All posts in “Buying Guides”

These 9 Brilliant Items Could Save Your Night Running Life

Sometimes the only time to squeeze in a workout is late at night, and for those who can’t stand the summer heat, it makes sense to head outdoors after the sun sets. However, it can also be dangerous to go running late at night, as you’re never quite as visible as you think. Before you go, you need gear that helps you stand out.

“Lights should be seen 360 degrees around you when you run at night, so just a headlamp is not enough,” Paul Ronto, competitive runner and content director at RunRepeat.com, says. “Even with a headlamp, pedestrians are really hard to see from a vehicle.”

To be extra safe, you should have a front light, rear strobe and at least one side light (usually on the side that’s closest to traffic). Reflective gear also helps increase visibility. “I would not advise only having lights or reflective gear, I think it’s crucial to have both,” Ronto says. “With drivers so distracted these days, it’s crucial to be hyper-visible.”

When picking out your clothes, opt for bright colors like white or yellow. Brighter colors are easier to spot than dark colors by car lights. And tall white socks are great to wear on night runs since drivers tend to pick up the motion before anything else. Your legs are what’s moving the most when you’re out on a run.

Lastly, stay on guard. Be extra cautious when crossing the street, do not expect drivers to stop for you as they would during the day (even if you are crossing at a crosswalk), and if you prefer to run with music, either listen with one headphone in or at a super low volume so you can stay aware of your surroundings. Pack your ID, phone and some cash; tell someone you’re heading out under the cloak of darkness and then hit the streets. There’s no reason to ditch your nightly runs if you enjoy them and they work with your schedule; just be sure to have the proper gear to stay visible — and alive.

Tracer360 Reflective Vest

Reflective vests can be an uncomfortable added layer, but the high-quality mesh and elastic in this one reduces the fabric-to-body contact so you can have a chafe-free experience. “With six fluorescent colors outlining this vest, your visibility will be at its highest, ensuring that you’re protected and seen by motorists and vehicles during your night run,” says Caleb Backe, CPT and wellness expert for Maple Holistics.

Knuckle Lights

These knuckle lights “will guide your way through those dimly lit streets and ensure that you see any potential obstacles in front of you to prevent injury,” says Backe. Thanks to adjustable silicone straps and wide flood beams, you’ll be comfortable and visible, too.

Black Diamond Spot325 Headlamp

“It’s compact and powerful and is one of the brightest headlamps on the market,” Ronto says. The Spot uses three AAA batteries, and has a dimming feature, strobe, spotlight and wide light settings. Plus, it’s waterproof. At $40, it’s affordable to boot.

Nathan Zephyr Fire 100 Hand Torch LED Light

While a headlamp will keep you seen, and help you see, a flashlight adds another layer of protection. This one has a small harness, so you can illuminate the trail or flash it towards traffic easily without worrying about dropping it throughout your run.

Road ID

“RoadID is a cheap option that prints your emergency contact info, blood type or any other information you think is important to share onto a small, lightweight bracelet,” Ronto says. If God forbid you get hurt out there, the RoadID will help medical personnel know all the critical things needed to properly assist you.

Nathan Reflective Ankle Band

Take reflective gear a step further by pairing your vest with ankle bands, a cheap, low-tech option to improve visibility. “The nice part about reflective gear is it takes no batteries, and as you move different areas reflect light at different times, making you hyper-visible,” says Ronto.

Nathan TrailMix Plus Insulated 2 Hydration Belt

“This insulated hydration belt is a convenient, lightweight solution that makes it easy to access your hydration and essential items,” says Ryan Raskin, triathlete, running coach and category director at RECREATIONiD.com. It’s important to carry an ID and cellphone in the event of an emergency, and this belt allows you to carry both without messing up your performance.

Petzl Bindi Headlamp

This compact and ultra-light rechargeable headlamp is ideal for night running. The thin headband adjusts easily and can also be worn around the neck. And there are three lighting modes: proximity, movement and distance, along with red lighting to preserve night vision while not blinding others during group runs.

SPIbeams LED Hat

Think of this hat as a more comfortable headlamp. It’s battery operated and has a convenient on/off switch, along with breathable material. It’s great for night runs in the heat as you’ll stay nice and cool as well as safe.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Panniers for Bike Commuting

As a relative newbie to the world of bike commuting, I quickly realized that while you can stick with just the bare bones, your bike commute can go from doable to nearly perfect with the addition of a few key accessories. Beyond a bike and a helmet, it’s helpful to have lights, a bell and a pannier. All these add-ons make commuting fast, safe and convenient.

While there are a variety of bells, headlights and taillights that have all worked for me, I’ve had the most difficulty finding a durable pannier. It needs to clip on and off easily as I lock my bike up outside overnight, keep my laptop safe over bumps and terrible road conditions and have plenty of storage for all of my work clothes if I bike to the gym first. Convertible backpack straps are a bonus. While some people can swing a messenger bag or backpack over their shoulders and ride, I’ve found that I can carry much more on the bike if I just attach my bag to it — and (bonus) I don’t show up to work with a big sweat stain on my back from said bag.

Here are four panniers (and an additional pack) that hit all our prerequisites in terms of durability, storage and design.

Brooks England Suffolk Rear Travel Pannier

The roll-top closure ensures that you can stuff this bag with extra sneakers, your lunch and even your laundry if you’re a drop off and pick up kind of guy. The leather accents elevate the bag so it can go with you from home to office — and even to important business meetings. The detachable shoulder strap is clutch, and the Ortlieb attachment system is the be all, end all of attachment options.

North St. Woodward Convertible

This pannier and backpack comes from the Pacific Northwest, so you can bet that it’s waterproof. There’s a lifetime warranty on the Woodward, which backs up its craftsmanship (each bag is made by hand). It comes in three colors — deep green, bold navy and black, each with reflective detailing so you don’t have to worry about riding at night. The internal laptop sleeve is a must-have, and the external pockets make it easy to stash your phone so you can check directions at stop lights. Attaching it to your bike is a breeze: just slide the hooks over your rear rack and connect the bungee cord. The hide-away backpack straps are a huge convenience as I hop on and off my bike frequently along my route. Velcro seals all the external pockets, so while loud, I’ve never once worried about my keys flying out mid-commute.

Ortlieb Back-Roller Classic

If you’re looking for simply the best pannier on the market, look no further than Ortlieb. Since 1982, these bags have proven themselves exceptionally durable, waterproof and easy to use. While not the sleekest-looking panniers on the market, it’s hard to find something as reliable. The back-roller classic comes in black, red, yellow and blue, with a shoulder strap to carry in and out of the office. The roll top guarantees water won’t sneak inside, and the QL2 closure is a breeze to attach the bag to your bike. Simply lift the handle to secure the two hooks around your rear rack and slide the hook over on the back to eliminate any bouncing while riding. You’re guaranteed to see these all over the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges as commuters make their way in and out of the city.

Arkel Signature V Urban Pannier

This bike bag built for a city commuter comes in three colors — copper, olive and black — and offers an impressive 28-liters of storage. The bag is made from 1000D Cordura and lined with a waterproof TPU laminate. Arkel makes all of its goods in Canada, and this pack is no different. You can run as many errands as you’d like post-work, as the bag will hold your laptop in a dedicated pocket, leaving room for groceries, tools and bike shoes.

Lululemon Surge Run Backpack II

While this is not a pannier, this has become my go-to bike commuting bag due to its sleek look, backpack first-design and ability to work like a stuff sack. I could easily fit three days worth of clothing in here, or a change of clothes, plus my laptop and extra magazines. The bag has a small footprint, so when the temperatures reach 75 and I don’t want to sweat through the back of my shirt, I can pop it in my basket. And for those times when I’m carrying something I don’t think can handle the shock of New York City roads (i.e., a photo frame, food or a recovery tool), the backpack straps are clutch.

The 9 Best Bike Lights For Commuting

Commuting via bike can be the perfect way to gear up for a busy day at work — and unwind after a long one. To stay safe while riding after sunset, proper lighting is key to helping you see and be seen.

Even if you ride the same 5, 10 or 15 miles to work every day, seeing what’s on the road in front of you can be the difference between a flat tire and a smooth ride. Beyond being able to see the path ahead of you, cars and people need to see you as well — and it helps to be illuminated even when it’s light out. “Eighty percent of fatalities on bikes occur during the day, and forty percent of those are from behind,” notes Scott Kasin, director of electronics at Trek Bicycle Corporation. So yes, you do need a light on your bike both in the front and the rear.

For the back of your bike, a red flashing light is ideal to keep the attention of motorists coming at you from behind. “When you use a flashing light, you are recognizable from three times the distance than if [you have] no light,” Kasin says. Attaching a solid red light to your heels or ankles as well is shown to be even more conspicuous.

Kevin Balay of Bicycle Workshop in Tenafly, NJ says there are a few things to consider when shopping for bike lights. “Selecting the proper lights depends on how you are going to use them, what level of brightness and what you are willing to spend,” he says. The brightness will vary if you’re riding through the streets of New York, or along suburban roads outside of Bend or Austin. “We prefer rechargeable lights,” Balay says. “They tend to be brighter and you aren’t throwing money away on batteries. So, in the long run, they will cost less overall.”

David Weiner, co-founder of Priority Bikes, also acknowledges that commuters have it tough. You need a set of lights that will hold up to the rain, snow, sleet and wind, yet is also easily powered and hard to remove (or steal). “Charging lights sucks,” Weiner says. “I used to forget it all the time. Remembering to remove them when you run inside somewhere, so they don’t get stolen, is a hassle.” Certain light frames can stay on your bike when you lock it up outside, but for others, you have to physically remove them every single time you stop, lock up your bike and then go inside. It can be a pain.

With all of that in mind, we pulled together a variety of lights at a plethora of price points that will help you see and be seen. We also tapped experts from all over the country to share their favorites with us.

Bontrager Ion Pro RT/Flare Light Set

Balay of Bicycle Workshop recommends these lights: “There are multiple reasons for this choice — light output, runtime, beam color and spread, price, quality, warranty, etc. The front light on this set also provides enough light to actually see the road or trail at night and as a bonus, the ‘RT’ lights can be controlled with a remote or even your Garmin-compatible devices.”

NiteRider Lumina Micro 650 and NiteRider Sabre 80

“The NiteRider Lumina Micro 650 & NiteRider Sabre 80 are the lights I personally use,” says Shaun Fowler, a buyer at New York City’s Paragon Sports. “I have ridden over 70,000 miles in the last seven years commuting to work.” The Sabre 80 is a multi-LED taillight with 80 lumens and six different light modes. The Lumina Micro 650 is a USB-rechargeable easy on and off handlebar light with four levels of brightness.

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Specialized Flux 1200 Headlight

The 1,200-lumen maximum on this double light works great on the streets of NYC. Once you attach the mount to your bike, you can just unclip the light from your bike and slip it into your bag, which also makes for easy charging. The light is nice to use in a variety of daytime and nighttime conditions thanks to its three different steady light modes and four flashing and low modes. It’s a powerful front loader for commuters. I pair mine with the Garmin Varia RTL510 radar tail light, but Specialized also sells a variety of Stix taillights that are super easy to attach and use.

Priority Light Set Front & Rear

“Perfect for an evening rider where you are trying to alert traffic that you are there,” says Weiner (who is admittedly biased). “If the roads are properly lit, as in NYC, you just want others to be aware of you. These are water resistant, fast to micro-usb charge, and they pop right off your bike in seconds.”

Kryptonite Street F-250 and Avenue R-50 COB

“Bike lights have come a long way,” says Melanie Mitchell, triathlete and CleverTraining.com rep. “More and more commuters are blazing lights on their bikes both day and night to alert motorists to their presence, as drivers are becoming more and more distracted.” For a light under $50, Mitchell worked with her team to recommend the Kryptonite pair. “The six different modes meet the needs of your ride, switching between nighttime pulse that demands the attention of drivers, to high steady that’ll show you every bump in the road.” The backlight is “designed for the everyday commuter, errand-runner or pub-hopper. This easy-to-operate light supplies you with the light you need to keep drivers aware of your presence, day or night.”

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Beryl Laserlight Core and Burner Brake

Our team has been particularly impressed with Beryl’s lights. The simplicity and power of the Laserlight Core and Burner Brake lights just shines. The Laserlight is currently on Kickstarter, and way above its goal. You can pre-order the rear lights today. The front light pumps out 400 lumens, while the back offers 200. Each is waterproof and will help keep you safe from blind spots and rain storms.

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Blackburn Design Dayblazer 800 Front and Dayblazer 65 Rear Light Set

Two lights under $100 is a pretty good deal for a rechargeable light set with a universal mount. This set is waterproof and built to help you focus in on the road, while also providing a clear visible path to follow. There are a variety of ways you can mount it, so do whatever works best for you.

Knog Big Cobber

Knog’s Big Cobber lights are some of the easiest ones to use. They seamlessly wrap around your handlebars and seat post, making them easy to remove. The best part is there’s no extra cord — you just plug these right into the USB port. Note: the price is for one light.

Light & Motion Urban 500 Commuter Combo

This Light & Motion combo pack features a durable 500 onyx front headlight and a smaller Vis 180 rear light — both of which are guaranteed for two years. It’s one of the most durable and long-lasting sets we’ve tested.

Best Commuter Bikes

These 10 commuter bikes cover everything from high-end electric bikes to speed-minded fixies. If you need one of the best commuter bikes of 2018, this is the place to start. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Gear We’d Buy If Price Was No Object

It’s summer, and we’re knee-deep in planning mode for vacations we’re going to take and dreaming up trips we have yet to make. In the midst of it all,  a few items would make these next 90 days even more enjoyable. We polled the team to see what their summer dreams include, and to hear what gear they’d buy if price weren’t a factor. Here are the nine items we’re coveting right now.

Parlee RZ7 Factory Edition

“This season, the disc-brake-aero-bike trend is in full force, and Parlee is the latest brand to embrace it. Although they’re very fast, aero disc brake bikes tend to be a bit heavier and more sluggish than traditional climbing bikes, but the Parlee RZ7 is one of the lightest aero bikes out there. A medium frame comes in at only 840 grams! It has proprietary “SpeedShields” which cover the disc brake calipers and improve airflow, a first for bikes like this. While this bike is nearly perfect in my eyes, I’d add a set of Vittoria Corsa gum wall tires and call it a day.” Hunter Kelly, Associate Designer

Vintage Sunfish Sailboat

“I used to sail in one of these every summer as a kid, and I miss it. I love being on the water, and there’s something strangely appealing about having to duck whenever you tack (the boom will otherwise swing around, hit you in the face, and knock you out). Keeps you on your toes.” Oren Hartov, Assistant Editor

2019 Indian Scout Motorcycle

“I got to ride a 2017 Scout all over South Dakota a couple of years ago, and I loved it so much I was tempted to steal the damn thing and pin it back to NYC. Why? That beguiling combo of classic looks and modern performance. The paint job is so cherry, people kept asking if it was custom, and the 1200cc, 6-speed, liquid-cooled V-Twin engine provides more than enough juice to fly over those wide-open Great Plains highways as fast as you like. Meanwhile, responsive shocks and forgiving ABS make handling a dream in the twisties. I’d gladly ride it across the country and back. Twice.” Steve Mazzucchi, Outdoor & Fitness Editor

Yeti SB130 LR XO1

“There are a few reasons that I don’t already own one of these, the biggest being that they are pretty cost prohibitive. I also live in Brooklyn, where storage space and decent trails come at a premium. In a perfect world, I’d be ripping around on one of these daily before work. The SB130 LR XO1 is Yeti’s do-it-all trail bike. The “LR” stands for a lunch ride because it’s the spec that the Yeti employees use on their lunch rides on the local trail system.” AJ Powell, Project Manager

Icon A5 Limited Edition

“It’s an airplane, sure, but one that comes without most of the hassles that tag along with plane ownership. It’s designed to be almost impossible to crash by accident; it’s small and light enough to be trailered anywhere you can drive and can land on both water and land alike. Car-inspired controls mean it’s easy to operate — you don’t even need a full pilot’s license to fly it. Sure, it’s as expensive as a Ferrari…but no supercar can offer half the thrills of flying.” Will Sabel Courtney, Motoring Editor

Fortel DT Carbon with Glass

“Atroposknife’s Fortel blades are not just beautiful but also brilliant. These ingenious transformers are a handful of knives in one clever package that looks like a joy to fiddle with even if I might have trouble bringing myself actually to use it. Even the base model is outrageously expensive, but if money were no issue, I’d spring for the beautiful titanium model with Damascus steel, no question.” Eric Limer, Tech Editor

Peloton Tread

“Not only would I be able to run any time I wanted, even in the dead of winter, and take any class I wanted — I’m assuming that a subscription would be included in this “money is no object” deal — but this glamorous treadmill would also allow me to kill my gym membership. Two birds, one stone.” Tucker Bowe, Staff Writer

Seiko Astron GPS Solar 5X Watch

The Seiko Astron 5X has some of the most practical, handy tech and robust specs you could want from a watch, but it also remains highly wearable at just 41.4mm and feels like a watch should — and not like some tech gadget. Perpetually charged by any exposure to light, it also updates the time automatically to near atomic-clock precision and adjusts to daylight savings and changes of time zone. Basically, it’s always extremely accurate with zero fuss from the user, making it ideal for travel, but it is also satisfying strictly from a watchmaking perspective for its build quality, aesthetics and details.” Zen Love, Associate Staff Writer

Almond Surfboards R-Series 8’0 Joy Surfboard

“There are more expensive items I could’ve nominated to this list — a full-suspension mountain bike and a wake surfing boat come to mind — but Almond’s big foamie sits comfortably in the overlap of six-figure dreams and reality. I probably could afford it, but I’m a total novice at surfing and don’t go enough (yet) to justify the cost of buying a board. But it is mighty pretty, and from what friends have told me about Almond’s foam R-Series, plenty fun on summer waves, too.” Tanner Bowden, Staff Writer

7 Things Vic Mensa Is on the Hunt for Right Now

Despite Mensa’s busy schedule, he took a few minutes to share some products he’s currently got his eye on. Ranging from bottled green tea to a vocal effects processor to a vintage t-shirt, the things reflect a life based in music and fashion. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

5 Protein Powders Top Fitness Trainers Swear By

Recovering from your workouts the right way is just as important as hitting the gym regularly — and recovery starts with a good protein powder. Protein is by far the most important macronutrient when it comes to your muscles recovering from a workout. Taking it shortly after a workout aids muscle recovery as well as muscle growth, an imperative step for anyone with a firm fitness goal.

There are a variety of brands on the market that utilize a wide array of base ingredients and grams of protein per serving to cater to different goals. The best way to supercharge your recovery routine is to make sure you’re not just taking any protein after your workouts but rather one that suits your needs and gets your body primed to bounce back for your next session.

Personal trainers spend hours in the gym and work with clients to help them achieve their goals, meaning they likely know how different body types react to proteins — and more importantly, which ones taste the best. We spoke with five personal trainers about the powders they love and their recipes for success (literally).

MFL Muscle Hydrolyzed Isolate Protein

Trainer, stuntman and cirque performer Brennan Mejia is generally skeptical of protein powders and aims to hit most of his macros through food rather than supplements. “Since supplements are not typically regulated by the FDA, I’m always hesitant to rely on them too heavily,” he says. However, when he needs to hit his protein goal for the day and food hasn’t gotten it done, Mejia turns to MFL Muscle Hydrolyzed Isolate Protein. “It’s manufactured in a good manufacturing practice (GMP) facility that is also inspected by the FDA, is free from a lot of artificial ingredients found in other protein powders and uses stevia as the sweetener.” His go-to mixing method when using MFL’s protein is blending their Strawberry Cake flavor, which comes in at 30 grams of protein per scoop, with almond milk, blueberries, a banana and almond butter.

Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard Whey Protein

Joshua Habeck is a longtime trainer at Root 18 Crossfit who keeps his protein fix simple: “I’ve stuck with Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard Whey Protein for about four years now. It’s the product I recommend to most of my clients.” The reason is simple: the price. “They provide a high-quality product at a relatively low price, which is pretty huge for me at the rate I go through the stuff.” Habeck also keeps it basic when it comes to preparation, usually taking it with water or sprinkling some on his oatmeal in the morning.

Plant Fusion Complete Protein

Vegan fitness buffs will appreciate trainer Ryan Foray‘s powder of choice. A powerlifting and strength training specialist, Foray is picky about his protein. He believes a lot of products are more filler than substance, but his surefire go-to is Plant Fusion’s Complete Protein. The protein is plant-based, vegan and non-GMO, which helps him recover well. “Most of the time I’m just mixing it with water on the go, but if I have time, it’s almond milk,” he says. “Chocolate is my go-to — gotta feed the sweet-toothed monster in me.”

Vega One Organic All-In-One Shake

Dominick Popolo is a bodybuilding trainer who needs a protein that will help build as much lean muscle as possible without making him put on unnecessary weight. He’s also been vegan for the past year or so. Consequently, Popolo sticks with Vega Organic All-In-One Shake, preferably the French Vanilla flavor. “I feel the ingredients are less harsh on my stomach than other powders,” he says. Dominick’s go-to Vega smoothie consists of almond milk, strawberries, bananas and Vega protein — with a bit of creatine for a boost in the gym.

Apollo Pure Protein Powder

Sometimes massive size gains aren’t the goal with a fitness routine or the accompanying recovery regimen. Certified trainer Neil Thomas, who specializes in conditioning, boxing and kettlebell training, knows this well. Because he’s rarely trying to build size (and tries to avoid whey product when possible), he usually recovers with BCAAs rather than protein; they help him build strength without bulk.When he does incorporate whey protein into his recovery, he’s a big fan of products made by Unico Nutrition. “Their stuff is by far the tastiest,” Thomas says. “Their transparency in regards to ingredients is great to see, too. While I’m not really opposed to putting terrible chemicals in my body for physical gain, it’s nice to know I can get the results I want without them.”

Color Title Using Title Casing

Whether you’re looking to bulk up, slim down or sustain your current weight and can’t always swing whole food proteins into your day, these four powders are worth a look. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best New Running Shoes This Month: June

Summer is the perfect time to pick up a running habit. The days are longer, providing you with both morning and evening options to shake out your legs. And of course, it’s the ideal time to start training for a fall race. If you’re looking to start training 16 weeks out for a marathon (the generally accepted amount of time to train), June is when anyone signed up for the Berlin or Chicago Marathons will start training. For those running New York City, your time is right on their heels. An intense training schedule calls for a new pair of shoes (or two).

If marathoning is not your thing, we understand. Summer’s still arguably one of the best times to start running. Whether you’re just looking to log a few extra miles each week or get back in the game after a slow spring start, here are the best new running shoes we can’t wait to test all summer long.

Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 36

The Zoom Pegasus 36 is one of the many updated Nike sneakers this season. We loved the Pegasus 35 when we ran in it last year and can’t wait to test these out. The neutral yet stable-leaning sneaker has a few minor updates; more perforations along the upper keep your feet dry and fresh; a slimmer heel collar and tongue mean less padding in those areas and fewer potential hot spots.

Reigning Champ x Asics Gel-Kayano 25

We’re big fans of Reigning Champ’s collaborations, especially when they’re with running shoe brands we trust. You can wear the Asics Gel-Kayano 25 all day long without any problems, and if you need a bit of arch support, these kicks are your next pick. The sleek white, tan and navy upper mean you can wear this from your run to the soccer game to the sidelines.

Hoka One One Clifton 6

The sixth update to the beloved Hoka One One Clifton, this lightweight (just 9 ounces) yet densely cushioned shoe caters to the neutral runner. It’s comfortable from your first step in and the Meta-Rocker build will help you roll from heel to toe with every footstrike.

Altra Paradigm 4.5

This beast of a sneaker features plush cushioning for those days when you’re just too sore from running — or for days you don’t want to feel the ground. The Altra Paradigm 4.5 is a maximalist sneaker that’ll stand up to however many road miles you need to log, all with a breathable upper that’ll keep the breeze moving between your toes in the summer heat.

Adidas Ultraboost Pride Shoes

The Adidas Ultraboost shoes are some of the most popular running shoes available, and in June, Adidas dropped a beauty of a sneaker for pride month. It boasts all the same great features we already love in the Ultraboost 19, just with a super colorful upper. The Primeknit 360 upper is mostly white with a rainbow of colors along the heel and just above the midsole around the entire sneaker.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Bike Pain-Free With These Game-Changing Cycling Upgrades

Pretty much any seasoned cyclist will tell you, if you feel a consistent pain on a ride, look at your frame fit. If your back hurts, your seat is probably angled too high; if your hands are going numb, your stem length is perhaps off.

But there’s also a level of expected — and accepted — mild discomfort. For me, that’s always been in the saddle and my knees. I’ve traded out my seat twice, tried covers, adjusted the angle of the saddle itself… but no matter what, I feel like I’m sliding off the pint-size perch; I can’t quite find that sweet sitting spot to lock and load instead of squirm.

As for my knees, they also act up during long runs and, since I know my frame fits and is set up correctly for my dimensions, I’ve long written off the dull ache as a biomechanical issue I can only hope to mitigate with cross-training and better recovery.

Then, last summer, I went through a fitting with Retül Match, a program owned by Specialized that uses full-body mapping sensors to determine your bone shapes and imbalances. A technician took pressure points of my foot, measured my femur length, measured my sit bones on a pressure map and lightly analyzed my biomechanics.

(Note: The company also has a super intensive fitting conducted from Specialized’s Boulder shop that analyzes your entire biomechanics on a bike, but I just did the program on the Match Tower that’s in bike shops nationwide)

The first few things they told me I already knew: I have a wide toe box and super high arches, which limits what kinds of shoes I’ll find comfortable in pretty much every sport, cycling included. But then they dropped statistics I hadn’t heard, or even considered: My sit bones were wider than most, so I need a 168mm saddle compared to the standard 135mm. My left foot naturally turns out 5 to 10 degrees.

What that meant: I needed to upgrade my saddle and reinstall my shoe cleats at the proper angle.

It sounds super basic, maybe even obvious if you’re a super seasoned rider. But in my two years getting into the sport, these were levels of detail I had never considered.

My first 60-miler with a new perch and properly aligned cleats felt like I had popped half a bottle of ibuprofen and gotten two days worth of sleep before heading out. My knees didn’t ache, and my undercarriage didn’t start screaming till the last 10 miles (hey, some things are inevitable).

Now, every rainy day that I go to a spin class where the saddles are all that 135mm, I can recognize that my constant battle against sliding off the seat is not just part of a ride, but something I can control (if only studios would let me bring my seat in).

It’s worth pointing out some pains are most likely the result of an improper fit or not enough core strength: namely, neck pain, hand pain, low-back pain and some knee pain. But the minor details are often overlooked by intermediate riders, says Todd Carver, founder of Retül, possibly because it takes a skilled fitter, advanced technology — not to mention time and money — to figure out the finer details.

But the payoff is real: “Comfort is the most immediate benefit of these minor tweaks,” says Carver. “But long-term, you also get a reduced risk of overuse injury and better efficiency by ensuring the right balance is created between fit aggressiveness and rider flexibility.”

Intrigued? You’ll get the most benefit from paying for your fitting at a local bike shop (you can find Retül Match programs here). Meantime, here are the main micro-changes that might make all the difference to your ride.

Trade Your Saddle Shape

If you feel constant pain or numbness in your, ahem, undercarriage, or like you can never get comfortable on the perch, the stock saddle is probably wrong for your body. The two variables here are width and shape — and it’s pretty much the opposite of one-size-fits-all, Carver says.

Ask your local bike shop for a saddle fit, where they should measure your sit-bone width, then let you try a zillion shapes till one feels right under your tush. Here are a few of our favorites for different booties.

Pro Stealth

A cult favorite among aggressive riders supporting stubby saddles, this seat is wider at the nose, allowing you to stay at the front of the saddle and in the drops for longer periods of times. The wide middle cut-out chops weight and helps take pressure off the soft tissue.

Planet Bike A.R.S. Anatomic Relief Saddle

This comfort saddle has firm foam padding to keep your sit bones from screaming and a slight mid-channel for blood flow. It feels cheaper than the saddles that’ll run you triple digits, but the gel top and affordable price tag make for an easy upgrade on a budget.

Selle SMP Pro

For guys with wide sit bones and serious perineal pain, this Italian-made saddle may be worth the price tag. The super wide center channel will cushion your soft tissue and optimize circulation while the drop nose encourages you to stand more often, alleviating the pressure underneath.

Tweak Your Cleats

Try this: Standing on one foot, lift your knee till it’s up 90 degrees. Look down at your foot; is it hanging straight ahead or slightly askew? Chances are it’s the latter. “All humans have a natural foot angle,” Carver says. Clipless pedals will make each stroke more efficient, but when your foot is clipped in perfectly straight with zero float, this causes weird torque on all parts of your leg, which translates to ankle, knee or hip pain, he explains.

Speedplay Zero Pedals

“Some cleats are fixed and have no float, which can be a huge problem as the foot has no room to rotate once clipped in,” Carver says. Float essentially lets your heel pivot slightly as you pedal. The ideal amount of swivel is a personal (and biomechanical) preference, but we — along with countless pro cyclists — love the Speedplay Zero pedal system; when paired with their Aero Walkable Cleats, you can adjust from wide open (15 degrees) down to a fixed position (zero float).

Crank Brothers Zero Float Cleats

There’s a solid camp of zero float devotees, as being completely locked in gives you optimal power. And that’s OK — adjusting the angle of your cleats may be enough to help offset the biomechanical issues causing your knee pain. These Crank Brothers cleats are durable but offer no play, so be sure your cleats are installed to match your natural foot angle.

BikeFit Cleat Wedges

Instead of angling your cleats, you can insert these wedges between your cleat and shoe to offset your biomechanical foot angle issues. By adding a little lift on the inside or outside of your foot, your leg won’t rotate inward or outward and, theoretically, your power will increase and knees will ache less. Considering these run about the price of a decent bottle of wine and don’t require the help of a fitter, they’re a pretty easy troubleshoot to lower limb pains.

Get Fitted for Shoes

Shoes that are too small overall or cause hot spots and numbness in your feet make for a very uncomfortable ride. You want enough room for that mid-ride swell in size, but also a tight closure around the heel and midfoot for optimal power production, Carver says. Just like with running shoes, you should go into a store, get fitted and try on a variety of brands to determine which best fits your foot shape, but here are a few of the most promising options.

Specialized Torch 2

This iconic mid-tier cycling shoe features Specialized’s signature Body Geometry technology, which means it was ergonomically designed to better align the hip, knee and forefoot to improve pedaling efficiency and decrease pain points. The Torch 2 specifically has a more relaxed fit around the toe box than other models (though it’s probably still too tight for those with a wide forefoot) and a less constrictive fit along the foot. Additionally, the insole is designed to minimize hot foot and support your arches.

Bont Vaypor S

The Vaypor S shoes are super light with a dual-layer Boa system that lets you get a tight fit without hot spots. Their biggest selling point is the wide toe box (akin to Altra running shoes), which theoretically allows your toes to grip, balance and resist more naturally than being crammed together. We also love that they come with a custom heat-molded footbed.

Louis Garneau Course Air Lite II

The shoe itself fits snugly in the heel with minimal stack height, but what makes it stand out is its adaptive fit. It features a lace design from top to toe, which means multiple anchoring points but with Boa closures for those ideal micro-adjustments. The included insole has three adjustable arch wedges for personalized support, but most impressive is LG’s patented X-comfort zone material. It’s essentially an elastomer-spandex built into the shoe’s upper that gives as your foot expands with heat without compromising the stability of the shoe.

Insert Insoles

Ideally, you want to support your natural arch, even if it’s neutral, to prevent it from collapsing while riding. This can go a long way toward preventing foot problems like toe numbness and plantar fasciitis, as well as knee pain, says Carver.

Specialized Body Geometry SL Footbeds

These Body Geometry insoles have three distinct arch supports, plus another for your metatarsals (placed right off the medial arch, something most footbed designs get wrong). They come in three levels of support depending how high your arches are from the start.

Sidas Bike+ Flashfit Footbeds

If your arches have dropped or you naturally have flat feet, opt for a custom footbed. Carver recommends having a mold created by a skilled fitter or medical professional, but for a quick at-home option, these heat-moldable insoles from beloved footbed company Sidas can help.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Bike Pain-Free (Finally!) With These Game-Changing Cycling Tweaks and Upgrades

Pretty much any seasoned cyclist will tell you, if you feel a consistent pain on a ride, look at your frame fit. If your back hurts, your seat is probably angled too high; if your hands are going numb, your stem length is perhaps off.

But there’s also a level of expected — and accepted — mild discomfort. For me, that’s always been in the saddle and my knees. I’ve traded out my seat twice, tried covers, adjusted the angle of the saddle itself… but no matter what, I feel like I’m sliding off the pint-size perch; I can’t quite find that sweet sitting spot to lock and load instead of squirm.

As for my knees, they also act up during long runs and, since I know my frame fits and is set up correctly for my dimensions, I’ve long written off the dull ache as a biomechanical issue I can only hope to mitigate with cross-training and better recovery.

Then, last summer, I went through a fitting with Retül Match, a program owned by Specialized that uses full-body mapping sensors to determine your bone shapes and imbalances. A technician took pressure points of my foot, measured my femur length, measured my sit bones on a pressure map and lightly analyzed my biomechanics.

(Note: The company also has a super intensive fitting conducted from Specialized’s Boulder shop that analyzes your entire biomechanics on a bike, but I just did the program on the Match Tower that’s in bike shops nationwide)

The first few things they told me I already knew: I have a wide toe box and super high arches, which limits what kinds of shoes I’ll find comfortable in pretty much every sport, cycling included. But then they dropped statistics I hadn’t heard, or even considered: My sit bones were wider than most, so I need a 168mm saddle compared to the standard 135mm. My left foot naturally turns out 5 to 10 degrees.

What that meant: I needed to upgrade my saddle and reinstall my shoe cleats at the proper angle.

It sounds super basic, maybe even obvious if you’re a super seasoned rider. But in my two years getting into the sport, these were levels of detail I had never considered.

My first 60-miler with a new perch and properly aligned cleats felt like I had popped half a bottle of ibuprofen and gotten two days worth of sleep before heading out. My knees didn’t ache, and my undercarriage didn’t start screaming till the last 10 miles (hey, some things are inevitable).

Now, every rainy day that I go to a spin class where the saddles are all that 135mm, I can recognize that my constant battle against sliding off the seat is not just part of a ride, but something I can control (if only studios would let me bring my seat in).

It’s worth pointing out some pains are most likely the result of an improper fit or not enough core strength: namely, neck pain, hand pain, low-back pain and some knee pain. But the minor details are often overlooked by intermediate riders, says Todd Carver, founder of Retül, possibly because it takes a skilled fitter, advanced technology — not to mention time and money — to figure out the finer details.

But the payoff is real: “Comfort is the most immediate benefit of these minor tweaks,” says Carver. “But long-term, you also get a reduced risk of overuse injury and better efficiency by ensuring the right balance is created between fit aggressiveness and rider flexibility.”

Intrigued? You’ll get the most benefit from paying for your fitting at a local bike shop (you can find Retül Match programs here). Meantime, here are the main micro-changes that might make all the difference to your ride.

Trade Your Saddle Shape

If you feel constant pain or numbness in your, ahem, undercarriage, or like you can never get comfortable on the perch, the stock saddle is probably wrong for your body. The two variables here are width and shape — and it’s pretty much the opposite of one-size-fits-all, Carver says.

Ask your local bike shop for a saddle fit, where they should measure your sit-bone width, then let you try a zillion shapes till one feels right under your tush. Here are a few of our favorites for different booties.

Pro Stealth

A cult favorite among aggressive riders supporting stubby saddles, this seat is wider at the nose, allowing you to stay at the front of the saddle and in the drops for longer periods of times. The wide middle cut-out chops weight and helps take pressure off the soft tissue.

Planet Bike A.R.S. Anatomic Relief Saddle

This comfort saddle has firm foam padding to keep your sit bones from screaming and a slight mid-channel for blood flow. It feels cheaper than the saddles that’ll run you triple digits, but the gel top and affordable price tag make for an easy upgrade on a budget.

Selle SMP Pro

For guys with wide sit bones and serious perineal pain, this Italian-made saddle may be worth the price tag. The super wide center channel will cushion your soft tissue and optimize circulation while the drop nose encourages you to stand more often, alleviating the pressure underneath.

Tweak Your Cleats

Try this: Standing on one foot, lift your knee till it’s up 90 degrees. Look down at your foot; is it hanging straight ahead or slightly askew? Chances are it’s the latter. “All humans have a natural foot angle,” Carver says. Clipless pedals will make each stroke more efficient, but when your foot is clipped in perfectly straight with zero float, this causes weird torque on all parts of your leg, which translates to ankle, knee or hip pain, he explains.

Speedplay Zero Pedals

“Some cleats are fixed and have no float, which can be a huge problem as the foot has no room to rotate once clipped in,” Carver says. Float essentially lets your heel pivot slightly as you pedal. The ideal amount of swivel is a personal (and biomechanical) preference, but we — along with countless pro cyclists — love the Speedplay Zero pedal system; when paired with their Aero Walkable Cleats, you can adjust from wide open (15 degrees) down to a fixed position (zero float).

Crank Brothers Zero Float Cleats

There’s a solid camp of zero float devotees, as being completely locked in gives you optimal power. And that’s OK — adjusting the angle of your cleats may be enough to help offset the biomechanical issues causing your knee pain. These Crank Brothers cleats are durable but offer no play, so be sure your cleats are installed to match your natural foot angle.

BikeFit Cleat Wedges

Instead of angling your cleats, you can insert these wedges between your cleat and shoe to offset your biomechanical foot angle issues. By adding a little lift on the inside or outside of your foot, your leg won’t rotate inward or outward and, theoretically, your power will increase and knees will ache less. Considering these run about the price of a decent bottle of wine and don’t require the help of a fitter, they’re a pretty easy troubleshoot to lower limb pains.

Get Fitted for Shoes

Shoes that are too small overall or cause hot spots and numbness in your feet make for a very uncomfortable ride. You want enough room for that mid-ride swell in size, but also a tight closure around the heel and midfoot for optimal power production, Carver says. Just like with running shoes, you should go into a store, get fitted and try on a variety of brands to determine which best fits your foot shape, but here are a few of the most promising options.

Specialized Torch 2

This iconic mid-tier cycling shoe features Specialized’s signature Body Geometry technology, which means it was ergonomically designed to better align the hip, knee and forefoot to improve pedaling efficiency and decrease pain points. The Torch 2 specifically has a more relaxed fit around the toe box than other models (though it’s probably still too tight for those with a wide forefoot) and a less constrictive fit along the foot. Additionally, the insole is designed to minimize hot foot and support your arches.

Bont Vaypor S

The Vaypor S shoes are super light with a dual-layer Boa system that lets you get a tight fit without hot spots. Their biggest selling point is the wide toe box (akin to Altra running shoes), which theoretically allows your toes to grip, balance and resist more naturally than being crammed together. We also love that they come with a custom heat-molded footbed.

Louis Garneau Course Air Lite II

The shoe itself fits snugly in the heel with minimal stack height, but what makes it stand out is its adaptive fit. It features a lace design from top to toe, which means multiple anchoring points but with Boa closures for those ideal micro-adjustments. The included insole has three adjustable arch wedges for personalized support, but most impressive is LG’s patented X-comfort zone material. It’s essentially an elastomer-spandex built into the shoe’s upper that gives as your foot expands with heat without compromising the stability of the shoe.

Insert Insoles

Ideally, you want to support your natural arch, even if it’s neutral, to prevent it from collapsing while riding. This can go a long way toward preventing foot problems like toe numbness and plantar fasciitis, as well as knee pain, says Carver.

Specialized Body Geometry SL Footbeds

These Body Geometry insoles have three distinct arch supports, plus another for your metatarsals (placed right off the medial arch, something most footbed designs get wrong). They come in three levels of support depending how high your arches are from the start.

Sidas Bike+ Flashfit Footbeds

If your arches have dropped or you naturally have flat feet, opt for a custom footbed. Carver recommends having a mold created by a skilled fitter or medical professional, but for a quick at-home option, these heat-moldable insoles from beloved footbed company Sidas can help.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Some of the Best Backpack Coolers of Summer 2019

Backpack coolers are ideal for summer travels. You stock up on six-packs, cans of wine and some snacks and then load it with ice to carry on your standup paddle board, the back of your jeep or on your shoulders as you walk into that private little lake you stumbled upon last year. Straps on coolers is not a new thing, but comfortable, padded ones with extra bands to secure the pack to your waist are relatively new.

While we likely wouldn’t want to hike Mt. Baker or Mt. Washington with any of these cooler backpacks, we wouldn’t mind kayaking to a small island and setting up camp for the night with all our preferred beverages. They’re easier to carry than hard-sided coolers and allow you some creature comforts (half and half! cheese! yogurt! eggs! butter!) without the noose that car-camping provides.

Seemingly in the last year, every brand that we know and love for adventure coolers now has a backpack cooler, too. Here are a few of our favorites right now.

Yeti Hopper Backflip 24L

Yeti and durability go hand in hand, and that extends to the brand’s first backpack cooler. Molle straps on the sides and front make it easy to add attachments or loop through a few carabiners or bottle openers. During testing, we liked how hard the top of this cooler was; we used it as an extra table while camping.

Otterbox Trooper LT 30 Cooler

With dual straps, you can quickly convert this Trooper LT Cooler from a backpack to a shoulder carry, meaning you won’t feel any discomfort over a long hike to the campsite. Of the ones we’ve tested, this is one of the most comfortable at the largest size. A bright interior helps you spot the food you’re looking for right away. So when you get to camp, it’s a breeze to grab those Reese’s cups you stashed for your reward.

Hydro Flask Unbound Soft Cooler Pack

At 22 liters, the Unbound is slightly smaller than both the Yeti and the Otterbox coolers but is the sleekest of the three. The slim side pocket holds your phone or speaker so you can blast tunes while you get to where you’re going. In a pinch, this one also works as a regular backpack. It can even serve as a carry-on if your hiking adventure extends past an airplane ride.

Orca Podster

The Orca Podster is one of our best coolers of 2019, but thanks to padded shoulder straps it works double duty as a backpack cooler as well. The bright color stands out in a sea of green, grey and black bags, plus the plethora of molle-webbing adds infinite storage capabilities. While the shape is a bit unconventional, it still leads the pack thanks to its 14.25-quart interior that stays just as cold as its competitors.

IceMule Classic Medium

The heavy-duty IceMule Coolers Boss also made our list for Best Coolers, but if you’re looking for something slightly smaller and more comfortable to carry in addition to a board or on a boat, this 15-liter Classic Medium is for you. The roll-top and single strap make this cross-body bag extremely portable. If you’re spending the day picnicking at the park or the beach, this bag will carry all the snacks and booze you need.

Pelican Dayventure Backpack Cooler

Two distinct compartments on this Dayventure Cooler provide more versatility than any other backpack on this list. The 13-liter bag has a bottom section ideal for carrying six-packs, and then the rolltop works as more cold storage — or a place to stuff a change of clothes, pots and pans or a towel for an easy overnight. We like the breathable straps and back panels that keep this cooler airy while you carry.

Built NY Welded Soft Cooler

This Built NY rolltop backpack is very similar to the Large Welded Cooler we recognized in our Best Coolers of 2019, just with more straps and a way to carry on your back. The large front pocket offers storage for extra cords, batteries, wallets and phones, while the molle straps above feature a bottle opener, which is always, always handy.

Corkcicle Eola Bucket Bag

When we tested out this padded, adjustable cooler bucket bag, we were pleasantly surprised by how cold everything stayed. It’s likely the smallest of the bunch, but also the best looking. Black camo is our pick: fill it with 12 cans or a couple of wine bottles, plus cans, and you’re good to go into the wild.

Coleman Soft Backpack Cooler

Coleman soft coolers are leak-proof with a 28-can capacity that’s shockingly easy to carry in a backpack. The bungee cord front means you can stash an extra pair of sneakers or sandals for any water crossings you may encounter as you hike into the perfect location.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Travel Pants for Summer Adventures

Any article of clothing that claims to be “perfect for travel” has an agenda. Like the word “natural” appearing on packaged food, a phrase like “travel-ready” is a vague and enticing smokescreen that can signify any number of qualities at the heart of which lies the question: What makes this thing better for wearing in places other than the place where I live? Pose the inquiry to any given brand, and a response might mention a techy material or maybe a hidden pocket (or nothing unique whatsoever). It’s particularly true of pants. What makes a good pair of travel pants? Is it material? The number of pockets? It isn’t, no matter what anyone tells you, legs that zip-off at the knee. We tested pair after pair on day trips, weekend trips and overseas trips to find out.

686 Anything Multi Cargo Pant

“Cargo pant” might have you thinking about thigh-mounted square pockets with flapping lids, but for these pants, all it means is that they have room to carry a lot of stuff. There are the two front pockets that we’re all familiar with, but then there’s a card pocket, pen pocket, zippered leg pockets, phone pocket, belt loop stash pocket and, oh yeah, two back pockets (and probably some others that we’re missing). Even with all that storage though, the Anything Multi Cargo Pants don’t appear bulky and gawky. They’re made of a stretchy, water-resistant fabric that’s fine to hike in but doesn’t look overtly technical.

Topo Designs Tech Pants

The Tech Pants, like much of what Topo Designs produces, are a blend of outdoor lifestyle and performance. It’s hard to say which of the two takes a larger share, though. They’re fully capable before, during and after mountain adventures with a lightweight and stretchy nylon fabric. Topo Designs built them with a gusseted crotch and articulated knees for extra mobility and cinchable ankle cuffs to move the material out of the way when you need to (when you’re rock climbing, hiking or bike riding, for instance). The pants also have a water-repellant finish and plenty of pockets, and, like many of the others on this list, are stylish enough to wear in any cities you might visit.

Roark Revival Layover Pant

Roark Revival’s entire brand is travel; each of the company’s seasonal collections is inspired directly by trips to places like Jamaica, the Falkland Islands and Hong Kong. These guys spend a lot of time in airports, cars, rickshaws — whatever it takes to get there — so it’s no wonder that they built a pant that prioritizes comfort and functionality. The Layover Stretch Travel Pant is made of a blended nylon and cotton fabric that’s stretchy and fastens with a drawstring instead of a button for a slightly adjustable fit. Its front pockets have oversized, zip openings to accommodate larger essentials like travel documents or sunglasses, and there’s also a hidden rear pocket that’s the perfect size for a phone. The material is soft and not too technical, and the fit is slim, qualities that make these pants good-looking enough to wear in cities (or every day back home).

Foehn Nelson Pant

You’d never know that Foehn made the Nelson for rock climbing. With a somewhat workwear-inspired look and feel and a slightly stretchy, hard-wearing fabric, the pants are well-suited to anything that requires rugged clothing. Like other dungaree-style pants, they have a roomy fit but are also trimmed and look good enough to be an everyday work pant, whether your office is indoors or out. In our testing, we also found that the zippered thigh pocket, which Foehn made to provide access to items while wearing a climbing harness, is also the perfect place to carry a passport and boarding pass.

REI Craglands Pant

The Craglands might be the most technical of the pants on this list. They’re also the simplest and lightest. REI built them with a stretchy ripstop nylon fabric that repels water, wicks moisture and dries quickly, so they’re ideal for any trips that include outdoor activities like hiking and climbing. That fabric, and an elastic waist and cuffs, do give these pants more of a technical appearance, but they also make them supremely comfortable.

Western Rise Slim Rivet Pant

We’ve been fans of Colorado-based Western Rise’s versatile everyday pant for some time now. One of our staff members once wrote, “I own — and constantly wear — two pairs of these suckers. The fit is excellent, like modern chinos or jeans. The colors are just unique enough to stand out. But what I like most about them is how tough they are.” The recipe for that magical combination includes stretch nylon and air-texturized fibers that make the pants feel like regular pants (as opposed to technical outdoor pants). They repel water, dry quickly, are plenty comfortable and lean strongly into a style that’s appropriate for everyday, urban and office environments, perhaps more than any other pair on this list.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Complete Guide to Nike Running Shoes

Back in 1964, Bill Bowerman and Phil Knight teamed up to create Blue Ribbon Sports, a sneaker brand that has grown immensely from its humble roots into what we know today as Nike. Bowerman and Knight initially sold Onitsuka Tiger shoes that they imported from Japan. After tweaking the outsole in a waffle iron, Bowerman experimented with athletes at the University of Oregon to figure out what worked on running shoes and what just didn’t. Nike was officially born in 1971 and now holds eight registered patents on its designs. While Nike pushes forward some of the most innovative and technical gear in the sportswear market today, its bread and butter are running shoes.

Bowerman was a track and field coach for 23 years at the University of Oregon and Knight was one of his runners, so the two worked together to design sneakers that would help track athletes shine during competitions — and feel good on their days off, too. Bowerman tinkered with shoes to make the spikes perfect for his athletes, using them as guinea pigs for new models. One of the first official sneakers was the Tiger Cortez. What was considered revolutionary from a performance standpoint has now become a universally recognized lifestyle sneaker. Nike has continued to push the boundaries of running with new technologies and materials every year.

Nike’s come a long way from putting outsoles in the waffle iron, and the brand now boasts a plethora of sneakers that are built to help you tackle speed, performance, agility and more. Whether you’re new to running or can rattle off your top three sneaker models and numbers, this is the complete list of Nike’s current running shoes.

Road Shoes

Renew Arena

The Nike Renew Arena look bouncy thanks to an exaggerated Renew foam midsole. You’ll find traction along the bottom only where you need it. This model comes in four colors.

Offset: 10 mm

Revolution 4

Offered in just two colors, the Nike Revolution 4 is a very basic supportive and comfortable sneaker. It’s one of the more affordable Nike sneakers, and design-wise, it’s a very safe choice for beginning runners.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 10.4 oz.

Zoom Strike 2

The bold swoosh on the side of the Zoom Strike 2 looks fast. It comes in three low-profile colors (a mix of black and white). There’s a Zoom Air unit underfoot, and Flywire cables in the upper to help you find your perfect fit.

Offset: 11 mm
Weight: 7.4 oz.

Air Zoom Winflo 6

This low-profile running sneaker has two separate Zoom Air units underfoot, so you feel supported with each step. The foam inside the midsole is Cushlon — basically a step down from the React foam.

Weight: 8.6 oz.
Widths: Regular, Wide

Air Zoom Streak 7

If you’re looking to ease into racing and don’t want to spend a ton of money on fast shoes, try the Air Zoom Streak 7. An engineered mesh upper is breathable, and the high abrasion rubber outsole keeps you from slipping on sharp turns and track loops. It’s one of the lighter sneakers on this list, and one of the least expensive.

Offset: 8 mm
Weight: 6.9 oz.

Air Zoom Pegasus 36

Part of the Nike Zoom Family launch in 2019, the Pegasus 36 is built for training days. A sleek engineered mesh upper and slim heel collar create a look that screams fast.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 9.9 oz.

Air Zoom Structure 22

The Air Zoom Structure 22 features engineered ventilated mesh that hugs your foot to the shoe, so you feel supported. There’s a Zoom Air unit (imagine an airbag underfoot) that provides a responsive feeling with each step and Duralon blown rubber in the forefoot.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 11.5 oz.
Widths: Narrow, Regular, Wide and Extra Wide

Odyssey React Flyknit 2

If you like the Epic React, but want a bit more support in the upper, check out the Odyssey React Flyknit. You’ll still get the React foam feel at a slightly lower price and a smooth ride.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 8.2 oz

Air Zoom Vomero 14

The Zoom Vomero 14 has a Zoom Air unit that runs from heel to toe combined with Nike React foam so you’ll feel a bit of a kick to your runs. The mesh upper protects and supports your forefoot.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 10.85 oz
Widths: Regular, Wide, Extra Wide

Epic React Flyknit 2

If you crave a lightweight sneaker with a lot of bounce, try the Epic React Flyknit 2. With over 15 colors to choose from, the React foam shines in its original package. Your toes will rule the roost — in your shoes — as you experience a lot of spring.

Offset: 9 mm
Weight: 8.4 oz.

Epic Phantom React Flyknit

If you’re looking for a sneaker that you can wear on the run and then walk around all day long in, the Nike Epic Phantom React Flyknit is for you. This laceless sneaker slips right on your feet and thanks to the React foam and TPU heel piece, you’ll find these are surprisingly supportive and super comfortable.

Zoom Fly SP

Spend enough time at run clubs, and you’re bound to see a pair of these speeding around a track. Some runners find them to be a more comfortable alternative to the Zoom Fly Flyknit thanks to the translucent, stretch-weave upper. There’s also a carbon-infused nylon plate in the midsole, plus Lunarlon foam to mimic the feel of the 4%, just at a slightly lower price.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 8.2 oz.

Pegasus Turbo 2

We reviewed these when they first came out last year and found them to be the perfect mix between a race day sneaker and a training shoe. Pull these on if you like the Pegasus 36 but want something with a little added boost from ZoomX foam, the coveted foam found in the NEXT%.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 8.4 oz.

Zoom Fly 3

The Zoom Fly features the same carbon-infused nylon plate as the Zoom Fly SP paired with a Flymesh upper so you’ll feel the wind on your feet as you speed through races. React cushioning underfoot makes for a super bouncy and responsive feel.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 8.7 oz.

Zoom Fly Flyknit

If you’re ready to race but don’t want to shell out $250 for one of Nike’s more elite running shoes, the Zoom Fly Flyknit is a viable alternative. It’s basically one rung down from the Nike 4% Flyknit — at a much lower price — and it includes a carbon fiber plate for a snappy feel.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 9.65 oz.

Vaporfly 4% Flyknit

When athletes like Galen Rupp and Eliud Kipchoge pull these on, you know they’re built for speed. These coveted sneakers feature ZoomX foam and a carbon fiber plate to help you get the most energy return from the race path you’re on. The Flyknit upper is breathable and stretchy, giving your toes more room to move around. Note: Opt for with the NEXT% shoes below if you like to have more structure in the forefoot.

Offset: 10 mm
Weight: 6.8 oz.

ZoomX Vaporfly NEXT%

Part of the Nike Zoom Pack Family for 2019, the NEXT% sneakers are the updated 4% but with more foam. The weight stays the same, though. Long story short, these are the shoes you want to run your fastest, especially during distance races like the half marathon or full 26.2. The shoes launched in April for $275.

Offset: 8 mm
Weight: 6.6 oz.

Training Shoes

Free RN 5.0 NRG

The Nike Free sneakers have always been the go-to shoes for athletes who like to feel the ground. The previous models had a low-profile look to them, and for anyone who was a fan of the barefoot running movement, these made sense. Nike updated these shoes in 2019, and they now feature a more modern look.

Offset: 6 mm
Weight: 7.3 oz.

Free RN 3.0 NRG

The 3.0 Nike Free running shoe lends itself more to training days since there are no laces. The Flyknit upper, combined with a more supportive yarn, helps keep your feet in place. The heel-to-toe flex grooves on the outsole move in every direction, so it feels like barefoot running.

Offset: 4 mm

Free RN 2018

The previous iteration of the Nike Free sneakers isn’t quite as vibrant as the 2019 version. You feel like you’re quite low to the ground (compared to other sneakers on this list). Offered in all black or all grey, this flexible shoe will work as you move from the treadmill to the weight room.

Offset: 8 mm
Weight: 7.8 oz.

Trail Running Shoes

Air Zoom Terra Kiger 5

There are three colors of this beloved trail running sneaker. Now in its fifth iteration, the Terra Kiger 5 has Nike React foam and a super sticky outsole to help you keep your grip on slippery rocks and moss.

Offset: 4 mm
Weight: 9.9 oz.

Air Zoom Wildhorse 5

The bold, vibrant colors of the Wildhorse are similar to the ones the Terra Kiger has; both make for unique looks on the trail. The rock plate helps protect your toes from awkward rocks, stones and sticks, and the breathable multi-layered upper keep things light and airy, even during the humid months of summer.

Offset: 8 mm
Weight: 10.2 oz
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Some of the Best Protein Powders We’re Testing Right Now

Protein isn’t just essential for a healthy, well-rounded diet in general or bulking up at the gym; depending on your fitness goals, it can help you either maintain or lose weight, too. Frustratingly, the supplement and nutrition market is overflowing with options from a seemingly never-ending number of companies. And on top of that, run-of-the-mill protein powders can contain additives and toxins you’d never want in your body, so adding one to your daily regimen becomes a research and cross-shopping nightmare. Luckily, the market for all-natural protein powders with clean, healthy ingredients is growing.

We’ve been testing a few new all-natural protein powders that have come across our radar. Whether you’re looking to bulk up, slim down or sustain your current weight and can’t always swing whole food proteins into your day, these four powders are worth a look. They all have minimal ingredients with zero fillers — and just the right amount of what you need.

Ladder Plant Protein

Best Subscription Service: With the dark cloud over the industry making everyone second guess what ingredients are in the supplements they’re taking, it’s comforting to know Ladder is certified by the NSF Safe For Sport program, which is backed by the USADA. The subscription service makes it easy to work into your weekly or monthly regimen in a sort of “set it and forget it” kind of way. Having each serving in an individual packet takes the eye-balling each scoop out of the equation too.

Protein Source: Pea and Pumpkin
Protein Per Serving: 21g
Sugar Per Serving: 2g
Flavor Tested: Vanilla

Less Naked Whey

Best Bulk Buy: If you’re looking for a clean powder with zero additives and minimal ingredients, Less Naked is the way to go. There are only three ingredients: Grass Fed Whey Protein, Dried Strawberries and Organic Coconut Sugar. Pro Tip: if you need some semblance of flavor in your protein shake mix this powder with almond or soy milk. Even with the dried strawberries to add taste, if you only use water as a mixer, it carries the same palate as wallpaper paste.

Protein Source: Grass Fed Cows’ Milk
Protein Per Serving: 25g
Sugar Per Serving: 7g
Flavor Tested: Strawberry

Care/Of Plant Protein

Current Favorite: From beginning to end, Care/of protein is the best experience. You start on the website with a quick questionnaire about your routine, which is used to customize your personal supplement package. It’s a little gimmicky that they go so far as to put your name on the tub, but if you live in a house with multiple people, all using Care/Of, it might actually come in handy. The Care/Of vanilla plant protein easily has the best taste and finish on the list. I mixed it with soy milk which, with the organic vanilla powder, cinnamon, monk fruit extract and Himalayan pink salt, resulted in something akin to vanilla chai smoothie.

Protein Source: Pea, Pumpkin Seed and Hemp
Protein Per Serving: 18g
Sugar Per Serving: 4g
Flavor Tested: Vanilla

TB12 Plant-Based Protein

Best Sugar Free Option: It’s not unreasonable to want to cut sugar out of your diet, especially if you’re looking to improve your overall health, lose weight or start a cut phase for beach season. Unfortunately, a lot of powders add sugar to offset the awful drywall mix-taste inherent with flavorless powders. TB12 chocolate somehow manages to taste like Ovaltine using only natural ingredients. The website has helpful tips on smoothie recipes and even workout plans to help get you started. Full disclosure: TB12 is Tom Brady’s personal line of protein, so Giants fans, you’ll probably want to stick to the first three.

Protein Source: Peas
Protein Per Serving: 24g
Sugar Per Serving: 0g
Flavor Tested: Chocolate
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Hiking Boots of 2019

Last updated June 2019: Our guide to the best hiking boots of 2019 provides information on nine hiking boots and nine hiking shoes, and offers tips and advice to know before you buy. We’ve recently updated it with new boots for the year and removed ones that are no longer available.



Introduction

Hiking is an activity with a low barrier to entry; all one really needs to head out for a day in the woods is a pair of sturdy shoes and a mindset for walking. Both are equally important, but one is far easier to come by. And while it may be tempting to head out for a summit bid in a pair of well-worn running shoes, we strongly suggest you shod yourself with the appropriate footwear. Unlike concrete sidewalks and gravel paths, the trail calls for hardened and supportive footwear to combat dirt, mud, jagged rocks and streams. The answer is hiking boots and hiking shoes, and the ones below are the best available.

About Fit

This guide is designed to be a resource that can help you find the best hiking boots available. Hours of research and wear-testing were undertaken to make sure that the hiking boots and shoes found here are actually pieces of high-quality footwear.

That being said, every person’s needs and walking habits are different, and more importantly, every person’s feet are different. What works for us may not work for you, and while we’ve provided as much variety here as we can, a review isn’t a substitute for trying a shoe on and making sure that it fits and feels comfortable.

Hiking Boots vs. Hiking Shoes

There are two types of footwear made for logging trail miles: hiking boots and hiking shoes. Hiking boots are full-sized footwear made with stability and support in mind. When you’re backpacking, or you’re just taking on black diamond terrain during a day hike, hiking boots are there to lend more ankle support and reinforced protection.

Hiking shoes don’t offer the same level of ankle support that a cuff provides; they’re designed to be lightweight for nimble mobility. Most hiking shoes still give more support than a running shoe, plus a durable rubber sole with lugs that will maintain grip through varying terrain. Hiking shoes are a good option for those who prefer short walks and don’t need the extra support, and they’re a great option for travel too.

Related Video: Nike ACG React Terra Gobe Review

Watch more of This Week In Gear video reviews.

Should You Buy an Aftermarket Insole?

The short answer is yes. Almost every hiking boot and hiking shoe comes with a foam insole that will wear out after very few uses. Some are better than others, and most will feel comfortable straight out of the box, but none will provide the long-term support of an aftermarket insole.

Superfeet makes a variety of affordable insoles that offer different volumes and levels of support. As with the boots themselves, it’s best to try these on at a store to find the most comfortable and best-fitting option. Bring your boots with you, because insoles can change the amount of space inside your shoe and affect the overall feel of its fit.

The Best Hiking Boots of 2019

Editor’s Pick: Tecnica Forge

The Forge is the first hiking boot from ski boot manufacturer Tecnica, and it’s also the first hiking boot that’s fully customizable. Every piece of the Forge is designed for customization, most notably the upper, which is available in both synthetic ripstop and nubuck leather. In addition, Tecnica equipped the Forge with all the indications of a solid hiking boot, including a Gore-Tex liner and Vibram rubber sole.

Because the Forge is a full-custom boot, buying options are limited to the brick-and-mortar stores that keep it and its boot-fitting robot in stock. The typical fit process that involves trying on multiple pairs of boots and walking up and down a ramp covered in fake rock doesn’t apply here because the boot feels remarkably different before and after molding. That process takes 20 to 30 minutes and involves two rounds of heating and molding, one for the Forge’s insoles and another for the uppers.

The result is about as good a fit as a hiking boot can achieve, and it doesn’t come with a rigorous break-in period either. That alone should make the Forge an attractive choice for many, but it’s not the only feature that makes it a great hiking boot. The Vibram sole is appropriately rugged, the wrap-around cuff is comfortable and supportive, and the upper is waterproof but breathable. For its first foray into a new category, Tecnica hit the mark.

Weight: 20.9 ounces (leather) 20.6 ounces (synthetic
Waterproofing: Gore-Tex Extended Comfort
Upper: Nubuck leather or synthetic
Sole: Vibram Megagrip

Danner Mountain 600 Enduroweave

With a design that fuses Danner’s classic outdoor silhouette with modern materials, the Mountain 600 is Danner’s city-to-mountain hiking boot. It’s lightweight and comfortable out of the box thanks to a leather upper and a cushiony Vibram outsole. The case is much the same with the Mountain 600 EnduroWeave, but the upper has been reimagined with a new carbon-washed textile upper that’s lighter and more breathable than leather.

I’ve spent a lot of time in the leather version of the Mountain 600, mainly because it’s lightweight and elegant enough to wear in town but has plenty of grip and support for trail use too. It truly is the best of both worlds and is a great option for those who don’t want multiple pairs of boots for different settings.

The EnduroWeave version holds true to that standard. It was slightly uncomfortable at first, mostly where the cuff overlaps the tongue, but this broke in on the first hike around town. Afterwards, the boot is among the most comfortable on this list. A secondary trait of the EnduroWeave fabric: it has a strange, techy look to it, which is actually pretty stylish and unique.

If you are going to go with the Mountain 600 in either EnduroWeave or leather, supplement it with a new insole. Also, size down half a size for the best fit.

Weight: 17 ounces
Waterproofing: No
Upper: Synthetic
Sole: Vibram Fuga

Hoka One One Kaha

Like Hoka’s super-plush running shoes, the Kaha features plenty of cushioning, the most of any boot on this list. That maximalism translates into a super comfy ride while walking trails, which is ideal for those who are more sensitive to impact and rough ground (or just want the cushiest platform possible). The thickness of the sole can feel strange at first, but you quickly get used to it, and Hoka helps out with the addition of a rockered bottom that helps naturally roll the boot from one step into the next.

Despite the size of the sole and the tall cuff, the Kaha remains relatively lightweight at 17.92 ounces. Its upper, which is made of leather, provides plenty of ankle support and includes a waterproof eVent sock liner. Hikers who favor more minimal boots might find the Kaha overkill and should look into hiking shoes or even trail running shoes, but if maximizing comfort and support is what you’re after, this option might be your best bet.

Weight: 17.9 ounces
Waterproofing: eVent waterproof bootie
Upper: Leather
Sole: Vibram Megagrip

Keen Targhee Vent Mid

The Targhee is one of Keen’s best-selling hiking boots and also one of the most versatile and budget-friendly available. This year, Keen widened the Targhee offering with the Vent, a non-waterproof boot that features windows of mesh paneling for increased breathability in warmer weather. The rest of the boot is much like the original: water-resistant oiled nubuck leather, a supportive footbed design and a grippy rubber outsole with deep lugs are the key points.

The Targhee Vent Mid follows its predecessor in that it offers a slightly wider fit that’s felt most in the toe box, which has ample room for movement. Heel hold is still exceptional, and the boot is very supportive, even before using an aftermarket insole. That the cuff isn’t too tall makes the Targhee a great everyday boot, too.

We chose the Vent version for our list because waterproofing in hiking boots isn’t altogether necessary. If you’re hiking in a situation where your feet are going to get wet, such as a downpour or on a trail with river crossings, chances are they’ll get wet regardless of what boots you’re wearing. Additionally, waterproof linings can be excessively hot, causing your feet to sweat and get soggy anyway. The Vent accomplishes the goal of preventing this by providing breathability — my feet didn’t sweat once, even when I wore them in the city.

Weight: 16.6 ounces
Waterproofing: No
Upper: Leather and synthetic
Sole: Keen All-Terrain rubber

Vasque Saga GTX

The Saga GTX builds upon the successes of Vasque’s best-selling Breeze III GTX. The new boot adds a lightweight and breathable double-engineered mesh upper and a Vibram MegaGrip sole that’s designed for walking over the most rugged terrain. Protection and support are amplified in the boot with a molded TPU toe cap and heel that has windows of ventilation so that the boot doesn’t get too warm (as waterproof hikers are wont to do). Vasque also used that sturdy TPU to create a lace yolk that extends from the ankle toward the tongue; it provides midfoot support and helps to keep the heel locked in.

A full-featured hiking boot built for long-distance trekking implies a prolonged break-in period, but that’s not the case with the Saga GTX. The boot is remarkably comfortable right out of the box. The tongue is extra cushiony, which helps prevent pressure points from lacing, and the cuff provides a firm and supportive wrap that’s immediately flexible and only gets better with wear. Those who are looking for the most support might lean toward a heftier boot, but you certainly won’t be unhappy in the Saga. I, for one, tend to favor that trait over lightness, but I have been quite satisfied with this boot and plan to log plenty more miles in it.

Weight: 23 ounces
Waterproofing: Gore-Tex Extended Comfort
Upper: Synthetic
Sole: Vibram Megagrip

Vasque Saga GTX LTR

Months after releasing the Saga GTX, Vasque revealed that it had already reskinned the boot with leather. The Saga GTX LTR comes equipped with all the features that make its still-young predecessor a success: a super-comfy fit straight out of the box, a supportive ankle cuff, a fit-enhancing lace yolk and reliable traction. Now it all comes in a leather shell, which will please purists who swear off synthetics. The LTR is seven ounces heftier, looks a tad like a winter boot and calls for more of a break-in period than the synthetic Saga, but additional durability and that worn leather patina are the return benefits.

Weight: 53 ounces
Waterproofing: Gore-Tex Extended Comfort
Upper: Leather
Sole: Vibram Megagrip

Salomon X Ultra 3 Mid GTX

Salomon’s mid-weight X Ultra 3 is a best-seller among the company’s stock of hiking boots, mainly because it’s well-rounded for all types of use. The boot features a Contagrip rubber sole with an aggressive lug pattern that provides grip through varying surfaces and conditions and a Gore-Tex-lined synthetic upper.

The X Ultra 3 Mid has a full-sized cuff that provides ample ankle support and stability, but note that it isn’t as tall as some of the other hiking boots on this list. In a way, that helps this boot to be more versatile — it wouldn’t be out of place walking around town or worn daily as a go-to shoe.

Weight: 15.8 ounces
Waterproofing: Gore-Tex Performance Comfort
Upper: Synthetic
Sole: High Traction Contagrip

Scarpa Zodiac Plus GTX

Scarpa’s Zodiac Plus GTX has found its way onto many “best of” lists and is recommended by professional mountain climbers — and rightly so. The boot is a tough and versatile option that’s suitable for both the trail behind your house and high-elevation climbs and approaches. The Zodiac Plus GTX is constructed with a suede upper and a heavy-duty Vibram sole.

Scarpa brought the Zodiac as close as it could to a mountaineering boot without crossing the line, and the result is a hiking boot packed with versatility. The boot is comfortable and cushioned right out of the box and very supportive. The laces extend further down the boot for precision fitting, and Scarpa has also added a pair of lace hooks on the top of the foot, which is lower than most companies place this type of hardware. Not only does this allow for easier in and out of the boot, but I found that it made controlling overall lace pressure more straightforward too.

The Zodiac may be sturdier than what more casual hikers are looking for but still manages to provide enough flex for low-angle and less-technical walking. If you do plan on getting into different types of terrain and potentially the rock or snow encountered at higher altitudes — even if just once a year — then it’s an awesome boot well-suited to the task.

Weight: 19.2 ounces
Waterproofing: Gore-Tex Performance Comfort
Upper: Suede
Sole: Vibram Drumlin

Adidas Terrex Free Hiker

The Terrex Free Hiker is Adidas’s first hiking boot to use the energy-returning Boost foam that’s present in many of its best-selling running shoes (like the Ultraboost). In those shoes, it serves as a comfortable platform but also rebounds to keep you moving without wasting energy. That’s precisely what it does in the Free Hiker, but that’s not the only technical feature that Adidas adapted from running in this hiking boot — there’s also a Primeknit upper for a close and breathable fit.

Comfort is the first thing to talk about in regards to the Free Hiker, as this is one of the most comfortable boots that we’ve tested yet. But this boot is unique in other ways too; for one, there’s a streetwear/sneaker style element that’s not present in other models. In many ways, the Free Hiker fits and walks more like a sneaker than a typical hiking boot, but it still provides plenty of traction (thanks to a lugged Continental rubber outsole) and more support than you’d expect from a knit upper. That said, the Free Hiker certainly isn’t the most supportive hiking boot on this list, but it wins points for being incredibly lightweight, which makes it a solid choice for those who prefer to move quickly. It also doesn’t look like a typical hiking boot, which makes it perfect for trips that include equal time exploring cities and trails. Note: Like with the Danner boot, I had to size down by half a size to get the right fit.

Weight: 13.5 ounces
Waterproofing: None
Upper: Primeknit textile upper with abrasion-resistant weldings
Sole: Continental Rubber

The Best Hiking Shoes of 2019

Editor’s Pick: Tecnica Plasma

A year after the release of the Forge, Tecnica brought its custom heat molding to the hiking shoe category with the low-cut Plasma. The process is entirely the same: there are two rounds of heat molding, one for the insole and a second for the upper. It uses the same machine, which is available at retailers where the shoes are sold, and takes less than 30 minutes. As with the Forge, the result is a hiking shoe that fits immediately — no break-in period.

The Plasma is on the more rugged end of the hiking shoe spectrum thanks to its stiff rubber outsole, but it’s still more flexible than many approach shoes and suitable to both long and short hikes, though maybe not walking around in a city all day. At first, I worried that the heat treatment wouldn’t be as effective in a shoe because there’s less material to mold, and I wondered if it would still create that tight, ski boot-reminiscent fit. These feelings were alleviated throughout an entire autumn hiking in the Northeast on trails of all types. I never experienced blisters (and I’m particularly prone to them), and my feet stayed comfortable on the longest days. Now my only problem is how to decide between these and the Forge before taking off on a hike.

Like the Forge, you can only get the Plasma in-store at a Tecnica retailer. (You can purchase a pair for in-store pickup through REI.)

Weight: 19.3 ounces
Waterproofing: Available in waterproof and non-waterproof versions
Upper: Synthetic
Sole: Vibram Plasma with Megagrip compound

Salewa Wildfire GTX

Our previous editor’s choice, Salewa’s Wildfire GTX, is a light and flexible approach shoe. It draws on the designs of rock climbing shoes in many ways but still provides a supportive ride that’s more than capable of handling miles on trails. The shoe delivers grip with a Pomoca sole that eases off the lugs around the toe, creating an area that can handle technical and precarious climbing moves. The upper is a Gore-Tex-lined synthetic mesh enhanced with a cage-like exoskeleton for improved stability.

I stumbled across the Wildfire GTX while searching for a go-everywhere shoe before spending four months traveling through South America. The goal was to bring one pair (in addition to flip-flops) that could handle everything from a six-day backpacking trek through Patagonia to full days of city exploration to a walk through a hot-as-hell equatorial jungle. The Wildfire GTX passed all these tests with flying colors.

Beyond the obvious qualities — lightness, good traction, comfort — the Wildfire GTX excels in fit. Like a climbing shoe, it wraps around the foot completely for a very snug feel. Those looking for a bigger toe box might not like this effect, but I found it ideal for making precision steps in technical terrain and didn’t mind it on less-ambitious days spent in town. The lace system has improved since I took that trip and added to the comfort by relieving some of the pressure points, making the Wildfire GTX even better.

For a hiking shoe that excels in many of the same ways as the Wildfire GTX but is even more climbing-oriented, check out Salewa’s Wildfire Edge. It’s a great approach shoe for rock climbers, but we ultimately decided not to include it on this list because of how specific it is to that activity.

Weight: 15.17
Waterproofing: Gore-Tex Extended Comfort
Upper: Synthetic
Sole: Pomoca Speed MTN

Danner Trail 2650

Danner’s most iconic hiking boot is the Mountain Light, which, despite what its name might have you believe, is notably not lightweight (it is rugged as hell though). The Trail 2650, however, actually is light. Danner says that 24 ounces a pair, the shoe is its lightest piece of hiking footwear yet. To get there, Danner built its upper with a combination of leather and mesh and used a Vibram outsole for traction.

The Trail 2650 certainly feels light on the feet, too. It fits much like a trail running shoe (the last that Danner used is based on them), but the construction includes a TPU shank and a heel counter, so they’re sturdy and supportive enough hiking long miles on dirt and clambering over boulders. They also aren’t waterproof — a trait we like particularly for hiking shoes — and they’re comfortable enough to wear around town as an everyday shoe, too.

Weight: 12 ounces
Waterproofing: None
Upper: Leather, synthetic
Sole: Vibram 460

Arc’teryx Konseal FL

Arc’teryx isn’t as well-known for its footwear as it is for its technical apparel, but the Konseal FL lives up to the brand’s high standards for quality. And like its clothing, the shoe packs lots of functionality into a clean and minimalist profile. Colors are coordinated and subtle, and the different materials that are present blend into one another almost invisibly; even the laces are fully integrated into the design, using loops of webbing instead of eyelets.

The lacing system might be the best part about the Konseal FL. It extends all the way down to the toe so that the fit can be adjusted and fine-tuned as much as possible, which in turn contributes to a better overall hiking experience, especially in technical terrain. The integrated system adjusts smoothly, too, so there’s less tugging and pulling to get the comfortable fit you need.

The Konseal FL is minimalist in appearance but also somewhat in use. As an approach shoe, it provides plenty of protection with toe and heel caps and a raised midsole sidewall, which is ideal for use in rocky terrain. The shoes don’t have as much cushioning as others on this list though, so fast-hikers and fans of lightweight minimalism will find the most use here.

Weight: 10.6 ounces
Waterproofing: No
Upper: Synthetic
Sole: Vibram Megagrip

Naglev Unico Kevlar Hiker

The Unico comes from the birthplace of outdoor footwear (the Alps), and it’s a shoe designed to be a crossover between a hiking boot and a trail running shoe. Regardless of what it aims to be, it is an impressive piece of footwear, with an upper made of one single piece of Kevlar fabric. That durable exterior is lined with a sock-like wool liner that’s connected at the bottom of the shoe only so that it can “float” inside and better export moisture. The footbed is made of a blend of leather and coconut fibers.

The Unico is among the burliest hiking shoes to make our list, and that’s thanks to the materials that Naglev so carefully selected in its construction. The rubber outsole is stiff, and the Kevlar is borderline abrasive, but the Unico mitigates these factors with its interior wool liner and leather insole, both of which make the shoe far more comfortable than it looks. Unlike some of the lighter shoes here it requires some break-in — if you’re looking for a more forgiving hiking shoe, check out some of our other picks — but the result is worth the process.

Weight: N/A
Waterproofing: Yes
Upper: Kevlar, TPU, wool liner
Sole: Natural rubber

Under Armour Horizon RTT

Technically, Under Armour’s Horizon RTT is a trail running shoe, but it provides all the support and traction to make it an excellent option for hiking when ankle support isn’t needed. As a running shoe, the Horizon RTT places particular emphasis on lightness and flexibility, so it’s a good option for those who want to walk quickly; it weighs just 10.4 ounces per shoe.

The Horizon RTT also gets points for its solid fit — as noted at the start of this guide, this observation is somewhat subjective — that’s both comfortably cushioned and quite stable. It feels more like a sneaker than a burly hiker but is well-suited to the task. Its high-traction rubber lug outsole also provides plenty of tread that works well in variable terrain (dirt, mud, rocks, leaves — anything). Aesthetically, the Horizon RTT is more athletic shoe than outdoor hiker, which will please those looking for a sportier vibe.

Weight: 10.4 ounces
Waterproofing: No
Upper: Synthetic
Sole: Under Armour high-traction rubber

Lowa Locarno GTX Lo

Take a pair of early 2000s Etnies or Vans, beef it up with more tread and support and you’d arrive at the Locarno GTX Lo. Of the hiking shoes on this list, the Locarno is by far the most casual in appearance, but it’s still reliably apt for trail use. It’s an interesting choice for Lowa, which has a long history as a core hiking brand that dates back to 1923.

The Locarno is designed as a multi-sport shoe, so it’ll be best for those who use it that way. It has a durable nubuck leather upper and a supportive midsole with ample traction underneath. It’s also equipped with Gore-Tex, which will keep your feet dry through mud and puddles. It’s the type of shoe that won’t excel at any one thing but is great at accomplishing many. If you’re the type of person who only wants to own one pair of shoes or is looking for a solid travel shoe that can be used for many tasks, this is it.

Weight: 14.5 ounces
Waterproofing: Gore-Tex S
Upper: Nubuck leather and fabric
Sole: Lowa Hybrid Trac

Five Ten Five Tennie

Before the original Five Tennie existed in 1985, climbers typically wore leather hiking boots or sneakers to get to the base of their climbs. The Five Tennie, with its lightweight upper and high-friction rubber sole, was the first of the approach shoe category.

The re-release of the Five Tennie is evidence that the technical footwear brand is collecting some of the trickle-down from its parent company, Adidas. The hiking/approach shoe uses a tongueless, integrated knit upper to stay lightweight and breathable while preventing debris from getting inside when it’s worn without socks (as some climbers like to do). It’s a middle-of-the-road approach shoe; not as stiff as many others but not as flexible as the lightest either. That makes it capable of hiking as well, particularly in rocky terrain where the sticky Stealth rubber provides excellent grip. Plus, the retro colors will win lots of points at the bar at the end of the day.

Weight: 11.5 ounces
Waterproofing: None
Upper: Leather
Sole: Stealth S1 rubber

Merrell Chameleon 7 Stretch

Merrell’s Chameleon hiking shoe has been a ranking member in its collection for years, but the brand recently modified it with this lightweight breathable option. It’s not waterproof, but that feature is honestly less important in hiking shoes than in taller boots (water can easily enter from the cuff). It’s a fair trade for extra breathability and makes it a good shoe for warm weather and dry conditions.

The Chameleon 7 Stretch uses a speed-lacing system and an elastic bungee-like cord that makes getting them on and cinched very quick — no hooks to thread here. Once tightened though, the plastic adjustment tab is fairly difficult and non-intuitive to loosen again. That being said, these shoes can be put on and taken off without loosening the laces.

It’s another tongueless hiking shoe, which means it’s super comfortable, perhaps even one of the most comfortable on this list (at least straight out of the box). The cuff is soft and stretchy and provides a close-to-ankle fit that’ll keep larger-sized debris from getting down inside the shoe. This trait is a huge plus for a hiking shoe because, without a tall cuff, gravel and dirt can easily sneak in and make trouble for your soles.

Weight: 14.7 ounces
Waterproofing: No
Upper: Nubuck leather and synthetic mesh
Sole: Vibram TC5+
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The 5 Flies You Should Always Have In Your Fly Box (and How to Fish Them)

As seasoned fishermen know, tailoring your fly box to the region and river you are fishing is important when angling for trout. Trout’s feeding habits change throughout the year and can be affected by water clarity, temperature and rate of flow, as well as cloud cover, air temperature and even changes in barometric pressure. This makes choosing the right fly at the right time one of the dark arts of fly fishing.

And yet, these five flies are all-around all stars with an almost universal fish appeal that can, if fished correctly, break a bad streak, save a trip and maybe even land you a trophy trout. And, being very common patterns, they can be found at almost any fly shop.

Flies are annotated by size — the higher the number, the smaller the fly. Generally, nymphs and dry flies in size 16 to 12 are the most common, but size 20 or 22 dry flies are often used. Streamers in size 6 to 4 tend to be most useful. Varying sizes can sometimes yield great results, but speaking to a local guide or fly shop is always a great way to zero in on the right size and pattern. The old adage ‘big fish eat big food’ doesn’t always apply; large trout frequently feed on very small insects.

Outside of getting snagged or getting broken off by a fish, flies should last you several seasons. Letting them dry thoroughly after use will protect them the metal rusting and thread degrading, extending the life of a fly. If dulled, hook points can be restored with light passes on a hook hone.

Brass Cone Wooly Bugger – Olive Size 6

In the angler’s toolkit, the Wooly Bugger is like a roll of duct tape. Capable of mimicking a number of aquatic insects, leeches and small baitfish, the Wooly Bugger works well in almost any type of water in just about any water condition. It’s routinely tied in a number of colors, but olive green tends to be the most practical for all-around use as the naturalistic hue will be evocative of a wider array of creatures. A size 6 will be big enough to entice large fish and yet small enough for something smaller to take, and a gold cone head will help get the fly sink faster, attracting fish that are a little deeper in the water column.

How to Fish It: Nine times out of 10, a Wooly Bugger is fished like a streamer; in other words, retrieved by the angler in a rhythmic pulse. This technique allows the fly to mimic a small baitfish, crayfish or swimming nymph and is often very productive in all kinds of conditions. However, the Wooly Bugger’s marabou tail is very enticing when fished below an indicator — a brightly colored float similar to a bobber used when fishing in ponds. This ‘dead drift’ technique evokes a dead or injured baitfish, a leech or a large non-swimming nymph; the prospect of such an easy meal will often induce strong takes.

Stimulator – Yellow Size 10

Some flies are designed to emulate certain species of insects at very specific moments in their life cycle. But many rivers and streams support several species of insects which hatch in windows of time that overlap, which makes ‘matching the hatch’ difficult. The Stimulator is designed to look generally ‘buggy’ and, as the name suggests, often attract fish that narrow in on food on the water’s surface. Though you can find Stimulators tied in a number of colors today, the traditional pattern is tied in natural brown or yellow, which can stand in nicely for anything from mayflies to small grasshoppers.

How to Fish It: As the Swiss Army knife dry fly, the Stimulator is best fished on the surface at the end of a tapered leader no shorter than nine feet. Most anglers opt to fish the Stimulator like a traditional dry fly — floated on the water’s surface to a rising trout — but the Stimulator’s ample spikey hackle makes it ideal for skating too. Treating the fly with some floatant, twitching and bouncing across the surface of the water will almost always induce explosive surface strikes, especially in the late evening just before dark.

Gold’s Head Hare’s Ear Nymph – Size 16

The Hare’s Ear nymph has been a workhorse for anglers for at least half a century. It mimics a wide array of aquatic insects in their larval stage. Most rivers are crawling with small subaquatic insects, the kind that comprise nearly all of a trout’s regular diet. The tawny rabbit fur that makes up the body of this fly is particularly well-suited for emulating insect legs when submerged and, coupled with a fine wire or tinsel wrapping and gold bead head, the fly offers sufficient — but not off-putting — flash to get a fish’s attention.

How to Fish It: Nymphs are typically fished below some type of indicator which suspends the fly at the desired depth, suggesting an insect larva that has been dislodged from the rocks and flora where they are typically found. While this method is widely effective, the flighty, well-educated trout will get spooked by the brightly-colored float. Tied to the hook bend of a large, buoyant dry fly — like the Stimulator — with a 14- to 18-inch section of fine tippet material (5X or 6X) achieves the same suspended effect while your dry fly operates as a natural indicator, which might also induce an exciting top-water strike.

The Worm – Size 8

There’s likely no fly more divisive than a worm fly. But where some purists see the brightly colored rubber worm as treasonous to the traditions of the sport, more down-to-earth anglers will recognize that worms are an important source of natural protein for trout, even moderate rainfall will coax earthworms to the surface, only for them to be washed into streams and rivers. There are actually a lot of variants of this simplistic fly, but the synthetic ‘wiggly worm’ material is very lifelike when submerged, and a bead adds sufficient weight to help the fly sink when water is high from rainfall.

How to Fish It: When submerged, worms don’t swim, exactly, but they do wriggle — and it’s that wriggling movement that makes trout crazy. With this in mind, a worm fly is best fished under an indicator where it can drift and twist in the current. The worm will be off-putting to some wilier trout but will get their attention, making it a great attractor fly. Tie a muted, natural-looking fly — a Hare’s Ear is a great option — to the bend of the hook; the trout will be attracted to the worm and, if it passes it up, will likely strike the smaller fly following close behind.

Mayfly Emerger – Pale/Morning Dun – Size 16

Trout seem to have a highly refined risk-reward matrix when it comes to feeding, especially when rising to take insects off the surface of the water. By rising, a trout becomes infinitely more exposed to predators, especially airborne ones like osprey and eagles. Emerger flies mimic an aquatic insect that is transitioning from its larval form to its adult form, a process that takes place in the water’s surface film. Because of their shape and design, these flies sit lower in the film than a traditional dry fly pattern, making them an easier — and safer — target for rising trout. Pale colors are good for emergers as many freshly emerged insects are pale, and light-colored flies are easier to spot in the evening when trout are rising.

How to Fish It: Emergers can be fished just like a traditional dry fly, affixed to fine tippet material and a long tapered leader, and are often very effective in the early mornings and evenings. Two or three flies of a similar pattern can be tied in a line — each secured to the hook bend of the fly above it — which increases odds and helps emulate a pod of hatching insects. Another approach is to tie an emerger to the hook bend of a larger dry fly with 14-inches of 5X or 6X tippet. As evening falls, more insects will begin to emerge and feeding trout will cause ripples and swirls. The emerger fly will ride deeper in the water and may be hard to see, so it’s best to set the hook when there is any disturbance within a foot of your larger fly as it’s probably your emerger that got taken.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Men’s Walking Shoes of 2019

Unless you’re Forrest Gump and only have a single speed, you likely spend significant time walking. In that respect, walking is a great equalizer — we all do it. But for some reason, any discussion of “walking shoes” brings to mind geriatric power walkers donning sweatsuits, lacing up china white tennis shoes and puffing around Floridian condo complexes. And not to throw salt on grandpa swag, but I’d sooner kick the bucket than go for a stroll in those outdated kicks.

Believe it or not, there are walking shoes geared toward those of us who aren’t recovering from hip surgery. And in this buyer’s guide, we’ve handpicked the best walking shoes, ranging from stylish retro releases to supportive trail-ready kicks. Tarmac or trail, fast or slow, long or short: whatever your walking preferences, you’ll find a pair of shoes that works for you below.

Best Walking Shoes: Under Armour HOVR Slk Evo Perf Suede Shoes

Balancing the popular knit style with a robust and supportive heel cup, Under Armour’s HOVR SLK EVO leads the pack both in style and comfort. Under Armour claims their HOVR tech supplies “zero gravity feel,” and though I’ve never been to space, I agree as much as any landlubber can. HOVR tech pairs a soft foam core with a mesh “Energy Web,” which retains and adds shape to the foam. Together, they offer prodigious cushioning and energy return — perfect for long walks through the concrete jungle. All the while, there’s an idiosyncratically Under Armour spin to the style: we’re talking triangular leather lace details, dual pull loops and a space-age outsole. Suede and summer don’t often go together, but plentiful perforations allow perspiration to escape. Our only gripe? The creamy leather forefoot is easily marred by wayward drips of salsa, so I recommend user discretion when taking down tacos. Of course, you can always opt for one of the darker colorways if clumsiness is all but predestined.

Best Distance Walking Shoe: Hoka One One Akasa

While Hoka One One’s aren’t renowned for their jaw-dropping aesthetics, they’re world-famous for their cushy, curved outsoles. Recognizable by their upturned “Meta-Rocker” shape, these outsoles are comfortable and easy on the knees. And the Akasa, Hoka’s latest road walker/runner, provides plush cushioning at a light-enough weight that you can run strides. There’s minimal lateral support throughout, but the cloud-soft, shock-absorbing rubberized foam in the midsole and outsole is remarkably pleasant when endless strolls are on the agenda — especially on merciless concrete. If you can embrace the style, the 4mm heel-toe drop Akasa is hands down one of the most comfortable walking shoes available and our top pick for logging long distances at a leisurely pace.

Best Retro Walking Shoe: Puma RS-0 Trophy

Like remaking a classic movie, updating a retro sneaker is a dicey decision — brands run the risk of inciting riots amongst diehard fans. With the RS-0 Trophy, Puma dishes out a free game on how to boldly walk this fine line. Based on the late 80’s “Running System” lineup, the RS-0 Trophy has the same basic style and branding as the originals, but updated materials and contemporary aesthetics make it a well-balanced mix of new and old. The outline is oversized, but the RS-0 is not as overtly clown-like as some other remakes from the era. Taking advantage of modern tech, the RS-0’s molded rubber heel cup and injection-molded EVA midsole maintain stability and offer supreme comfort, making the Trophy ideal for strolling block after city block. Laces match the heel pull-loop, which stylistically ties the shoe together (pun very much intended). Undeniable style and surprising comfort earn the Trophy, well, a trophy in our book.

Best Lightweight Trail Walking Shoe: Vasque Breeze LT Low GTX

We’re throwing this adventure-ready low hiker into the mix; after all, what’s hiking if not walking in the woods? As one of our top picks for venturing beyond the realm of city streets and sidewalks. The Breeze LT stays true to Vasque’s trail-crushing roots with a thin yet aggressive Vibram Litebase outsole, which both delivers grippy traction and shaves weight off the already sleek package. A permeable Gore-Tex membrane guarantees weather-resistance and moisture management. For long days on the trail, Vasque’s dual-density EVA midsole will keep your dogs from barking too loud. What’s more, if you do happen to wander back into a more urban setting — be it a metropolitan hub or mountain town main street — the Breeze’s low-cut and low-key style make this hiker much more versatile than you might think.

Best Hybrid Trail/Road Walking Shoe: Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 36 Trail

Given their baffling array of sneakers, just picking the right pair of Nikes is often the biggest challenge — especially when a fresh drop seems to be announced every single day. If you can’t see the forest for the trees, but love walking along tree-lined trails, zoom in on the Air Zoom Pegasus 36 Trail: the recent release (June 13) is the first Pegasus edition in over a decade to possess a lugged outsole geared for dirt and mud. The lightweight Pegasus has been a hit with road runners (and walkers) over the years, and hype has been building around this all-terrain release. While the outsole is beefier than the regular Pegasus 36, the new Pegasus 36 Trail’s numerous flat-topped lugs offer a continuous surface that’s well-prepared for road walking, too. The moisture-managing mesh upper is both breathable and quick to drain should precipitation or perspiration be in the forecast.

Best Walking Shoe for Comfort: Asics Tiger Gel-Saga

Asics owns a massive chunk of the athletic shoe market thanks to its extensive lineup of gel-equipped sneakers, but they’re not necessarily top of the mind on the fashion side. Until you feast your eyes upon Asics Tiger, the Japanese footwear brand’s street-savvy branch, where the brand regularly collaborates with creatives around signature releases. The Gel-Saga’s been around the block a few times — it was initially released in 1990 and has since been a top seller — and the latest retro remake is true to the classic style. The body of the shoe is plush and borderline fat (think cross trainer meets skate shoe), while the molded insole/outsole provides ample cushioning and rebound. Should the going get slick, the tacky rubber outsole delivers the necessary traction. With an OG vibe and Japanese characters on the laces, this comfortable shoe is a conversation starter, to say the least.

Best Travel Walking Shoe: Allbirds Tree Runners

Billed as the “World’s Most Comfortable Shoe” and championed by both tech bros and your dad alike, New Zealand-bred Allbirds are everywhere right now. One of the most alluring aspects of the Allbirds lineup is the simplicity: they have a few models, sure, but they’re only available in two constructions: merino-made “Wool” and eucalyptus-based “Tree.” With the summer heat in full swing, we’re opting for the Tree Runners over the ubiquitous wooly versions, as they offer better breathability and temperature control. Like the Wool edition, the Tree Runner is soft enough to be worn comfortably without socks. It’s lightweight and still wrangles the odor-bashing properties of merino wool in the replaceable, padded insole, making it primed for international travel. If sockless summer use, an impromptu hike or a hellacious travel day pushes your Runners past olfactory standards, you can chuck these shoes straight into the wash.

Best Supportive Walking Shoe: Mammut Mercury III Low LTH

The Mammut Mercury III Low is by far the most supportive, burly option in this round-up, and we’ve included it for that explicit reason; the Mercury Low kicks ass and takes names on muddy trails and loose rock. The hiker is expressly designed to reduce stress on the ankles and minimize the risk of serious injury. Heavy and heavier duty, the Mercury III Low boasts a hexagonally lugged Vibram outsole purpose-built for barbarous use in the mountains. And yet, full Terracare leather construction, subtle style and an under-the-radar color scheme help the Mercury blend into more urban surroundings (provided it’s not already caked with mud). Given the stiffness of the shoe, some break-in time is required, but once you’ve got the fit dialed, the Mercury is ready for anything you are.

Best Reflective Walking Shoe: Adidas Nite Jogger

The Nite Jogger is a remake of an Adidas smash hit from 1980 — proving just how far ahead of its time the footwear maven actually is. Available in a handful of colorways, ranging from murdered-out black to flashy reds and blues, the lightweight Nite Jogger juxtaposes suede overlays with high-vis, reflective embellishments on the upper (so you don’t get run over while taking Oscar for a walk). The sneakers don’t just stand out at night, however, and earn countless daylight double takes as well. That attention comes courtesy of the unmistakable three stripes on the side, a protruding, almost angular heel and an overall funkified, classic vibe. Lastly, though the style is retro, Adidas revamped the Nite Jogger with their cushioning Boost midsole. Day or night, this Adidas Original is a showstopper.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Last Chance: Some of The Best Father’s Day Deals for Dad

Editor’s Note: This post will be updated throughout this week. Bookmark this page to keep track of all the best Father’s Day sales going on.

Celebrating dad has never been so easy. There are plenty of Father’s Day gift ideas to help you find dad that perfect gift whether he loves whiskey, the outdoors or he needs an EDC upgrade. Seeing how we’re less than a week away, you’d be smart to see our picks for Best Last-Minute Gifts, too.

Along with all these great ideas, plenty of brands and retailers offer up some can’t miss Father’s Day sales and deals. We’ve assembled the best ones you need to know about in case you still need to find pops a gift, or if you wanna grab yourself something you’ve been needing.


L.L. Bean 20% Off

L.L. Bean and dads are a inseparable pair. The Maine-based brand is offering up 20% off purchases when using the code DAD20.

Mega Savings on Pre-Owned Rolex Watches

Bob’s Watches is running a buy more, save more deal on men’s Rolex watches and watches in its Father’s Day Collection. Save $100 on all orders over $2,000. Save $200 on all orders over $5,000. And save $400 on all orders over $10,000.

Mujjo 15% Off With Code

Using the coupon #dad will get you 15 percent off all Mujjo products found on its website.

New Balance Savings

You can get the quintisential “dad shoe” with a bit of extra savings. You can get
$10 off of purchases of $75 or more along with free shipping when you use the code DAD19 until 6/18.

OXO Brew Sale

Oxo’s Brew products are all on sale on Amazon until the 16th — that includes the lowest price we’ve seen on its superb burr grinder (it’s 35 percent off). Also on sale are Oxo’s cold brew coffee maker, excellent drip coffee brewer, travel French press and more.

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Dick’s Sporting Goods Dad Deals

Dick’s Sporting Goods is running lots of sales from workout apparel to footwear to outdoor living/camping to golf and more.

Huckberry Steals

Huckberry’s clearances are events you don’t want to miss. Currently, Huckberry is running up to 40 percent off its clearance items right now.

Rare ThermoWorks Grilling Sale

ThermoWorks grilling accessories rarely go on sale. And right now, the ChefAlarm, Infrared Gun, Extra-Loud timer, and more are all marked down from 10 to 40 percent — discounts that don’t crop up more than a few times a year. A hint: ThermoWorks stuff is peak Father’s Day.

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Deals on All the New Kindles

Amazon is discounting all of its newest Kindles. The Kindle Oasis, the company’s largest and brightest e-reader, is $50 off. The Kindle Paperwhite, which is smaller and not as bright as the Oasis, is $30 off. Finally, Amazon’s newest and most entry-level e-reader, the Kindle, is $20 off.

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Save 25% on the Citizen Promaster Nighthawk

Right now, you can nab the Citizen Promaster Nighthawk for just $142, a 25 percent savings off the list price of $190.

|

Save Water and Money with This Smart Sprinkler Controller

The main goal of the Rachio 3 is to save you money by reducing your monthly water bill. Well, now it’s time for us to you that you can save money on the Rachio 3: it’s $30 off on Amazon right now.

|

Train Better, for Less

For a limited time, you can purchase any of TRX’s training essentials from Huckberry and save up to 25%. It’s much cheaper — and more mobile — than a gym membership.

|

Marathon Watches for an Even Better Value

Marathon is a Canadian company that makes affordable, durable tool watches that have been worn by military servicemen and women, from the U.S. Army to the Canadian Coast Guard. The value proposition of these sturdy timepieces is made even better with Marathon’s Father’s Day Collection that offers a selection of watches for up to 40 percent off.

Monthly Beer at a Discount

The Microbrewed Beer of the Month Club is offering three deals for different tiers of monthly memberships for Father’s Day: $10 off any four-shipment order (use code FD10); $15 off any prepaid six-shipment order (use code FD15); and $30 off any prepaid 12-shipment order (use code FD30).

A Rare Snowe Sale

A discount from the Gear Patrol-favorite Snowe home store is a rarity. To celebrate its 4th birthday (and Father’s Day), Snowe is offering 15 percent off sitewide for orders of $250 or more.

Discounts on Alcohol

Reserve Bar’s Father’s Day Gift Guide has all sorts of specials, including deals on Johnnie Walker, Don Julio and more.

The Grill Upgrade for Dad

The past-generation Texas Elite Traeger grill might not connect to Wi-Fi like the newer model, but it still does everything you need it to, and it’s 25 percent off right now.

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Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Some of The Best Father’s Day Deals

Editor’s Note: This post will be updated throughout this week. Bookmark this page to keep track of all the best Father’s Day sales going on.

Celebrating dad has never been so easy. There are plenty of Father’s Day gift ideas to help you find dad that perfect gift whether he loves whiskey, the outdoors or he needs an EDC upgrade. Seeing how we’re less than a week away, you’d be smart to see our picks for Best Last-Minute Gifts, too.

Along with all these great ideas, plenty of brands and retailers offer up some can’t miss Father’s Day sales and deals. We’ve assembled the best ones you need to know about in case you still need to find pops a gift, or if you wanna grab yourself something you’ve been needing.


L.L. Bean 20% Off

L.L. Bean and dads are a inseparable pair. The Maine-based brand is offering up 20% off purchases when using the code DAD20.

Mega Savings on Pre-Owned Rolex Watches

Bob’s Watches is running a buy more, save more deal on men’s Rolex watches and watches in its Father’s Day Collection. Save $100 on all orders over $2,000. Save $200 on all orders over $5,000. And save $400 on all orders over $10,000.

Mujjo 15% Off With Code

Using the coupon #dad will get you 15 percent off all Mujjo products found on its website.

New Balance Savings

You can get the quintisential “dad shoe” with a bit of extra savings. You can get
$10 off of purchases of $75 or more along with free shipping when you use the code DAD19 until 6/18.

OXO Brew Sale

Oxo’s Brew products are all on sale on Amazon until the 16th — that includes the lowest price we’ve seen on its superb burr grinder (it’s 35 percent off). Also on sale are Oxo’s cold brew coffee maker, excellent drip coffee brewer, travel French press and more.

|

Dick’s Sporting Goods Dad Deals

Dick’s Sporting Goods is running lots of sales from workout apparel to footwear to outdoor living/camping to golf and more.

Huckberry Steals

Huckberry’s clearances are events you don’t want to miss. Currently, Huckberry is running up to 40 percent off its clearance items right now.

Rare ThermoWorks Grilling Sale

ThermoWorks grilling accessories rarely go on sale. And right now, the ChefAlarm, Infrared Gun, Extra-Loud timer, and more are all marked down from 10 to 40 percent — discounts that don’t crop up more than a few times a year. A hint: ThermoWorks stuff is peak Father’s Day.

|

Deals on All the New Kindles

Amazon is discounting all of its newest Kindles. The Kindle Oasis, the company’s largest and brightest e-reader, is $50 off. The Kindle Paperwhite, which is smaller and not as bright as the Oasis, is $30 off. Finally, Amazon’s newest and most entry-level e-reader, the Kindle, is $20 off.

|

Save 25% on the Citizen Promaster Nighthawk

Right now, you can nab the Citizen Promaster Nighthawk for just $142, a 25 percent savings off the list price of $190.

|

Save Water and Money with This Smart Sprinkler Controller

The main goal of the Rachio 3 is to save you money by reducing your monthly water bill. Well, now it’s time for us to you that you can save money on the Rachio 3: it’s $30 off on Amazon right now.

|

Train Better, for Less

For a limited time, you can purchase any of TRX’s training essentials from Huckberry and save up to 25%. It’s much cheaper — and more mobile — than a gym membership.

|

Marathon Watches for an Even Better Value

Marathon is a Canadian company that makes affordable, durable tool watches that have been worn by military servicemen and women, from the U.S. Army to the Canadian Coast Guard. The value proposition of these sturdy timepieces is made even better with Marathon’s Father’s Day Collection that offers a selection of watches for up to 40 percent off.

Monthly Beer at a Discount

The Microbrewed Beer of the Month Club is offering three deals for different tiers of monthly memberships for Father’s Day: $10 off any four-shipment order (use code FD10); $15 off any prepaid six-shipment order (use code FD15); and $30 off any prepaid 12-shipment order (use code FD30).

A Rare Snowe Sale

A discount from the Gear Patrol-favorite Snowe home store is a rarity. To celebrate its 4th birthday (and Father’s Day), Snowe is offering 15 percent off sitewide for orders of $250 or more.

Discounts on Alcohol

Reserve Bar’s Father’s Day Gift Guide has all sorts of specials, including deals on Johnnie Walker, Don Julio and more.

The Grill Upgrade for Dad

The past-generation Texas Elite Traeger grill might not connect to Wi-Fi like the newer model, but it still does everything you need it to, and it’s 25 percent off right now.

|

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Mountain Bikes of 2019

Buying a mountain bike is somewhat like buying a car. Older ones can be functional enough to get you from one point to another, but newer ones have features and upgrades that make the ride safer, more comfortable and more fun. If you want to keep up with your trail-riding friends, become a better rider and keep bumps and bruises to a minimum, a modern mountain bike is an essential tool to add to your quiver.

What makes new bikes better?

In short: suspension and geometry. Combined, they let you pedal uphill without bouncing around, saving energy and keeping your wheels on the ground, which helps you negotiate technical terrain.

Modern geometry and suspension also improve the descent. Modern suspension forks and shocks are super responsive to both big and small variations in the trail, so they’ll smooth out the ride. When you’re rolling over pea- to walnut-sized rocks on a rough trail, the fork and shock absorb vibration, staving off fatigue, so you can ride for longer, or at least enjoy a really good beer post-ride without falling asleep. And when you’re barreling through a boulder garden or soaring off a jump, good suspension absorbs the landing, keeping you rubber side down.

The wheels are another factor. Older bikes have 26-inch wheels, whereas newer ones have 27.5- or 29-inch wheels, which roll over obstacles in the trail better. They’re also faster up and down. Choose 27.5-inch wheels for a more playful ride, and 29-inch wheels for a speedier one.

Lastly, gearing sets these futuristic bikes apart. Many mountain bikes now come with a 1x drivetrain, which features a single chainring in the front and a range of gears in the back. Having one shifter, not two, makes choosing the gear you want to be in much simpler. It also makes the drivetrain and your bike lighter, and it declutters your handlebar, leaving more space for a dropper post lever that lets you move your seat up and down on the fly.

How do I pick the right bike?

Whether you’re just starting out or you’re a seasoned rider, choose your new bike based on the terrain where you’ll ride, your budget and your aspirations. Do you want to drop off big jumps, get fast and win races, do multi-hour epic rides? Or is an hour after work in a city park what you need to clear your head and move your body? Cross-country bikes are best for smoother terrain and speedy uphills and also for gravel or touring. Trail bikes and enduro bikes are for progressively more technical riding, typically steeper trails with roots, rocks and other obstacles, and downhill bikes are for riding lift-served bike parks. Some bikes bridge the gap between disciplines because they climb well and descend well, for example, meaning there’s more overlap in design. As you move from cross-country to downhill, how much suspension a bike has will increase from 100mm or 120mm to 170mm and beyond. The amount of suspension your ideal bike needs isn’t based on your skill or experience, it’s based on how technical the terrain is that you want to ride.

A more expensive bike will be lighter with longer-wearing, more precise components, and more responsive with the added ability to tune the suspension to control the bike’s ride characteristics, which makes a big difference as you get into more technical terrain. If you never plan to leave the rail trail, you don’t need best in class suspension. If you hope to ride Enduro World Series trails, buy the best bike you can afford. Working within your budget, it’s better to grow into a bike instead of investing in a bike that won’t help you meet your goals and leaves you having to buy a whole new one in two years.

Hardtail vs. full suspension?

Hardtail bikes (those that have suspension in the front but not the rear) are typically more affordable than comparable full-suspension bikes. However, they’re not always lighter. Many hardtails come with fatter, heavier tires that, when run at low pressure, supplement the bike’s suspension on the trail, which helps you control the bike over rocky trails or a few too many potholes.

Do I need a dropper post?

If you’re riding single track and your bike doesn’t come with a dropper, add one. A dropper post lowers your center of gravity for descents and will significantly reduce the likelihood of OTB (over the bars) dismounts (a.k.a. a crash or fall, definitely not how you want to end the day).

What’s the difference in components?

Brakes, derailleur, chain, shifters, chain rings and cassette all comprise a bike’s drivetrain. As you climb in price, drivetrains become lighter and more durable, as well as more precise. The great news is that some of the features that were only available in the highest end drivetrains, like a 12-speed rear cassette, are now available at nearly all price points. Most bikes are available with a couple of frame options, and a range of component levels to choose from (called the spec), so that riders can find a bike that fits their budget and riding style.

Should I buy a carbon bike?

Carbon is lighter and better at absorbing shock than alloy or aluminum. It’s also generally more expensive. Carbon is easier to repair than aluminum.

Once I get my bike, how do I care for it?

Keep your drivetrain lubed by applying a bicycle-specific lubricant — one drop on every second link — when the chain seems dry or dirty. Let the lube soak in overnight, then run the chain through a rag in your hand to wipe off excess grease and dirt. Have a shop service your shock and change that oil annually. Take your bike for a tune-up and get your brake pads and cables checked at the same time.

Should I buy online or buy from a shop?

Direct to consumer brands, like Canyon, Diamondback and YT give riders a great value at the time of purchase. Eliminating the bike shop means those brands pass on savings to you. On the flip side, that also means you need to assemble the bike yourself and anything you want to customize is an extra cost sold separately. Sans bike shop, you won’t be able to ride the bike in advance to make sure it fits and feels good unless you’re able to try one at a demo. Many bike shops offer these tryouts to prospective purchasers, so you know what you’re getting before you take the time to purchase and build. Buy your bike at a shop and you get customer service, support in getting the suspension dialed, a free tune-up once cables have stretched — and the feel-good of keeping dollars in your community.

Buying Guide

KHS Aguila

Dipping a toe into XC racing or riding? This hardtail bike has the geometry for aspiring speed demons and the single track curious, with an 11-speed rear cassette to help you have fun in rolling terrain. But what we really appreciate about this alloy 29er is its versatility. Sure, you can hammer in your local Wednesday night citizen’s race, but you can also throw a set of 27.5 wheels on this bike with fatter tires and try out bikepacking.

Scalpel Fsi Carbon 5

Long and low, the carbon frame F-SI feels better the faster you ride it. This bike is a hardtail, but the carbon frame absorbs and disperses vibration at any speed, reducing rider fatigue. It soared up climbs, swooped through descents and was so fast in and out of corners it took a few rides to believe it. In the flats, this bike was exceptional at translating power from the pedals into forward motion. The 5 is the F-SI’s lowest spec, which means it comes with a double crown fork instead of Cannondale’s trademark lefty, an attention-grabbing fork with only one side. But once you have this speed demon frame, you can upgrade components on your own schedule, or as they wear out.

Specialized Epic Pro

This dream cross-country race bike is dialed with all the bells and whistles on a highly tuned, extremely light, stiff-where-you-want-it, supple-where-you-don’t carbon frame. With 100mm of front and rear suspension, it’s a classic cross-country race build. Specialized’s “Brain,” a shock modulator, knows when you need support and when you need more give and it fine tunes the suspension accordingly. Hydraulic disc brakes, an ultralight and shock-absorbing carbon bar, a high-end SRAM XO1 drivetrain and carbon wheels make this bike one fast, sexy beast. If you’re not afraid to invest in fun and you want to be over the finish line first, this bike will help you crush your previous PRs and get results.

Rocky Mountain Growler 20

Normally, we wouldn’t recommend a sub-$1000 mountain bike for a serious rider. Nearly all bikes at this price point are hybrids made for rail trail or bike path riding, not hammering single track. But the hardtail, plus tire, aluminum Growler is different, manufactured by mountain bikers for mountain bikers. The ride is playful and slack, which translates to crazy fun, but also stable. If you love single track, but can’t or don’t want to spend more than $1000, this is the best bike you can buy. You’ll need some leg power to ride up steep hills — the Growler has nine gears, not the standard 10-12. But the firm and supportive saddle, responsive mechanical disc brakes and a bump-absorbing 120mm coil fork will make the journey as good as the destination. Run the tire pressure low to soften the ride.

Marin Hawk Hill 1

If you’re on a budget, don’t buy a bike with low-grade front suspension. It’s not worth spending money on full-suspension unless that suspension will improve your ride. Marin’s Hawk Hill 1 does just that. The aluminum frame Hawk Hill has a 130mm suspension in the front and 120mm in the back, with smaller, playful 27.5-inch wheels and a 10-speed drivetrain. You give up a few gears with this bike and you’ll want to add a dropper, to give you more control on downhills and more efficiency on climbs, but it’ll put a smile on your face on the trail without putting a dent in your wallet.

Canyon Neuron CF 8.0

Weighing in at just over 29 pounds, Canyon’s carbon-frame Neuron has 130mm front and rear suspension to help you switchback up and sail down mountains. The Neuron’s suspension was inspired by Canyon’s Sender DH bike, but this bike excels in technical cross-country and on rowdy but not ridiculous trails. Geometry and suspension combined give it a stable and grounded feel. This was our favorite bike for smaller and lighter riders; Canyon uses a lighter shock tune on XS and S frame sizes as well as smaller wheels to makes it easier for petite pedalers to use the bike’s full range of travel (the length of the suspension) and to keep the feel of the bike consistent across sizes.

Diamondback Release 29 2

An aluminum trail ripper with 130mm suspension rear and 150mm front, the Release 29 2 bombed down technical singletrack like a boss. The frame isn’t the lightest, but the components are solid and dependable for hard use. This is the bike for an enthusiastic rider who wants to progress quickly or a rider who wants to ride hard but isn’t ready or able to commit to a bike that’s double the price. It never wavered at high speeds, and when we went to boost off a kicker or rail through a berm, the bike didn’t hamper us in any way.

Transition Carbon Sentinel GX

A workhorse of a bike, the carbon frame Sentinel will transform your riding on downhills. With 140mm rear travel and 160mm up front, this 29-inch-wheeled bruiser is a monster truck with a wheelbase, geometry, brakes and tires that border on what you’d see on a downhill bike. And while you can take this bike to the park, the GX Eagle drivetrain provides a dinner plate of 12 rear gears to help you get up any climb. The bike climbs fine, but it’s the downhill where it will make you feel like you’re ready to tackle World Cup courses. If you want a bike for mellow flow trails or sprints, choose another. It’s not the hoppiest or most playful ride, but you’ll own rubble, rocks and drops on the Sentinel.

Evil The Offering

A steep seat angle and longer reach make this one of the most precise steering, stable bikes we’ve ridden in rocky, rooty and steep terrain. With 140mm front and rear suspension, the Offering was tenacious on slick rocks and roots, easy to throw around and hoppy and poppy in berms and jumps. Even though this is a big bike, we didn’t dread the climbs. In fact, thanks to the aggressive tires, we cleared steep rocks and roots on the uphills that we didn’t make on other bikes. The Offering gives you options: a pair of flip-chips lets you change the bike’s geometry from low to extra low depending on how downhill focused you want to be. The lower the bottom bracket and the slacker the geometry, the more stable a bike is in steep, heart-pounding descents. This is the gold star spec — not over the top with fancy electronic features, but with a high level of parts and pieces on the frame that will make you the envy of your friends.

Scott Ransom 720

For riding bike parks like Killington, Snowmass and Whistler, you want a bike with maximum suspension and slack geometry to absorb impact arcing tabletops and airing jumps, to keep you stable racing down steep descents and through cobble-filled rock gardens. Traditionally, park riders choose massive suspension double crown fork downhill-specific bikes that are nearly unbreakable — but heavy. If you’re not racing World Cup courses, most riders don’t need a single-purpose, downhill-specific bike, and in fact a crossover bike like the aluminum frame Ransom 720 is lighter, so less tiring, which means you get more laps. With 170mm front and rear suspension and SRAM NX Eagle 12 speed in the rear, this bike is an aggressive descender, adequate pedaler and super dependable all around.

Santa Cruz V10 S/Carbon CC

A staple in the Santa Cruz line, the double crown downhill-only V10 has won more World Cups than any other downhill bike. Now it’s been reinvented so it’s not just for racers, but the weapon of choice for weekend warriors who just want to ride lift-served laps. Its 216mm suspension can tackle the most extreme terrain, hucks, drops and gnar. Choose speedy 29-inch wheels or more playful 27.5-inch wheels, then pick your geometry. A new flip chip lets you change the headtube angle and bottom bracket height to make the bike more lively or more stable, depending on the day. The carbon frame on this build bumps up the price, but it’s worth it for the reduced weight and the vibration dampening.

Yeti SB150 X01 Turq

This carbon 170mm front and 150 mm rear bike straddles the enduro and downhill categories. It’s nimble and playful, plus easy to jump. It made us feel like a superhero in the park and on any technical trail. Yeti nailed this bike’s geometry and suspension. The company uses a secondary shock that prevented it from ever bottoming out, and that prevents any bouncing on climbs, which wastes energy. And, because it’s at least five pounds lighter than most downhill-specific bikes, it’s easier to move around and therefore less tiring to ride. Spec’ed with a light and dependable XO1 Eagle drivetrain, it has all the gears you need even when the lifts aren’t running. And you won’t be left behind on any trail you choose to ride. This bike is one kickass chameleon.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Camping Gear You Can Buy for Less Than $50

Given the comforts that we’ve created for ourselves in modern civilization, camping can seem a little inane. We rationalize the endeavor though; we go camping to get away from it all, to get in touch with nature, to find ourselves or, like Thoreau, “to live deliberately.” Or, unlike Thoreau, to get dirty and drink beers next to a roaring fire. The common denominator here is a notion of simplicity, but camping gear can become complicated… and expensive. Most of the essential items — a tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad — cost over $100. And yet, quality can still be found on a budget. We set a per-item limit of $50; here’s some of our favorite stuff in that range.

Opinel No. 10 Corkscrew Folding Knife

This is a larger, picnic-oriented version of Opinel’s classic No. 8 folding knife, and it’s perfect for campsite food prep. Plus, corkscrews are likely one of the most oft-forgotten items during the packing process, so if you’re pairing pinot with your dehydrated chili-mac, it’s extra handy.

Moon Lence Camp Chair

Moon Lence’s collapsible aluminum and fabric camp chair uses a design similar to our favorite seat by Helinox but at a fraction of the cost.

Black Diamond Spot325 Headlamp

Black Diamond’s Spot325 is one of the best available — it is waterproof, has multiple light modes (close quarters, beam, strobe, red night vision) and is bright enough to shoot photons as far as 262 feet. Plus, it’s only $40.

Gear Aid Tenacious Tape

When one of those things that’s too expensive to make it onto this list — say, an insulated jacket or tent — tears (because beating up your gear is inherent to camping), Tenacious Tape is a quick, easy and cheap way to repair it.

Soto Pocket Torch

A typical cheap lighter will suit you just fine for most fire-starting needs. But if you’re worried about wind and temperature, this $24 add-on turns your last minute gas station purchase into a mini blowtorch.

Sea to Summit eVent Compression Sack

Getting wet is one of camping’s inevitabilities. Your clothes might get wet, your shoes, your backpack, your tent — but the last thing you want to dampen, the one thing that’s dryness you want to preserve at all costs, is your sleeping bag. This compression sack is the foolproof preventive measure (and you can pack it with clothing or electronics if need be, too).

Gerber Compleat Camp Cutlery Tool

The Compleat is one of those things that makes so much sense you wonder how it didn’t exist before. It has four separate implements that provide more than double the uses: spoon, fork, spatula, tongs, scraping edge, cutting edge, can opener, bottle opener, peeler. They all nest together neatly and weigh just over two ounces.

Nemo Equipment Fillo Elite Camp Pillow

Bundling up your sweatshirt and pants as a headrest always seems like a good idea, until you wake up with a crick in your neck in the middle of the night. This backcountry pillow is inflatable, has a soft cover and packs down to the size of a deck of cards.

BioLite SiteLight Mini

Not everything that you bring camping has to be essential. For additional campsite ambiance, string up BioLite’s affordable holiday-style lights. They’re bright, durable and stack neatly together when it’s time to pack.

Sea to Summit Alpha Pot

Sea to Summit’s Alpha cookware collection earned our award for one of the best products of the year back in 2017. This ultralight pot has a lockable folding handle and a lid with notches for draining pasta water without losing a single noodle.

Lodge Cast Iron Skillet

On the heavier side of the camping gear spectrum is the trusty cast iron skillet. While new boutique versions of the cookware classic can run as much as $200, Lodge’s offering is sufficiently non-stick and wildly affordable. Throw it on a grate or, if your campsite doesn’t have one, directly into the coals of your fire. (Just don’t leave it out in the rain overnight.)

MSR TrailShot Water Filter

The TrailShot is bigger than iodine tablets but smaller than a bike pump-style filter, and lighter too. If you’d rather not pack in multiple jugs of water to your site, bring this instead and filter it as you needed.

Mophie Power Boost XXL

Like it or not, electronics are a part of camping now, and having enough power for your gadgets is an important consideration to make. A backup charger isn’t essential but can come in handy in a pinch.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Father’s Day Sales

Editor’s Note: This post will be updated throughout this week. Bookmark this page to keep track of all the best Father’s Day sales going on.

Celebrating dad has never been so easy. There are plenty of Father’s Day gift ideas to help you find dad that perfect gift whether he loves whiskey, the outdoors or he needs an EDC upgrade. Seeing how we’re less than a week away, you’d be smart to see our picks for Best Last-Minute Gifts, too.

Along with all these great ideas, plenty of brands and retailers offer up some can’t miss Father’s Day sales and deals. We’ve assembled the best ones you need to know about in case you still need to find pops a gift, or if you wanna grab yourself something you’ve been needing.


L.L. Bean 20% Off

L.L. Bean and dads are a inseparable pair. The Maine-based brand is offering up 20% off purchases when using the code DAD20.

Mega Savings on Pre-Owned Rolex Watches

Bob’s Watches is running a buy more, save more deal on men’s Rolex watches and watches in its Father’s Day Collection. Save $100 on all orders over $2,000. Save $200 on all orders over $5,000. And save $400 on all orders over $10,000.

Mujjo 15% Off With Code

Using the coupon #dad will get you 15 percent off all Mujjo products found on its website.

New Balance Savings

You can get the quintisential “dad shoe” with a bit of extra savings. You can get
10 percent off of $100 purchases and 15 percent off of $125 purchases when you use the code Summer19 until 6/15.

OXO Brew Sale

Oxo’s Brew products are all on sale on Amazon until the 16th — that includes the lowest price we’ve seen on its superb burr grinder (it’s 35 percent off). Also on sale are Oxo’s cold brew coffee maker, excellent drip coffee brewer, travel French press and more.

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Dick’s Sporting Goods Dad Deals

Dick’s Sporting Goods is running lots of sales from workout apparel to footwear to outdoor living/camping to golf and more.

Huckberry Steals

Huckberry’s clearances are events you don’t want to miss. Currently, Huckberry is running up to 40 percent off its clearance items right now.

Rare ThermoWorks Grilling Sale

ThermoWorks grilling accessories rarely go on sale. And right now, the ChefAlarm, Infrared Gun, Extra-Loud timer, and more are all marked down from 10 to 40 percent — discounts that don’t crop up more than a few times a year. A hint: ThermoWorks stuff is peak Father’s Day.

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Deals on All the New Kindles

Amazon is discounting all of its newest Kindles. The Kindle Oasis, the company’s largest and brightest e-reader, is $50 off. The Kindle Paperwhite, which is smaller and not as bright as the Oasis, is $30 off. Finally, Amazon’s newest and most entry-level e-reader, the Kindle, is $20 off.

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Save 25% on the Citizen Promaster Nighthawk

Right now, you can nab the Citizen Promaster Nighthawk for just $142, a 25 percent savings off the list price of $190.

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Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.