All posts in “Motorcycles”

Yamaha’s 2021 Ténéré 700 Celebrates Legendary Dakar Dominance

In its retro blue & yellow race team livery, the 2021 Yamaha Ténéré 700 Rally Edition honors the brand’s iconic Dakar champion bikes. The original XT models claimed 18 podiums in the first 6 editions of the world’s toughest race. 40 years later, this new model is powered by a 689cc, 4-stroke & features switchable ABS, a slip-on Akropovic exhaust, heavy duty skid plates, & LED lights.

This Famous Motorcycle Company Is Planning a Massive Product Onslaught

<!–Royal Enfield Is Planning a Massive Motorcycle Onslaught • Gear Patrol<!– –>

a whole lot of new bikes coming


Even 119-year-old businesses can need a shot at reinvention. Royal Enfield had a rough April, selling just 91 motorcycles. But the manufacturer won’t let that deter their ambitious product plans moving forward. Recently, the company’s CEO Vinod Dasari told Car and Bike that Royal Enfield has an onslaught of new bikes planned.

Dasari says Royal Enfield has a new platform coming soon, and plans to launch about four new motorcycles per year over the next three to four years.

“We’re so excited that, to a point, every quarter, for the next three to four years, every quarter, we have a new model,” Dasari told Car and Bike. “It’s not just changing the colors or something, it will be almost a new model, or a variant, coming for the next three to four years.”

Royal Enfield produces fantastic-looking vintage-style motorcycles, including the Interceptor and the Continental GT. The company was founded in the 1950s as a subsidiary of the British firm Royal Enfield to produce bikes for the Indian police. It kept on going after the U.K. company went defunct and kept the right to use the name.

Besides looking great, Royal Enfield bikes are also super-affordable for what they are, with models starting at less than $5,000. They are sold in the U.S., and you can find your local dealer here.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tyler Duffy

Tyler Duffy is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Staff Writer. He used to write about sports for The Big Lead and The Athletic. He has a black belt in toddler wrangling. He’s based outside Detroit.

More by Tyler Duffy | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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These Great Motorcycle Jackets Are All Made for Summer Riding

Now that summer is almost upon us, the temptation to go riding in jeans and a T-shirt rises with the temperature. But doing so risks serious injury; as the old adage goes, “Dress for the fall, not for the ride.”

Yet while it’s in your best interest to keep your skin off the pavement, dressing for the elements is essential too; if temps are in the upper 80-degree range and humidity is reaching Turkish bath levels, keeping layers to a minimum without sacrificing safety (or style) is key. In that case, you need to consider summer motorcycle jackets.

Leather jackets, regardless of the number of vents and the amount of perforation, will always be a slightly heavier option, but they tend to have the most style. Synthetic textile jackets tend to be the exact opposite, running much lighter but sporting a technical look to leather’s timeless one. But it’s entirely possible to balance safety and style — all while staying cool. Consider this list a great place to start.

Alpinestars Viper V2 Air Jacket

The V2 is the improved version of the Alpinestars Viper, with with a little more style and added subtlety to its more technical aspects. CE Level 2-rated armor at the shoulders and elbows is less noticeable than the old version but still has you covered in the event of an impact. The massive mesh panels on the chest and back also allow for more airflow to keep you cool.

Should the temperatures take a dip and you don’t need maximum cooling, the Viper comes with a removable windbreaker liner. Luckily, the V2 comes with a zippered pocket on the lower back on the outside of the jacket, so you can store the liner when you don’t need it. And as a bonus, the Alpinestars Viper V2 is the most affordable option on the list.

Belstaff Temple Jacket

Belstaff is known for its leather and waxed canvas jackets, but you’ll be sweating gallons if you try to stick out the summer in your Tourist Trophy. For the warmer months, Belstaff has the Temple Jacket, a lightweight nylon shell with mesh section along the arms for airflow.

Although it’s made from nylon, Belstaff still managed to translate its classic two-pocket, vintage moto jacket style to the technical construction — an achievement in its own right.

Aether Draft Mesh Jacket

Aether held off on creating a mesh motorcycle jacket for a long time, mainly because the material naturally lends itself to more tactical looks, which isn’t the brand’s M.O at all. As the company’s first mesh jacket, the Draft keeps with the minimalist, understated style Aether is known for, while still providing the full airflow benefits of the porous material.

The Draft also comes with a water and wind-resistant outer shell that stores in a zippered pouch in the back — the better to deal with the porous downsides of mesh jackets in inclement weather. The Draft isn’t canvas or leather as we’ve come to expect from them, but it’s undeniably Aether.

(Note: Use code STAYATHOME at checkout to save 25%.)

Rev’It Convex Jacket

Rev’It’s overall style leans more to the tactical, high-performance side of the spectrum; the company is loud and proud about the capabilities of their jackets, and the Convex Jacket is no exception. The Convex takes inspiration from Rev’It’s race suits, but dials back the intensity for everyday use.

Perforations in the leather along the torso, chest and back, combined with the PWR stretch panels, provide the airflow you need to keep cool on a hot day’s ride, but there’s still plenty of abrasion protection thanks to the Monaco Performance cowhide construction.

Dainese Bardo Perforated Jacket

As a traditional, relatively heavy leather jacket, the Bardo should, in theory, have the toughest job of all the picks on this list keeping a rider cool. But Dainese used perforations throughout nearly the entire front and back of the jacket to maximize airflow; there are even extra perforated panels on the underside of the arms for increased circulation.

If you’re looking for classic Italian style but don’t want to sweat to death before you reach your destination, the Dainese Bardo Perforated Jacket is the way to go this summer.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Meet Harley-Davidson’s Top-Secret Cafe Racer and Flat Tracker Motorcycles

Harley-Davidson may be one of the best-known brands in the motorcycle world — hell, one of the best-known brands in the world, period — but that brand recognition hasn’t been translating to growing sales. 2019 saw the brand’s units moved drop for the fifth straight year in a row, a consequence of its difficulties in pulling in fresh customers as their current ones grow older.

Still, the company is at least taking a few good swings at innovation. The all-electric LiveWire may not have brought in customers in droves, but it still managed to help redefine what an EV motorcycle can be, and the upcoming Bronx and Pan American models show how Harley plans on pushing into other categories buyers certainly don’t associate with the brand today.

Continuing that trend: it seems the motorheads from Milwaukee are planning on releasing a cafe racer and a flat track-inspired bike onto the streets.

That’s the word discovered by Motorcycle.com, which dug up European patent drawings for such a pair of bikes powered by the same new liquid-cooled Revolution Max engine found in the Bronx and Pan American. Those drawings pair almost perfectly with a pair of concept bikes spotted in Harley-Davidson’s investor presentation from September of last year — the blue and black bikes seen above.

The flat tracker, it seems, is likely targeted at the Indian FTR 1200 — which makes sense, given how that bike has opened Indian up to a younger audience less interested in massive cruisers, and that’s exactly what Harley is looking to do. The patent illustrations reveal much of the apparent design: there’s a single oval headlight up front, foot pegs mounted back behind the pivot for the tubular swingarm, an inverted fork front suspension, and a three-slot flyscreen that brings to mind a Jeep grille turned on its side.

The cafe racer seems to share the flat tracker’s front suspension setup, but as the patent drawings reveal, it differs in quite a few other ways. The foot pegs sit higher and further back, the handlebars sit low, and there’s a traditional swingarm with dual shocks in back instead. A headlight fairing and small windshield complete the cafe racer look.

While the style of the concepts is a bit of a matter of taste — we can’t help but think they look like a Harley designer went to Radwood and got the wrong ideas about what people want — the idea of H-D pushing into new categories certainly seems exciting. Sadly, there’s no word on when we’ll see them, but given how far along they look, we wouldn’t be surprised to see them revealed sometime in 2020 and hit the streets in 2021.

And while Harley-Davidson’s new CEO has reportedly played around with the company’s forthcoming model launches in a bid to play things a bit more conservatively — the so-called “Rewire” strategy moved the debuts of the Bronx and Pan American back to 2021 — we’re still hopeful that these exciting bikes will make it to market sooner or later.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

More by Will Sabel Courtney | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

What the Future Looks Like: Verge Rolls Out TS Electric

The muscular, futuristic outline of the Finnish Verge TS electric motorcycle highlights its advanced design from the angular aluminum frame to its impressively torquey power delivery: 0-62 mph sub 4 seconds and a top speed of 112 mph. And right back to its Tron-like, hubless rear wheel, which, with its integrated motor provides power & braking to the rear end. The Verge also offers an impressive range, up to 186 miles in the city & 124 on the open freeway.

This Incredible Motorcycle Gear Rarely Goes on Sale. Right Now, It’s 25% Off

<!–Aether’s Motorcycle Gear Is 25% Off, But Not for Long • Gear Patrol<!– –>

ready to ride


There are plenty of places to buy motorcycle riding apparel and plenty of brands to choose from, but only a few companies make gear that truly ranks among the best you can find — and Aether is unquestionably among them. The adventure-minded, California-based company makes all sorts of apparel meant for Getting Out There and Seeing The World…which, admittedly, can seem like a bit of a dream these days, after months of social distancing guidelines and work-from-home order have kept many of us isolated and cooped up.

Not surprisingly, given their status, Aether rarely offer their items for less than retail. But right now, you can snap up all of Aether’s motorcycle gearin fact, everything on their website — for 25 percent off the usual price. All you have to do is enter the code STAYATHOME at checkout. (They’ll even throw in free shipping.) Consider it a balm to ease the pain of being stuck in the house.

We’ve chosen a few of our favorites from Aether’s motorcycling collection below, but hit up the company’s website to see all the options.

Ramble motorcycle pants by Aether $475 $356

Divide Motorcycle Jacket by Aether $995 $746

Divide Motorcycle Pants by Aether $695 $521

Badlands Motorcycle Jacket by Aether $695 $521

Moto Boot by Aether $595 $446
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

More by Will Sabel Courtney | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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These Stylish Motorcycle Boots Are Perfect for Any Situation

<!–These Stylish Motorcycle Boots Are Perfect for Any Situation • Gear Patrol<!– –>

These Boots were Made for Riding (and Everything Else)


The second you go to search ‘motorcycle boots,’ you realize how broad of a spectrum the category truly is. There are boots for every style rider, for every category of bike — and nearly every situation imaginable. However, the main problem with a good portion of road-worth motorcycle boots is they look like, well, motorcycle boots. Some have chunky plastic buckles; others are more akin to old-school cowboy boots, while others tend to look like they’re made for walking on the moon.

The point is, most motorcycle boots not stylish and suitable for everyday use; they only look appropriate when you’re on the bike, riding. And since you can’t ride your bike through the front door of the restaurant and park it at your table, qualified boots that look just as good on the bike as they do off are always good to have in your gear arsenal.

These motorcycle boots, however, will have you protected and looking good in any scenario, be it on the road or in the restaurant.

Hero by TCX $250

Ace Boots by Stylmartin $260

Marshal by Rev’It $300

Urban Racer by Rokker $449

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The Best Warm Weather Motorcycle Gear for Spring Riding

Whether you’re one of the brave humans who layer up and ride through the winter or choose to hibernate during the cold months with your bike safely hooked up to a trickle charger, the longer, toastier days of summer are always welcomed. Still, while you’re stuck inside incessantly checking the weather for incoming warm fronts, you might as well get ready — and see if you need any new or improved riding gear

Warm weather riding gear can make the difference between a mediocre first ride of the season and a truly great one. Here’s some of the best gear you can grab now ahead of the nice days that are about to come.

Bell Eliminator Helmet

The vintage helmet style has been done to death at this point, but Bell has added a new twist: the Eliminator dips into Bell’s rich history of auto racing for inspiration.

Its old-school always-open venting is great for hot days — though if you get caught in the rain, you’ll definitely get wet. However, it’s hard to beat the Bell Eliminator’s bang for buck factor as it’s still a highly rated lid. Most importantly, it’s both DOT- and ECE-rated.

Dainese Bardo Perforated Jacket

Textile motorcycle jackets, while incredibly breathable, are an acquired taste. Leather jackets, on the other hand, ooze style — but aren’t exactly the first choice on a hot day’s ride. That is, unless, you pick up a perforated leather jacket like the Dainese Bardo, which provides protection, subtle style and airflow in abundance.

Rev’It Arch Gloves

The key to a good summer riding glove is a balance of protection and airflow. Rev’It employs the perfect amount of leather, mesh and neoprene in the right places to ensure comfort never encroaches on style — or vice versa.

Aether Ramble Pants

Aether’s reputation of designing products at the intersection of minimalism, functionality and style is top-notch –and exemplified by these pants. It’s not very often you find pants that can seamlessly transition from a commute through morning traffic to sitting in an office meeting.

Rokker Urban Racer Boots

You see a lot of motorcycle-style boots out there that broadcast timeless design…but back it up with absolutely no utility. Hand-made in Portugal, the Rokker Urban Racer Boots are real motorcycle boots; ankle, heel, and toe protection are expertly hidden under well-styled, water-repellant cow hide.

This Incredible Motorcycle Gear Rarely Goes on Sale, But Right Now, It’s 25% Off

<!–Aether’s Motorcycle Gear Is 25% Off, But Not for Long • Gear Patrol<!– –>

there’s a “Thor 2” joke here somewhere


There are plenty of places to buy motorcycle riding apparel and plenty of brands to choose from, but only a few companies make gear that truly ranks among the best you can find — and Aether is certainly among them. The adventure-minded, California-based company makes all sorts of apparel meant for Getting Out There and Seeing The World…which, admittedly, can seem like a bit of a dream these days.

Not surprisingly, given their status, they don’t often offer their items for less than retail. But right now, you can snap up all of Aether’s motorcycle gearin fact, everything on their website — for 25 percent off the usual price. All you have to do is enter the code STAYATHOME at checkout. (They’ll even throw in free shipping.) Consider it a balm to ease the pain of being stuck in the house for now.

We’ve chosen a few of our favorites from Aether’s motorcycling collection below, but hit up the company’s website to see all the options. Don’t wait too long to snag this gear, though; the deal ends on Friday.

Divide Motorcycle Jacket by Aether $995 $746

Divide Motorcycle Pants by Aether $695 $521

Moto Boot by Aether $595 $446

Badlands Motorcycle Jacket by Aether $695 $521
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

More by Will Sabel Courtney | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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2020 Indian FTR Rally Review: Embracing the Past, Looking to the Future

Brand: Indian Motorcycle
Product: FTR Rally
Release Date: Spring 2020
Price: $13,499+
From: indianmotorcycle.com

The cool, rainy city of Portland — and the surrounding tangle of curled mountain roads — might not be the first place that comes to mind when it comes to places you’d want to first ride a bike from a traditional American motorcycle company like Indian. Domestic motorcycle manufacturing, after all, tends to be known for big V-twins and thumping down desert highways. But the last few years have revealed a whole new side of Indian; the release of the FTR 750 and FTR 1200 marked a hard shift from the highway monsters to scrappy, sporty bikes that proudly shine a light on Indian’s badass flat-tracking past.

Now, the 2020 Indian FTR Rally — a new iteration of the FTR 1200 — shows that Indian is digging into not only their racing history, but also their future.

What We Like

The 2020 FTR Rally isn’t all that different from the FTR 1200, but it isn’t meant to be. The FTR works well for Indian; the Rally is only meant to give riders some altered aesthetics and a few new features. Indian made the decision to hire Ola Stenegard — the fella whose impeccable taste was proven forever by designing one of the coolest bikes in recent memory, the BMW R nineT — as the company’s new head designer, and it’s paid off.

Doubling down on the flat-track vibe, they based the Rally on the base-model 1200, which results in a charmingly mechanical speedometer, a tiny digital screen with fuel gauge and gear selection, no tachometer, and a cleverly hidden USB port, leaving the handlebars simple and clean.

The FTR Rally does have a few eye-catching changes. The color palette has moved from the FTR 1200’s very raceday-esque red-frame-and-splash-of-white-on-the-tank to more of a bad-guy vibe. The Rally comes in a leather-jacket-cool combo of black and matte gray, with a few tasty pops of red pinstriping around the classic chief’s-head logo, windscreen and wheels. In a more retro vein, Indian added what they call a brown “aviator seat” — which is also lowered slightly to provide a better riding position, on conjunction with the new handle bars that sit two inches higher than the FTR 1200.

One change that’s a matter of taste: the semi-knobby Pirelli Scorpion Rally STR tires. Although the tires (and the bike’s name) give the impression the Rally is meant for off-road riding, it really isn’t; these tires have the aggressive look of a dirt track racer, but after nearly 150 miles of wet, twisty roads, I can say these tires never gave me the impression that they were intended for anything other than tarmac.

Speaking of performance: the Rally’s more upright riding position, high foot pegs and snappy torque make this bike a back road killer. The Rally is built around the same 1203cc V-twin motor as the FTR 1200, making 123 horsepower and 87 pound-feet of torque. Due to the power and torque, it almost didn’t matter which gear I was in; the torque would snap the bike into shape coming out of a corner whether I was in third gear or fifth.

The galloping of the V-twin was as lovely to hear (although I do wish it were a touch louder) as it was exciting to rip open on the occasional straight bit of road we found. Although the base model doesn’t come with the riding modes and traction control, it thankfully does come with ABS — which I employed often while leaning on the dual-disc Brembo brakes up front and the single disc out back.

Watch Out For

As cool as the V-Twin is, it is a thirsty power plant. I was shocked to find I was down to a quarter of a tank after about 75 miles. The fuel tank holds 3.4 gallons of juice, but the Rally just can’t help but guzzle it like light beer at a frat house.

With range limited to about 100 miles per tank, the gas situation could be cripplingly limiting, unless you only plan to use this bike for a local commuter. Problem is, if this is just an around-town commuter bike, then $13,499 and up is awfully damn pricy.

And speaking of pricy: I dig how simple the handlebar situation is, but again, for more than $13K, I feel like grip warmers should be included. It’s 2020; cold hands should be a memory of the past.

Other Options

Ducati Scrambler Pro 1100 ($13,495+); Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled ($11,995+)

Verdict

The FTR Rally isn’t massively different from the FTR 1200, but there’s nothing wrong with that — if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. The FTR has not only proven to be a rad re-entry for Indian into the racing world, but it has also brought in a massive new group of motorists to the marque: millennials. Young people want to see something fresh and cool, even if that’s actually just a retro-inspired bike.

The Rally didn’t need to be anything beyond a minor, largely cosmetic update to bring them (and me) in. Sure, it’s not cheap, and some of the details aren’t perfect. But it is a great bike from a company that motorcycle nerds have been wanting to see do well for a long time.

Indian hosted us and provided this product for review.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Indian Rolls Out Low, Lean 2020 Scout Bobber Sixty

It’s not just the stripped-down & low-slung styling that make Indian Motorcycles’ 2020 Scout Bobber Sixty such a standout. Available only in 2 different shades of blacked-out, this clean cruiser is almost 25-pounds lighter than its predecessor yet powered by the same 999cc V-twin. And weight isn’t the only thing that’s lighter. The price tag is slimmed down, too.

Now It’s Easier to Rent a BMW Motorcycle in One of America’s Best Places to Ride

<!–Rent a BMW Motorcycle in Southern California, Save 15% • Gear Patrol<!– –>

california love


Riding a motorcycle is one of the best ways to experience the open road, but it also usually limits you to a fairly small radius around your home base. Knocking out a 1,000-mile road trip in a car is so easy, you don’t even need to think about it; a 1,000-mile journey on a motorcycle, in contrast, requires the sort of physical endurance and preparation usually reserved for military operations. Far better, then, to take alternate transportation to go where you want to ride, then grab a bike once you get there…but that involves finding a place to rent a motorcycle from, and that’s not nearly as easy as doing the same with a car.

Luckily, though, renting a motorcycle and riding some of America’s best roads just got that much easier. Hertz — yes, the people you’ve been renting cars from for yearsis launching a motorcycle rental location in the Los Angeles area that better opens up all of Southern California’s amazing roads to riders from far away.

The Long Beach, CA location of Hertz Ride is actually the third one to pop up in the United States in recent years (the other two are in Las Vegas and Riverside, CA), but its close proximity to Los Angeles International Airport makes it far easier for visitors to pop over and grab a bike. And what a selection they offer: the Hertz crew has a wide variety of 2020 model year BMW motorcycles up for grabs,including the R nineT Scrambler seen above, the K 1600 B and K 1600 GA, the R 1250 GS and R 1250 RT and the F 750 GS.

Better yet: if you book your trip now for any dates until April 30th, you can save 15 percent at any of the three locations. As if you needed another reason to get away from everything right now.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

More by Will Sabel Courtney | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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Cake’s Kalk INK is An All-Terrain Performer

Sweden’s Cake builds rad electric motorcycles. Their latest is called the Kalk INK. Sharing the same off-road-proven platform as the brand’s original OR dirtbike, the INK is built as a lighter, freeriding and trail bike. With a design inspired by downhill mountain bikes and modern motocrossers, the Kalk Inc hits a top speed of 50+ mph and boasts a ride time of up to three hours.

This Badass Electric Motorcycle Is Reviving an Iconic Name for the 21st Century

<!–Pursang’s New Bultaco Is a Badass Electric Motorcycle With Motocross Roots • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Peter Fonda would be intrigued


Once upon a time, Spanish manufacturer Bultaco built an iconic motocross bike called the Pursang, which went on to find fame thanks in part to a notable appearance in the film Easy Rider. The company went out of business for good in the mid-1980s…but the legend of the Pursang endured.

Now, a new Spanish manufacturer calling itself Pursang plans to revive the name with a new line of electric motorcycles. They will bring two versions to the market starting this year.

The first, the carbon fiber-bodied E-Track, will arrive in September 2020, and be available in a limited run of 72 bikes at first. The E-Track will use an 11-kW Bosch motor to achieve a top speed of 75 mph and a range of 99 miles. It will sell for €13,700 — a little over $15,000 at current exchange rates.

The second will be a cheaper offering called the E-Street, which will be perfect for the electric motorcycle enthusiast who also happens to be a Bruce Springsteen fan. It will use a 6-kW Bosch motor for a top speed of 62 mph and a 62-mile range. Pursang will sell it for €9,700, currently a little north of $10,000. The website does not provide a date as to when that bike will be available for purchase, however.

Competition in the electric motorcycle space is heating up, with major manufacturers like Harley Davidson competing with independents like Zero. If you’re looking for an EV bike to add to your garage, check out some of our favorite electric motorcycles here.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tyler Duffy

Tyler Duffy is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Staff Writer. He used to write about sports for The Big Lead and The Athletic. He has a black belt in toddler wrangling. He’s based outside Detroit.

More by Tyler Duffy | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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