The Raging Bull might seem like it would be the last automaker on the planet to embrace electric cars. After all, Lamborghini’s stock in trade is screaming engines and high-performance, high-speed machines. Then again, that’s exactly what we might have said about Porsche a few years ago; smash cut to today, however, and that company is pushing a game-changing electric sports sedan into showrooms and plotting an EV replacement for its most popular model (and possibly one of the best sports cars on sale as well).

So maybe it’s not all that surprising to hear that Lamborghini may be planning to dive into the electric car space as soon as the middle of next decade.

According to a report by Autocar, Lamborghini may planning on releasing a fully-electric grand tourer in 2025, with room for two adults to spread out up front and two smaller people to cram into little seats in back. (This arrangement is often called a “2+2,” but let’s face it, four seats are four seats.) The car will allegedly serve as the long-awaited fourth model in the company’s lineup, joining Lambo’s existing portfolio of SUV, super sports car and supercar (roles currently filled by the Urus, the Huracan and the Aventador, respectively).

The car, Autocar claims, will be inspired by the Estoque sedan concept of 2008. Don’t be surprised to see some technical bits and ideas inspired by this year’s limited-run Sian (pictured above) reach the car as well; that car, which combines the Aventador’s V12 with a small electric motor to whip up a total of 774 horsepower, is Sant’Agata’s first dalliance into hybrid technology — which, obviously, is an important stepping stone on the path to full electrification. Interestingly, the Sian uses a supercapacitor in lieu of a battery to hold its juice, allowing it to hold more power in a lighter package.

The new Lambo EV GT should still source its power from good old-fashioned batteries, however. In fact, the car may source quite a bit of its bones from the familiar Volkswagen Group parts bin; the PPE platform being developed by Porsche and Audi for future models after the Taycan and E-tron has been suggested as a basis for this new Lamborghini. (That platform could also be used by Bentley for its first electric vehicle.)

Of course, 2025 is still a long ways off, even in automotive development terms. It’s possible that Lambo could choose a more conventional powertrain for its GT car, such as a plug-in hybrid setup (like the one soon to arrive in the Urus) or even a more traditional V10 or V12. But with Lambo parent VW AG pushing hard into the electric car space, it seems hard to believe the Italian sports car company could manage to avoid adding an EV to its portfolio.

“If you look at the timing for a fourth model line, there is the potential that this will be the right time for a full-electric vehicle,” Lamborghini R&D head Maurizio Reggiani told Autocar. Sounds like a big hint to us.