All posts in “Porsche”

Supercar driver totals Gemballa Mirage GT in massive NYC wreck

Police arrested the driver of Gemballa Mirage GT — an ultra-rare exotic based on the Porsche Carrera GT — after it struck several other vehicles and left a trail of destruction on 11th Avenue in the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan Tuesday morning.

Police did not release the name of the driver, but said he was the owner of the vehicle and charges are pending, per reports. Road & Track did some sleuthing and reports that it was likely Benjamin Chen, a supercar collector and the co-founder of Gold Rush Rally, an annual rally of exotic and luxury vehicles that he once described as a “rolling party with over 200 of your friends.” And sure enough, the car looks just like the one he talked about in 2014 with the DuPont Registry Daily. There’s even an Instagram video of the hoodie-wearing driver, who resembles Chen, being ordered out of the vehicle. He initially appears to stumble when exiting the cockpit.

The car, a modified Porsche Carrera GT that can cost north of $750,000, had Massachusetts plates reading “Nine 80” and came to a stop at 11th Avenue and 44th Street on Manhattan’s west side, just north of the Javits Center, which is being used as a makeshift field hospital for coronavirus patients. The car looks to be a total loss, its entire front right corner sustained heavy damage, with the panels missing and the body structure badly mangled. Other photos showed the wheels cocked at different angles, windshield shattered, part of the rear fender missing and its hood lying on the sidewalk. Helicopter footage from Fox 5 in New York showed it surrounded by ambulances and other emergency vehicles after it was stopped.

One video showed it careening out of control at high speed down a mostly abandoned 11th Avenue and slamming into a white Toyota Sienna minivan, but then trying to flee.

Chen was involved in a wreck while driving a McLaren 12C Spider during the goldRush Rally in 2013 in Texas.

2021 Porsche 911 Turbo S dressed up with Exclusive Manufaktur parts

The last time the Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur overhauled a 911 Turbo S, the result was a more powerful limited edition called the Exclusive Series, with carbon fiber racing stripes and carbon wheels. Stuttgart’s couturier is at it again with the 2021 911 Turbo S, this time to show off what’s possible with off-the-shelf Exclusive Manufaktur components, the same way it did recently with the Taycan’s SportDesign Package Carbon.

The makeover begins with a coat of Indian Red paint. As far as we can tell from perusing Porsche forums, Indian Red has a long and convoluted history with, but little difference from, Guards Red. The naming seems dependent on international market, model year, and which Porsche factory built the car. We make the point because the Porsche USA configurator offers Guards Red but not Indian Red. 

The configurator does, however, present the choice of the staggered, center-lock Exclusive Manufaktur wheels that were fitted to that low-volume 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series. The rims add $2,490 to the price. Normally painted Platinum Silver, for this application the wheels receive a silver and black finish that could cost more. The exterior comes with additional alterations including black-rimmed LED Matrix Design headlights for $970, clear taillights for $990, and rear side air intakes in high gloss black for $600.

Plenty of Indian Red has bled into the cabin, the hue running along the doors, the length of the instrument panel, and around the center console. That is a no-cost option, which is pretty special from a carmaker that charges $370 for a rear windshield wiper and considers the $900 painted black brake calipers an exterior performance option. There are no such gimmies for the extended red accents in the tachometer ($420) and dash-mounted Sport Chrono clock (also $420). Deleting the “S” logo on the seat headrests in order to put the Porsche crest there requires $290. In case that switcheroo causes occupants to forget the particular model they left the garage with, embossing the center console lid with the Turbo S logo can be done for $340.

Those aren’t the only upgrades being prepared for the new GT. CarBuzz found early photos of a new SportDesign Package and Aerokit designed for the Turbo S. On the Carrera Coupe, the optional SportDesign Kit costs $4,890 to add a new lower front bumper and splitter, deeper, body-colored side sills, and new rear bumper with a matte black diffuser. Carrera buyers can also get just the SportDesign front fascia for $3,240, while the Aerokit includes all of that and adds a fixed, high-rise rear wing for $6,910. We don’t have detailed info yet on the breakdown of the Turbo S packages, but combined, they install the new lower front fascia, sharp side sill extensions, new rear fascia with a reshaped diffuser, two large oval exhaust pipes instead of the four square pipes, and a new active rear wing design with curled-up edges.

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Range Topping Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe and Cabriolet Debut

One of the biggest launches not to happen at Geneva this year is the Porsche 911 Turbo S. The first of the true performance 911’s, this is the one people have been waiting for. Let us tell you, it does not disappoint!

The new Porsche 911 Turbo S has been revealed, but we are yet to hear anything about the lesser Turbo. You will be pleased to hear that Porsche has not downsized, the Turbo S gets a new version of the iconic 3.8-litre boxer engine. It includes two VTG turbochargers, which deliver 650 hp, 70 hp more than its predecessor. Torque is now rated at 800 Nm and the eight-speed PDK helps translate those figures into a 2.7 second 100 km/h sprint. Top speed is unchanged at 330 km/h.

The new engine gets a redesigned charge air cooling system, new turbochargers and electrically adjustable wastegate flaps. Piezo injectors improve responsiveness, as does a new intake system. The air filters are now situated in the rear wings with four intakes overall.

The Porsche 911 Turbo S gets larger with an increase of 45 mm at the front axle and 20 mm at the rear axle. The modified track widths, developed aerodynamics and new mixed-size tyres contribute to its dynamics. The track is now 42 mm wider at the front axle and 10 mm wider at the rear axle.

The adaptive aerodynamics include controlled cooling air flaps at the front. The larger rear wing has been designed for greater downforce. It has 20-inch tyres with unique 255/35 dimensions at the front and 21-inch 315/30 tyres at the rear.

The Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) sports chassis has been lowered by 10 mm and a sports exhaust system has been fitted with adjustable flaps. The Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel-drive system is now capable of delivering up to 500 Nm of torque to the front wheels.

At the front, the standard LED matrix headlights gets dark inserts. The tailpipes at the rear are rectangular, finished in high-gloss Black, typical of the Turbo.

Inside, the standard equipment list includes a full leather interior and carbon trim in combination with Light Silver accents. Two-tone interiors will be available through Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur as an option. The 18-way adjustable sports seats feature stitching that pays homage to the first 911 Turbo and the interior has all of the comfort and tech from the rest of the 911 range.

The Porsche 911 Turbo S will be available in Germany at a price of €216,396 including country-specific equipment and 19 per cent VAT. The Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet will be priced at €229,962.

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Believe the Hype: The Porsche Macan S Is Every Bit a True Porsche

When Porsche introduced its first SUV, the Cayenne, in 2002, enthusiasts lost their mind over the idea of the archetypal sports car company betraying its heritage by serving up a jacked-up soft-roader. (Not helping matters: the fact that it looked like a bloated fish carcass.) But the crossover proved a gold mine for the company, providing the funds that helped enable the continued excellence of the 911 and Cayman / Boxster, as well as projects like the 918 Spyder and the company’s return to the top tier of endurance motor racing.

It’s been the smaller Macan, however, that’s turned out to be the company’s true cash cow. The compact crossover has perched high on Porsche’s sales charts ever since it arrived six years ago, in spite of the fact that it shares some of its bones with the lesser Audi Q5. Still, its comparatively proletarian roots apparently haven’t caused it harm: enthusiasts and journalists alike have been singing its praises ever since it arrived.

But as the old saw goes, the proof of the pudding is in the eating, and the proof of the car is in the driving. So we nabbed a Macan S for a few days of highway and byway driving around the greater Detroit area to see how it really feels to drive Porsche’s pocket crossover.

It feels every bit like a Porsche from behind the wheel

Porsche has long been a master of giving vehicles off shared VW Group platforms a unique brand feel, and the Macan is no exception. From the moment you twist the key (mounted, of course, to the left of the wheel), every control serves up the distinctive connectedness and directness that every car designed in Zuffenhausen these days serves up.

The steering is far sharper and more involving than any crossover’s rack has a right to be; the brakes grab decisively; the suspension keeps the SUV level and balanced even while dissecting tight turns. The 3.0-liter turbocharged V6 may be the base engine in the larger Cayenne and Panamera, but it doesn’t feel one iota like a cheapo choice; its 348 horsepower and 354 pound-feet of torque are more than enough to let this cute ‘ute rip around like a hooligan.

If you snap the Macan S into Sport or Sport Plus modes, the gearbox holds the revs closer and closer to the meat of the power band; left in Comfort, it promptly shuffles up to the highest cog for better fuel economy, although slamming the gas pedal to the firewall will, as in most VW Group cars, spur the engine into the lowest possible gear. (You can also always switch to manual mode and shift with the paddles, too.)

It’s the looker of the carmaker’s SUV lineup

The Cayenne may be newer and more expensive, but the Macan has it beat when it comes to visual appeal. Unlike the taller, chunkier Cayenne, the Macan is lean, low and muscular, with curves that channel the company’s famous sports cars.

The corporate face works better here, too; it has less sheet metal to be stretched across, and the matte black trim pieces make it look more ferocious, evoking bared fangs. It all adds up to one of the most attractive SUVs on the market — at least, if you prefer them more svelte and car-like, rather than boxy and brutalist.

An old interior isn’t always a worse interior

The Macan also whups the Cayenne (and the new Panamera) when it comes to interior usability. Unlike those newer Porsches, it has yet to move over to an almost-all-glass touchpad control, instead sticking with a combination of a 10.9-inch touchscreen display and a series of hard buttons and dials below it and around the shift lever. The resulting combination of physical controls and crisp, clear touchscreen may be one of the best infotainment and car control setups to be found today, bringing the best of the iPhone/Android world and merging it with the muscle memory-optimized realm of tactile controls.

Sadly, other new Porsches like the 992-generation 911 and the all-electric Taycan suggest the carmaker is pretty much all-in on glassy touchscreen interiors for the foreseeable future. But with the current Macan expected to stick around for at least another few years — likely being sold alongside its electric replacement for a while — there’s still time for Porsche to change its mind before it ditches this delightful control system for good.

Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

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Try to spot the new Porsche 911 GT3 in this Super Bowl commercial

When Porsche chose YouTube for the reveal of its Super Bowl commercial, the biggest news was the Stuttgart sports car maker returning to The Big Game after 24 years away. Depending on whether you’re more interested in the annual commercial-palooza or the products therein, Porsche hid even bigger newness inside “The Heist:” A sneak peek of the 992-series 911 GT3. As far as we can tell, Motor1 was first to catch the trickery, a Porsche rep confirming the subterfuge to Motor Trend. The presentation begins at 43 seconds in the video above, ending at 49, the culprit being the blue coupe on the lift above the yellow GT2 RS.

What can we tell from these snapshots? That the prototypes haven’t lied. It’s real busy in back, with a high-rise wing above a ducktail spoiler. The current 911 GT3 uses a pair of solid supports at the base of the engine cover supporting the wing from the bottom. Prototypes we’ve seen of the new GT3 fit a pair of thick stanchions set higher up on the body, next to the backlight, that clamp the wing top and bottom. Our guess is engineers needed to make room for the ducktail spoiler across the width of the car. We can’t quite make out the arrangement on the GT3 in the commercial, but it looks like the prototype plinths have been shaved down to a pair of thin braces next to the rear glass. Beneath all that, the rear bumper shows the same recessed section across its width. And an inordinate amount of the coupe’s flanks is taken up by big, 10-spoke, center-lock wheels fronting giant rotors.

Curiously, the GT3 Touring prototypes spotted at the Nürburgring lack both the big rear wing and the ducktail spoiler.   

Don’t be surprised at a Geneva Motor Show reveal in March. Technical specs have homed in on a naturally aspirated 4.0-liter flat-six with up to 550 horsepower, the choice of a manual transmission, and a speculated ‘Ring lap time of around seven minutes, which would take about 12 seconds off the current car’s time.

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Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS Ditch Four-Cylinder Engine

Porsche took the covers off of the 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS this morning. The release had been expected, the inclusion of the 4.0 litre inline six, less so.

The GTS ditches the 2.5-litre flat four engine from its previous generation in favour of the six cylinder unit found in the GT4. It is detuned compared to the GT4, making do with just 400 hp. The six cylinder model is available with a manual six-speed transmission and sports exhaust system for full driver engagement. It manages 100 km/h in 4.5 seconds on its way to a top speed of 293 km/h.

It’s also quite efficient. Porsche offer adaptive cylinder control as standard which switches off one of the two cylinder banks at low loads, direct fuel injection with piezo injectors and a variable intake system.

The GTS is intended to bridge the gap between the hardcore GT4 and the road-focused S models. As a result, it gets Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) sports suspension, a 20 millimetre lower ride height and Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) as standard. Sport Chrono is also standard.

Inside, black contrasting design elements and a dark Alcantara interior have become typical of Porsche’s GTS models. Porsche fit Sport Seats Plus and the optional GTS interior package adds another contrasting colour: either Carmine Red or Chalk. The new models should be available in Germany from March 2020. Pricing details are yet to be announced.

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Updated Porsche Macan GTS Revealed

A refreshed Porsche Macan GTS launched earlier this week. The GTS has become a staple model within the Porsche range. In the 911, Cayman and Boxster ranges it links the standard Carrera models to the hardcore RS range. For the Cayenne, Macan and Panamera, it sits between the standard models and the Turbo versions. It blends performance and comfort.

The latest version of the Porsche Macan GTS uses a 2.9-litre V6 engine with turbochargers mounted inside the V. It puts down 380 hp and 520 Nm, mild increases over the outgoing model. The changes are enough to propel the GTS to 100 km/h in 4.7 seconds, three tenths faster than before. It has a top speed of 261 km/h.

The GTS gets a reworked PDK dual-clutch transmission and an optional Sport Chrono package. The Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) damping control system has been specially tuned with the suspension sitting 15 mm lower than standard. The Macan GTS gets optional adaptive air suspension too, this drops ride height by another 10 mm.

The GTS rides on 20-inch RS Spyder Design wheels and generously sized cast iron brakes (360 x 36 millimetres at the front, 330 x 22 millimetres at the rear). Two further brake options are available including the Porsche Surface Coated Brake (PSCB) with tungsten carbide coating or the Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB).

2020 Porsche Macan GTS Rear

The Sport Design package is standard with the Macan GTS with a new front trim, rear trim and side skirts. Black painted elements – a feature of all GTS models – are plentiful. The LED headlights with Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS) and the three-dimensional rear lights with LED light bar are darkened.

Inside, Alcantara is available on the seat centre panels, the centre console armrests and door panels. A multifunction sports steering wheel is fitted as standard. The GTS gets a unique seat set with eight-way adjustment. In Germany, prices start at 77,880 euros including VAT.

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2020 Porsche Taycan 4S Review

The Porsche Taycan has landed and made not just a splash, but tsunamis in the automotive world. The model was unveiled and released in Turbo and Turbo S forms at first, models that boasted tremendous power and stats aimed at dethroning Tesla as the king of AC/DC power. The Turbo models are astonishing and fulfil the brief of being high performance vehicles that sit as flagships of the range; as a result the pricing was a breathtaking as the acceleration. 750 bhp does not come cheap.

To broaden the appeal of the Taycan Porsche unveiled this, the 4S and I was shipped over to the -19 degree icebox that is Kittilä, Finland to experience the 2020 Porsche Taycan 4S. The 4S is, of course, down on power compared to the Turbo and Turbo S. As standard 523bhp is available on overboost with a range of 405 kilometres. One option that I suspect will be ordered by all customers is the Performance Battery Plus that increases power to 563bhp and the range to 462 kilometres for around €5,000. 0-100 with either battery is done in 4.0 seconds.

At this point I would love to share my driving impressions with you. I will, but it must be noted that it was horrifically cold, this really was a winter wonderland and there is no tarmac in sight, just icy surfaces and standard winter tires to connect with it. There were no spikes in sight. As a result, any feedback in muted and power statistics are almost irrelevant as traction management is far more important.

That being said, I have driven a handful of cars in similar conditions so am somewhat familiar with how cars typically handle when dancing on ice. The first part of the program was a 90-minute road drive in the darkness of the Finnish winter. First impressions are all about traction and the mighty impressive Goodyear winter tires. Although absent of spikes, traction under gentle braking and acceleration. The Taycan 4S felt balanced and incredibly quick, even on the slippery ice. The 992 steering rack that feature in the Taycan still felt well weighted, of course, there was very little feedback on the ice. Braking was still reasonable although the weight became evident when braking harder and the ABS cutting in.

The main event was the Porsche Experience set on a frozen lake, the ideal place to exploit instant torque from the 800volt batteries powering all four wheels. First up was a tight twisty circuit. The aim if the game was to understand the torque split front to rear and swing the car into delicious drift angles. It is harder than you would imagine, opposite lock doesn’t help and you have to be gentle with the power or the car does what it is meant to do and drags itself into a straight line.

Next on the list of activities is a slalom where the weight and its distribution would be tested. The 4S weighs in at 2,215 kilograms and often had me questioning just how thick the ice on this frozen lake was. It is still some 200 kilograms lighter than the Turbo S model but it is still a substantial mass for anything that is considered ‘sporty’. The slalom test highlights the impressive agility that comes courtesy of the antiroll and stability systems.

The third and final test was the drift circle. Again, this is a test of balance and the torque split and where feedback and feel are key. This is a Porsche and at times the Taycan really did feel comparable to a 911, it is spooky, but there is just a level of disconnect that you would never find in a conventional petrol burning 911. The instant torque is spectacular, the acceleration, even on ice, takes you by surprise despite this being the 4S and not a Turbo or Turbo S. The Taycan in 4S is an extremely capable car. If the greater power is not of paramount importance to potential customers, I would strongly argue that the 4S is the pick of the bunch.

The case for the 4S is further heightened by the significant saving over the Turbo models. In the United Kingdom, the 4S starts at under £90,000, a considerable £50,000 less than a base Turbo S. The 4S is the electric car that offers significant steps forward in the industry at a realistic price point with stats and prestige that make it capable and desirable in equal measure. Let’s hope Porsche can build them quickly enough.

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New Porsche hypercar could use F1-spec hybrid powertrain

Not long after the Porsche 918 Spyder went out of production in 2015, the automaker began internal debate about what kind of powertrain it would use in the follow-up. Four years later, the debate is ongoing. In 2017, Porsche voiced its desire to move its hypercar game on with a battery-electric powertrain, beyond the hybrid 918. The problem — echoed by McLaren — was that battery technology wouldn’t make such a BEV possible until at least the middle of the 2020s. In 2019, the same issues remain, with solid-state battery tech not progressing as quickly as hoped. Autocar reports that Porsche could switch to Plan B in the meantime, that being an as-yet-unused 1.6-liter V6 hybrid engine Porsche Motorsport developed in order to return to Formula One as an engine supplier.

Porsche has been mentioned as a potential new F1 entrant for years, but uncertainty at the Volkswagen Group and in the F1 rulebook compelled the German sports car maker to walk away from the opportunity, opting for Formula E instead. However, after leaving LMP1, 40 Porsche engineers from the Le Mans effort began working on a six-cylinder version of the 2.0-liter four-cylinder hybrid from the 919 Hybrid. That work turned into the creation of a 1.6-liter V6 hybrid along the lines of an F1 engine but without “the complex and expensive” MGU-H unit that converts exhaust heat into electrical energy. Motorsport chief Fritz Enzinger says that engine is still in development, having got as far as running on a test bench for “analysis with regard to series production relevance.”

There’s no info on the hybrid component yet, but Stefan Weckbach, who oversees Porsche’s EV projects, said the company could turn to its partnership with Rimac for that aspect.

Even though Porsche has a motor ready, the board hasn’t decided on whether to go electric or hybrid, and sports car boss Frank-Steffen Walliser says he doesn’t care what kind of powertrain goes into the car as long as it can tick off a 6:30 lap time at the Nürburgring. So according to Autocar, what kind of bodywork might surround this powertain “remains at conceptual stage, with an introduction unlikely before 2023 at the earliest.” We don’t think the 917 Concept from 2014 would be a bad place to start. If Porsche goes with the 1.6-liter hybrid, though, the market would get a clearer competitor to the Mercedes-AMG One, and the platform could provide entries to the ACO’s new so-called Hypercar class in the World Endurance Championship and to IMSA’s Daytona Prototype class. 

2020 Porsche Macan Turbo Review

Porsche have been extremely busy recently. The Taycan has been dominating the headlines and the German brands agenda and, as a result, it is not difficult to forget that the SUV market is where Porsche make most of their money. The Macan and Cayenne are more important than ever before. I drove the updated Macan and Macan S on Mallorca a few months ago and now the range topping Turbo has been treated to the same facelift. I went to South Africa to see if it was any good.

The Macan sits in purgatory, it has been updated but is still essentially a generation old compared to other models such as the Cayenne, Panamera and 992, the interior is a mix of old and new. This dominated my initial impressions, somewhat unfair seeing that I had been in the most modern and futuristic car in the world, the Taycan, just two days before. The reason for the Macan not being completely overhauled is simple. The next generation is set to be dominated by electric variants, I am promised that there will be combustion variants, but they may be market specific.

The mid-sized SUV market is one that has been evolving at an impressive rate. The Macan Turbo used to rule the roost, its success inspired the likes of Mercedes-AMG, Alfa Romeo and others to up their game. The Turbo faces competition that simply outgun the Porsche. The GLC 63 from AMG is a powerhouse and the Stelvio Quadrifoglio is a magnificent car to push through twisty roads. BMW’s X3 M is a recent addition to the list of rivals.

With such illustrious competition, the Macan must shine, it does, but it is not the fastest and arguably no longer the most desirable car in the class. That being said, it is still mighty fine in a number of respects. The steering feel is magnificent, the same can be said for the braking feedback, but only after you adapt to the unbelievably sensitive pedal (potentially better without the optional carbon ceramics on my test car). The good old 3.6-litre V6 is out, replaced by the 2.9 V6 twin-turbo (hot V) that you’ll find in the Audi RS5 as well as the Cayenne and Panamera. In the Macan it packs 434bhp, 39 more than in the Macan Turbo it replaces. Maximum torque of 406lb ft is developed between 1800 and 5600rpm via a seven-speed PDK transmission. This means, with Sport Chrono equipped, 0-100km/h is done in 4.3-seconds. Not bad considering this is a near 2 tonne car (1945kgs).

The new engine is not as impressive, the accompanying soundtrack leaves much to be desired and the gearing is far too long. Fortunately the chassis is a highlight worth shouting about, typical Porsche. The car handles in a way that a two tonne SUV simply should not be able to. Over rough South African roads it is pliant, even on 21-inch wheels, and remains impressive as you start to push on harder, this comes courtesy of the optional air suspension. It begins to trip over itself under braking where the mass has nowhere to try and disguise itself, even with the dampers in their sportiest mode. Push harder still into bends and it will understeer. Traction is supreme but it is led by the front wheels. There is no oversteery tomfoolery that you could provoke in the aforementioned rivals despite Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus doing its thing via the rear diff.

The Macan Turbo is a car that represents itself as a well balanced, competent and attractive car to own. It is a car that will never let you or the family down as a city city car or a highway cruiser. There is enough power and poise to meet your daily needs and it will still put a smile on your face when you find yourself on your favourite road when you left the 911 at home. It is a fabulous all-rounder. It is the sensible choice, if you want something a little more spicy turn to AMG, if you want something to set your pants on fire, it has to be the Quadrifoglio.

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Porsche Taycan Turbo S Review

This is a big deal and perhaps the most significant car I have ever written about in my short, prepubescent life as an editor writing about cars. I am also a sceptic of electric cars, I am just not a fan, this is a chance for Porsche to change my views. Some 350 journalists have been driving the Taycan before me, specifically the Turbo and Turbo S models, on a mega road trip starting in Oslo. Nineteen days later, the convoy would reach the spiritual home of Porsche, Stuttgart and I had the honour of driving the final leg of the journey from Berlin.

Stepping into the Taycan is quite an overwhelming experience for me. Knowing that I would be able to finally drive a car I have sat in on multiple occasions before and even been a passenger in when in pre production form, it was my time to drive one of the most eagerly anticipated and important cars in a decade.

When I jump behind the wheel the first thought is that there is a wall of screens to comprehend. There are a lot of screens, four in this car (including optional passenger screen). That being said, it all is very clear and logical, futuristic but still familiar in a typical Porsche way. If you have not previously sat in a Taycan you may need a second to: a) know whether or not is is on, b) find the gear selector (it is hidden to the right of the wheel like it was in a 918 Spyder).

Orientation completed, what is it like to drive? Crawling around the congested streets of Berlin in a Taycan is a quiet and tranquil experience. Then you find yourself in the left turning lane but you need to take a right. Sport Plus engaged…red, red, red. GREEN. I am pinned to the seat and crossing four lanes and feeling like a naughty school child. The feeling of speed is intensified by the synthesised spaceship noise the accompanies the neck snapping acceleration, the noise can be turned on or off at the touch of a button. So it goes like a Porsche, a very fast one at that. The Taycan Turbo S will do 0-100 in a blistering 2.8 seconds, that GT2 RS quick, in a family saloon that will fit four adults and has two boots. As I am sure you would have seen, the Taycan Turbo S recently set the fastest Nurburgring lap time for a four door EV with a sterling time of 7min42, a time that was seemingly set on very ordinary tires, bring out the Cup 2 Rs and watch Tesla cry.

Out onto the country roads of rural Germany the Taycan can stretch its legs, and boy, it has legs. The acceleration from standstill is potent, instant and and honestly, takes your breath away. When you’re up to speed you can focus on placing the car fabulously using the brilliant steering, typical Porsche. Thread it through a corner and the acceleration out of the bend dominates again. Into the next one and it dawns upon me that I am chucking a 2.4 tonne car through the corners like a car that weighs a tonne less. The weight is all down in the floor, the Taycan has a lower centre of a 911 and it shows. There is little to no body roll, there is supreme control and composure. The only time the illusion wears thin is under heavy braking, you can’t cheat physics forever. It stops well and hard using the giant carbon ceramics, but the inertia can be felt.

So it is a revelation for electric cars in the way it drives, it has a futuristic interior and it looks the part. The car is fabulous, but then we come to the other side of the coin: the infrastructure.

When setting off from the start line in Berlin the navigation was set and the car displayed an estimated battery change percentage upon arrival. It read 12% to the lunch stop where the car would be charged at one of the Ionity 800watt chargers. 12% is a reasonable level and my passengers and I felt confident that we could arrive without giving the range much thought. Remember that quick lane change in the city that I mentioned earlier?

That switch into Sport Plus and the pedal to the metal acceleration cost 1% of that 12% estimate. A few amusing accelerations from standstill to the speed limit cost a further 5%. A short 3km autobahn blast to the vmax of 260km/h and the estimated battery upon arrival is at 1%. With more than 100kms to go, the famed range anxiety set in. I shift into Range mode to try and earn back some precious power. This is where things get a little dull, there are some stunning roads coming up, but I cannot push or my passengers and I will be stranded on the side of the street playing I Spy.

Some careful driving and arduous steady kilometres later we are close to the destination with around 4% charge remaining. Into sport plus I hope to make the most of the remaining power, only to find the car is warning me to preserve the remaining charge and it has limited the max speed. Killjoy.

Throw in a short unexpected detour, such as dropping a friend to a train station a few kms off the route and you will not make it to your final destination without having to visit another charger on the way, make sure it supports 800watts or you’ll be sat around for far too long staring at the percentage of charge in a service station memorising the Burger King menu.

The Taycan is a fabulous machine, one that has, without a doubt, changed perceptions and the expectations of electric cars. I cannot help but question how the concept of electric cars can be considered feasible in a world where the infrastructure is not yet ready to alleviate the woes of range anxiety. We are so accustomed to the convenience of having endless access to petrol stations where we can brim our tanks with fossil juice in seconds. Until we can charge our batteries in less than the time it takes to do a shot of espresso and chomp down a Snickers bar, there will always be sceptics of the need to build in 20-30 minute stops to recharge a battery. For day-to-day short commutes in congested towns and cities like London, the efforts of the BMW i3s or Renault Zoe are far more compelling. A week of commuting can be completed on a single charge overnight on the weekend, a real alternative to combustion motoring. Why claim that electricity is ready to replace fossil fuels in all scenarios?

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Porsche Panamera 10th Anniversary Editions Revealed

It’s hard to believe that the Porsche Panamera is 10 years old. The production version debuted at the Auto Shanghai International Automobile Show in 2009. It was a controversial design back then. It has mellowed in recent years, yet it has also proved a massive sales success, shifting 251,000 models.

The Porsche Panamera 10th Anniversary Editions have been revealed to celebrate the milestone. The special edition package is available for the four Panamera 4 models; the Saloon and Sport Turismo models of the Panamera 4 and Panamera 4 E-Hybrid.

Each example will get a ‘Panamera 10’ badge repeated on the interior and the exterior. White-gold decorative stitching will punctuate the interior leather.

The Porsche Panamera 10th Anniversary Editions will get new 21-inch Panamera Sport Design wheels in satin-gloss White Gold Metallic.

A huge amount of additional equipment will also be bundled in; LED matrix headlights including PDLS Plus, Lane Change Assist and Lane Keeping Assist, Park Assist, panoramic roof system, privacy glass, heated 14-way comfort seats and the BOSE Surround Sound system.

The special edition models will also receive adaptive three-chamber air suspension, Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and Power Steering Plus.

The catch? The Porsche Panamera 10th Anniversary Edition will only be made available in Germany.

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Here’s a Look at the Porsche Taycan’s Interior

The Electric Porsche’s Cabin Is Gorgeous

The Porsche Taycan is the company’s first all-electric car, and it will be an impressive machine by all accounts. The company will reveal the car in full on September 4 of this year. That’s not far away, and the company has been teasing the car recently to great fanfare. The most recent teaser sent out were some shots of the car’s interior. 

Technology Everywhere

You might expect the cabin of the car to be pretty tech-savvy, but there’s even more than we thought. The cabin is completely full of screens and advanced technology. There are four different screens on the dash and center console, including a digital instrument cluster. The passenger gets their own touchscreen. 

The digital instrument cluster is a massive 16.8-inch curved display that uses real glass with a vapor-deposited, polarizing filter. This makes the cluster anti-reflective. By doing this Porsche could get rid of the unsightly cowl over the cluster that so many cars have. To either side of the instrument cluster are some touch buttons for basic controls like the lights and driving settings.

2020 Porsche Taycan Interior2020 Porsche Taycan Interior

The main, central infotainment screen measures 10.9 inches. It provides access to Porsche’s user interface and gives you access to apps, navigation, phone connections, media, comfort settings, and Porsche Connect. Below this screen is another with haptic feedback. It’s an 8.4-inch screen used for the climate controls and offers a handwriting area. This means you can write in an address you want the navigation system to use. 

The screen in front of the passenger is for just the passenger. It won’t even turn on if the driver is the only one in the car. TechCrunch reported that Porsche is playing with the idea of having it stream video, but right now it’s just for making adjustments to settings that impact the passenger. 

Minimalistic Interior

2020 Porsche Taycan Interior2020 Porsche Taycan Interior

The overall design of the cabin is minimalist. Porsche stayed true to its roots for the most part. The lines of the interior are simple and actually look considerably similar to the 911. This is no surprise. Why mess with a good thing? The 911’s interior is handsome and recognizable, and it makes sense for the Taycan to follow suit. 

When it comes to interior materials and colors, you can expect some of the best. Porsche will have wood trim, matte carbon, aluminum, fabric, and leather in it. You can get a leather-free version if you’d like. The car also comes with your choice of three color schemes: black-lime beige, blackberry, Atacama beige, and Meranti brown.

The Taycan’s interior lives up to the hype of the overall car for us. With the interior looking so good, we can’t wait for the rest of the car to be revealed in September. 

2019 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid Review

Porsche are on the dawn of a new era. In just a few weeks they will unveil a car that they hope with revolutionise the industry – the Porsche Taycan. The all electric car is the first full EV for the Stuttgart based brand, but it is by no means their first foray into the high voltage. high stakes world of electricity.

Since the 918 hybrid hypercar, there have been a plethora of series production models that have been born as a result of the technology trickling down into cars you need not be a millionaire buyer on Porsche’s VIP list to own. The Panamera and Cayenne have been fitted with hybrid drivetrains to not only lower emissions and increase fuel economy, but also to make then more potent courtesy of additional power and instant torque. It is a winning formula, and now Porsche have applied it to the updated Cayenne and Cayenne Coupe – the Turbo S E-Hybrid models to be accurate.

The results are frankly, barmy. The Turbo Coupe I drove a few months back never had me thinking more power was necessary given that it weighed in at over two tonnes and packed 542 brake horsepower from its 4-litre V8. The added 14.1 kWh battery packs boost power by 134bhp bringing the total to 676bhp, in an SUV. The Turbo S and Turbo S Coupe both share the same drivetrain which launches the car to 100 in 3.8 (one tenth quicker than the Turbo) and top out at 295km/h (286 in the Turbo).

However, the added performance comes at a cost – those batteries add an additional 130 kilograms (add around 200 more for the DC converter, charger and cables) to the already beefy Cayennes. At a total of over 2.6 tonnes, the Turbo S-E Hybrid models should handle like cruise ships…they don’t.

With the usual raft of optional tech such as four wheel steer, torque vectoring, active engine mounts and other weight masking goodies, the sporty characteristics of the Cayenne remain. The weight penalty is negated by the shove that comes courtesy of hybridisation that almost abolishes any turbo lag. In Sport+ the hybrid drivetrain in working to provide the maximum amount of power and torque wherever possible and the gains are tangible. The in gear acceleration is vicious, there seems to be no fade in the force of acceleration, something I experienced time and time again on the derestricted autobahn.

Air suspension, roll stabilisation and ceramic brakes are all fitted as standard on the S E-Hybrid models, options that help to justify the €172,604 and €176,293 base prices for the normal and Coupe bodies respectively. The price tag is hefty, but the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrids really are cars that can do it all.

From long journeys in extreme comfort and luxury, to blasting down the autobahn with such brute force and even doing the school run in silence in electric mode for up to 43 kilometres, the Turbo S really can do it all. The choice of body styles and the vast array of configurable specifications make the appeal of such SUVs wider still.

Personally, I must question the necessity of the added power, as I mentioned, driving the Turbo earlier in the year, I never felt that the car required more power, even when driving up valley and mountain roads. However, I am not in the market for such a car and with ever tighter emissions and regulations, the hybrid element may well be enough to persuade a few buyers to fork out the extra cash and bare the additional weight. Either way, there is no way of denying that the Cayenne Turbo S E-Hybrid is a mighty fine machine.

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Road Review of the Porsche 718 Spyder by Carfection

Watch Henry Catchpole Take the Topless 718 Around Scotland

The Porsche 718 Spyder is new and improved and features a wonderful six-cylinder engine. Henry Catchpole of Carfection recently had the chance to take the car to Scotland on some beautiful roads and discuss the merits of the model and how it’s different than the previous version of the car. 

As you can expect, Catchpole likes the car. “Oh yes, it’s brilliant,” he said. “Just as well all expected.” Of course, it helps that he’s driving the car on some of the most beautiful country roads ever. However, even if he weren’t on those roads, you can tell that the car would have performed admirably. 

In the end, he says the Spyder is a notable improvement over the previous car and even says he finds that he thinks it justifies upgrades more so than the coupe if you owned the last generation model. You can watch the full video below. 

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Porsche Revealed the Entry-Level 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet

The Most Basic Version of the Cars

The most basic version of the Porsche 911 Carrera has now been unveiled. Porsche chose to detune the twin-turbocharged flat-six engine and downgrade some of the chassis components. These cars offer very good performance and driving dynamics for a slightly lower price. 

In the base 911 Carrera, you only get 380 hp. That’s down from the Carrera S’s 444 hp. Despite this drop in horsepower, the car is still capable of making the 0-62 mph sprint in just 4.2 seconds. The base model only comes with the eight-speed PDK automatic transmission. The model’s weight is down by about 22 pounds from the Carrera S. 

The car also features 19-inch wheels at the front and 20-inch wheels at the rear. Providing the stopping power are fou-piston calipers. These are slightly smaller than the ones on the Carrera S. When you go inside the car, you’ll notice that it features essentially the same cabin as other 911s. It offers the same 10.9-inch PCM infotainment system and central rev counter with two high-definition displays. 

According to Car and Driver, the coupe version of the car will cost $98,750 and the cabriolet version costs $111,550. These cars will go on sale at the beginning of 2020.

2004 Porsche Carrera GT: History, Specifications, & Performance

Table of Contents

Introduction

The Porsche Carrera GT has become one of the most iconic and sought after vehicles in the realm of exotic car idolization and ownership. It  is hard to believe, that things didn’t really start off that way. 

When the Porsche Carrera GT was released in 2004, it was anticipated to stir up plenty of fervor. It certainly had all the attributes to do so. It was a mid-engined V10 hypercar – one of the first to be considered a step beyond supercar status – and introduced a variety of industry-first technologies and features to the production car market. 

It was hard to argue against the Carrera GT having the performance, appearance, and stature to justify its $440,000 USD price tag when brand new. Nevertheless, Porsche dealerships would have a difficult time selling them despite costing over $200,000 USD less than a new Ferrari Enzo; the Carrera GT’s intended target and rival. 

The slower than forecasted sales are likely the cause for Porsche ending production after just 1,270 units. Though a run 1,500 units were originally planned, the German marque went on record to blame “changing airbag regulations” for their decision to ax the car. Thankfully, this turn of events would not prove ominous for the Porsche Carrera GT over the long run. In fact, quite the opposite.

Interestingly enough, we can thank the ongoing technological advancements taking place in the automotive industry for the Porsche Carrera GT’s resurgence into the limelight. Besides being equipped with a wicked state-of-the-art, naturally aspirated, 612-horsepower engine which was ahead of its time, the Carrera GT was otherwise an extremely analog machine and it is this very characteristic that would elevate its appeal over time.

This was helped on mainly by the fact that since the Porsche Carrera GT was released, the exotic car landscape has shifted dramatically to the production of more user-friendly, techologically refined and easy-to-live-with supercars – the fastest for the masses, if you will. 

This generally means that certain features have become standard issue in today’s highest performing vehicles – electronic assists and nannies which prioritize safety, dual-clutch automatic transmissions to make driving easier, hybrid powertrains designed to lower fuel consumption, and so on. You don’t have to be a professional driver to wring out the most, if not all of the performance potential in a modern supercar – that predictably appeals to more people.

While all of these changes are welcome and generally considered to be advancements in the supercar space, the pace at which the technology has been improving often feels too fast and overwhelming. In the midst of all the craziness, people began to catch on to just how special of a car the Porsche Carrera GT really is. 

That is because it is one of the last hypercars/supercars that isn’t like anything that is produced today – in all the best ways possible, of course. For instance, it is one of the last mass production supercars to be fitted with a true manual transmission. 

Today, this sentiment is reflected in the Carrera GT’s sky-high prices in the used market, which would have translated to a very reasonable return on investment if you had bought one new, kept it and then decided to sell now.

Engine & Performance

Specifications:

  • Engine Type & Size: 5.7L Naturally Aspirated V10
  • Horsepower: 612 hp @ 8,000 rpm
  • Torque: 435 lb-ft @ 5,750 rpm
  • Transmission: 6-speed Manual
  • O-60 mph: 3.8 seconds

What makes the Porsche Carrera GT engine so special is that it is technically a race car engine. Not in that loosely-based sense, often used as a sales gimmick in marketing ads these days, but in the true sense of the word. 

In the late 1990s, Porsche engineers in Zuffenhausen were assigned the task of developing a naturally aspirated V10 concept engine which was to later be used in a race car for the infamous 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race.

Sadly, the completion of that race car never came to fruition, but the efforts of the engine builders would not be wasted. Porsche decided to adapt the engine for the use in the Carrera GT and took the necessary steps to not only refine it in order to satisfy production car protocols but still managed to make it a more powerful version than the original unit. 

The result is a naturally aspirated 5.7L V10 midship engine, which produces 612-horsepower @ 8,000 rpm and 435 lb-ft of torque at 5,750 rpm. This allowed the Carrera GT to accelerate to 0-60 mph in 3.8 seconds and 0-100 mph in 6.9 seconds, with a top speed of 205 mph.

2004 Porsche Carrera GT Engine2004 Porsche Carrera GT Engine

The engine wasn’t just all brawn, as it was meticulously designed to be just one element of something that was greater than the sum of its own parts. For example, the optimized V-angle of the cylinders and the extremely low-to-the-ground crankshaft helps to give the car a very low center of gravity which enhances its overall handling and chassis capabilities. 

The Carrera GT’s V10 engine, in spite of its large displacement, weighs in at just 472 pounds thanks to the extensive use of lightweight forged alloy materials which provides bulletproof engine internals which have the highest levels of temperature resistance.

Mated to the powerplant is a six-speed manual transmission developed especially for the Carrera GT. Like the rest of the car’s driving components, the transmission was also designed to be compact and ideally specced to reduce overall weight and maintain an optimum weight distribution.

For the first time in a production car, Porsche introduced a factory-installed ceramic clutch known officially as Porsche Ceramic Composite Clutch – or PCCC. While sharing the characteristics of some race car clutches such as compactness and low mass, PCCC was also designed to meet or exceed the life expectancy of conventional clutch plates, making it suitable for everyday driving applications and importantly, fit for use on a production car.

The transmission, in an overall sense, is able to smoothly translate the car’s massive power into something that is as manageable as it is robust. Although the grabby and sensitive ceramic clutch will likely take some time to get acquainted with, it will soon reward the driver with solid, mechanical shifts which could be most accurately described in one word as “satisfying”.

Chassis & Handling

The Porsche Carrera GT continues to benefit from the manufacturer’s experience in endurance racing, through which their carbon fiber technology had undergone the most rigorous of trials by the turn of the millennium. 

The most notable use of carbon fiber in the formation of the chassis is the Carrera GT’s pure carbon fiber monocoque and subframe. This would be the foundation on which the car’s rigidity, lightweightedness and agility would be showcased.

Many of the technologies used in the Carrera GT’s suspension components were adapted from the Porsche 911 GT1 race car, which won the 1998 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race. 

The suspension configuration was designed with double-wishbone axle pushrods in the front and rear which improved the car’s responsiveness to driver inputs while enhancing road feel – something that the more common McPherson spring/strut design would not have provided adequately. The majority of the components were also made of aluminum to save weight.

Porsche Carrera GT DiagramPorsche Carrera GT Diagram

The electronic driving aids in the Carrera GT does nothing to detract from the purest of driving experiences, while at the same time allowing the car to feel compliant when driving at the limits. A meticulously thought-out power steering system accentuates the car’s agility and is perfectly weighted at both low and high speeds to elevate communication between man and machine. 

The ABS and traction control systems are adaptive to a variety of different road surfaces and conditions, to allow for a spirited driving style in any circumstance. Working in tandem with each other, both systems enhance stability under hard braking and acceleration to give the driver dynamic control of the vehicle’s steering capabilities, even in the most demanding situations. Safety without sacrifice of performance or driving pleasure is paramount in the philosophy on the Carrera GT.

Porsche Carbon Ceramic Brakes – or PCCB – come standard on the Carrera GT and were the first of its kind in the production car world, when Porsche introduced them on the 2001 Porsche 911 GT2. 

Besides being considerably lighter than conventional rotors, Porsche had the technology improved for use in the Carrera GT, which featured enlarged cross-drilled ceramic brake discs which have the highest level of heat resistance and an exceptionally consistent frictional coefficient. Completing the braking system were set 6-piston monoblock calipers, employed at all four corners of the car. 

Last but not least, the Porsche Carrera GT meets the tarmac a set of staggered center-locking forged magnesium wheels wrapped in Michelin tires specially developed for the Carrera GT (F: 265/35/19, R: 335/30/20)

This combination allowed for the extremely strong and lightweight wheels to complement the chassis in its unsullied responsiveness to driver inputs, while also reducing the rate of wear on the extra-wide and grippy tires.

Porsche Carrera GT TirePorsche Carrera GT Tire

 Design, Styling, & Interior

On the outside, there is nothing to suggest that the Porsche Carrera GT should be anything but a purpose-built super/hyper sports car. The silhouette of the car is a properly executed amalgamation of sleek and muscular features which certainly feels applicable to the Carrera GT’s overall demeanor.

Porsche Carrera GTPorsche Carrera GT

From the front particularly, the car is still undeniably a Porsche, with its headlights paying tribute to the Porsche 917 – the first Porsche race car to win at Le Mans. The bulgy front fenders extend across the doors and connect to the rear haunches of the car, which then blend into its extroverted rear deck finished off by the large, retractable rear wing. 

The double-clamshell engine lid conceals the 5.7L power plant while complimenting the two roll hoops it sits purposefully behind. The windshield and windows are designed to provide maximum visibility to the driver from all angles.

The cockpit of the Carrera GT is relatively understated but still more than adequately appointed with its perfect blend of functionality, elegance, and convenience. The center console inclines at a sharp angle towards the front dash, and is fully made from carbon and bolted to the chassis of the car to promote rigidity and safety.

 Mounted near the top of the center console, is one of the Carrera GT’s most quintessential features – its ergonomically located manual gearbox fitted with a laminated birchwood shift knob, which pays tribute to the heritage of Porsche motorsport.

Porsche Carrera GT WheelPorsche Carrera GT Wheel

One of the Carrera GT’s world firsts for production cars was its use of sport buckets made from a special hybrid of carbon fiber and aramid fiber, which is commonly known today as carbon kevlar. This super light and durable composite meant that the seats could be upholstered in high-end leather and still weigh less than 23 pounds each. With comfort still being a paramount feature in the Carrera GT, Porsche fitted the car with power windows, air conditioning, infotainment, and BOSE speakers.

Pricing

When the Porsche Carrera GT was released for the production year 2004, it had a retail price of $440,000 USD. Few would have guessed that its price would skyrocket over time to the levels they are at now – least of all Porsche, who cut production of the Carrera GT well before reaching its original target of producing 1,500 examples.

Today, a used Porsche Carrera GT can go for upwards of $700,000 USD. Some of the lowest mileage and best condition examples have been seen to fetch north of $1,000,000 USD. 

Over the past 15 years, the Carrera GT has become one of the most renowned supercars in history; thanks to its unique blend of driver-focused elements and advanced road-going technologies, it epitomizes what has now become the pinnacle of an era in which cars of this ilk would be produced. 

Knowing what the Carrera GT represents and possessing a rudimentary understanding of economics, my guess is that these prices will only go up as time passes.

Performance & Specifications Summary

Model & Pricing Info

Make Porsche
Model Carrera GT
Car type Coupe
Category Limited Series Production Car
Built At Zuffenhausen, Germany
Introduced 2004
Base Price (US) $440,000
Units built 1,270

Chassis, Suspension & Powertrain

Curb Weight 1,380 kg (3,042 lbs)
Layout Rear mid-engine, Rear-wheel drive
Body / Frame Pure carbon fiber monocoque and subframe
Suspension (F) Independent double-wishbone with axle push rods made from aluminum
Suspension (R) Independent double-wishbone with axle push rods made from aluminum
Steering Power-assisted rack-and-pinion
Brakes Porsche Carbon Ceramic Brakes (380 mm carbon-ceramic brake discs and 6-piston calipers, front and rear) 
Tires Michelin (F: 265/35/19, R: 335/30/20)
Transmission 6-Speed Manual

Engine, Output & Performance

Engine V10
Displacement (Litres) 5.7L
Aspiration Naturally Aspirated
Power (hp) 612 hp @ 8,000 rpm
Power (hp) / liter 107.4 hp / liter
Power (hp) / weight 0.44 hp / kg
Torque 435 lb-ft @ 5,750 rpm
0-60 mph time 3.8 seconds
¼ Mile (standing) 11.3 seconds
Top Speed 205 mph (330 km/h)
Average Fuel Consumption 16 mpg (combined)

Image Gallery

The Porsche Carrera GT exudes a level of performance that can only exist in the highest echelons of road car hierarchy. It is rare that such a design can become so timeless in just 15 years, which can be the lifetime of a single iteration of vehicle. 

In my opinion, the Porsche Carrera GT is a monument of automotive history which will only become more prominent in the years to come. It is the culmination of arguably the most ideal era of automobiles, in which technological prowess and puristic driving principles were combined in perfect harmonization. It serves as a reminder as to how powerful the connection between man and machine can be, without one overwhelming the other.

Doug DeMuro never holds back when exclaiming that the Porsche Carrera GT is ‘the single greatest car ever made’. The famed YouTube car reviewer provides an in-depth overview of the car, and takes it for a test drive in the streets near Cleveland, Ohio where he discovers that it is less intimidating to drive than it looks.

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The most viewed review of the Carrera GT on YouTube is from Top Gear, where none other than Jeremy Clarkson admits that it is one of the most beautiful, exciting and fastest drives of his life. Also watch as the Stig attempts to beat the record-holding McLaren Mercedes, as the fastest car around the Top Gear test track.

[embedded content]I’ve always enjoyed the way in which EVO presents their video review documentaries, so here is Dickie Meaden taking the Carrera GT through its paces in an ‘ICONS’ episode. He credits the car’s analog driving experience and its engine, as positive differentiators amongst its competition which includes the Ferrari Enzo, McLaren Mercedes SLR, and Ford GT.

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Here is the only official video uploaded by Porsche on the web, which features the Carrera GT in an episode of ‘Porsche Experience TV’.

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Press Release: Carrera GT ‘Recommissioned’

02/04/2019

The Porsche Carrera GT is still counted among the most exciting sports supercars in the world, more than 15 years after it first appeared. Now, Porsche Classic has implemented a spectacular reconstruction as part of a custom order.

Porsche Carrera GTPorsche Carrera GT

With a ten-cylinder V engine with 612 PS of horsepower derived from a Formula 1 powertrain, premium design, and – not least – the incomparable driving experience it offers, the Porsche Carrera GT remains a milestone in the world of sports supercars today, and a collector in the US has commissioned Porsche Classic to thoroughly rework one of their privately owned vehicles.

It was truly a spectacular project. 

The collector wanted a complete, custom reconstruction of the vehicle, implemented at a manufacturing quality that can only be achieved by Porsche itself. The process involved the vehicle being entirely disassembled into individual parts, with every component extensively checked, and refurbished or replaced where necessary.

Extraordinary Paintwork in Oak Green Metallic

To set off the completely overhauled engine, transmission, and chassis components to their best advantage, the Carrera GT was also treated to a full refinish. Working with Porsche Classic, the owner chose Oak Green Metallic paintwork – a color that appeared for the first time in the 1970s, but which has never been available for the Carrera GT.

Porsche Carrera GTPorsche Carrera GT

The complementary five-spoke magnesium tires were specially designed, taking their initial inspiration from the legendary motorsport tires from BBS, which had a star-spoke painted in gold and a polished rim ring. 

However, material experts from the Porsche R&D center Weissach advised that polishing the rim ring would structurally alter the material in such a way that it would potentially be dangerously weakened, so an alternative engineering process was required to create the desired metallic high-gloss effect rim.

A Silver Ring Coated with Silver

The solution to the challenge lay in using silver, a precious metal. In an innovative procedure that had never before been used in series vehicle construction, a silver layer was applied to create a visually chrome-like surface finish.

This high-gloss silver layer requires a final protective coating though because silver is second only to iron in terms of metals that most readily oxidize: where prolonged   on iron results in rust, silver responds to exposure to atmospheric oxygen and water by accumulating unsightly black tarnish on its surface. 

This is why the silver-coated rim ring required a protective layer of clear lacquer, and the star-spoke was painted in gold to match. Serving as a technical contrast to this is the blue-and-silver central wheel lock, bearing the Porsche emblem in color.

Porsche Carrera GT TirePorsche Carrera GT Tire

The gold of the star-spoke has also been picked up elsewhere, for example in the Porsche lettering on the brake callipers, in the engine compartment, on the intake housings, and even in the interior, where the top marking in the center of the steering wheel is adorned by a single gold stripe flanked on both sides by a stripe of Oak Green – a discreet and individual touch.

Elaborate Repair of All Carbon Fiber Parts

Even at this stage, the work on this special Carrera GT was far from complete. “Because the coating on older carbon fiber parts tends to yellow and fade, we spent 350 hours manually sanding and recoating all the carbon fiber components, including the monocoque,” explains Uwe Makrutzki, Manager of Porsche Classic Factory Restorations in Stuttgart.

Porsche Carrera GT WheelPorsche Carrera GT Wheel

The vehicle is now ready for delivery, and at the invitation of Porsche Cars North America, Porsche Classic has presented it for the first time at the Porsche Experience Center in Atlanta, to a select group of 100 invited guests including the car’s owner.

Porsche Classic also hosted a symposium to coincide with the event, moderated by motor journalist Pete Stout, and featuring Alexander Fabig, Head of Customer Center, Uwe Makrutzki, Manager of Porsche Classic Workshop Restoration, record-winning race driver David Donohue, and Porsche Designer Tony Hatter, who were all available to talk about the project and answer questions.

About Porsche Classic

Porsche Classic takes care of all vehicles whose production end date is generally more than ten years in the past. 

These include legendary sports cars, such as the 356, 914, 959 and 911 up to and including type 996, as well as all four and eight-cylinder vehicles, such as the 924, 928, 944 and 968, and the Porsche Boxster, type 986. Since 2016, Porsche Classic has also been responsible for the genuine parts supply of the Carrera GT super sportscar. Further information is available at Porsche.

Final Verdict

As my fellow Supercars.net colleague, Nick Dellis once remarked, “The world is full of armchair commentators when it comes to cars. At Supercars.net we have a number of journalists and automotive publications we rely on when we want to get unbiased opinions from people we admire.”

Below are snippets from some of our favorite car reviewers and automotive personalities regarding the Porsche 911 Speedster. As always, we ask that you support the amazing publications they release, so that the automotive community continues to benefit from the hard work and enthusiasm they put into providing us with content that we love.

Car Magazine – “Brilliant. Pure, Full-fat Unadulterated Brilliance.” – 5/5

Porsche Carrera GTPorsche Carrera GT

Ben Whitworth from carmagazine.co.uk reviewed the Porsche Carrera GT in 2008. He admits that the car can be a hassle to drive in low speed, stop-and-go traffic thanks to the sensitively operated clutch. Where things really start to get good are when “It’s only above 3000rpm that the ride, steering, chassis, and engine really start to work their magic. But boy, what magic.”

The Carrera GT’s handling is the perfect compliment to its engine, where he notes that “One of the car’s key attributes is its forgiving chassis and superb steering that together allow you to extract the best that fabulous engine has to offer. The more speed you add, the smoother and more fluid the ride becomes, allowing you to sew a series of bends together with real precision and confidence.” 

A disclaimer to end things off though, as he reminds us that “You can drive the Carrera GT at seven-tenths all day – which by normal standards is still phenomenally quick – but you’d better have your go-fast synapses all snapping together if you push harder.”

More: Read full review

Autotrader- “…the greatest experience of my entire life.” – DOUGSCORE: 71

Porsche Carrera GTPorsche Carrera GT

It’s easy to forget that Doug DeMuro actually writes his reviews on behalf of Autotrader, as the charismatic – and often quirky – the presenter has transcended into his own form of celebrity through his entertaining video car reviews.

His written review of the Porsche Carrera GT is a loosely based transcript of his video performance, mentioned earlier in my review. There are some things he reveals in his written article which he didn’t on Youtube, such as what was going through his mind before getting into the driver’s seat. “I’ve never felt so much pressure in my entire life. Tom Brady has never felt so much pressure in his entire life,” he remarked.

Doug knew that that car would be impressive, but he noted that “What was a surprise, however, was just how much I didn’t feel intimidated when I was behind the wheel.”, which is a testament to Porsche engineering principles. 

His final word: “My all-time favorite dream car. And the greatest car ever made.”

More: Read full review

My Final Verdict

5/5

The Porsche Carrera GT is one of the most distinguished representatives of an automotive era now concluded. It was the last supercar to be fitted with a true manual transmission. It introduced world-first technologies derived from racing, in a road car. It could very well be the last driver-focused car of its kind, with no successor – spiritually or materially. 

In fact, Michael Hölscher who led the development of the Carrera GT has stated regarding a second iteration, “We don’t want one. We have promised customers that there will be no successor. It would kill the value of the GT overnight. But we will always demonstrate that we are a leader in technology.” 

However, we will continue to see the Carrera GT’s influence in Porsche’s production cars which have – and are yet to – come through the production pipeline. “We have learned from the Carrera GT programme how to work with carbon fiber, ceramics, and magnesium. It’s a technology that will filter down into new products.” Hölscher notes.

This is especially important as the automotive landscape is changing both drastically and exponentially, as time goes on. In a future that looks to be dominated by software and electronics, the Carrera GT will hopefully serve as a reminder for Porsche to continue engineering cars that elicit an emotional connection with their owners/drivers. I am confident that Porsche is well-positioned to be both a leader in technology, while also staying true to its heritage.

The Porsche Carrera GT will always be one of the most incredibly balanced and exquisitely engineered cars ever made. Many years into the future – perhaps when the role of the automobile as we know it, becomes obsolete – the Carrera GT will become the equivalent of scripture for the soul; something for us to deeply reflect on, as we look to rekindle our relationship with the simple and good things in life. 

Rivals

Ferrari Enzo
Pagani Zonda C12S
McLaren Mercedes SLR 
Maserati MC12
Koenigsegg CC8S

Porsche 964 Specs & Performance Numbers

As part of our ongoing process to organize all the information on Supercars.net, we pulled together the most important specs and performance numbers into one easy to read table. For the Porsche Type 964 you will find everything from model years to top level models as well as engine type and classification, power numbers and torque figures. We also have performance numbers like acceleration times and top speed. Specs-wise we decided to focus on the length, width and weight numbers for the 964 models. Below is an outline of what we cover:

Variant Grouping / Production Years / Production Numbers / Engine /  Engine Code / Cooling Induction / Engine Capacity (cc) / Engine Capacity (liters) / Compression Ratio / Maximum Power & RPM (HP) / Maximum Power (HP) / Max Power RPM / Maximum Torque (NM) / Maximum Torque & RPM (ft lbs) / Maximum Torque (ft lbs) / Maximum Torque RPM / 0-60 mph (seconds) / 0-100 mph (seconds) / 1/4 Mile (seconds) / Top Speed (mph) / Top Speed (kph) / Length (MM) / Width (MM) / Weight (lbs) / Weight (kgs)

To see all the details simply click on the “+” button to see it for all the specs and the performance numbers.