All posts in “hybrid”

Ferrari Roma platform to underpin Purosangue SUV, as product roadmap takes shape

To create the Roma, Ferrari started with the platform used for the Portofino convertible. Engineers strengthened and lightened the architecture and made it modular, so that it will support the company’s range of front-engined vehicles included in CEO Louis Camilleri’s near-term product roadmap of 15 new vehicles over the next three years. Auto Express reports one of those products will be the Purosangue SUV – or FUV, Ferrari Utility Vehicle if you heed the carmaker’s marketers – expected to debut in 2021 before going on sale in 2022 or 2023. The breadth of possibility built into the platform means it can swallow Ferrari’s range of V8 and V12 engines, as well as the coming V6, plus plug-in hybrid equipment and all-wheel drive mechanicals. 

Although observers figure a V12 Purosangue will grace the lineup eventually, models with smaller engines braced with hybrid assistance are expected first. The V12, in fact, is unlikely to get a hybrid form if Ferrari can help it, the brand’s marketing manager saying, “To be honest, electrifying a V12 means creating, very probably, a heavy and big car. So electrification ideally should be coupled with smaller engines.” Absent Ferrari’s righteous 6.5-liter V12, Ferrari’s head of technology says there will be other ways the vehicle codenamed “175” distinguishes itself from V8-powered super-SUV competition, but wouldn’t clarify what those ways are.

We’ll guess the people-hauler slots into the company’s GT vehicle classification alongside the GTC4Lusso, Portofino, and Roma. In the next decade, the GT category grows with a new supercar that marks “the return of an elegant model” cued off classic, mid-20th-century Ferrari Gran Turismos, as well as a battery-electric car after 2025. The Sport Range includes the 812Superfast and 812 GTS, 488 and 488 Pista, and SF90 Stradale. The Icona line kicked off with the Monza SP1 and SP2, and will expand with “timeless design[s] of iconic Ferraris reinterpreted with innovative materials and state of the art technologies.” One-offs like the F12 TRS, SP12 EC and SP38 form the Special Series. The carmaker’s entire range will be split across two modular platforms, one for front-engined placement, one mid-engined.

At the pointy end of the product roadmap, it’s thought Ferrari’s already begun development of its LaFerrari successor. Said to use a naturally-aspirated V12 without electric help, it will produce less output than found in the 986-horsepower, hybrid-V8-powered SF90, while at the same time Ferrari says the new model will be faster than the hybrid-V12-powered LaFerrari. Due sometime after 2022, the new small-run screamer will focus on lightness, controllability and aerodynamics. 

The Mercedes-AMG One sounds just like a Formula One car

Billed as the closest thing to a road-going Formula One car, the Mercedes-AMG One, unveiled as a close-to-production concept at the 2017 Frankfurt auto show, is still under development. Mercedes-Benz’s go-fast division released an update on the project that shows the hypercar in action.

Six-time Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton took a break from winning races around the world and trying to save the planet to check in with the team developing the One. Designing a groundbreaking hypercar is an expensive and time-consuming process, and the One stands out from its peers because it uses a street-legal version of the powertrain found in AMG’s championship-winning Formula One car. This explains why development has taken so long. Deliveries are now tentatively scheduled to begin in 2021, about two years later than originally announced, but it sounds — literally — like AMG’s most powerful street-legal model will be worth the wait.

“The sound is pretty much exactly the same as it is in the race car,” Hamilton pointed out. Video footage of the One going around a track hints it will take a turn like a race car, too.

The turbocharged, 1.6-liter V6 is the One’s main source of power, and its main source of delays. Getting it to comply with emissions regulations was easier said than done. It idles at 1,200 rpm, which is high for a road car but low for a Formula One car, which turns at a stratospheric 5,000 rpm when it’s waiting on the starting grid. The electrified part of the powertrain consists of four electric motors, including two that zap the front wheels into motion, and they also need to be fine-tuned for road use. All told, the One will put over 1,000 horsepower under the driver’s right foot. The tradeoff is that the powertrain will require a major overhaul after about 30,000 miles.

Mercedes-AMG will cap One production at 275 units, and pricing starts at $2.7 million. That’s an eye-watering sum, but the hypercar market is stronger than ever, and every build slot was spoken for before the model made its official debut. Don’t expect to bag a used example shortly after deliveries begin; AMG is going to great lengths to ensure reservation holders don’t flip their car for a profit.

Our first look at the Peugeot hypercar for Le Mans

Peugeot is returning to Le Mans with Rebellion Racing, and the French automaker just dropped the first photo of what its car will look like in the hypercar class. We normally wouldn’t get too worked up over a race car rendering, but this one has certain … implications.

Homologation rules require manufacturers to both build and sell at least 20 production versions of the race car for it to be competition-legal in this class. That means Peugeot is ultimately going to have to sell a road-going version of this wild-looking race car, but only a few of them. Whether this potential Peugeot hypercar ends up looking anything like this rendering is still up for debate, but it’s an interesting idea to toy around with.

Peugeot has never produced a supercar or hypercar before, so the news that it would enter the WEC in this fashion was a bit shocking last month. The FCA-PSA tie-up just makes it all the more interesting now that Peugeot will be part of a massive company producing cars for the U.S. We’re still waiting on details about how much involvement Peugeot Sport will have in the car, as a previous report suggested Peugeot would hand much of the project off to Oreca and Rebellion Racing. Today, Peugeot made the Rebellion Racing partnership official, but the rest is still a bit hazy. 

The racing program is scheduled to kick off in 2022 with the Swiss Rebellion Racing team. We dig the jagged edges and concept design of the hypercar rendering Peugeot released today, which leaves us hopeful for an awesome final product in a couple years.

Soundcheck: Aston Martin Valkyrie begins to scream

In July, Aston Martin published the first video of the Valkyrie on track at Britain’s Silverstone Circuit during the Formula One Grand Prix weekend there. Test driver Chris Goodwin didn’t push the 1,160-horsepower coupe to its limits, merely massaging the throttle for the camera a few times. The English carmaker headed back to Silverstone this month with a group of guests in tow, and this time the test driver put a little more muscle into the fly-bys. Since the track was wet, the soundtrack still can’t be considered the ultimate experience, but even so, the 6.5-liter Cosworth V12 sounds exceptionally good.

This new video injects a high-pitched wail that was missing in July, the kind of wicked, soaring keen that jellies one’s organs and notifies the mind of blinding terrors on approach. In fact, the Valkyrie now makes all the noises Formula 1 fans wished the F1 race cars could make. That’s no hyperbole, either. Compare the modern Cosworth to the 3.5-liter Honda V12 in the 1991 McLaren MP4/6, the resemblance is clear. Remove the street-legal equipment on the Aston Martin and let Goodwin uncork it, as we expect to happen in next year’s World Endurance Championship, and it’s clear the WEC might have the best sounding racers in all of motorsport.

Deliveries are scheduled to begin before the end of the year, so Aston Martin should be wrapping up its validation testing on Verification Prototype 1 if it hasn’t already. After that come competition entries into the FIA World Endurance Championship (WEC). And after that, someone will need to convince at least one owner to drive the Valkyrie on the street so that we can all enjoy the noise.

New C8 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 engine rumor posits 900 horsepower

Let’s just go ahead and plan to feast on C8 Chevrolet Corvette rumors for the next few years. Two new reports have come out that drop new info on the ZR1 and gobs of details about what could turn into multiple hybrid Corvette models. Starting with Motor Trend, the magazine cites “a senior official at GM” for confirmation that the coming ZR1 will produce “an even 900 hp” from a performance-oriented hybrid powertrain. Displacement of the gasoline engine component remains a mystery. MT writes that the “ZR1 will build on the Z06’s all-new engine” with a block anywhere from 4.2 to 5.5 liters of displacement, but the potential vibration issues make the larger end of that range unlikely if the rumored flat-plane crank is involved.

Motor Trend sticks by sister publication Automobile‘s story that the Z06 will use an 800-hp twin-turbo engine based on the naturally aspirated 5.5-liter V8 in the C8.R. Countering that, Muscle Cars & Trucks believes the Z06 will go down to around 600 hp and use a naturally aspirated V8, with only the ZR1 getting the two turbos.

MT didn’t get any specs on the ZR1’s hybrid component, but Bozi Tatarevic happened upon internal GM documents that potentially fill in a swath of the picture. In a lengthy report for Jalopnik, Tatarevic suspects there could be “both a hybrid ZR1 and a hybrid base model Corvette.” The documents, along with cutaway models of the mid-engine sports car, show how the front area could house a single electric motor driven by a 1.94-kWh battery pack and power electronics packaged in the center tunnel. The e-motor, which is listed as running through an open differential, would produce about 114 peak horsepower and more than 880 lb-ft of torque after an 8:1 reduction gear. Being oriented toward performance, a pawl clutch would disconnect the motor and gear reduction from the front axle for better fuel economy. Said to be offered in coupe and convertible forms, the base Stingray with the LT2 V8 and hybrid system would throw something in the “mid-to-high 500 HP range if not more.”

Paperwork appears to show the motor would be mounted low enough in front for the Corvette to retain its frunk. In order to fit the shaft through the space currently occupied by the front dampers, the hybrid system will require split yoke dampers akin to those used on AWD versions of the Tesla Model 3. It’s possible magnetic dampers will be standard fit, as well as an electronic limited-slip differential running through a 3.797 final drive. Wheel sizes for what we’ll figure is the ZR1 would increase an inch front and back to 20 and 21 inches, respectively, with respective tire sizes of 275/30 and 345/25. According to codes in the document, carbon-ceramic brakes would be standard. 

We only have a few more years to figure out where all these pieces go, so while you wait, check out Tatarevic’s in-depth report for cutaway images and loads more details on issues like weight balance and benchmarking against the Acura NSX.

New Porsche hypercar could use F1-spec hybrid powertrain

Not long after the Porsche 918 Spyder went out of production in 2015, the automaker began internal debate about what kind of powertrain it would use in the follow-up. Four years later, the debate is ongoing. In 2017, Porsche voiced its desire to move its hypercar game on with a battery-electric powertrain, beyond the hybrid 918. The problem — echoed by McLaren — was that battery technology wouldn’t make such a BEV possible until at least the middle of the 2020s. In 2019, the same issues remain, with solid-state battery tech not progressing as quickly as hoped. Autocar reports that Porsche could switch to Plan B in the meantime, that being an as-yet-unused 1.6-liter V6 hybrid engine Porsche Motorsport developed in order to return to Formula One as an engine supplier.

Porsche has been mentioned as a potential new F1 entrant for years, but uncertainty at the Volkswagen Group and in the F1 rulebook compelled the German sports car maker to walk away from the opportunity, opting for Formula E instead. However, after leaving LMP1, 40 Porsche engineers from the Le Mans effort began working on a six-cylinder version of the 2.0-liter four-cylinder hybrid from the 919 Hybrid. That work turned into the creation of a 1.6-liter V6 hybrid along the lines of an F1 engine but without “the complex and expensive” MGU-H unit that converts exhaust heat into electrical energy. Motorsport chief Fritz Enzinger says that engine is still in development, having got as far as running on a test bench for “analysis with regard to series production relevance.”

There’s no info on the hybrid component yet, but Stefan Weckbach, who oversees Porsche’s EV projects, said the company could turn to its partnership with Rimac for that aspect.

Even though Porsche has a motor ready, the board hasn’t decided on whether to go electric or hybrid, and sports car boss Frank-Steffen Walliser says he doesn’t care what kind of powertrain goes into the car as long as it can tick off a 6:30 lap time at the Nürburgring. So according to Autocar, what kind of bodywork might surround this powertain “remains at conceptual stage, with an introduction unlikely before 2023 at the earliest.” We don’t think the 917 Concept from 2014 would be a bad place to start. If Porsche goes with the 1.6-liter hybrid, though, the market would get a clearer competitor to the Mercedes-AMG One, and the platform could provide entries to the ACO’s new so-called Hypercar class in the World Endurance Championship and to IMSA’s Daytona Prototype class. 

Peugeot to contest Le Mans in 2022 with new hybrid hypercar

Peugeot is the third OEM to put its hand up for the new, so-called hypercar class in the World Endurance Championship, after Aston Martin and Toyota. The French manufacturer last competed at La Sarthe from 2007 to 2011 with its diesel-powered 908 HDi FAP, beating Audi in 2009. It quit the sport in 2012 to deal with dire financial issues, parking its brand new 908 HYbrid 4 LMP1 car (pictured) on the eve of the season opener. The announcement by parent company PSA Group put the return in 2022, giving it an even decade out of the sport before coming back with a racer that might make more waves on the street than on the track. Homologation rules require class entrants to build and sell 20 production versions of the race car, and Peugeot hasn’t built a production supercar in, well, ever.

We’re not sure how much building it’ll be doing here, either. Even though Peugeot Sport will play a key role in this effort, Sportscar365 reported in October that the French carmaker was looking at a “customer-based hypercar built by ORECA and run by Rebellion Racing.” Oreca and Rebellion are LMP-category stalwarts with OEM experience; the 47-year-old French team Oreca ran Toyota’s TS030 Hybrid in 2012 and has designed Rebellion’s cars, while the nine-year-old Swiss Rebellion team ran Toyota engines in its LMP car for the first four years of its existence. It’s possible the future Le Mans runner will campaign will be a technical partnership between the three outfits, a “semi-works effort run under the Rebellion banner.” Furthermore, the collaboration could start with Peugeot-branded engines supplied to the Rebellion R13 LMP1 car grandfathered into the series’s inaugural season that begins next summer.

As for Peugeot’s official debut, it’s not clear if the 2022 date means the first WEC race in the calendar year, or the 2022-2023 WEC season. The endurance racing calendar starts in September and overlaps calendar years. The 2019 season commenced in September, the first race in 2022 will be the fifth round of the current season. Peugeot promises more details in early 2020.

For the moment, Glickenhaus and ByKolles —run by former Formula One team boss Colin Kolles — are the other two manufacturers planning to compete at the top level in the new class in 2020. Porsche and McLaren have made noises about it but nothing’s come of it yet, and Lamborghini said in August that it’s looking closely at the regulations to gauge an entry.

Koenigsegg plans a ‘CO2 neutral’ hybrid supercar

Fresh from receiving a 150 million-euro infusion from National Electric Vehicle Sweden, the Chinese-backed company that bought up Saab‘s assets out of bankruptcy, supercar maker Koenigsegg has signaled just what it plans to do under the new joint venture. Christian von Koenigsegggave an interview to Top Gear in which he said he wants to develop an all-new supercar to sit below ultra-exclusive models like the Agera RS and Regera, priced at around €1 million (about $1.15 million) to grow sales from 20 a year into the hundreds, because “our brand has outgrown our production volumes by quite a big margin.” And it will feature a novel, “completely CO2 neutral” hybrid powrtrain using the “freevalve” camless combustion engine technology the company has been developing in concert with battery-electric power.

“Given the freevalve technology, we can actually cold-start the car on pure alcohol, down to -30 degrees Celsius, so there’s no need for any fossil fuel mix then,” he told Top Gear. “The idea is to prove to the world that even a combustion engine can be completely CO2 neutral.”

Von Koenigsegg previously hinted at the setup after talking about how his engineers were responding to Tesla‘s claims that its forthcoming next-generation Roadster would be capable of a 1.9-second 0-60 mph time. He further hints that the new hybridized supercar will look unmistakably like a Keonigsegg but be in a different segment altogether from either the Agera RS or plug-in hybrid Regera.

Consider us very much intrigued and eager to hear more. Meanwhile, Koenigsegg has said it plans to reveal the successor to the Agera RS next month at the Geneva Motor Show based on a refined version of the same supercharged V8 combustion engine.

The new joint venture with NEVS, meanwhile, sees that company take a 65 percent ownership stake, with Koenigsegg holding the rest and contributing its trove of intellectual property, technology licenses and product design. NEVS also gets a 20 percent stake in Koenigsegg itself.

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Could BMW i8 Replacement Come Soon?

A New Electrified BMW Supercar? Yes Please

It seems BMW’s affinity for electrified powertrains will extend to new supercars in the future. There have been a few rumors of BMW working on a new EV supercar, but now it seems more likely. BMW R&D boss Klaus Froehlich sat down with Autocar and one of the topics he discussed is an electric supercar or at least a hybrid supercar much like the i8. 

“If you are an engineer, once in your life, you want to make a super-sports car,” Fröhlich told Autocar. “I think partial electrification will enable that.”

He pointed to the fact that BMW has the ability to build high-powered electric drive units, super light carbon fiber chassis, and high-performance gasoline engines. He said those three elements could be combined to make a supercar. 

What Will it be Like?

According to Autocar, the new model could compete directly with Ferrari and McLaren. It would have a much larger gasoline engine paired with high-powered electric motors and a carbon fiber chassis much like the i8’s. The car should have 700 hp so it can edge out the M8’s 620 hp and put the car at the top of BMW’s M-Division lineup. 

2011 BMW i8 Concept Gallery2011 BMW i8 Concept Gallery
An i8 replacement would be much more powerful.

That 700 hp mark sounds like a lot until you consider that Froehlich told Autocar the electric motors BMW produces should make 197 hp and 378 lb-ft of torque. Froehlich also said that BMW’s M-Division will eventually go fully electric, but that hybridization will play an important role moving forward.

With all that Froehlich said during the interview in mind, it’s clear that BMW sees electric cars as the future for high-performance vehicles. While BMW hasn’t officially released anything that explicitly says the i8 will be replaced by a much more powerful supercar, Froehlich’s interview is a clear sign of where things are heading. 

Koenigsegg sees new Tesla Roadster as the ‘gauntlet’ thrown down

Christian von Koenigsegg, the man behind the company that holds the current record for world’s fastest car, does not like to be outdone. So he did not particularly enjoy hearing the numbers regarding the forthcoming next-generation Tesla Roadster and its vaunted 1.9-second 0-60 mph time.

“We kind of had our future mapped out, and then we heard about the new Tesla Roadster and its insane acceleration numbers, and we thought ‘Damn, that’s put the gauntlet down,'” the Koenigsegg founder and CEO told Top Gear.

As he told the site, he enlisted his engineers to start running numbers, and within a couple of days, they’d figured out a solution. “The simplest way of putting it is like this: It’s combining direct drive with the hybridization we have in a different format with free-valve engine technology, in a peculiar layout,” von Koenigsegg said. He said the powertrain could take a car from 0-250 mph in 14 seconds “or something like this,” and said he wants to make a combustion engine with a higher power density than an electric powertrain “for as long as possible.”

His talk about hybrids brings to mind the Koenigsegg Regera plug-in hybrid, which weighs just 3,505 pounds and puts out more than 1,500 horsepower. It does 0-62 mph in 2.8 seconds — impressive, but a full 0.9 seconds less than the Roadster’s purported time. And not surprising for a company that is all about maximizing ponies, Koenigsegg likes to geek out over the details of things like the design of the 1,160-hp Agera RS engine. Could he be talking about the same vehicle as the successor to the Agera RS, rumored to be called Ragnarok?

Tesla, meanwhile, unveiled said Roadster at Grand Basel in Switzerland — or rather, it showed off what appeared to be a white, empty design shell that had been shown last year at Tesla’s shareholder meeting.

And don’t forget that the mad scientists over at Hennessey are tinkering with the 7.6-liter V8 for the Venom F5, the key to its quest to hit 300 mph. So buckle your seat belts, boys and girls: Things are about to get very fast.

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Mercedes-AMG wants to prevent Project One owners from flipping them

Mercedes-AMG will include contract language in its exclusive upcoming Formula One-sourced Project One hypercar when it starts delivering to customers early next year prohibiting the new owners from flipping the $2.6 million car for a quick profit.

Germany’s Auto Motor und Sport reports the move is similar to what Ford is doing with its GT supercar and Porsche, with its 911 GT3 Touring after customers began flipping the 911 R. It also says all 275 examples of the 1,000-horsepower-plus Project One are sold and that Mercedes-AMG has undertaken the first test drives using camouflaged prototypes on closed race tracks in England and Spain.

Late last year, Ford sued wrestler and actor John Cena for violating the terms of his purchase contract, which involved an application process, for the $450,000 supercar. The two sides in June settled outside of court for an undisclosed amount that Ford will reportedly donate to charity. Meanwhile, another 2017 Ford GT is on Mecum’s Monterey sale bill. It’s headed for the block Aug. 23-25.

Similar attempts have already been made with the Project One. Motor 1 reports someone tried to sell a build slot last November for the equivalent of $5.2 million, nearly double the asking price, and a newer listing not yet removed is similarly asking $5.2 million, with a mid-year 2019 delivery date.

The Project One, which debuted as a concept last fall in Frankfurt, boasts some eye-popping specs, with its mid-mounted 1.6-liter single-turbo V6 doing more than 1,000 horsepower, a top speed of more than 217 miles per hour and going from 0-124 mph in just 6 seconds. It can also operate as a zero-emission electric car for 15.5 miles, thanks to its lithium-ion battery powering two 120-kilowatt electric motors, plus two smaller ones driving the front wheels. Owners will have to take the car in every 31,000 miles or so to have the gas engine rebuilt.

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Ferrari LaFerrari: Price, Specs, Videos, Images, Performance & More

Introduction

What happens when quite possibly the world’s greatest supercar and hypercar maker sets out to create its greatest model ever?

The Ferrari LaFerrari – that’s what.

Described at launch by company president Luca Di Montezemolo as “the maximum expression of what defines our company,” the LaFerrari was revealed at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show.

Limited to just 499 examples (although since an additional 210 Aperta open-top LaFerraris have been produced), the LaFerrari featured a Formula-One derived HY-KERS system – an electric motor teamed to a 6.3-litre V12. Some would shirk at the concept of a hybrid Ferrari, but while enhanced efficiency is a by-product of the LaFerrari’s powertrain, this was by no means Ferrari’s motivation with the system.

Following in the footsteps of legendary Ferrari halo cars as the 288 GTO, the F40, F50 and Enzo, the LaFerrari had its work cut out from the start. Add to that competition – yes, at this insane level of performance and prestige – from Porsche and McLaren with their hybrid hypercars, the 918 and P1, and this ultimate Ferrari model had a lot to deliver in order to stand out.

Design, Styling & Interior

The overall shape of the LaFerrari – inside and out – is dictated mainly by the car’s carbon fibre tub chassis. Up front, surfaces are kept to a minimum and what is there is minimised to aid aerodynamics, with every strafe and slice in the car’s bodywork having been optimised in the F1 Wind Tunnel. Ferrari sought to produce a shape with the highest degree its efforts have granted the hypercar with a drag coefficient of just 3.

Underneath the car, active aerodynamic features including diffusers and a guide vane team up with the rear spoiler to generate downforce, gluing the LaFerrari to the road or track. These active features are automatically controlled by the car’s computer brain, which analyses various parameters to adjust the systems to work optimally to the conditions.

Inside the LaFerrari, carbon fibre detailing dominates, with the two seats bolted directly to the tub. A bulky squared-off steering wheel greets the driver, with Formula-One inspired LEDs to indicate when to change gear and Ferrari’s now-familiar Mannetino drive mode selector nestled among the various controls on the wheel.

An in-house design team headed up by Flavio Manzoni handled styling for the Ferrari LaFerrari. Inspiration was gathered from the engineering team to ensure a form that reflected the functional elements of the car, as well as taking inspiration from various Ferrari racecars from over the years.

Performance

LaFerrari’s 6.3-litre V12 hybrid power plant produces 950hp (788hp at 6750rpm from the V12 and 160hp courtesy of the electric motor, which delivers the power to the differential). The car’s dry weight is a meagre 1255kg, and on a charge 0-60 is dispatched in under three seconds. Top speed is rated by Ferrari as somewhere north of 217mph.

Figures only tell a part of the story with this car, with the sensations and usability involved in that performance having been prioritised by Ferrari during the car’s development. Despite its obvious track potential the LaFerrari is reputedly fairly comfortable and compliant on the road. Ambling about town, the car’s double clutch automatic gearbox takes the onus of shifting away from the driver, while a surprisingly supple ride cossets the driver, despite the perceived harshness often brought on in vehicles fitted with carbon fibre tubs.

Get it to a track, however, and the LaFerrari will do its thing better than almost any other road car on the planet. Those who questioned the addition of the hybrid powertrain may be surprised to find out its fitment is mainly to help out on the racetrack – with lowered emissions just a byproduct of that.

The HY-KERS system ensures on-demand torque across the rev range, improving throttle response for the driver and making chasing that 9250rpm redline even more addictive.

Ride & Handling

Performance and track capability are almost a given in a car of this caliber, and those the LaFerrari has in cartfuls. Its really surprising party piece are its manners on the road.

Ferrari wanted the car to be usable on the road and its automatic gearbox is sedate and easy to live with around town as these systems go, according to reviews of this scarlet missile.

Visibility is good around the front three-quarters, while the ride quality is as good as you can expect in a hypercar with seats bolted directly to a super-stiff carbon fibre chassis.

Take things up a notch and the LaFerrari provides an involving experience, with the active aero and stability control system working in tandem to flatter the driver. Steering response is smooth and communicative; giving an enjoyable response on the road that also translates well to track driving. Many of the videos we have brought together include footage of LaFerraris in acrobatic tail slides, which the system allows to flourish – to a point.

On track, the LaFerrari impresses further with the full fury of the V12 and HY-KERS systems available to be exploited in a chassis that is more than up to the task. Gearshifts are reputedly so quick as to almost be seamless, and the balance of the package allows the car to simply erupt along straights and flow through corners.

Prices & Specs

If you’re looking for a LaFerrari, it will have to be used as the limited run of 499 hardtops and 210 Aperta open-tops all sold out, despite an initial asking price of around $1,420,000 for the coupe and no official price confirmed for the convertible.

Thanks to the exclusivity of this “ultimate Ferrari” prices have quickly skyrocketed to hilarious levels on the auction circuit, so if considering one then deep pockets and a chequebook long enough to fit at least six zeroes and a digit or two in front are a must.

Ferrari auctioned off the final “new” examples of the Aperta and coupe LaFerrari to benefit charity. The final coupe (car number 500) went for $7 million, in aid of reconstruction in Italy following 2016’s earthquakes.

More recently, the last of the run (210th) Aperta convertible broke records when it went under the hammer at RM Sotheby’s, fetching almost $10 million, with the proceeds of the sale going to Save the Children.

Ferrari LaFerrari Performance & Specs >
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Electric Lamborghini? Maybe Next Time

So just when we thought we’d have a competitor to the Tesla Model S, we get terrible news. Auto News reports that Lamborghini has no plans to go full electric because battery technology today can’t provide the power that Lamborghini customers expect. Maurizio Reggiani, Director Research and Development, says,

“Our target is to deliver a super sports car, and these specifications don’t exist with a battery package in terms of energy and power”

Right now, Lamborghini is waiting on vast improvements in electric technology before going down the path of producing a full-electric supercar. The hard part is that roaring V10 and V12s provide something that electric cars don’t: sound which can convert to a supercar’s ‘soul’.

Is this nonsense or do you feel that a supercar should emote something to the driver to be connected? Is brute force enough to provide that emotion?

Let us know!