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2019 Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO Review

The AMG GT family is a well established gaggle of sports cars that arrived on the scene and quickly proved that they were worthy of competing with the mighty Porsche 911 with their caricature like proportions and preposterously charming V8s. Every model from the base GT, to the Beyoncé hipped GT C and batshit GT R brute – there is a GT model for everyone.

The latest addition has clearly been targeted at the fiend that eats blue steak for breakfast, small children for lunch and lion flesh for dinner – a little unhinged. Meet the Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO. This is the new poster boy for Mercedes-AMG until the Black Series arrives and scares us all half to death. It is no more powerful than the GT R, but that isn’t the point of the PRO. The PRO is for the track…pro that is set on shaving milliseconds off their Nordschleife PB lap time.

Ahh yes, the Green Hell. The GT R was broke built to, and broke, the production car lap record and was branded ‘The Beast of The Green Hell’. It has since been beaten by the GT2 RS and Huracán Performante – the PRO is six and a bit seconds quicker than the boggo GT R, an impressive feat given that the powertrain is identical. This highlights just how significant the changes to the rest of the car are.

So there is still 577bhp and 516lb, how is it so much quicker and how much does this PRO cost? Well, it costs £188,345, some £40,000 more than the GT R. You must consider that the Track Pack (4 point harnesses, roll cage and fire extinguisher), Carbon Ceramic Brakes and Carbon Aero Kit are all included in the base price of the PRO where they are options on the GT R. What else does the price hike include? Well, there is some serious race tech borrowed from the GT4 car that is based on the AMG GT. There are adjustable dampers, a plethora of weight reduced parts including carbon fibre antiroll bar at the front, carbon fibre shear panel on the rear underfloor to stiffen the structure and the fixed lightweight carbon buckets. However, it does not make the GT R PRO a straw weight fighter like the Porsche GT3 RS as it has only burnt off 25 kilograms (1,575kg dry).

The aero is where you start to see your moneys worth – there is a chunk more aero action over the front half of the car bringing the PRO closer to the 50/50 aero balance that race cars aim to achieve. There is an additional 99kg of downforce at 250km/h, a lot of which is working on the front half of the car – AMG did not divulge exactly how much but it can be felt through the steering and overall balance in the high speed sections.

Sounds like you had a go at testing the high speed stability? Well, yes. I was only allowed to drive the car on track – Hockenheim, an ideal venue with its scary fast bends that require you to push hard to make the most of. It is on the circuit when pushing hard that the quality of the dampers over kerbs and under hard braking that the changes are felt. Cup 2 tires are flattering out of the slower corners with immense traction firing you onto the next straight.

The long sweeping left hand bend sees speeds of 250km/h on the speedo and the car feels supremely stable – still sounds fabulous too. It inspires confidence and trust and that is perhaps what lacked in the standard GT R. The aero and suspension have cut the floating feeling that the GT R often unnerved me with on track last year.

Sounds like the dream package? Better than an GT3 RS? Well, the GT R PRO is still based on the AMG GT. This means that it is BIG and there is a lot of car ahead of you. I wish it was a little smaller and a tad more nimble. In some of the slower corners there is a smudge of front end push that the magicians at Porsche have eliminated – perhaps it is a weight issue that the Black Series will manage to address. The Porsche is still a sizeable 10 or so seconds quicker around the benchmark ‘Ring time that we all pine about – AMG are quick to say that the PRO lap time was not set in optimal conditions.

What I could deduce from my quick stint at Hockenheim is that the GT R PRO is just as much of a laugh as the rest of the AMG GT family – it is up for having a bit of a fun. Set the ESP to Sport or OFF and pick a level of traction control using the stubby yellow knob and the GT R PRO will still have you laughing out loud. A GT3 RS might be more pointy and focused, but the GTR PRO is still a worthy of being held in equally high regard as a track day weapon. The GT R stops and goes hard, the PRO takes the on track abilities to another level.

LA Auto Show 2018: Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO

GTspirit are live at the LA Motor Show 2018 and the wraps have just been pulled off the Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO. When you buy a Porsche RS car you have the option of ticking a box for something called the Weissach Package. This adds an extra track focus you the already crazy fast GT3/2RS that you are buying. Now AMG have cooked up something similar for the bonkers AMG GT R – meet the GTR PRO.

The new PRO shares its powertrain with the AMG GT R. It differs in what it offers for the suspension, aerodynamics and weight reduction packages. The PRO gets a new coilover suspension system which can be mechanically adjusted by the driver depending on the circuit they are driving. The front axle gets an adjustable carbon fiber torsion bar, the rear steel unit is also adjustable. Dynamic engine and transmission mounts have been re-tuned specifically for the PRO.

Cars delivered outside of the Chinese, US and Canadian markets will get the option of a track pack. This adds roll over protection, a four point safety harness and a 2 kg fire extinguisher. Ceramic brakes are fitted as standard in the PRO as well as AMG bucket seats. Aerodynamics are taken care of with a variety of unique carbon fiber pieces. These include two front flicks, a larger front splitter, a larger rear diffuser and rear air vents.

This culminates, along with the new facelift lights and dashboard, to make the AMG GT R even more angry and menacing. This really is a racecar for the streets that holds the title of being the fastest front engined production car ever to lap the fearsome Nurburgring.

2019 Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO Officially Revealed

The new Mercedes-AMG GT R PRO has been officially announced at the Los Angeles Motor Show 2018. The two seater will serve as the GT for the race track, taking lessons learned by Mercedes-AMG through its customer racing programs in GT3 and GT4 and applying them to a barely road-legal track day tool.

The official release of the GT R PRO model coincides with the release of facelift AMG GT’s. With four years in the market, it was about time for a fresh look. The AMG GT gets light clusters that closely resemble the four door coupe launched earlier this year. The cars also get new rear diffusers with tailpipes to resemble the four door, the GT and GT S get new sill covers and new alloy wheel options are also available.

The AMG GT retains the 4.0 litre AMG V8 throughout the range. In the standard GT it now produces 476 hp, in the GT S it is boosted to 522 hp, the GT C gets 557 hours and the GT R a healthy 585 hp. On all models, the AMG Dynamics program is increased to add more adjustability to the ESP programs. In conjunction with the normal drive programs, AMG now offers four new settings, ‘basic’, ‘advanced’, ‘pro’ and ‘master’.

Inside, The AMG GT gets a new AMG Performance steering wheel and the centre console and display buttons from the AMG GT 4-Door Coupé. The dashboard is now fully digital with a 12.3-inch instrument cluster and a 10.25-inch multimedia display on the centre console.

The new PRO shares its powertrain with the AMG GT R. It differs in what it offers for the suspension, aerodynamics and weight reduction packages. The PRO gets a new coilover suspension system which can be mechanically adjusted by the driver depending on the circuit they are driving. The front axel gets an adjustable carbon fibre torsion bar, the rear steel unit is also adjustable. Dynamic engine and transmission mounts have been retuned specifically for the PRO.

Cars delivered outside of the Chinese, US and Canadian markets will get the option of a track pack. This adds roll over protection, a four point safety harness and a 2 kg fire extinguisher. Ceramic brakes are fitted as standard in the PRO as well as AMG bucket seats. Aerodynamics are taken care of with a variety of unique carbon fibre pieces. These include two front flicks, a larger front splitter, a larger rear diffuser and rear air vents.

While there are no Nurburgring records to report, Mercedes-AMG have confirmed that Maro Engel completed a circuit of the North Loop in exactly 7.04.632 minutes. An impressive time for the front engined GT R PRO!

2019 Mercedes-AMG GT 43 and GT 53 Models Revealed

We are currently out in Texas driving the new Mercedes-AMG GT five-door models. Back in Germany though, AMG have taken the covers off of two new models which join the ’63’. Whilst we will have to wait a bit longer to share our impressions of the new GT, we can at least confirm the specifications of the models that join the range.

The Mercedes-AMG GT 43 gets a 3.0-litre 6-cylinder in-line engine. It produces 367 hp and delivers maximum torque of 500 Nm. Acceleration from 0-100 km/h takes just 4.9 seconds and it has a top speed of 270 km/h. Mercedes-AMG continues to roll out its EQ Boost starter-alternator which adds an additional 22 hp and 250 Nm for short periods of time.

EQ Boost is Mercedes-AMG’s performance hybrid system. Based on a 48 volt system, an integrated starter motor is teamed with an electric compressor to provide plenty of low down power. Essentially, EQ Boost fills the gaps a conventional turbocharger leaves when spooling. The power required to run the 48 volt system is recuperated kinetically making it extremely efficient and less costly than a plug-in hybrid.

The second model, the Mercedes-AMG GT 53, gets the same 3.0 litre 6-cylinder power unit but benefits from increased performance, churning out 435 hp and 520 Nm of torque. The EQ Boost system is almost exactly the same and allows for a 4.5 second 100 km/h sprint in the AMG and a 285 km/h sprint. Both cars get an AMG 9-speed transmission and Airpanel active aerodynamics.

Both cars are identical when it comes to interior design. With a large amount of customisation options. The Mercedes-AMG GT 43 will cost 95,259.50 euros in Germany including 19% VAT, the Mercedes-AMG GT 53 will retail at 109,182.50 euros.

2019 Mercedes-AMG GT R Roadster spied at the Nurburgring

So far, the Mercedes-AMG GT C Roadster has been the hottest drop-top version of Mercedes‘ range-topping sports car, which with 550 horsepower, wasn’t far off the top dog GT R Coupe. Yet, there’s far more to the R than just its higher power figure, with a multitude of weight-saving and aerodynamics-enhancing elements improving its all-around performance. And now, it seems that Mercedes-AMG will be applying them to a GT with a folding roof.

The proof is in the spy photos above. Around the side, it has the GT R’s fender vent with a single bar across it and strakes that extend into the doors. The wheels and brakes are identical to the GT R, too. And guess what? The rear is also straight off the GT R with the big rear diffuser, center-exit exhaust, and unmissable manually adjusted rear wing.

Up front, this roadster has the wider, more aggressive GT R front bumper. However, after zooming in on the lower grille and fiddling with shadows in Photoshop, it’s hard to tell with the active aero shutters have been replaced with fixed slats or if they’re just open.

We expect that this car will simply be a GT R with a soft top, meaning it will have the same twin-turbo 4.0-liter V8 making 577 horsepower and 516 pound-feet of torque. It will also have the GT R’s 7-speed dual-clutch transmission, rear-wheel steering, electronically controlled limited-slip differential, adjustable traction control, adjustable coilover suspension and carbon fiber parts. We’re not sure if the same aerodynamic trickery used through the coupe will work the same when the roof has been removed, so perhaps some of those elements may be different (such as those slats).

Being a convertible, though, it will probably be heavier because of chassis reinforcements and soft top equipment. As a result, it will likely be a tad slower, but you’ll also be able to hear its wicked exhaust better. The car will also probably appear soon, possibly by the end of the year, or early next year. This is based on how little camouflage is on the car, as well as the fact that much of the powertrain and chassis has already been developed for the coupe.

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