antonio Ciongoli: “What’s funny about trends at a time where everyone is basically mainlining hyperspecific content based on their interests is that it feels like everything is cool to somebody.”

Bigger silhouettes

From straight leg to relaxed to straight-up massive, guys are looking for more legroom.

Chris Black: “Volume. Things are bigger. I think the tiny thing is kind of over. I think we’re going big again, whether it was a bag or a fit.”

Amy Leverton: “I’m seeing some absolutely massive silhouettes. Loads of brands like Anglan from South Korea are going with huge, huge silhouettes.”

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Gerald Ortiz is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering style. From San Diego, now New York City.

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RTH Is One of the Coolest Brands You Need to Know

It’s no secret that working at Ralph Lauren is a fashion school in itself. And the prestigious university has churned out notable alumni in its 53 year run including Sid Mashburn, Todd Snyder and Antonio Ciongoli. Another name to know is René Holguin, founder of one of the coolest brands you’re likely to hear about, RTH.

Holguin grew up as many young designers did, idolizing Ralph Lauren and his perfected prep lifestyle, a look he’d not found so easy growing up in El Paso, Texas. His highly-developed taste was undoubtedly a result of both his father who was the owner of lauded cowboy bootmaker Laramie and his mother who was a self-made interior designer. Crisp white button-up shirts, cowboy boots and faded jeans would become a uniform for him.

Eventually, he found himself working for the designer he’d revered so much, gaining that singular hands-on education so many alumni talk about. After working as the creative director for Polo retail, Holguin worked as a fashion director for J. Crew and held executive positions at both Lucky Brand Jeans and Levi’s. When it came time to move on, Holguin set off to Los Angeles to start his own brand.

The store started out as an outpost for Southwestern-inspired style with a discerning mix of handcrafted leather goods (made in-house), Native American jewelry and customized vintage jeans and drew loyal fans like Erykah Badu and Diane Keaton. Now, the brand has a second location located conveniently next door and it houses an international brand list serving as a sort of mood board for RTH. When you find yourself in Los Angeles, the side-by-side shops are worth a visit.

But if you’re not able to visit RTH in person, or can’t get there anytime soon, you can at least get a hold of one of the brand’s popular suede-trimmed bandana tote bags over at Alex Mill. “I’ve been a huge fan of Rene [Holguin] and RTH for a very long time — his store in LA is a must-visit for me,” Alex Mill creative director Somsack Sikhounmuong told us. “It’s always consistent, and never boring.”

Bandana Tote by RTH $120

Bandana Tote by RTH $120

Bandana Tote by RTH $120
Today in Gear

Over a half century since its inception, Ralph Lauren remains a powerful force in the style world. Former employees, now with successful businesses of their own, maintain the standards and lessons they learned during their time there. Here are five you may know. Read the Story
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Gerald Ortiz is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering style. From San Diego, now New York City.

More by Gerald Ortiz | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

Are $700 Custom Jeans Worth It? I Got My Own Pair and Found Out

For many people, the perfect pair of jeans are seemingly elusive. Countless brands offer a myriad of silhouettes in an endless variety of denim. The perfect pair might be the first ones you pick up at the store — but the odds are stacked against you. It’s for this reason that there are now more custom jeansmakers and bespoke denim programs than ever. From the big players like Levi’s and 3×1 to local denim obsessives, a pair of jeans cut and sewn just for you promises to take the guesswork out of denim shopping.

But with price tags that can go into four figures, does it make sense to spring for a pair of custom jeans? With the help of Glenn’s Denim, I went through the process and here’s what you need to know when considering a pair for yourself.

Why You Should

Off-the-rack jeans just don’t fit. We’ve rapped about tailoring your jeans and how you can get off-the-rack pairs to fit like they were bespoke. But there are just some things you cannot fix. By now, if you haven’t found a pair that hits all the right notes, you might want to consider bespoke blue jeans.

You’d rather not take your jeans to a tailor. Jeans from the store might require a second outing to get them tailored. Though the point of ready-to-wear garments is to fit the masses, the added burden of tailoring can be time-consuming. For bespoke jeans, the initial time investment allows the tailor to lock down the fit, so they’ll have your patterns on file for future pairs you want to have made.

You’re very particular. Most people looking for a pair of custom-made jeans tend to know what they want and they aren’t satisfied by what’s served to them on store shelves. The level of control in the custom jean process can vary, but a range of fabrics, hardware and even pocket styles are par for the course. Beyond that, a custom jean service may offer hand-stitched details, nerdy denim production methods and more. If you’re a lover of denim and you want your hands all over the process, especially the minute details, go for it.

Why You Shouldn’t

It’s expensive. Bespoke jeans ain’t cheap. Depending on where you go, tailor-made five-pockets can run you upwards of $800. With custom details, they can get you up into a rack. If you’re able to find jeans that fit you well enough, you can have them tailored for much less.

You already have jeans that fit well. The biggest reason to go bespoke is to get jeans that fit perfectly. Jeans aren’t traditionally a tailored garment like a suit or a pair of dress trousers which are highly scrutinized in formal meetings. The casual essence of the blue jean makes it easy to get away with a pair that fits closely enough. Taking the humble workwear garment to tailoring heights like this has potential to be incongruous.

You’re not super particular. The bespoke jean process involves a lot of details that you choose yourself. The level of customization varies between makers but if you’re not detail-oriented when it comes to clothing, then bespoke jeans are likely not for you.

It’s inconvenient. Annoying as it is to peruse shop after shop, donning and doffing one jean after another in cramped fitting rooms, bespoke jeansmakers are fewer and further between. Levi’s has its own bespoke program, called Lot 501, but you’ll only find those at certain locations.

What to Consider If You Do

Fabric. Fit is the number one objective with bespoke jeans. Achieving that becomes more complicated if you opt for raw denim which will shrink after its washed. Unless you plan on never washing your jeans — please don’t do that — or you’re a denim purist who knows their way around shrinkage, save yourself the headache and go for pre-washed fabric.

Lead time. Jeans aren’t built in a day, unless you want to pay extra. Bespoke jeans can take weeks to make, so if you’re in a time crunch, it’s best to avoid getting custom jeans for a deadline. If you’re a patient consumer, willing to wait six-to-eight weeks, then go for it. Really, you’ve been waiting your whole life for the perfect pair, so what’re another few weeks?

Is it your first time? If it’s your first time buying a pair of bespoke jeans, you might be tempted to go with a crazy fabric or, putting it nicely, “unique” details. But it’s a safer bet to get a pair that’s straightforward so you don’t end up regretting your decision a few months down the road. Sure, your bespoke jeans fit you great, but maybe turmeric denim with buttoned pockets was a bad move. At Glenn’s Denim, Daniel Lewis stresses, “The main point is to get a perfect fit. Keep it simple.” If you’ve successfully navigated your first pair of bespoke jeans and you’re on to a second pair, maybe get the same thing in a different fabric. Or, the same fabric in a slightly different fit.

Why I Love Mine

For my custom jeans, I went to Brooklyn Tailors. Among British dress shoes, Japanese socks and locally-made button-ups, they’re adept at custom suiting and recently launched an in-house denim brand called Glenn’s Denim. With over 30 years of experience behind the sewing machine, crafting jeans for the world’s biggest blue jeans brands, Glenn Liburd’s namesake label is worth investing in for the off-the-rack garments alone. But the artisanal brand can also make fully custom jeans.

I’d call myself a denim nerd, as lame as that sounds. But it makes me just the sort of guy who’d consider getting a pair of jeans made just for my body.

Collaborating with Liburd and business partner Lewis on the jeans was both enjoyable and educational. I’d come into the initial fitting with a clear idea in mind — a high-rise wide-fitting jean reminiscent of a 1930s silhouette, but with 1950s details. What I had in mind, thankfully, would ultimately be scrapped. I wasn’t so much talked out of my dream jean as I was thoroughly and gently convinced that there was a better option for my first pair.

Glenn and Daniel know exactly what they’re talking about and are as much consultants as they are artisans. In the end, we decided on a straight fit, mid-rise jean. Basically, a 501 that actually fits my tree trunk calves and knock knees. We waffled between a few readymade pairs on the first consultation and made notes and adjustments where necessary. The toile fitting (a first draft of the jeans) was 80 percent there.

By the end, we’d nailed the perfect pair and I’m ecstatic. It’s difficult for me to find jeans that have a straight fit without it buckling at my concave knees before tapering at my calves, but Liburd solved those issues. It’s hard for me to imagine finding a better-fitting jean straight from the store. Plus, the personal touches and attention to detail make this pair even more special.

If you’re considering a pair of custom jeans and you’re able to do go through the process, there’s almost no reason not to do.

What Makes a Quality Pair of Jeans?

To explain the nuances that led to jeans’ worldwide adoption, we asked Paul Dillinger (Levi’s Head of Global Product Innovation) and Kiya Babzani (co-founder of leading selvedge denim retailer Self Edge) to weigh in on what kinds of construction, fabric and longevity characterize a great pair of jeans. Read the Story

Glenn’s Denim provided this product for review.

Gerald Ortiz is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering style. From San Diego, now New York City.

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A Day With a Top-Ranked Professional Bull Rider

Ezekiel Mitchell is quickly making a name for himself as a professional bull rider. Born in Rockdale, Texas, the 22-year-old is one of the top-ranked riders in the country and competes regularly at events across America. Unlike many of his peers, Mitchell didn’t grow up in a family steeped in rodeo tradition. Instead, he learned to ride bulls by watching Youtube and eventually built his own bucking barrel to practice in his back yard.

Video: A Day With Ezekiel Mitchell

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Now, Mitchell spends much of his time on the road competing at PBR events. His days build toward a single moment in the evening, a chance to pit himself against a 1,500-pound bull. As such, his schedule on tour is relatively relaxed: a few interviews, time to rest and an unchanging pre-ride routine. To learn about this up-and-coming athlete’s regimen and the gear he uses to ride, we caught up with him on January 3 in New York City.

Starting the season at Madison Square Garden, Mitchell demonstrated the inimitable determination needed to compete at a national level and deal with the volatile nature of the sport.

John Zientek is Gear Patrol’s style editor and in-house guitar authority. He grew up on the West Coast.

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Save the Date: Uniqlo’s Newest Collection of Designer Goods Is Coming

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