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Why Every Kitchen Absolutely Needs an Extra-Large Big Green Egg

Gibsons Restaurant Group, the restaurant empire that Chef Daniel Huebschmann helms, is immense. It spans four states and 14 kitchens. It’s the first and only restaurant group to have its own USDA Certified Angus Beef Program. Huebschmann’s job, like his gear picks, is commercial. In other words, there are no tweezers counted in his essential kitchen gear setup. From a cheap pair of extra-long tongs to the only charcoal grill you should buy, these are the things Chef Daniel Huebschmann couldn’t live without.

Vollrath 12-Inch High-Heat Tongs

“Size does matter in this case. If you are using tongs over an open flame, you’ll want to keep a little distance and the 12-inch length on these tongs allows you to keep an appropriate distance. The added bonus of the coated tip gives you the option to use these on scratch sensitive surfaces as necessary. The coated handle is very helpful when gripping the tongs and it allows you to move large format food around easily. It’s best to use a nonstick pan on a side burner (gas grills) to sauté some vegetables while grilling steak.”

Wüsthof Stainless-Steel Metal Skewers

“These skewers are both stylish and functional. Not only do they look sexy when placed on a platter and presented with meats and vegetables, but they are also highly functional. The shape of the handle allows for very easy gripping.”

Kitchenaid 3-Burner Propane Gas Grill

“For a cost-effective grilling machine, the 3-burner unit does the trick. It provides even heat distribution with Kitchenaid quality and design that performs. I would not advise going smaller unless space is an issue. You can grill and slow roast a variety of sizes for home BBQs. The cooking surface on the 3-burner is large enough to allow for indirect heat as well. The side burner that allows you to sear and sauté is an added bonus that simply can’t be beat.”

Big Green Egg (Large)

“For charcoal grilling and smoking, this is my weapon of choice. While similar size and shape charcoal grills offer high-temperature searing and even heat distribution, the Big Green Egg has an edge. Not only does it get hot, and it does get smoking hot, it also offers extremely even heat distribution and retains its heat for an extended period of time. This allows for killer smoking and grilling of larger items like turkeys and beef briskets.”

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Why Every Outdoor Cook Absolutely Needs This $4 Amazon Buy

David Shim’s Cote in Manhattan’s Flatiron District is one-part American steakhouse, one-part Korean barbeque. It features classic gas-fired yakiniku grills from Shinpo at the center of every table and effectively merges American steakhouse favorites with Korean ingredients and flavors (a shrimp cocktail with gochujang being the clearest example). The result of Shim’s cuisine blending was a strong review from the New York Times’ Pete Wells, a place on GQ’s Best New Restaurants of 2018 list and a Michelin star. From $4 firestarters to an obscure Japanese table grill, here are four things Cote’s David Shim couldn’t cook without.

Weber Lighter Cubes

“If you ever find yourself outdoors with a charcoal grill, these mini cubes are a must. How many times have you seen people stuffing paper, small pieces of boxes or pouring liquid charcoal lighter? Everyone has their own way making the fire but many times isn’t as easy as one thinks. With the mini lighter cubes all you need to do is put the lighter cubes in between the charcoal and wait till it starts to light, give a light fanning and you are ready to go.”

Kizen Instant-Read Thermometer

“A digital thermometer is one thing that I always have when grilling. Everyone has their own way of telling if the steak is done but it is always great to have a backup plan. There are some with basic temperatures on the thermometer itself so that you don’t have to google what a medium-rare steak is supposed to be.”

Peugeot Pepper Mill

“There are many different pepper mills out there, but this is the one that you want to have. I have used this throughout my career in NYC working at a lot different restaurants and this is also the one that we use at home. Peugeots are great because they can handle the usage of a professional kitchen and it also has different settings to either make it finer or more coarse. It also looks beautiful.”

Iwatani Aburiya Portable Gas Grill Stove

“This is the ultimate portable grill that anyone can have. Living in NYC, not many people have the luxury to grill in the backyard but with this small gadget, you can practically grill anywhere. It has different inserts to either grill steak, seafood and vegetables or make yakitori or skewers. It gets hot enough to make really nice grill marks on steaks as well. This has always been my portable go-to grill.”

More Chef-Approved Kitchen Gear

From a lava stone molcajete to a disposable thermometer to a very, very old-school pasta maker, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

10 Solid New Places to Shop for Men’s Furniture Online

There’s more to the furniture world than Ikea, CB2 and legacy furniture makers. These days, a number of internet-native companies have joined the competition with all manner of aesthetics and prices represented. Here are 10 of the best spots for guys to buy furniture online.

Dims.

Dims.’s Eugene Kim would prefer if you didn’t call his company the “Warby Park of” anything. Dims. (the period is always there) isn’t a design house as much as it is a design incubator. Designers who lack decades-long résumés pitch Kim on their pieces and, if produced, earn royalties off of them. In the original design space, its prices are competitive, with products listed from $145 to $795. To date, there’s a coffee table, side table, dining table and bar cart.

Can’t Miss: Barbican Trolley ($350)

Artifox

Artifox’s products like they were designed for full-stack developers with good taste. Its tech-minimalist aesthetic stems from Sarah and Dan Mirth’s blend of interior and industrial design backgrounds; the collection heavily features hardwoods, powder-coated steel and small-but-useful organization measures (the headphone hook and cable management grid are great). The lineup includes the things you’d expect to find in a small apartment space — bike racks, wall shelves, monitor raisers and side tables included. Prices are on the higher end, but not unreasonable, with an oak desk starting just under $1,000.

Can’t Miss: Desk 02 ($950+)

Floyd

Floyd may be of the same flat-pack ilk as many of its direct-to-consumer forebearers, but comparison stops there. It’s assemblable (and disassemblable) furniture made of heavy birchwood and thick-gauge steel and it’s meant to last — all rareties in its space. With a nice balance of heavy materials and light colors, the look is a sort of whimsical-industrial. Starting a few years back with just a platform bedframe, its catalog has now opened up to include a sofa, shelves and tables. Its prices are fairly moderate.

Can’t Miss: The Platform Bed ($650)

Akron Street

It’s all about the wood. Every piece in Hansley Yunez and Lulu Li’s catalog is made, at least in part, of American white oak. In spite of that, few pieces are visually heavy and all are, given the materials and original designs, surprisingly affordable. Its wares include chairs, tables, desks, bedframes, coat racks, media consoles and more.

Can’t Miss: Small Tenon Oak Table ($277)

Article

Article doesn’t look much different than most internet furniture retailers, but it is. Where others are built overnight with seed funding and venture capital, Article has taken longer to reach its size than most, and unlike others on this list, Article doesn’t necessarily have a specialty. There are hundreds of products in its catalog, ranging from mid-century sofas to boho-inspired wall shelves. The upshot: you could furnish an entire home with Article and hit myriad styles throughout, and do so affordably. Plus, it’s one of few retailers — online or off — to include the absolute maximum of information on product spec sheets (check out the rub counts on upholstered sofas and chairs).

Can’t Miss: Sven Sofa ($999)

Burrow

Burrow’s greatest strength is listening to its customers just enough. Its initial collection of sofas upholstered sofas were met with praise, but they weren’t perfect; buyers said the arms were too high to comfortably lean against for a nap, the cushions took too long to break in and the built-in phone charger in the base was too flimsy. Oh, and it should come in leather. It updated the collection in 2019 to remedy all those issues and doubled down on quick shipping and easy assembly, a combination which made its sofas our favorite on the internet. The brand makes sofas, sectionals, armchairs and ottomans in a number of upholstery and leather options.

Can’t Miss: The Nomad Leather Sofa ($1,995)

Schoolhouse

The driving force behind Schoolhouse’s founding was a nostalgia for heavy things. Brian Faherty’s Portland, Oregon-based company, which started as a mail-order catalog selling old school, cast-iron molded glass shades, makes everything from barware to hardware to extendable dining room tables, each piece intended to become what Faherty calls a “modern heirloom.” Visually, its pieces are either direct descendants or reminiscent of various art and design movements of the 20th century (Art Deco, Cubism, Mid-Century Modern all makes appearances), but because its products are made Stateside and in an uncompromising manner, don’t come looking for a bargain. They’re built to stick with you for a lifetime.

Can’t Miss: Jack Loveseat ($2,199)

Muji

Muji isn’t a new company, but it is new to America. The intensely Japanese company makes damn near everything — house slippers, gel-ink pens, facewash, tea kettles and beanbags included — but its furniture is quietly one of its strongest categories, despite a significantly depleted stock compared to its Japanese equivalent. Look for a satisfying mix of smart storage, compact seating and a series of cult-favorite beanbags at fair prices. Also a plus: the brand recently updated the look and functionality of its outdated online store, which makes things a lot easier.

Can’t Miss: SUS Steel Shelving Unit ($250)

Vipp

Vipp is a high-end Danish design house that recently launched its first full-fledged furniture collection online, but its beginnings are, shall we say, humbler. The company made a name for itself making the best damn trashcans in the world and has become a respected fixture in Scandinavian design. Expect powder-coated aluminum frames dressed up with luxe materials, high price points and lots of people asking where you found your chair.

Can’t Miss: Chair w/ Leather ($950)

Hay

Hay’s ability to bend smart ideas and forms from its Danish roots with a playful disposition is second to none, and since Herman Miller acquired a portion of the company in 2018, its stuff is finally available in the US. And unlike Herman Miller, Hay’s products typically register at more manageable price points. Look for furniture that seems normal but throws you a curveballe, like a black marble-topped coffee table with a frame made of rebar.

Can’t Miss: Don’t Leave Me Side Table ($165)

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

10 Solid Places to Shop for Men’s Furniture Online

There’s more to the furniture world than Ikea, CB2 and legacy furniture makers. These days, a number of internet-native companies have joined the competition with all manner of aesthetics and prices represented. Here are 10 of the best spots for guys to buy furniture online.

Dims.

Dims.’s Eugene Kim would prefer if you didn’t call his company the “Warby Park of” anything. Dims. (the period is always there) isn’t a design house as much as it is a design incubator. Designers who lack decades-long résumés pitch Kim on their pieces and, if produced, earn royalties off of them. In the original design space, its prices are competitive, with products listed from $145 to $795. To date, there’s a coffee table, side table, dining table and bar cart.

Can’t Miss: Barbican Trolley ($350)

Artifox

Artifox’s products look like they were designed for full-stack developers with good taste. Its tech-minimalist aesthetic stems from Sarah and Dan Mirth’s blend of interior and industrial design backgrounds; the collection heavily features hardwoods, powder-coated steel and small-but-useful organization measures (the headphone hook and cable management grid are great). The lineup includes the things you’d expect to find in a small apartment space — bike racks, wall shelves, monitor raisers and side tables included. Prices are on the higher end, but not unreasonable, with an oak desk starting just under $1,000.

Can’t Miss: Desk 02 ($950+)

Floyd

Floyd may be of the same flat-pack ilk as many of its direct-to-consumer forebearers, but comparison stops there. It’s assemblable (and disassemblable) furniture made of heavy birchwood and thick-gauge steel and it’s meant to last — all rareties in its space. With a nice balance of heavy materials and light colors, the look is a sort of whimsical-industrial. Starting a few years back with just a platform bedframe, its catalog has now opened up to include a sofa, shelves and tables. Its prices are fairly moderate.

Can’t Miss: The Platform Bed ($650)

Akron Street

It’s all about the wood. Every piece in Hansley Yunez and Lulu Li’s catalog is made, at least in part, of American white oak. In spite of that, few pieces are visually heavy and all are, given the materials and original designs, surprisingly affordable. Its wares include chairs, tables, desks, bedframes, coat racks, media consoles and more.

Can’t Miss: Small Tenon Oak Table ($277)

Article

Article doesn’t look much different than most internet furniture retailers, but it is. Where others are built overnight with seed funding and venture capital, Article has taken longer to reach its size than most, and unlike others on this list, Article doesn’t necessarily have a specialty. There are hundreds of products in its catalog, ranging from mid-century sofas to boho-inspired wall shelves. The upshot: you could furnish an entire home with Article and hit myriad styles throughout, and do so affordably. Plus, it’s one of few retailers — online or off — to include the absolute maximum of information on product spec sheets (check out the rub counts on upholstered sofas and chairs).

Can’t Miss: Sven Sofa ($999)

Burrow

Burrow’s greatest strength is listening to its customers just enough. Its initial collection of sofas upholstered sofas were met with praise, but they weren’t perfect; buyers said the arms were too high to comfortably lean against for a nap, the cushions took too long to break in and the built-in phone charger in the base was too flimsy. Oh, and it should come in leather. It updated the collection in 2019 to remedy all those issues and doubled down on quick shipping and easy assembly, a combination which made its sofas our favorite on the internet. The brand makes sofas, sectionals, armchairs and ottomans in a number of upholstery and leather options.

Can’t Miss: The Nomad Leather Sofa ($1,995)

Schoolhouse

The driving force behind Schoolhouse’s founding was a nostalgia for heavy things. Brian Faherty’s Portland, Oregon-based company, which started as a mail-order catalog selling old school, cast-iron molded glass shades, makes everything from barware to hardware to extendable dining room tables, each piece intended to become what Faherty calls a “modern heirloom.” Visually, its pieces are either direct descendants or reminiscent of various art and design movements of the 20th century (Art Deco, Cubism, Mid-Century Modern all makes appearances), but because its products are made Stateside and in an uncompromising manner, don’t come looking for a bargain. They’re built to stick with you for a lifetime.

Can’t Miss: Jack Loveseat ($2,199)

Muji

Muji isn’t a new company, but it is new to America. The intensely Japanese company makes damn near everything — house slippers, gel-ink pens, facewash, tea kettles and beanbags included — but its furniture is quietly one of its strongest categories, despite a significantly depleted stock compared to its Japanese equivalent. Look for a satisfying mix of smart storage, compact seating and a series of cult-favorite beanbags at fair prices. Also a plus: the brand recently updated the look and functionality of its outdated online store, which makes things a lot easier.

Can’t Miss: SUS Steel Shelving Unit ($250)

Vipp

Vipp is a high-end Danish design house that recently launched its first full-fledged furniture collection online, but its beginnings are, shall we say, humbler. The company made a name for itself making the best damn trashcans in the world and has become a respected fixture in Scandinavian design. Expect powder-coated aluminum frames dressed up with luxe materials, high price points and lots of people asking where you found your chair.

Can’t Miss: Chair w/ Leather ($950)

Hay

Hay’s ability to bend smart ideas and forms from its Danish roots with a playful disposition is second to none, and since Herman Miller acquired a portion of the company in 2018, its stuff is finally available in the US. And unlike Herman Miller, Hay’s products typically register at more manageable price points. Look for furniture that seems normal but throws you a curveballe, like a black marble-topped coffee table with a frame made of rebar.

Can’t Miss: Don’t Leave Me Side Table ($165)

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Staub vs. Le Creuset: Which Brand Makes the Best Dutch Oven?

The role of the enameled dutch oven is to serve as a vessel when preparing anything that takes a while to cook. Their weight keeps temperatures even during hours of cooking; their tight-fitting lids keep moisture in; and because they’re in fact cast-iron, they’re capable of reaching heat levels needed to acquire crusty goodness (though enameled cast-iron won’t reach the peaks that bare cast-iron will).

Any discussion pertaining to enameled cast-iron begins and ends with two brands: Le Creuset and Staub. Both are French, and share the crown by delivering on similar promises: slow-but-even heating, extra durable enameled interior and exterior, fitted lids, unmatched braising abilities and, finally, lifetime warranties. You’ll frequently find sales on both brands, but, if you’re going to drop the kind of coin required to pick one up, you should know which to buy and for what reasons.

To draw my own conclusions, I tested a 5.5-quart model from each brand and made the most stereotypical dutch oven dish there is — the classic beef bourguignon — as well as a few other recipes. This is the short of it.

Test 1: Browning



Most reviews online claim the Staub browns more effectively, but this was not my experience. I heated both ovens up for 10 minutes on high heat and developed crusts indiscernible from one another, whether I was browning protein or veggies. In comparison to Staub’s matte black interior enamel, Le Creuset features a creamy white interior that makes it much simpler to gauge browning progress. This might seem like a small advantage, but, with the Staub, it can be mildly frustrating to pull out a phone flashlight to check progress.

Test 2: Moisture Retention



The lid of a dutch oven needs to be hefty and fit well to the body. Le Creuset’s lid is fairly standard in this regard, apart from the 500-degree safe phenolic knob handle. It fits well, but steam still visibly slips through and out of the pot. The Staub is on another level in this regard. Tiny nubs on the inside of Staub’s lid collect condensation and slowly drip back onto the food below (Wagner Ware’s Drip-Drop Dutch Oven of old has a similar lid design), and the lid fits onto the body well enough that hardly any liquid escapes.

To test, I boiled five cups of water in each at high temperatures for about 10 minutes. The Le Creuset boiled out a little over a cup of water, while the Staub lost less than half a cup. With many dishes, you’ll want to cook off excess water in order to concentrate flavor, so this isn’t necessarily a full-fledged plus. That won’t stop you from placing the lid off-center to let some steam out, though.

Test 3: Care and Storage



Due to its white interior, the Le Creuset makes it easier to see what you’re doing (in this case cleaning off burnt bits and brown marks), and I didn’t have any issues with staining or discoloration. Folks who do have this problem have likely left the food in the pot overnight or more and let it set too long. It’s also dishwasher-safe, which is hugely convenient if you’re just not in the mood to scrub.

The Staub, whose black interior shrouded much of the leftover food bits, should not be dish-washed, as its interior enamel is porous and can be degraded by the chemicals in dishwashing detergent.

As far as storage and maneuverability go, neither are particularly comfortable to pick up or put down. They’re big and bulky and you probably don’t need more than one per kitchen. That said, the Le Creuset is slightly lighter.

I’d advise against giving either the Matryoshka doll treatment by stacking all manner of other cookware inside — the enamel coating is very strong, but coming into contact with another heavy metal object is asking for a chip.

The Verdict: If we’re just measuring the ability to cook, the Staub is the superior vessel. The lids self-basting drip function as well a much tighter fit are not just buzzy features, they affect your finished dishes. It browns to the same capacity as the Le Creuset and its lid handle isn’t temperature-limited. Convenience-wise? By way of much simpler care and cleaning, coupled with an interior enamel that’s passively helpful, the Le Creuset is easier on all accounts. If you’re still on the fence, use price to guide you — the Staub is slightly less expensive. Then again, Le Creuset offers more striking colors. The choice is yours.

16 Tools That Pro Chefs Can’t Cook Without

There are no gear testers more rigorous than the commercial chef. Can openers, skillets, thermometers, mixing bowls and all manner of other essential gear are put through the ringer night in, night out. So when chefs talk about the gear they couldn’t cook without, we listen. Here are the kitchen tools four pro chefs can’t get enough of.

Rick Ortiz

Rick Ortiz is the chef and owner of Antique Taco, a three-location string of Mexican restaurants in Chicago, Illinois. Ortiz’s background, like his restaurant, is a deep mix of high- and low-brow sensibility — the chef worked at two Michelin-starred Relais Sainte Victoires and in the kitchens of Chicago’s Soldier Field.

La Caja China Roaster

“I love my Caja China. It took some time and some pointers to get it right, but I continue to learn more and more of its many uses. It is great for cooking for family and friends in your backyard or at outdoor events. We’ve cooked cochinita pibil low and slow and turkeys for Thanksgiving dinner. I like to use the exposed hot charcoal or wood embers on top for direct cooking a pot of frijoles charros or posole. Be sure to add the grill grate attachment to cook your favorite Vegetables. I love it for elotes with spicy mayo, grated Parmesan and a sprinkle of ground champulines (grasshoppers).”

Hedley & Bennett Aprons

“I’m also obsessed with my Hedley & Bennett Aprons. I have quite a few. They are comfortable and hold up to the wear and tear of the kitchen or just make you feel fresh. I have one for each season and for different types of work. I have a few brighter and lighter Hedley’s for the spring and summer when I am cooking carne asada or seafood over a hot grill, and darker heavier thread Hedley’s for the fall and winter when we are making hot caldos and smoking meats.”

Three-Pack of Tongs

“The tool I use most frequently are my tongs. Small, medium and long should do the trick. I use small tongs for garnishing, medium tongs for serving vegetables and proteins and long tongs for cooking over high heat. If you have a hot pot with handles and one side towel you can use your tongs to hold the other handle. You can use your tongs to spread out the hot charcoal and wood. If you use your tongs enough they eventually become an extension of yourself.”

5 Rabbit Beer

“My favorite ingredient is beer. Not just any beer but 5 Rabbit Beer. 5 Rabbit is an artisan latino cerveceria in Bedford Park, Illinois. I like to use it in my Marinades and for finishing sauces and beans. The 5 Lizard Cerveza helps make a great brine for chicken cooked asado style and their Xicago is great for rounding out beans and guisados. Enjoy one or two while you cook. It makes everything taste better.”

Craig Koketsu

If you’ve been in New York City for more than a week, there’s a good chance you’ve eaten something with Craig Koketsu’s fingerprints on it. The partner and executive chef of the city’s Quality Branded restaurant group develops recipes, techniques and processes for each of its five neighborhood spots (Quality Meats, Park Avenue Summer (Autumn, Winter, Spring), Quality Italian, Quality Eats and Quality Meats). His style is classic with a touch of modern flair and he’s been named one of NYC’s top up-and-coming chefs by both New York Magazine and Esquire.

Vollrath Heavy Weight Mixing Bowls

“The curve of and depth of these bowls is perfect. You can mix and whisk aggressively in them and don’t have to worry about spillage. The heavier gauge of the stainless steel also makes for more even heat distribution when you use them as a double boiler to make hollandaise. I have one in almost every size, and since they nest, they don’t take up a lot of space.”

LamsonSharp Slotted Turner

“Hands down my favorite offset spatula. I use it mostly when I’m working the griddle — its sharp edge makes sure that every bit of the golden brown sear stays on the scallop. It’s also the perfect size and ridgidity to fillet Dover sole tableside. Lastly, it’s ideal for cutting and scooping out brownies from the pan.”

Mac Professional Series Bread Slicer

“Deadly sharp, it’s equally adept at slicing through roast beef as it is through a crusty baguette. And it passes the overripe tomato test with flying colors. The long blade also allows you to make longer strokes which result in cleaner slices.”

Field Cast Iron Skillet (No. 12)

“The cooking surface of this incredibly well-made pan is practically non-stick. I also love its straight sides which make for perfectly round parmesan fricos and old-fashioned cornbread. When considering sizing, my advice is to go big, especially since the pan is easy to handle because it’s lighter weight. Also, you can always cook less in a larger pan, but you can’t always cook more in a smaller pan — the 12-inch diameter allows me to cook four medium-sized pancakes at the same time which saves loads of time when I have friends over for brunch.”

Jimmy Papadopolous

In the last five years, Jimmy Papadopolous has earned an Eater Chef of the Year award in Chicago, a Zagat ’30 Under 30′ designation and various ‘Best New Restaurant’ awards for his 2017 opening of Bellemore in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood. Papadopolous describes the restaurant, a temple of dark woods, woven cane chairs and brass, as “artistic American.”

Japanese Water Stones

“I have long built my knife kit over my career to where it is. Collecting one of the most important and basic tools to great cooking; a knife. Right behind having a knife, the second most important thing is keeping it sharp. I like sharpening my knives to the point of being able to shave the hair off the back of my hand with a single stroke — a feat that wouldn’t be as easily attainable without the technique and skill that comes from mastering Japanese water Stones.

Polyscience Immersion Circulator

“I cannot stress enough how convenient, precise and how much these machines shrink the margin of human error in professional and home kitchens alike. An absolute must in my kitchen.”

Vita Prep Blender

“They literally can turn a brick to dust. Well, I have never tried to powder a brick in one so, not literally. But they are amazingly versatile. From silky purées, to powders, to emulsifications, my kitchen could not function without one.”

Minipack Vacuum Sealer

“One of the best inventions ever. Vacuum sealers have become complete commonplace in professional kitchens — I could not picture our kitchen functioning without one. From cooking sous vide to tight storage of all prepared food products, a vacuum sealer is an absolute essential.”

David Shim

David Shim’s Cote in Manhattan’s Flatiron District is one-part American steakhouse, one-part Korean barbeque. It features classic gas-fired yakiniku grills from Shinpo at the center of every table and effectively merges American steakhouse favorites with Korean ingredients and flavors (a shrimp cocktail with gochujang being the clearest example). The result of Shim’s cuisine blending was a strong review from the New York Times’ Pete Wells, a place on GQ’s Best New Restaurants of 2018 list and a Michelin star.

Weber Lighter Cubes

“If you ever find yourself outdoors with a charcoal grill, these mini cubes are a must. How many times have you seen people stuffing paper, small pieces of boxes or pouring liquid charcoal lighter? Everyone has their own way making the fire but many times isn’t as easy as one thinks. With the mini lighter cubes all you need to do is put the lighter cubes in between the charcoal and wait till it starts to light, give a light fanning and you are ready to go.”

Kizen Instant-Read Thermometer

“A digital thermometer is one thing that I always have when grilling. Everyone has their own way of telling if the steak is done but it is always great to have a backup plan. There are some with basic temperatures on the thermometer itself so that you don’t have to google what a medium-rare steak is supposed to be.”

Peugeot Pepper Mill

“There are many different pepper mills out there, but this is the one that you want to have. I have used this throughout my career in NYC working at a lot different restaurants and this is also the one that we use at home. Peugeots are great because they can handle the usage of a professional kitchen and it also has different settings to either make it finer or more coarse. It also looks beautiful.”

Iwatani Aburiya Portable Gas Grill Stove

“This is the ultimate portable grill that anyone can have. Living in NYC, not many people have the luxury to grill in the backyard but with this small gadget, you can practically grill anywhere. It has different inserts to either grill steak, seafood and vegetables or make yakitori or skewers. It gets hot enough to make really nice grill marks on steaks as well. This has always been my portable go-to grill.”

More Chef-Approved Kitchen Gear

From a lava stone molcajete to a disposable thermometer to a very, very old-school pasta maker, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

This Is What Every Cast-Iron Skillet Lover Wants for the Holidays

Chef Sean Brock is a Southern American food evangelist who is known for a love of cast-iron cookware. Butter Pat Industries is one of the best cast-iron cookware makers in the US. Together, the two released the ideal holiday gift for the home cook.

The Sean Brock x Butter Pat bundle includes one of the brand’s 10-inch cast-iron skillets, a copy of Brock’s new cookbook, South, a bag of H.S. Brock’s Jimmy Red Cornbread Mix and a Butter Pat poster for $245. Butter Pat’s skillets are prized for their blend of old school cast iron design and new school (and mostly proprietary) manufacturing methods; the pans are thin where they can be and thick where they need to be, as smooth as glass and sport near-perfect pour spouts. No iron we’ve tested cooked as evenly while remaining relatively lightweight.

On Brock’s end, his new recipe tome is a followup to the award-winning Heritage cookbook (it includes its own chapter on cast iron, too). The sack of Jimmy Red cornbread mix was made in partnership with a South Carolina mill to save the rare, non-homogenized grain. It’s also the mix Brock used in his Chef’s Table feature on Netflix (in which he uses a Butter Pat pan).

The set is available through Butter Pat’s site now while supplies last.

Everything You Need to Know About Chef’s Knives

Chef’s knives are a crucial instrument for any home chef. Whether you love cooking every night of the week or just need to cut some vegetables from time-to-time, there is a wealth of information out there on chef’s knives. We’ve rounded up some of our best how-to guides and tips to give you a complete reader on chef’s knives.

4 Things to Consider Before You Buy a New Chef’s Knife

4 Things to Consider Before You Buy a New Chef’s Knife

Buying a knife isn’t all about how sharp it is.

How to Sharpen Kitchen Knives the Right Way

How to Sharpen Kitchen Knives the Right Way

Sharpening a chef’s knife manually doesn’t have to be a daunting task. We asked a guy who sharpens 100 knives a day to show us the way.

This Tiny Store in New Orleans Might Be the Best Place to Buy Japanese Chef’s Knives in the US

This Tiny Store in New Orleans Might Be the Best Place to Buy Japanese Chef’s Knives in the US

Get a knife made by a 750-year-old name that used to make swords for the Emperor.

America’s Most Celebrated Knife Maker Is Just Getting Started

America’s Most Celebrated Knife Maker Is Just Getting Started

Bob Kramer has spent 25 years trying to forge a better chef’s knife. Now America’s most celebrated bladesmith is setting out to unravel the mysteries of steel itself.

How to Care for a Carbon Steel Knife, According to an Expert

How to Care for a Carbon Steel Knife, According to an Expert

Magnus Pettersson of the knife sharpening service KnifeAid has tips to keep your carbon steel knife in top shape.

What’s the Difference Between German and Japanese Kitchen Knives?

What’s the Difference Between German and Japanese Kitchen Knives?

Steel hardness impacts how well a blade can hold an edge. But the more durable option isn’t necessarily the better one.

Unbeatable Meat Cleavers for Your Home Kitchen

Unbeatable Meat Cleavers for Your Home Kitchen

Got a pig roast or barbecue coming up? One of these bad boys will be your tool of choice.

If You Use a Knife Block to Store Your Kitchen Knives, You’re Doing It All Wrong

If You Use a Knife Block to Store Your Kitchen Knives, You’re Doing It All Wrong

Knife bars are cheaper, don’t dull the blade, cleaner and take up less space in your kitchen.

10 Knives World-Class Chefs Can’t Cook Without

10 Knives World-Class Chefs Can’t Cook Without

All-purpose chef’s knives, single-focus slicing tools and everything in between.

The Best Chef’s Knives for the Novice Cook

The Best Chef’s Knives for the Novice Cook

When kept sharp and treated with care, an affordable knife can withstand years of regular use.

The Autonomous SmartDesk 2 Is the Standing Desk You Want

Alternating between standing and sitting while you’re working has been shown to be effective at boosting your mood, increasing your productivity and improving your health. But while standing desks are great, they’re also pricey. That’s…

Why Every Kitchen Absolutely Needs at Least One Enormous Cast-Iron Skillet

If you’ve been in New York City for more than a week, there’s a good chance you’ve eaten something with Craig Koketsu’s fingerprints on it. The partner and executive chef of the city’s Quality Branded restaurant group develops recipes, techniques and processes for each of its five neighborhood spots (Quality Meats, Park Avenue Summer (Autumn, Winter, Spring), Quality Italian, Quality Eats and Quality Meats). His style is classic with a touch of modern flair and he’s been named one of NYC’s top up-and-coming chefs by both New York Magazine and Esquire. From the benefits of a set of heavy-duty mixing bowls to a really, really big cast-iron skillet, these are the things Chef Craig Koketsu couldn’t live without.

Vollrath Heavy Weight Mixing Bowls

“The curve of and depth of these bowls is perfect. You can mix and whisk aggressively in them and don’t have to worry about spillage. The heavier gauge of the stainless steel also makes for more even heat distribution when you use them as a double boiler to make hollandaise. I have one in almost every size, and since they nest, they don’t take up a lot of space.”

LamsonSharp Slotted Turner

“Hands down my favorite offset spatula. I use it mostly when I’m working the griddle — its sharp edge makes sure that every bit of the golden brown sear stays on the scallop. It’s also the perfect size and ridgidity to fillet Dover sole tableside. Lastly, it’s ideal for cutting and scooping out brownies from the pan.”

Mac Professional Series Bread Slicer

“Deadly sharp, it’s equally adept at slicing through roast beef as it is through a crusty baguette. And it passes the overripe tomato test with flying colors. The long blade also allows you to make longer strokes which result in cleaner slices.”

Field Cast Iron Skillet (No. 12)

“The cooking surface of this incredibly well-made pan is practically non-stick. I also love its straight sides which make for perfectly round parmesan fricos and old-fashioned cornbread. When considering sizing, my advice is to go big, especially since the pan is easy to handle because it’s lighter weight. Also, you can always cook less in a larger pan, but you can’t always cook more in a smaller pan — the 12-inch diameter allows me to cook four medium-sized pancakes at the same time which saves loads of time when I have friends over for brunch.”

More Chef-Approved Kitchen Gear

From a lava stone molcajete to a disposable thermometer to a very, very old-school pasta maker, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Why Every Kitchen Absolutely Needs One Enormous Cast-Iron Skillet

If you’ve been in New York City for more than a week, there’s a good chance you’ve eaten something with Craig Koketsu’s fingerprints on it. The partner and executive chef of the city’s Quality Branded restaurant group develops recipes, techniques and processes for each of its five neighborhood spots (Quality Meats, Park Avenue Summer (Autumn, Winter, Spring), Quality Italian, Quality Eats and Quality Meats). His style is classic with a touch of modern flair and he’s been named one of NYC’s top up-and-coming chefs by both New York Magazine and Esquire. From the benefits of a set of heavy-duty mixing bowls to a really, really big cast-iron skillet, these are the things Chef Craig Koketsu couldn’t live without.

Vollrath Heavy Weight Mixing Bowls

“The curve of and depth of these bowls is perfect. You can mix and whisk aggressively in them and don’t have to worry about spillage. The heavier gauge of the stainless steel also makes for more even heat distribution when you use them as a double boiler to make hollandaise. I have one in almost every size, and since they nest, they don’t take up a lot of space.”

LamsonSharp Slotted Turner

“Hands down my favorite offset spatula. I use it mostly when I’m working the griddle — its sharp edge makes sure that every bit of the golden brown sear stays on the scallop. It’s also the perfect size and ridgidity to fillet Dover sole tableside. Lastly, it’s ideal for cutting and scooping out brownies from the pan.”

Mac Professional Series Bread Slicer

“Deadly sharp, it’s equally adept at slicing through roast beef as it is through a crusty baguette. And it passes the overripe tomato test with flying colors. The long blade also allows you to make longer strokes which result in cleaner slices.”

Field Cast Iron Skillet (No. 12)

“The cooking surface of this incredibly well-made pan is practically non-stick. I also love its straight sides which make for perfectly round parmesan fricos and old-fashioned cornbread. When considering sizing, my advice is to go big, especially since the pan is easy to handle because it’s lighter weight. Also, you can always cook less in a larger pan, but you can’t always cook more in a smaller pan — the 12-inch diameter allows me to cook four medium-sized pancakes at the same time which saves loads of time when I have friends over for brunch.”

More Chef-Approved Kitchen Gear

From a lava stone molcajete to a disposable thermometer to a very, very old-school pasta maker, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Why Every Outdoor Cook Absolutely Needs This $3 Amazon Buy

David Shim’s Cote in Manhattan’s Flatiron District is one-part American steakhouse, one-part Korean barbeque. It features classic gas-fired yakiniku grills from Shinpo at the center of every table and effectively merges American steakhouse favorites with Korean ingredients and flavors (a shrimp cocktail with gochujang being the clearest example). The result of Shim’s cuisine blending was a strong review from the New York Times’ Pete Wells, a place on GQ’s Best New Restaurants of 2018 list and a Michelin star. From $3 firestarters to an obscure Japanese table grill, here are four things Cote’s David Shim couldn’t cook without.

Weber Lighter Cubes

“If you ever find yourself outdoors with a charcoal grill, these mini cubes are a must. How many times have you seen people stuffing paper, small pieces of boxes or pouring liquid charcoal lighter? Everyone has their own way making the fire but many times isn’t as easy as one thinks. With the mini lighter cubes all you need to do is put the lighter cubes in between the charcoal and wait till it starts to light, give a light fanning and you are ready to go.”

Kizen Instant-Read Thermometer

“A digital thermometer is one thing that I always have when grilling. Everyone has their own way of telling if the steak is done but it is always great to have a backup plan. There are some with basic temperatures on the thermometer itself so that you don’t have to google what a medium-rare steak is supposed to be.”

Peugeot Pepper Mill

“There are many different pepper mills out there, but this is the one that you want to have. I have used this throughout my career in NYC working at a lot different restaurants and this is also the one that we use at home. Peugeots are great because they can handle the usage of a professional kitchen and it also has different settings to either make it finer or more coarse. It also looks beautiful.”

Iwatani Aburiya Portable Gas Grill Stove

“This is the ultimate portable grill that anyone can have. Living in NYC, not many people have the luxury to grill in the backyard but with this small gadget, you can practically grill anywhere. It has different inserts to either grill steak, seafood and vegetables or make yakitori or skewers. It gets hot enough to make really nice grill marks on steaks as well. This has always been my portable go-to grill.”

More Chef-Approved Kitchen Gear

From a lava stone molcajete to a disposable thermometer to a very, very old-school pasta maker, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Everyday Pots and Pans for Every Kind of Cook

Not all cookware is for all cooks. Between the person who doesn’t know what blanching is and those that own commercial-grade blowtorches, there is a divide. Cookware, like all product categories, can be stratified in a dozen different ways. What’s the best brand if you want your pans to look good? What about the best cheap brand? The best for beginners? These are the best cookware companies for every different cook to invest in.

The Budget-Minded Cook: Potluck

Potluck makes utilitarian cookware. On its site, it promises no retail markups, no gadgets and no single-use products. To that end, its lineup is stuffed with just the basics — a skillet, a stock pot, sauce pans, the only three knives you actually need and a tightly curated cast of kitchen utensils. The cookware is three-ply stainless steel, the knives are hardwearing high-carbon steel and the prices are ideal — $270 for an entire kitchen suite.

The Beginner Cook: Equal Parts

The newest brand on the list was designed from the top-down to cater to the cook who doesn’t know their way around stovetop. The pots and pans are ceramic-coated aluminum, making them lighter, easier to clean and faster-heating than any stainless steel cookware you can buy. The entire collection is nesting, so space isn’t an issue, and every set comes with eight weeks of free text-based cooking guidance. Fire questions, curiosities and recipe ideas to Equal Parts’ cook hotline for immediate backup in the kitchen.

The Aesthetics-First Cook: Great Jones

Great Jones serves up cookware with a helping of vibes. The brand’s distinctively glossy, round look isn’t for everybody, but for those looking for cookware that doubles as decor, there aren’t many better options (Eva Solo makes a solid alternative). But the two best things about Great Jones cookware have nothing to do with its looks: the rivet-less interior is as easy to clean as pans can get, and the handle, though strange at first, stays cooler than any handle we’ve ever tested. Great Jones stainless steel pieces are also much thinner and lighter than most performance-focused options.

The Value-Conscious Cook: Made In

Made In is kind of like a millennial All-Clad; its carbon steel, stainless steel and non-stick cookware is premium, performance-minded and is sold at marginally better price points. Like All-Clad, they’ve got more chef cred than most cookware brands, with company investments from Tom Colicchio and Grant Achatz. If you want technical cookware for a more manageable price, it’s Made In or bust.

The Pure Performance Cook: All-Clad

The inventors of cladded cookware have, for the better part of fifty years, been the choice brand for commercial cooks. Its stainless steel cookware — the line it’s best known for — is heavier than standard layered steel. The added weight means its temperature is kept stable, even when cold food is dropped into it, and it’s resistant to warping like more affordable options. Is it expensive? Yes, a single 10-inch fry pan can run you $100. Is it worth it? If you spend serious time in the kitchen, without a shadow of a doubt.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Upgrades to Your Cheap, Disposable Pens Are Pretty Cheap, Too

There are three inevitabilities we will experience during our time on this mortal coil: we are born, we will die, and sometime in between, we will use a BIC Cristal pen. The company claims to have sold over 100 billion of dirt-cheap pen since the design launched in 1950.

Despite its humble price, the Cristal is a bonafide design icon. The pen is on permanent display at the Museum of Modern Art and was revolutionary for its time. The hexagonal shape, modeled after a wooden pencil, provided better grip and wouldn’t roll from a tabletop. And assuming you could hold on to one long enough to be concerned about it running out of ink, the transparent fuselage easily showed the user how much ink was left inside. Few manage such a feat. This is the downfall of the BIC Cristal.

Cheap, disposable pens can bring out a lot of bad habits. We lose them, we chew on them and we toss them in the trash without a second thought. This is before considering that the cheap pen, while plenty useful, isn’t all that special to write with.

Enter, the moderate upgrade. We’re not talking three-figure Montblanc’s and gold-nibbed Parkers. There is a whole world of high-end ballpoints under the $20 mark. A fair bit more than a $3 package of BIC Cristals, for sure, but between their high-quality builds and refillable cartridges, they’ll last you eons longer. These are the best upgrades to your cheap pen collection.

OHTO Horizon

OHTO was established in Japan in 1929 and started making ballpoints 20 years later, so even if you haven’t heard of it, know it isn’t a spring chicken when it comes to the writing utensil game. OHTO’s well-known for making fine-tipped writers (including the absurdly slim Minimo), and the Horizon is no different coming stock with a 0.7mm tip and cartridge nestled in its sleek, aluminum barrel. Better still is the fact that the pen will take a multitude of cartridge refills, including Pilot’s Hi-Tec-C, revered among pen nerds for its smooth, consistent writing action and needle-thin tip.

Caran d’Ache 849

The Caran d’Ache 849 shares the BIC Cristal’s hexagonal fuselage, which gives it a similarly comfortable grip, but the aluminum construction is more durable and more satisfying to hold than the BIC’s cheap plastic. The overall effect is sleek, and since the 849 is Caran d’Ache’s mainstay products — it was introduced in 1969 — there are endless colors and finishes to choose from. One of the calling cards of the 849 is its stainless-steel “Goliath” cartridge, which the brand claims is good for 8,000 meters, or nearly five miles of writing line.

Pilot Metropolitan

Pilot’s Metropolitain is better known as an entry-level fountain pen, but it comes in a ballpoint guise, too. The body is thick and round, not all dissimilar from something you’d expect to see on an ‘80s executive’s desk, but the variety of monochrome matte finishes makes it look and feel more appropriate for the 21st century. The body is made from brass so it’s weighty; a good thing if you tend to write with a heavy hand.

Fisher Space Pen

You don’t need to be a certifiable pen dork to know the story of the Fisher Space Pen: developed in the 1960s, it was designed to write in zero gravity for astronauts. You’ll never go to space, but it’s nice to know that if Elon Musk’s idea for a moon colony pans out (it won’t) that at the very least you can write with it in any situation, in any orientation, on any surface. That makes it particularly suitable for EDC types who find themselves jotting notes anywhere that isn’t a flat desktop.

Kaweco Classic Sport Ballpoint

Like the Metropolitan, Kaweco’s Classic Sport is well known as a cheap fountain pen, but the ballpoint version is not to be slept on. Like it’s nibbed brethren, the fuselage is thick, hexagonal and made from a thick, durable plastic. Yes, it lacks the metallic composition of other pens on this list, but it allows for a girthy body without excessive weight and means you can opt for a clear variant if you appreciate the transparency of the BIC Cristal. It will also accommodate a massive amount of refills — Jet Pen, for instance, lists a whopping 77 cartridges that are compatible.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Upgrades to Your Cheap, Disposable Pens Are Surprisingly Affordable

There are three inevitabilities we will experience during our time on this mortal coil: we are born, we will die, and sometime in between, we will use a BIC Cristal pen. The company claims to have sold over 100 billion of dirt-cheap pen since the design launched in 1950.

Despite its humble price, the Cristal is a bonafide design icon. The pen is on permanent display at the Museum of Modern Art and was revolutionary for its time. The hexagonal shape, modeled after a wooden pencil, provided better grip and wouldn’t roll from a tabletop. And assuming you could hold on to one long enough to be concerned about it running out of ink, the transparent fuselage easily showed the user how much ink was left inside. Few manage such a feat. This is the downfall of the BIC Cristal.

Cheap, disposable pens can bring out a lot of bad habits. We lose them, we chew on them and we toss them in the trash without a second thought. This is before considering that the cheap pen, while plenty useful, isn’t all that special to write with.

Enter, the moderate upgrade. We’re not talking three-figure Montblanc’s and gold-nibbed Parkers. There is a whole world of high-end ballpoints under the $20 mark. A fair bit more than a $3 package of BIC Cristals, for sure, but between their high-quality builds and refillable cartridges, they’ll last you eons longer. These are the best upgrades to your cheap pen collection.

OHTO Horizon

OHTO was established in Japan in 1929 and started making ballpoints 20 years later, so even if you haven’t heard of it, know it isn’t a spring chicken when it comes to the writing utensil game. OHTO’s well-known for making fine-tipped writers (including the absurdly slim Minimo), and the Horizon is no different coming stock with a 0.7mm tip and cartridge nestled in its sleek, aluminum barrel. Better still is the fact that the pen will take a multitude of cartridge refills, including Pilot’s Hi-Tec-C, revered among pen nerds for its smooth, consistent writing action and needle-thin tip.

Caran d’Ache 849

The Caran d’Ache 849 shares the BIC Cristal’s hexagonal fuselage, which gives it a similarly comfortable grip, but the aluminum construction is more durable and more satisfying to hold than the BIC’s cheap plastic. The overall effect is sleek, and since the 849 is Caran d’Ache’s mainstay products — it was introduced in 1969 — there are endless colors and finishes to choose from. One of the calling cards of the 849 is its stainless-steel “Goliath” cartridge, which the brand claims is good for 8,000 meters, or nearly five miles of writing line.

Pilot Metropolitan

Pilot’s Metropolitain is better known as an entry-level fountain pen, but it comes in a ballpoint guise, too. The body is thick and round, not all dissimilar from something you’d expect to see on an ‘80s executive’s desk, but the variety of monochrome matte finishes makes it look and feel more appropriate for the 21st century. The body is made from brass so it’s weighty; a good thing if you tend to write with a heavy hand.

Fisher Space Pen

You don’t need to be a certifiable pen dork to know the story of the Fisher Space Pen: developed in the 1960s, it was designed to write in zero gravity for astronauts. You’ll never go to space, but it’s nice to know that if Elon Musk’s idea for a moon colony pans out (it won’t) that at the very least you can write with it in any situation, in any orientation, on any surface. That makes it particularly suitable for EDC types who find themselves jotting notes anywhere that isn’t a flat desktop.

Kaweco Classic Sport Ballpoint

Like the Metropolitan, Kaweco’s Classic Sport is well known as a cheap fountain pen, but the ballpoint version is not to be slept on. Like it’s nibbed brethren, the fuselage is thick, hexagonal and made from a thick, durable plastic. Yes, it lacks the metallic composition of other pens on this list, but it allows for a girthy body without excessive weight and means you can opt for a clear variant if you appreciate the transparency of the BIC Cristal. It will also accommodate a massive amount of refills — Jet Pen, for instance, lists a whopping 77 cartridges that are compatible.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Way to Keep Coffee Fresh Is Secretly the Easiest

Coffee can be supremely confusing. It is the seed of a fruit that grows off an exceptionally finicky plant, which itself roots in hard-to-access parts of the world. Once the seed is obtained, it’s bagged and freighted thousands of miles to a roaster cooks it using a combination of math and feel. Then it is ground and brewed into coffee, both tasks that require a cupboard’s worth of gear.

The reality is that this gear controls very few of the variables that determine the quality of this coffee. Three things to keep in mind: your grinder and grind level, the brewing style and when it is you brew that seed into something drinkable. The latter is easiest to gloss over, and, according to Peter Giuliano, research director at the Specialty Coffee Association, perhaps the most misunderstood.

“There isn’t a perfect, catch-all way to describe how long coffee is going to be good for, really, because there are far too many variables to consider. But we do know the primary causes of coffee going stale,” Giuliano said. Here’s what you need to know about keeping coffee fresher for longer, according to experts.

Coffee Goes Bad in Two Ways

The gist, says Giuliano and the team behind the SCA’s new Coffee Freshness Handbook, is that coffee loses quality (a word many science-types balk at, as it’s often viewed as a subjective quality) by de-gassing and growth of “undesirable compounds.”

Prior to roasting, coffee beans carry the same level of carbon dioxide as the air around you; but once roasted, up to two percent of each bean’s weight may be carbon dioxide. Gas begins leaking from the bean the moment roasting ends, and the release of this gas leads to the loss of the coffee’s aromatics (also called volatile organic compounds) and the oxidization of the beans. The bad flavors that crop up are a result of age and oxidization.

You Might Want to Leave the Coffee in the Bag

Oxygen is the ultimate enemy of coffee beans, which is why most bags of coffee nowadays feature a small valve hole. This one-way hole is for de-gassing carbon dioxide to escape (so the bag doesn’t inflate and explode), and doesn’t allow oxygen into the bag. This means that the bag is primarily filled with carbon dioxide making its way out of the bag, and very, very little oxygen.

According to Giuliano, the carbon dioxide in the bag even acts like a “blanket” to cover the beans for oxygen, and that even if you’re re-opening the bag to make coffee, you aren’t losing much carbon dioxide. “If you dump all the beans into a new container — which contains oxygen — you are basically disposing of that valuable C02 blanket, and replacing it with oxygen-containing atmosphere,” Giuliano said. The effect of vacuum containers which remove the air from the interior of the canister, like Fellow’s new Atmos canister, remain untested, according to Giuliano.

Coffee Stays Fresh for Two Weeks

Generally speaking, drinking coffee within two weeks of it being roasted is best, Giuliano said. “It degrades very quickly after that. Certainly, by three months, the coffee is fully stale. However, these numbers change dramatically depending on packaging material and atmosphere.”

These Pots and Pans Were Designed to Teach You How to Cook

Cookware brand Equal Parts isn’t trying to make peak performance cooking equipment. It doesn’t want to be a direct-to-consumer All-Clad and it doesn’t make a big deal of how much money you save buying directly from them. Instead, Equal Parts, the first brand under the Pattern umbrella, makes pots, pans and kitchen gear for people who don’t know the difference between a sauté pan and a skillet.

Pattern co-founder and chief creative officer Emmett Shine and Equal Parts general manager Tyler Sgro started with a simple task: create a cookware company that got people who aren’t cooking into the kitchen.

“Not a lot of people actually know what poaching is versus frying, searing, blanching and so on. If you didn’t grow up in a kitchen, those things are intimidating,” Shine said. “What does the home cook want? What’s something they’re actually going to use?”

The culmination of years of research, data collecting and testing, Equal Parts’ beginner-friendly cookware collections are here.

Equal Parts murdered-out “Big Pan” in action.

Sgro and Shine say every feature is tied to pain point with traditional cookware. The cookware is aluminum because it’s lighter and heats faster than steel, and it’s coated in a ceramic mixture that cleans up easily and heats evenly. Everything from the pots and pans to the mixing bowls are designed to nest, making cabinet space less of an issue, and every item is dishwasher-safe. Even the vocabulary is edited for simplicity — “big pan” instead of sauté pan, “small pot” in place of saucier.

The brand even goes as far as offering an 8-week text-based “coaching” package with every cookware set. Buyers can text coaches cooking-related questions seven days a week, from simple recipe queries to custom meal advice based on what ingredients are on hand.

“Our intention was not to be another pro-sumer brand, it was to focus on the millions and millions of young adults in America who have worked hard, live in a space that’s not as big as they’d like and have less skill in the kitchen than they’d prefer,” Shine said.

Equal Parts products are available in sets starting at $249. Sets may include anything from a few pieces of ceramic-coated aluminum cookware or an entire kitchen suite.

These Pots and Pans Are for People Who Don’t Know How to Cook

Cookware brand Equal Parts isn’t trying to make peak performance cooking equipment. It doesn’t want to be a direct-to-consumer All-Clad and it doesn’t make a big deal of how much money you save buying directly from them. Instead, Equal Parts, the first brand under the Pattern umbrella, makes pots, pans and kitchen gear for people who don’t know the difference between a sauté pan and a skillet.

Pattern co-founder and chief creative officer Emmett Shine and Equal Parts general manager Tyler Sgro started with a simple task: create a cookware company that got people who aren’t cooking into the kitchen.

“Not a lot of people actually know what poaching is versus frying, searing, blanching and so on. If you didn’t grow up in a kitchen, those things are intimidating,” Shine said. “What does the home cook want? What’s something they’re actually going to use?”

The culmination of years of research, data collecting and testing, Equal Parts’ beginner-friendly cookware collections are here.

Equal Parts murdered-out “Big Pan” in action.

Sgro and Shine say every feature is tied to pain point with traditional cookware. The cookware is aluminum because it’s lighter and heats faster than steel, and it’s coated in a ceramic mixture that cleans up easily and heats evenly. Everything from the pots and pans to the mixing bowls are designed to nest, making cabinet space less of an issue, and every item is dishwasher-safe. Even the vocabulary is edited for simplicity — “big pan” instead of sauté pan, “small pot” in place of saucier.

The brand even goes as far as offering an 8-week text-based “coaching” package with every cookware set. Buyers can text coaches cooking-related questions seven days a week, from simple recipe queries to custom meal advice based on what ingredients are on hand.

“Our intention was not to be another pro-sumer brand, it was to focus on the millions and millions of young adults in America who have worked hard, live in a space that’s not as big as they’d like and have less skill in the kitchen than they’d prefer,” Shine said.

Equal Parts products are available in sets starting at $249. Sets may include anything from a few pieces of ceramic-coated aluminum cookware or an entire kitchen suite.

Why Every Kitchen Absolutely Needs a Set of Japanese Water Stones

In the last five years, Jimmy Papadopolous has earned an Eater Chef of the Year award in Chicago, a Zagat ’30 Under 30′ designation and various ‘Best New Restaurant’ awards for his 2017 opening of Bellemore in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood. Papadopolous describes the restaurant, a temple of dark woods, woven cane chairs and brass, as “artistic American.” From $30 whetstones to $2,000 vacuum sealers, here are four things he couldn’t cook without.

Japanese Water Stones

“I have long built my knife kit over my career to where it is. Collecting one of the most important and basic tools to great cooking; a knife. Right behind having a knife, the second most important thing is keeping it sharp. I like sharpening my knives to the point of being able to shave the hair off the back of my hand with a single stroke — a feat that wouldn’t be as easily attainable without the technique and skill that comes from mastering Japanese water Stones.

Polyscience Immersion Circulator

“I cannot stress enough how convenient, precise and how much these machines shrink the margin of human error in professional and home kitchens alike. An absolute must in my kitchen.”

Vita Prep Blender

“They literally can turn a brick to dust. Well, I have never tried to powder a brick in one so, not literally. But they are amazingly versatile. From silky purées, to powders, to emulsifications, my kitchen could not function without one.”

Minipack Vacuum Sealer

“One of the best inventions ever. Vacuum sealers have become complete commonplace in professional kitchens — I could not picture our kitchen functioning without one. From cooking sous vide to tight storage of all prepared food products, a vacuum sealer is an absolute essential.”

More Chef-Approved Kitchen Gear

From a lava stone molcajete to a disposable thermometer to a very, very old-school pasta maker, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.