All posts in “Lamborghini”

Lamborghini Sian: Most Powerful Lamborghini Ever Revealed

The Lamborghini Sian has been officially unveiled. The limited edition model is based off the Aventador platform and debuts some exciting technology set to bleed down into future Lamborghini supercars. It has been unveiled in time for a public debut at the Frankfurt Motor Show 2019 which starts next week.

The Sian uses Lamborghini’s preferred engine, the V12, and couples it to a hybrid drivetrain. The V12 is said to produce 785 hp with the addition of titanium intake valves. The electric element is run from a 48 volt system and uses a “supercapacitor” to store power from an e-motor. The e-motor produces an additional 34 hp for an overall total of 819 hp.

The Lamborghini Sian therefore generates the highest power levels of any Lamborghini to date. As Lamborghini are not using a conventional lithium battery cell, they are able to retain 3 times as much power for comparable weight. It is an evolution of an existing innovation found within the starter motor of a conventional Aventador.

A regenerative braking system, unique to Lamborghini allows the motor to produce a power boost at speeds of up to 130 km/h. After 130 km/h, the combustion engine does 100% of the work. As a result, the Sian hits 109 km/h in just 2.8 seconds with a top speed of over 350 km/h.

Lamborghini Sian Specs

The design also provides a taste of what to expect for the future. The Y shape is evident through the NACA air ducts on the door, the glass elements, the lights and the engine cover. A Periscopio tunnel adds a throwback to the original Countach. The silhouette allegedly carries inspiration from Marcello Gandini.

Lamborghini. Plans a production run of just 63 cars with all 63 delivered through the exclusive Ad Personam division. All 63 are accounted for!

GTSPIRIT NEWSLETTER

Thanks to Urus, Lamborghini Now Valued at $11 Billion

Bloomberg recently published a report on the Italian brand Lamborghini. Long seen as a competitor for Ferrari, the two have moved further apart in recent years with Ferrari pursuing a public offering while Lamborghini has remained under the wing of parent company Lamborghini.

As a result, Lamborghini has been able to benefit from group platforms with the release of an SUV, the Lamborghini Urus. The Bloomberg report focuses on the sale effect that the Urus has had. Last year, Lamborghini saw sales rise 51% to 5,750 units, including more than 1,700 Urus models.

This year, further improvements are expected with the U.S. leading the charge. The US market accounts for three times as many car sales as any other region.

These successes mean that Bloomberg’s analysts have placed a valuation of $11 billion. Of course, this means nothing in circumstances where Volkswagen Group has no plans to sell the Italian brand, yet it makes for some interesting comparison.

Ferrari closed on Friday with a market capitalisation (the value of all of its shares) of €26.83 billion making it more than two times as valuable as its competitor. Aston Martin, on the other hand, closed at £1.08 billion. With Volkswagen’s market cap at €71.53 billion, Lamborghini appears to have some value to the German behemoth!

GTSPIRIT NEWSLETTER

Lamborghini Reveals the Aventador SVJ 63 Roadster

A Special Roadster

At The Quail in Monterey, California, Lamborghini unveiled a special 63 edition roadster of the Aventador SVJ. Only 63 of the cars will be made. The 63 is significant to Lamborghini due to the fact that the company started in 1963. The car is special not only because of the fact that so few will be made, but also because there will be eight different designs used for the paint and exterior and interior elements. 

The car that was shown at The Quail featured a matt grey Grigio Acheso paint job and orange Arancio Dac accents. The 63 Roadster comes with a slew of carbon fiber accents and components inside and out. The cabin is fitted with plenty of Alcantara and Lamborghini’s patented CarbonSkin. 

The roof, engine cover, air vents, rim around the windscreen, and the side mirrors are all made of carbon fiber, according to GTSpirit. Other than the unique exterior and interior components, the car is an SVJ Roadster. It gets Lamborghini’s V12 engine that puts out 770 hp and about 531 lb-ft of torque. This makes the car good for a 0-60 mph time of just 2.9 seconds. It has a top speed of over 217 mph. 

Lamborghini Showcases an Art Car at Monterey Car Week

A Pop Art Crafted Aventador S

The car you see here is a Lamborghini Aventador S that was crafted by Skyler Grey, a 19-year-old pop artist based in Los Angeles, California. Lamborghini worked with the artist to make this art car, and it has just revealed the car at the Monterey Car Week in California. 

Paying homage to some of the best pop artists out there, Grey took the Aventador and added plenty fo bright colors and some bulls along the side, which is, of course, the emblem for Lamborghini. The Lamborghini CEO Stefano Domencali said that the car was already sold before the project even completed. 

Inside the car, you’ll find a black interior with orange contrast stitching and an intricate Bull embroidered between the seats. While all Lamborghini Aventador S models are special, this one is a true one-of-a-kind art piece. The project came about through the Ad Personam program, which personalizes customer’s cars. 

The car is also part of Lamborghini’s Lamborghini Sicura program. According to Motor Authority, the program certifies cars and works to prevent counterfeits. 

Like all Aventador S models, this special art car features a 6.5-liter V12 that produces 730 hp. The car is just as much a performer as any other Lamborghini. It features a 0-60 mph time under three seconds and a top speed of 217. Just because it looks cool and unique doesn’t mean it should be any slower. 

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Lamborghini Could Join Aston Martin in Le Mans Hypercar Class

Since the FIA announced new regulations which open the door to a ‘hypercar’ class in the World Endurance Championship for the years 2020-2024, many manufacturers have expressed interest. Lamborghini is the latest as its current CEO indicates that the company is evaluating whether an Italian entry would be possible.

During interviews given at the Goodwood Festival of Speed earlier this year, Domenicali was said to have confirmed that the company are looking at the regulations to see if they are of interest. This means that Lamborghini are yet to make a decision about whether to field a competitor, however, the signs look promising for the Italian brand.

Despite marketing itself as a performance brand, Lamborghini has never experienced a great deal of success in motorsport. Throughout the years, Lamborgini has dabbled in the world of Formula 1 but with little success. It currently runs a dedicated Squadra Corse team with single-make racing series at its core. However, Lamborghini merely supports its customers outside of officially sanctioned events.

The new hypercar class aims to capture the thrill of the GT1 and Group C eras. The cars will be based on a production hypercar design and manufacturer will need to produce at least 20 road-legal versions to comply with homologation. The competitors will see aerodynamic downforce and drag heavily restricted, however, engine choice will be completely free.

Competitors will be allowed a maximum power output of 740bhp with electric assistance limited to one electronic motor of 264bhp. Engine weights will be limited to 180 kg while batter and electric motors are limited to 70 kg and 50 kg respectively. The restrictions will prevent manufacturers throwing too much money into ultra-lightweight systems. Fuel consumption limits are also expected. With minimum weight restrictions of 1,100kg, hypercars will be 230 kg heavier than the LMP1 category.

So far, Aston Martin and Toyota have confirmed that they will field a competitor. Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus are expected to enter a new car, the SCG 007 while WEC regulars ByKolles Racing plan to re-engineer its ENSO CLM P1/01 LMP-1 to comply with the regulations. Koenigsegg are said to be considering an option, rumours have also been spreading which talk of interest from Ferrari and McLaren.

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1 of 9 Lamborghini Veneno Roadster for Sale in Dubai

Following the announcement that Teodorin Obiang’s Lamborghini Veneno will be auctioned in Geneva, UAE-based dealership Al Ain Class has revealed that it has secured its own Lamborghini Veneno Roadster. The iconic supercar dealership has secured one of 9 examples. If you weren’t a fan of the cream colour scheme applied to the Bonhams car, here is your opportunity for something less controversial!

The Lamborghini Veneno Roadster is one of the rarest Lamborghini’s of all time. It was built, following the release of the Veneno Coupe, on the structure of the Lamborghini Aventador and served as a precursor to the Aventador SV.

The car Al Ain Class are offering is finished in matte naked carbon fibre. Alongside the usual tricolour flag details, this car also features a red coach line at the very bottom of the bodywork and on the edge of the front fenders. Inside, there is a blend of red leather, black Alcantara and gloss carbon fibre.

Al Ain Class’ listing suggests that the vehicle is brand new. The estimate Bonhams have placed on their car is £4,2 million to £5 million, this particular example will undoubtedly sell for more with its less controversial colour scheme. It seems clear that we are looking at the most expensive modern Lamborghini.

(EDIT: This article, as originally published, suggested that the car was being sold with 820 miles on the clock. This is incorrect, it in fact had 85 kms on the clock)

Lamborghini R&D Chief Dicusses the Death of the Manual Transmission in the Company’s Cars

A Sad Reality

The death of the manual transmission is a topic hotly debated among sports car and supercar enthusiasts. It’s true that a manual transmission enhances the driving experience in many ways. It’s also true that cars are often faster without them. Maurizio Reggiani, Lamborghini’s research and design chief, recently sat down with Road and Track to discuss why you’ll never see a manual transmission in a Lambo ever again. He said the following:

All the systems that are integrated in the car need to have a dialog with one another. The clutch is one of the fuses of the system, whether you’re engaging or disengaging the torque. This creates a hole in the communication between what the engine is able to provide and how the car reacts to the power of the engine. For this reason, unfortunately, I must say I am sure that in a premium supersports car like the Huracán, we will only do a semiautomatic.

Maurizio went on to note that he understands and enjoys manual transmission cars. He said that the issue is really about chassis control. It’s easier to control the chassis of the car with the modern day semi-automatic transmissions found in vehicles like the Huracán.

He also discussed some puzzlement over the idea that manual transmissions are held up as the purest driving experience. He said almost all new manual transmissions have servos at the clutch. This helps you keep from burning up the clutch. That means there’s a filter between the driver and the clutch. It’s not as pure as many people actually think. 

High-powered Lamborghinis of the future and likely of most other cars will come with an automatic or semi-automatic transmission. With horsepower, torque, and the resulting speeds being so high, an automatic transmission simply makes more sense. 

Lamborghini Miura – The Ultimate Guide

The Ultimate Guide To The Lamborghini Miura: Review, Price, Specs, Videos, Pictures, Performance & More

Miura Vitals
Production: 1966–73
Units: 764 built
Designer: Marcello Gandini at Bertone
Layout: Transverse rear mid-engine
Engine: 3929 cc Naturally Aspirated V12
Transmission: 5-speed manual

Only three years after the first Lamborghini prototype appeared at the 1963 Turin Motor Show, Miura number 1 was parked on the Place du Casino during the 1966 Monaco F1 week. The car shared its name with the fierce fighting bulls from Seville and it was completely different from anything Ferrari had on offer. Ferruccio said “the Miura is for the keenest sporting driver who wants the ultimate in looks and performance.”1 It caused a stir that weekend and had to be one of Ferruccio Lamborghini’s best moments.

Before the Miura, Ferruccio had established himself as a successful industrialist and decided to take on Ferrari with a series of high-quality grand tourers known as the 350 GT and 400 GT. These laid foundations for the Miura, such as the V12 engine designed by ex-Ferrari engineer Giotto Bizzarrini to have as much available horsepower as possible. Initially, this high-revving, 3.5-liter V12 produced a maximum output of 360 bhp at 9800 rpm and was enlarged on the SV to 3929cc for a reported 385 bhp. For the Miura, it was formed from a single aluminum casting that combined the cylinder blocks, crankcase and transmission.

Gian Paolo Dallara and assistant Paolo Stanzani designed the unique steel tub chassis that placed Bizzarrini’s V12 engine directly behind the driver in a transverse position. They were inspired by both the Lola GT, a race car developed by Eric Broadley that lent its chassis tub design to the Ford GT; and the Austin Mini with its transverse engine that had a common crankcase for the engine and transmission. The final design was first presented as a bare chassis at the 1965 Turin Motor Show where everyone could admire its radical layout and only imagine what the final product would look like.

Although the Miura chassis design could be mistakenly interpreted as a race chassis, Ferruccio had a strict no-racing attitude. He wrote a policy in the company’s bylaws that prohibited racing and avoided the pitfalls of expensive development by trying to intercept Ford vs Ferrari at Le Mans. Instead, the Miura was destined to be a road car of the highest order.

At the Turin show, design of the Miura’s body was still up for grabs and at the end of the show Ferruccio gave Nuccio Bertone the job as he was well suited for series production at Carrozzeria Bertone SpA. Initial sketches were laid out by Giorgetto Guigiario who thought he was designing a new Bizzarrini. When he left the firm, Marcello Gandini finished the work which included a lower nose that repositioned the front radiator. Bertone then sent Gandini on vacation while he finalized the design himself before submitting to Lamborghini. Due to these three talented men, the Miura didn’t have a wrong line anywhere. Later, Carrozzeria Bertone became responsible for manufacturing the Miura bodies and interiors on chassis produced by Marchersi. Final installation of the engine, transmission and suspension were completed at Lamborghini’s factory in Santa’Agata Bolognese.

The first completed prototype was painted orange and personally driven by Bertone to the 1966 Geneva Motor Show where it became the highlight of the event and overshadowed the debuting Ferrari 330GTC. Furthermore, with a press release proclaiming 198 mph, everyone in Maranello took notice. A later trip down to Monte Carlo for the F1 weekend was another resounding success.

Initially, orders exceeded production and Lamborghini had to only worry about manufacturing. Several pre-production prototypes were built and tested which varied only slightly to the final production specification. Over time, upgrades and small details were changed, but a huge update called the SV was planned in 1971 starting with chassis 4758. The main focus of the SV was a new rear suspension that made the car much wider. Longer wishbones were fitted that added 1.5 inches of length. Furthermore, larger Campagnolo cast magnesium wheels were added with wider Pirelli Cintaurato tires. Many of these changes were undertaken by chief test driver Bob Wallace in conjunction with Claudio Zampolli and greatly improved handling of the Miura.

Eventually the oil crisis and lack of demand halted Miura production in 1973 after nearly 150 cars were completed. By this time, development emphasis had been placed on the Countach which the public first saw in 1971. In April of 1972 Ferruccio sold off his controlling shares of the Lamborghini, probably because he achieved everything he had set out to do with the Miura.


Lamborghini Miura Models & Specs

Very few cars managed to change the automobile world like the Miura. It was the first true supercar. It had a radical specification in relation to common engineering of the time. The Miura was endowed with a quad-cam V12 that sat transverse and behind the drivers. Immediately, everything from Ferrari to Aston Martin looked outdated by comparison upon release. It redefined the concept of a sports car.

Lamborghini Miura PrototipoLamborghini Miura Prototipo

Miura Concept

Before the first production Miura was completed on April 20th of 1967, Lamborghini produced five developmental prototypes which were used for testing and as show cars. A total of five prototypes were built in 1966 and 1967 which progressed towards the final production specification. These cars were chassis 0502, 0862, 0706, 0961 and 0979. The first one appeared at the 1966 Geneva Motor Show as the Miura P400 GT, also known as the Sperimentale.

The first three of the prototypes featured counter-clockwise crankshaft rotation which later turned clockwise with car number four with the addition of an idler gear. These first three cars also featured a roof-mounted pop-out vents which were abandoned after car four due to leaking issues.

The first four cars benefit from a slightly lower roofline that was raised by car number five to offer additional headroom. Further distinguishing features of these cars include a lack of Lamborghini script on the rear, different rear window slats and more interior indicator lights.

Production Years: 1966 – 1967
Engine: 3.9 L Naturally Aspirated V12
Power: 350 hp @ 7,000 rpm
Torque: 300 lb-ft @ 5,500 rpm
0-60 mph: 6.3 seconds
0-100 mph: 14.3 seconds
Top Speed: 163 mph

Lamborghini MiuraLamborghini Miura

1968 Lamborghini Miura P400

The first supercar definitely stood out in looks, tech and performance. The Miura was the fastest production car in the world with a top speed of 163 mph and 0 to 60 mph in 6.3 seconds. It set new standards.

Production Years: 1966 – 1969
Engine: 3.9 L Naturally Aspirated V12
Power: 350 hp @ 7,000 rpm
Torque: 300 lb-ft @ 5,500 rpm
0-60 mph: 6.3 seconds
0-100 mph: 14.3 seconds
Top Speed: 163 mph

Lamborghini Miura SLamborghini Miura S

1968-1971 Lamborghini Miura S

The second generation Miura was released at the 1968 Turin Motor Show with a number of detail upgrades both in and out of the car. It shared the same potent transverse V12 engine and Bertine-designed body from it’s predecessor released three years earlier. Inside Lamborghini fitted power windows to the Miura S and also offered optional air conditioning for the first time. Detail differences included a locking glove box.

The engine also received an overhaul which was good for 20 additional horsepower. This included new intake manifolds and different camshafts. Outside, the car received a new chrome trim piece around the window locking strip. Around 140 cars of this type were produced until the SV replaced the model in March of 1971.

Production Years: 1968 – 1971
Engine: 3.9 L Naturally Aspirated V12
Power: 370 hp @ 7,500 rpm
Torque: 287 lb-ft @ 5,500 rpm
0-60 mph: 5.5 seconds
0-100 mph: 12.3 seconds
Top Speed: 168 mph

Lamborghini Miura RoadsterLamborghini Miura Roadster

1968 Miura Roadster

There was only one factory built Roadster and it was created in 1968 by Marcello Gandini and Bertone for the Geneva Show. Ot featured larger air intakes, lower roll-over hoop, different taillights and a larger spoiler. It was more than just a chop job, it was dramatically different from production Miuras. As released at the show, the Roadster featured larger air intakes and a lower roll-over hoop which distinguished it from any other Miura. Other modifications included different taillights and a larger spoiler. As needed, the box section structure of the chassis was strengthened up to cope with additional loads usually absorbed by the roof.

Production Years: 1968 (One Off)
Engine: 3.9 L Naturally Aspirated V12
Power: 350 hp @ 7,000 rpm
Torque: 272 lb-ft @ 5,750 rpm
0-60 mph: 6.6 seconds
0-100 mph: N/A
Top Speed: 174 mph

Lamborghini Miura SV PrototipoLamborghini Miura SV Prototipo

1971 Miura SV Prototipo

Over time, upgrades and small details were changed on the Miura, but a huge update called the SV was planned in 1971 starting with development chassis 4758. The main focus of the SV was a new rear suspension that made the car much wider. Longer wishbones were fitted that added 1.5 inches of length. Furthermore, larger Campagnolo cast magnesium wheels were added with wider Pirelli Cintaurato tires. Many of these changes were undertaken by chief test driver Bob Wallace in conjunction with Claudio Zampolli and greatly improved handling of the Miura.

The prototype is the first car to feature many of the SV upgrades that later typified the model. It was first displayed at the 1971 Geneva Auto Show in Fly Giallo with black leather interior. It was distinguished from the later production versions by numerous detail differences such as different front headlight surrounds, and interior details such as the ashtrays.

Production Years: 1971 (One Off)
Engine: 3.9 L Naturally Aspirated V12
Power: 385 hp @ 7,850 rpm
Torque: 295 lb-ft @ 5,750 rpm
0-60 mph: 5.75 seconds
0-100 mph: N/A
Top Speed: 170 mph

Lamborghini Miura SVLamborghini Miura SV

1971 – 1973 Lamborghini Miura SV

Over time, upgrades and small details were changed, but a huge update called the SV was planned in 1971 starting with chassis 4758. The main focus of the SV was a new rear suspension that made the car much wider. Longer wishbones were fitted that added 1.5 inches of length. Furthermore, larger Campagnolo cast magnesium wheels were added with wider Pirelli Cintaurato tires. Many of these changes were undertaken by chief test driver Bob Wallace in conjunction with Claudio Zampolli and greatly improved handling of the Miura.

To accommodate the new setup, the first SV chassis was sent to Bertone so Gandini could redesign the wider rear bodywork, but other features such as smooth headlight surrounds, Fiat Dino Spyder rear lights and better integrated front signals were added. The result was a much more aggressive car that emphasized the Miura’s rear-engine power. Options such as Borletti air conditioning were also offered for the first time and fitted as standard on cars shipped to America. Only 30 cars were fitted with this essential option.1

In the end, the Miura SV was a remarkable performer. Lamborghini’s own specification listed a horsepower of 380 bhp and a top speed of 180 mph but these were probably exaggerated figures compared to any regular production model. In fact, only around 350 bhp was produced from a standard SV engine and the top speed is actually slower than the P400S model due to the larger tires.

Production Years: 1971 – 1973
Engine: 3.9 L Naturally Aspirated V12
Power: 385 hp @ 7,850 rpm
Torque: 295 lb-ft @ 5,750 rpm
0-60 mph: 5.75 seconds
0-100 mph: N/A
Top Speed: 170 mph

Lamborghini Miura SVJLamborghini Miura SVJ

Lamborghini Miura SVJ

As if the Miura wasn’t already radical enough, Lamborghini let test driver Bob Wallace make an experimental version that was even better. Prepared as a quasi-racecar, it had no compromises to comfort. Known internally as ‘Miura Privata’ by the factory, the project was later named Jota to potential customers. Unfortunately the original Jota was lost in the crash, but the factory fitted some Jota modifications to several road cars and these became known as the SVJ.

Only one original Miura Jota was ever made, and it was Bob Wallace’s personal test car built around chassis #5084. He used it to test various ideas that would prepare the Miura for the track and improve overall performance. Having plenty of time on his hands, the Jota became evermore radical to the point were it eclipsed standard Miura performance by several degrees.

The main focus of Bob’s modifications was to decrease and balance weight. This meant the car had a completely stripped interior, single window wiper, Plexiglas windows and fixed headlights. Most of weight savings came from the use of a light-gauge aluminum alloy called Avional which was used for the new body, floor pan and front spoiler.

Production Years: 1971 – 1975
Engine: 3.9 L Naturally Aspirated V12
Power: 440 hp @ 8,500 rpm
Torque: 296 lb-ft @ 6,500 rpm
0-60 mph: 3.6 seconds
0-100 mph: N/A
Top Speed: N/A


SV MiuraSV Miura

Best Lamborghini Miura – The Miura SV

This one is easy. The Lamborghini Miura SV, also known as the P400SV was easily the best Miura made. It was introduced in 1971. Essentially an updated Miura S, the SV was the last and most famous Miura. Produced in significantly smaller numbers than the previous versions, the SV is also the rarest Miura as well. Although visual updates were mostly subtle, the Miura SV featured extensive drivetrain and chassis upgrades that enhanced both the output and the handling of the car.


Lamborghini Miura Gallery & Photos

We pulled together some of our favorite photos of the Miura from our posts over the years. Don’t forget we have hundreds more photos of the Miura, just click on the models above to find them. 


Lamborghini Miura Videos

There are hundreds of Miura videos on the internet. We spent way too long watching most of them over the years. We whittled down the list to find the three best videos about the legendary Miura. The first is from our friends at Petrolicious, who take a Miura out and really make you feel what it is like to experience history. The second is a great in-person drive in a Miura with the founder of the best car magazine on the planet (EVO). The third Miura video is the intro to the Italian Job, probably one of the most iconic movie scenes and easily a spot that cemented the Miura as a star. 

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2017 Lamborghini Aventador S

For all its likeably flamboyant design and visceral performance, the Lamborghini Aventador never quite delivered on its promise. The chassis in particular tended to feel a little leaden. So now Lamborghini is upping the ante with the Aventador S.

The Aventador’s frankly stunning performance figures, from the 2.9sec 0-62mph time to the 217mph top end, remain unchanged. But to judge the improvements Lamborghini has implemented based on data alone is to entirely miss the point. Because a) the Aventador always had plenty enough performance, and b) the S version is a dramatic improvement over went before.

Design boss Mitja Borkert hasn’t messed too much with the looks, but you might notice the new fangs on the front bumper, the cleaner side intakes and the new BBS-like cross-spoke wheels (which look a little flat to our eyes). Don’t worry, it still turns heads.

Inside, it’s business as usual: you glimpse the carbonfibre monocoque as you raise the dramatic doors, the windscreen races over your head, the centre console seems so rakish it’s almost flat, and you’re still a bit too aware of Audi switchgear. However, there is a new TFT display in the instrument binnacle. This changes according to driver mode, but always features an arcade-game-like font – it fittingly emphasises the Aventador’s sci-fi otherworldliness, like you’re driving a spaceship.

But no, really, this isn’t about the facelift, it’s about the driving dynamics.

The key difference is the new rear-wheel steering system, which works much like the systems fitted to the Porsche 911 GT3 and Ferrari F12 TdF. Below 81mph, the rear wheels turn in the opposite direction to the fronts by up to three degrees, just 5ms after you’ve made a steering input. It effectively makes the wheelbase feel shorter, much like a forklift truck. Above 81mph, all four wheels turn in the same direction, with the rears turning by up to 1.5 degrees. This effectively makes the wheelbase longer.

There’s new rear suspension hardware to account for the turning rear wheels, the springs are 20% stiffer and the magnetorheological dampers have been recalibrated. The Pirelli P Zeros are a new design – even the tread appears different – with 355/25 ZR21s on the rear.

The all-wheel drive system is also tuned to be more rear-biased, and sends less torque forwards when you decelerate. The idea is you’ll get a more agile, rear-drive feel when you turn in to a corner.

As before, the system also changes its torque split based on the drive mode, with up to 90% of torque flowing rearwards in Sport mode, less in Strada (Street) and Corsa (Race) modes – the latter to prioritise clawing grip for faster lap times in the most hardcore setting. A new Ego drive mode debuts too, allowing you to mix and match your choices for the powertrain, chassis and steering settings. Lamborghini Active Vehicle Dynamics – a new brain – takes care of marrying everything up.

Handily, Lamborghini let us drive old and new Aventadors back-to-back, on a short slalom they’d set up at Circuit Ricardo Tormo. The difference isn’t subtle. Where the old car feels very nose-led and slightly stubborn, its steering lethargic where you need flighty flicks left-to-right, the S dances through the slalom with a balance that feels much more in line with your hips, and steering that feels light years faster. You’re also more aware of that heavy V12 shifting about behind you, helping point the nose just to the left or right of the cones we’re dodging.

Not only does the S feel a giant leap in terms of agility, it also feels much lighter too, because of the increased hunger for direction changes. And yet it weighs exactly the same.

The V12’s been downsized and turbocharged… only joking. No, the Aventador sticks with the glorious 6.5-litre V12 engine, naturally aspirated and a fantastic riposte to everyone who says they had no choice but to give us smaller blown units. The noise is heaven, all raucous yelps at high revs and theatrical thunderclaps on down shifts, the instant response flings you forward at seemingly any revs, and the power builds ferociously all the way to 730bhp at 8400rpm, and now screams 200rpm higher at 8500rpm. Technologically off-the-pace, maybe, but its soul, emotion and passion more than compensates.

The differences in feel between old and new engine specs is less obvious than the chassis, but there’s 39bhp extra, if no additional torque at 509lb ft. Despite its 730bhp being just 10bhp shy of the hardcore Aventador SV, the philosophy is different: the SV’s 100kg weight loss gives it permission to focus more on power, where Lamborghini’s engineers have also targeted driveable torque for the S. So the new airbox can be virtually split into smaller or larger sections by the use of four separate drive-by-wire throttles – all throttles deployed for full power, fewer throttles to increase low-speed torque. Trust me, you won’t want a turbo.

A lighter exhaust is said to offset the weight gain of the rear-steering system, meaning the chunky 1575kg dry weight remains unchanged.

The seven-speed automated manual gearbox of course remains. There’s still a little hole in the delivery when you shift at lower speeds – a Ferrari dual-clutch transmission feels far more sophisticated in this respect – but Lamborghini says they’ve targeted low-speed refinement, and it surely won’t be a deal breaker if you’re already prepared to use a car as radical as this in town. And when you’re flat-out on the racetrack, pulling those paddles as the revs zing towards 8500rpm? You don’t need faster changes, and there’s a lovely physicality to the shift that stops short of unnecessarily theatrical brutality.

Amazing. We were privileged to follow Lamborghini test driver Mario Fasanetto, who was piloting an SV and not hanging about. The Aventador S is a fantastically quick supercar with some old-school rawness to it, but it’s still highly accomplished.

On racetrack corners much faster than the slalom we also tested on, you can feel the effects of the rear-wheel steering, the extra torque that’s been kept at the rear wheels when you decelerate and the weight of the V12 behind you; the S really wants to turn in – it’s almost nervously keen to do so – and it’s here you’re most likely to overcook things and get a slide on. You might also need to add steering correction even when you’re off-throttle in a slower corner, so keen is this Lambo to point its snout down the next straight. But otherwise, this is a very sure-footed all-wheel drive chassis, with immense traction combined with a lovely rear-biased adjustability.

It allows you to work that 730bhp very hard and have fun, with very little understeer – make it scrub and, really, you’re just doing it wrong.

If the Aventador was a disappointment, the S is a revelation. Don’t let the similarity of design or performance fool you, this is a very different feeling supercar, and the key to its new-found engagement is its revised chassis, particularly the new rear-wheel steering system. An SV still manages to be the driver’s choice, but the S feels far more closely aligned to that hardcore range-topper than it does its predecessor.

The Aventador has always been unique in its segment, but the S takes it to a whole new level. Would we buy one? Absolutely.

2017 Lamborghini Aventador S Press Release

The Lamborghini Aventador S: Elevating the benchmark for super sports cars

• The next generation of the V12 Lamborghini flagship • New iconic design features focused on aerodynamic performance • New four-wheel steering system • Significantly enhanced suspension and electronics, and customisable driving modes • More powerful naturally aspirated V12 engine outputting 740 hp • 0-100km/h in 2.9 seconds, top speed of 350 km/h
S a n t ’ A g a t a B o l o g n e s e , 1 9 D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 6 – The new Lamborghini Aventador S is characterized by new aerodynamic design, redeveloped suspension, increased power and new driving dynamics. The ‘S’ is the suffix of previous enhanced Lamborghini models and defines a new benchmark for the V12 Lamborghini.

“This is the next generation Aventador as well as the expression of new technological and performance milestones in super sports car development,” says Automobili Lamborghini Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Stefano Domenicali. “The Aventador S is visionary design, cutting-edge technology and driving dynamics in pure harmony, and elevates the concept of super sports cars to a new level.”

Design and Aerodynamics

The design of the new Aventador S clearly indicates the new Aventador generation. The Aventador S features a number of exterior developments, particularly in front and rear, while its profile remains clearly an Aventador. Every modified component is redesigned for a purpose, achieving maximum aerodynamic efficiency while accenting the Aventador’s complex, muscular dynamism. Furthermore, Lamborghini Centro Stile has intelligently integrated certain elements of past icons, such as the lines of rear wheel arches reminiscent of the original Countach.

A more aggressive nose and longer front splitter redirect airflow for better aerodynamic efficiency, improved engine cooling and increased cooling to the radiators. Two air ducts in the side of the front bumper reduce aerodynamic interference from the front tires and optimize wake flow to the rear radiator.

The rear of the Aventador S is dominated by a black diffuser, available on request in carbon fiber, characterized by a number of vertical fins that amplify the airflow effects, reduce drag through pressure recovery and generate downforce. Three single exhaust outlets exit through the rear bumper.

The active rear wing is movable in three positions depending on speed and drive select mode, and optimizes the car’s improved overall balance, working with vortex generators created in the front and rear of the chassis’ underside that maximize air flow as well as assist in brake cooling.

The Aventador S design results in significantly enhanced aerodynamic performance. Front downforce has been improved by more than 130% over the previous Aventador coupé. When the wing is in its optimum position the overall efficiency at high downforce is improved by over 50%, and in low drag by more than 400% compared to the previous model.

Four masterpieces evolve driving emotion: Four-wheel drive, new active suspension, new four-wheel steering system and the new EGO driving mode

The Aventador S chassis retains the Aventador’s unique and extremely rigid lightweight carbon fiber monocoque with attached aluminum frames resulting in a dry weight of just 1,575 kg.

The Aventador S is redeveloped around a ‘total control concept’ to provide a superior drive, ride and performance; every aspect of the car’s suspension and electronic control systems has been advanced, with the goal of particularly enhanced control and driving emotion.

Enhanced lateral control comes from new four-wheel steering, adopted for the first time on a series production Lamborghini. The system provides improved agility at low and medium speeds and more stability at high speed. On the front axle it is combined with Lamborghini Dynamic Steering (LDS), tuned for a more natural and responsive feel with a sharper turn-in. It is specially adapted to integrate with the active Lamborghini Rear-wheel Steering (LRS) on the rear axle: two separate actuators react in five milliseconds to driver’s steering movements, allowing a real-time angle and cornering stiffness adjustment.

At low speeds, rear wheels wheels face in opposite direction to the steering angle, thereby virtually reducing the wheelbase. With less steering wheel angle required, the Aventador S is more agile with a reduced turning radius, ensuring higher performance in curves and making it easy to maneuver in town and at low speeds.

Conversely at higher speeds both front and rear wheels share the same steering angle, thus virtually extending the wheelbase, providing increased stability and optimizing the responsiveness of the car.

Vertical control comes from Lamborghini’s updated pushrod and Lamborghini Magneto-rheological Suspension (LMS), with revised kinematics adapted to the new four-wheel steering. New suspension geometry, optimized for Lamborghini Rear-wheel Steering, includes upper and lower arm and wheel carrier to reduce caster and load on the system. A new real-time variable damping system optimizes wheel and body control, and balance and ground stiffness is maximized. New rear springs also enhance the car’s balance.

Longitudinal control is achieved via an improved ESC strategy with faster and more precise control of traction control and vehicle dynamics, depending on the driving mode selected. Extensively tested on surfaces such as snow and ice, the Aventador S has improved adhesion detection to maximize grip in all conditions and enhance its handling capabilities. The Aventador S permanent four-wheel drive has been calibrated for the stabilizing effect of the new Lamborghini Rear-wheel Steering, allowing more torque to the rear axle: when powering off the throttle, less torque is shifted to the front axle to allow oversteer behavior and a sporty, but safe drive.

Lamborghini engineers have integrated the smart Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Attiva (LDVA) control unit to manage these systems in the car. LDVA is the new brain of the car, which receives real time and precise information on body motion via input from all sensors of the car. It instantly defines the best set-up of all active systems in order to guarantee the best vehicle dynamics in each and every condition.

EGO concept – customizable driving modes

The Aventador S allows the driver to select between four different driving modes: STRADA, SPORT, CORSA and the new EGO mode, which influence the behavior of traction (engine, gearbox, 4WD), steering (LRS, LDS, Servotronic) and suspension (LMS).

STRADA stands for maximum comfort and daily use. SPORT provides a sporty, rear-wheel drive feel and CORSA is suitable for maximum track performance.

EGO is the new driving mode option. This provides several additional and individual set-up profiles, customizable by the driver, selecting his preferred criteria for traction, steering and suspension within the STRADA, SPORT and CORSA settings.

All driving modes have been recalibrated in the Aventador S, improving ESC integration with all-wheel drive and the interface between engine torque management system and traction control reaction. The continuous torque split to front and rear axles in each driving mode is recalibrated for the Lamborghini Rear-wheel Steering and the differentiation between the driving modes is enhanced.

In STRADA, the progressive damping is smoothed for better comfort and stability on rough roads. Torque is split 40/60 to the front and rear as standard: safe and stable with maximum adhesion, the car is easily driven and controlled.

In SPORT mode, the stabilizing effect of the Lamborghini Rear-wheel Steering allows up to 90% torque to the rear wheels for maximum sportiness and driving fun on curving roads. Driving precision and driver feedback is improved, while maintaining safety and without compromising on comfort. When powering off the accelerator, less torque is shifted to the front axle to enhance the car’s agility, with oversteer and drifting easy using light throttle and steering wheel control.

In CORSA, drivers experience less intrusive dynamic and traction control intervention while maintaining driving precision and traction. High levels of damping force maximize driver feeling and feedback from driver inputs including steering, braking and throttle. Counter-phase steering is enhanced in high-performance situations and torque is balanced to both axles, with a maximum 20/80 split to front and rear for more neutral behavior and to maximize track-oriented performance.
The engine and exhaust

The Lamborghini Aventador’s naturally aspirated twelve cylinder, 6.5 liter engine outputs an additional 40 hp over its predecessor, to a maximum 740 hp, with a 690 Nm of torque at 5,500 rpm. To achieve the power increase, both VVT (Variable Valve Timing) and VIS (Variable Intake System) have been optimized in order to obtain an enriched torque curve. Additionally, the maximum engine revs have been increased from 8,350 to 8,500 rpm. A dry weight of just 1,575 kg provides a weight-to-power ratio of just 2.13 kg/hp. Acceleration from 0-100 km/h is reached in 2.9 seconds, with a top speed of 350 km/h. Transmission is provided by Lamborghini’s lightweight Independent Shifting Rod (ISR) 7-speed shifting system, providing robotized gear shifts in up to 50 milliseconds.

The Aventador S adopts a new exhaust system developed as the result of a significant R&D project. More than 20% lighter than its predecessor and the product of testing multiple configurations, the results are an enhanced

Lamborghini sound and resonance from the already inimitable V12 aspirated engine, with the three single pipe outlets at the rear of the Aventador S a visual reminder of the new exhaust system.

As in its predecessor, the Aventador S is equipped with a stop-and-start system and cylinder deactivation for optimized engine efficiency. When full engine capacity is not required, six of the twelve cylinders are temporarily deactivated by switching off one cylinder bank. When the driver accelerates, the system switches back instantaneously to twelve-cylinder mode, with the changeover virtually impossible to detect by the driver.

Tires and braking system

The Aventador S sits on a new, specially developed set of Pirelli P Zero tires. Designed to optimize steering, traction, lane changes and braking efficiency, the tires are specifically designed to respond to the dynamic behavior induced by the Lamborghini Rear-wheel Steering, ensuring handling consistency and driver feedback. With improved force generation from both front and rear tires, the Pirelli P Zero tires provide a higher lateral acceleration and reduce understeer characteristics.

Carbon ceramic brakes are standard equipment for the Aventador S. The ventilated and perforated carbon ceramic discs (Ø 400 x 38 mm – Ø 380 x 38 mm) enhance braking performance from 100 km/h to standstill in 31 m. Aventador S – a driver’s environment

The cockpit of the Aventador S brings new functionality and refinement. A new TFT digital dashboard can be customized according to the driver’s preferences, with different kombi screens for STRADA, SPORT and CORSA in conjunction with the EGO mode. Selected from the driving modes options on the control panel, the EGO button reveals further options on pop-up digital screens, allowing the driver to choose his preferred settings.

AppleCarPlay comes as a standard specification, allowing the cockpit’s occupants to manage voice activated communications and entertainment from personal Apple devices.

The Lamborghini telemetry system is an optional specification: recording lap times and track performance as well as trip data, the telemetry system is especially appealing to the owner who wants to take his car on track.

The interior specification of the Aventador S is virtually limitless through Lamborghini’s Ad Personam customization program.

Price of the Lamborghini Aventador S and market delivery

The first customers will take delivery of the new Lamborghini Aventador S in Spring 2017 at suggested retail prices as follows:

Europe: EUR 281.555,00 (suggested retail price taxes excluded)

UK: GBP 225.955,00 (suggested retail price taxes excluded)

USA: USD 421.350,00 (suggested retail price – GGT included)

China: RMB 6.739.673,00 (suggested retail price taxes included)

Japan: YEN 41.578.179,00 (suggested retail price taxes included)

2017 Lamborghini Aventador S Photos

2017 Lamborghini Aventador S Specs

Mileage

EPA Fuel Economy Est – Hwy : MPG 18 (Est)
Cruising Range – City : mi 261.80
EPA Fuel Economy Est – City : MPG 11 (Est)
Fuel Economy Est-Combined : MPG 13 (Est)
Cruising Range – Hwy : mi 428.40
EPA MPG Equivalent – City : N/A
EPA MPG Equivalent – Hwy : N/A
EPA MPG Equivalent – Combined : N/A
Battery Range : mi N/A

Fuel Tank

Fuel Tank Capacity, Approx : gal 23.8
Aux Fuel Tank Capacity, Approx : gal N/A

Cargo Area Dimensions

Trunk Volume : ft³ N/A

Brakes

Brake Type : N/A
Brake ABS System : 4-Wheel
Brake ABS System (Second Line) : N/A
Disc – Front (Yes or ) : Yes
Disc – Rear (Yes or ) : Yes
Front Brake Rotor Diam x Thickness : in 15.7
Rear Brake Rotor Diam x Thickness : in 15
Drum – Rear (Yes or ) :  
Rear Drum Diam x Width : in  

Emissions

Tons/yr of CO2 Emissions @ 15K mi/year : 13.6 (Est)
EPA Greenhouse Gas Score : N/A

Transmission

Drivetrain : All Wheel Drive
Trans Order Code :  
Trans Type : 7
Trans Description Cont. : Auto-Shift Manual w/OD
Trans Description Cont. Again :  
First Gear Ratio (:1) : 3.91
Second Gear Ratio (:1) : 2.44
Third Gear Ratio (:1) : 1.81
Fourth Gear Ratio (:1) : 1.46
Fifth Gear Ratio (:1) : 1.19
Sixth Gear Ratio (:1) : 0.97
Reverse Ratio (:1) : 2.93
Clutch Size : in N/A
Final Drive Axle Ratio (:1) : 2.86
Seventh Gear Ratio (:1) : 0.89

Vehicle

EPA Classification : Two-Seaters

Interior Dimensions

Passenger Capacity : 2
Passenger Volume : ft³ 50
Front Head Room : in N/A
Front Leg Room : in N/A
Front Shoulder Room : in N/A
Front Hip Room : in N/A
Second Head Room : in N/A
Second Leg Room : in N/A
Second Shoulder Room : in N/A
Second Hip Room : in N/A

Weight Information

Base Curb Weight : lbs 4085

Trailering

Dead Weight Hitch – Max Trailer Wt. : lbs N/A
Dead Weight Hitch – Max Tongue Wt. : lbs N/A
Wt Distributing Hitch – Max Trailer Wt. : lbs N/A
Wt Distributing Hitch – Max Tongue Wt. : lbs N/A

Engine

Engine Order Code :  
Engine Type : Premium Unleaded V-12
Displacement : 6.5 L/397
Fuel System : Sequential MPI
SAE Net Horsepower @ RPM : 691 @ 8250
SAE Net Torque @ RPM : 507 @ 5500

Electrical

Cold Cranking Amps @ 0° F (Primary) : 380
Maximum Alternator Capacity (amps) : 190

Cooling System

Total Cooling System Capacity : qts N/A

Suspension

Suspension Type – Front : Double Wishbone Pushrod
Suspension Type – Rear : Double Wishbone Pushrod
Suspension Type – Front (Cont.) : Double Wishbone Pushrod
Suspension Type – Rear (Cont.) : Double Wishbone Pushrod
Shock Absorber Diameter – Front : mm N/A
Shock Absorber Diameter – Rear : mm N/A
Stabilizer Bar Diameter – Front : in N/A
Stabilizer Bar Diameter – Rear : in N/A

Tires

Front Tire Order Code :  
Rear Tire Order Code :  
Spare Tire Order Code :  
Front Tire Size : P255/35YR19
Rear Tire Size : P335/30YR20
Spare Tire Size :  

Wheels

Front Wheel Size : in 19 X 9
Rear Wheel Size : in 20 X 12
Spare Wheel Size : in  
Front Wheel Material : Aluminum
Rear Wheel Material : Aluminum
Spare Wheel Material :  

Steering

Steering Type : Rack-Pinion
Steering Ratio (:1), Overall : N/A
Lock to Lock Turns (Steering) : N/A
Turning Diameter – Curb to Curb : ft 41
Turning Diameter – Wall to Wall : ft N/A

Exterior Dimensions

Wheelbase : in 106.3
Length, Overall : in 188.2
Width, Max w/o mirrors : in 79.9
Height, Overall : in 44.7
Track Width, Front : in 67.7
Track Width, Rear : in 66.9
Min Ground Clearance : in 4.1
Liftover Height : in N/A

2017 Lamborghini Aventador S Videos

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Could the Lamborghini Huracán Sterrato Go to Production in 2021?

The Rumor Mill is A-Churnin’

We reported on the Lamborghini Huracán Sterrato when it first popped up as a concept model not very long ago. Now the rumor is that Lambo is seriously considering putting it into production. We thought it would be cool if they built the car, but we didn’t expect the company to actually do it. Is it a sign of the times that a concept this wild could actually go to production? 

Recently, the good people over at Automobile Magazine managed to drive the model and began to speculate as to if it would be built. As they put it, “Signs point to yes.” While nothing has been officially confirmed, Automible says sources told the publication that Lamborghini would produce between 500 and 1,000 units. The price for such a production vehicle? About $270,000. 

Lamborghini Sterrato concept

Lamborghini Sterrato concept

The reasoning goes like this, The company needs to get about five more years out of the Huracán. Next year, 2020, will be for a Super Trofeo Omologato (STO) version of the car. The following year will be for the Sterrato, and the year after that will be for some kind of hybrid model. In 2023, the Superveloce is the likely car. 

Of course, Lamborghini could switch up the order of those vehicles. With that in mind, the 2021 car might not be the Sterrato. It could be one of the other versions mentioned. However, with interest high in this model, we wouldn’t be surprised to see this car come in 2021. 

Lamborghini Shows Off Beastly Huracán Sterrato Concept Off-Roader

Here’s the Huracán Sterrato, Lamborghini’s latest concept off-roader. Seemingly a course-correction of the imperfect Urus, the ride’s a supercar based off the Huracán EVO. It keeps the 640 horsepower, 5.2-liter V10 engine, which comes with the EVO’s LDVI system. Specifically tuned for gruesome off-roading.

First up, the exterior. A number of noticeable upgrades here, including a higher ground clearance by almost two inches. That makes for an improved front approach and departure angle. The wheel track is wider this time, too, both on the front and rear. It’s just a hair over an inch, but that’s significant enough. The 20-inch wheels come fitted with balloon tires. With body wheel arches with integrated air intakes, no less.

Right you are if you’re expecting underbody reinforcements and body protections. This Huracán Sterrato concept build gets a rear skid plate doubling as a diffuser. And a front aluminum skid as well that covers aluminum reinforcements on the front frame. Sides skirts are aluminum-reinforced, too. And you get a composite bodywork with stone-deflecting protection around the engine and air intakes. Let’s not forget the carbon fiber and elastomeric resin mudguards, plus the off-road LED lighting package.

There’s more, of course. The car boasts a lightweight aluminum roll cage, four-point seat belts, carbon bi-shell sport seats, and aluminum floor panels. In a word, this car is scary. But scary in a good way. With terrifying specs to match its formidably stylish exterior, we really wish the Huracán Sterrato wasn’t just a concept. Check out more photos of the fantasy off-roader below. Hit the link to read more information.

MORE INFO HERE

Photos courtesy of Lamborghini

The Huracán Sterrato Concept is the Off-Road Lambo You’ve Only Imagined

This Lambo Looks Built for Rambo

Based on the Huracán EVO, the Huracán Sterrato Concept is the off-road vehicle that you only see in dreams, movies, and children’s drawings. There have been some wild ideas for concept off-roaders, but the fact that Lamborghini decided to actually build a concept car is amazing. 

The Sterrato Concept still has most of the Huracán EVO’s bits, including the 5.2-liter V10 that makes 640 hp. The drive systems have been recalibrated to handle the rigors of off-road terrain. The vehicle has all-wheel drive, four-wheel steering and torque vectoring. 

The car sits up only 0.3 inches higher, so it’s more of a desert sand-slinger rather than a rock-crawler. Approach and departure angles were improved and the decks widened by 1.18 inches. The car receives 20-inch wheels wrapped in off-road rubber. The car gets some added underbody protection and exterior enhancements to protect it from the elements. It gets stone-deflecting protection around the engine and air intakes. There are also various LED lighting additions include a large light bar and LEDs added to the bumper. 

While this might not be the typical Lamborghini, it sure is interesting. Who needs a Urus when you can have this? Oh, right. You can’t have this because it’s a concept, but you know Lambo would sell them if you could. 

Feast Your Eyes on This London Dealership’s Amazing Supercar Inventory

Perhaps the Best Collection of Supercars In London

As you might imagine, there’s a lot of money in London, and that translates to quite a few people owning amazing supercars. There are some dealers out there that buy and sell these cars, and Joe Macari is one of them. The dealer offers some of the best supercars available. In a recent YouTube video, the channel F1 YMS got to take some time and walk the dealership floors. 

There are some truly beautiful cars in the video below. A few of them that catch our eyes are the green Ferrari LaFerrari, the two Ferrari Enzos—one of which features a bare carbon fiber body—two Ferrari F50s, two Ferrari 599 GTOs, a 599 SA Aperta, and a Ferrari 250 SWB. Don’t think it’s all Ferrari’s, though. Joe Macari has multiple McLarens and Lamborghinis, too. 

According to Carscoops, most of the cars shown in the video are for sale. You can browse the dealer’s website if you’d like to see prices or are interesting is spending a little (okay, a lot) of money. Many of these cars will run well into seven figures. If you don’t have that kind of money to spend, then just view the video below and enjoy all of the beauty at the dealership. 

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The Greatest Supercars of the 1990s

The Golden Era – Homologation, The Big Mac and the Rise of the Everyday Supercar. Your Ultimate Guide to the Best Supercars from the 1990s

This is our first in a series of posts about the awesome cars of the 1990s. In this post we curate the best supercars from the 1990s, an era stacked with exotic masterpieces. Some of the defining features of the 1990s supercar era includes the amazing McLaren F1 and the revelation that was the Honda NSX as well as the spirit of competition amongst top manufacturers in prototype racing that created some awesome limited run homologation specials for the road.

The high performance supercar market went from niche to mainstream in the 1980s. Supercars like the Lamborghini Countach, Porsche 959 and Ferrari F40 had collectively wowed car fans the world over in the late 1980s and with Wall Street humming and the global economy in good shape, the appetite for exotic cars only grew going into the early 1990s. As the 1990s started, many pundits wondered however whether we had already reached peak car. After the extraordinary supercars of the eighties, many supercar manufacturers entering the nineties asked “how on earth do we follow that?”

It is impossible to talk about the 1990s supercar era and not mention the impact of the mighty McLaren F1. McLaren came along in the mid-90s with the ultimate supercar, the McLaren F1. The F1 did not just beat the other supercars at the time, it blew them away so convincingly that it wasn’t until the Bugatti Veyron came along more than a decade later that its acceleration and top speed records were beaten. It was Gordon Murray, the former F1 engineer and his obsession with weight savings and attention to detail that redefined what a supercar could be. It was like no other supercar before it (or like any other since), a car that redefined what it meant to be a supercar.

At the other end of the spectrum was the Honda NSX. It came along in the 1990s and shook up Lamborghini, Ferrari and Porsche. Here was a major manufacturer known for small compact Honda Civic cars who created a supercar that was easy to drive, was fast and agile and didn’t break down. Anybody could drive it. It forced all the sports car makers to get better and ushered us all into the world of the everyday supercar. Speaking of everyday Supercar, the 1990s saw the 911 Turbo genuinely scare the top players with more than 400 horsepower, all wheel drive and astonishing performance in a daily driver.

On our list of the best 20 cars, no less than six cars raced. In fact, five of the cars on our top supercars of the ‘90s list were expressly built to race and are known as homologation specials. Carmakers had fully embraced the “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” mantra in the early 1990s and channeled vast amounts of money into trying to find racing glory. Racing homologation rules (stipulating that road-going versions of cars had to be manufactured for homologation) inspired automakers to produce these machines. The FIA GT1 class therefore produced some of the best race cars of the mid-1990s and (thanks to those loosely interpreted homologation requirements), some of the wildest street cars too. These included the Porsche GT1, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR and the insane Dauer 962 LM.

In terms of awesome supercars, the 1990s were the golden age. Fun times indeed. Please read on for our take on the greatest 1990s supercars.

Criteria note: We focused on the first year of manufacture as our criteria for a car making it into the decade. If the car had first been manufactured in the 1980s and was carried over into the 1990s largely unchanged then it belongs in the 1990s (aka Ferrari F40). If it was initially built in the 1980s but was substantially updated or had a sub-model in the 1990s then it could make the 1990s list (aka Ferrari F512 M). 

Author note: This initial article was written by JACK MATTHEWS in May 2017 and was updated by Nick Dellis (with help from car nut Kenny Herman) in May 6th 2019.

20 Best Supercars from the 1990s

Read on for our ranked list of the greatest supercars of the nineties. We discussed whether to rank the cars versus just have an unranked list and realized it was way more fun to have people argue about rankings than not.

Lotus Esprit Sport 350

Lotus Esprit Sport 350

20. Lotus Esprit Sport 350

The best Lotus of the 1990s. Rare, fun, a little underpowered though.

Power: 349 bhp @ 6500 rpm / Torque: 295.0 ft lbs @ 4250 rpm / Engine: 3.5 liter twin-turbo V8 / Produced: 1999 / Base Price: £64 950 / Units made: 50 / Top Speed: 175 mph (281.6 kph) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 4.7 seconds

Having raced the Esprit in GT2 and GT3 classes, Lotus began to develop a new version of the car to race in GT1 class racing. Development of the car was entrusted to the newly formed Lotus GT1 Engineering group, which included many staff from the recently dissolved Team Lotus. For us however the more impressive Lotus of the 1990s was the 1999 Lotus Esprit Sport 350.

It was the ultimate incarnation of the Esprit. Only 50 were made. Taking the V8 GT further, the Sport 350 was one of the most exclusive Esprits made. It featured the standard-spec V8 with blue-painted intake manifolds. What set the 350 Sport apart from the VT GT was a number brake, suspension and chassis improvements. Lowering the kerb weight was a primary design focus for Sport 350. Apart from the weight reduction, the other major change to Sport 350 was its braking system. While exclusivity was offered with the Sport 350, it is a shame Lotus never tuned the engine beyond its standard specification. This is strange given the fact that every other aspect of the car was up-rated for track use. It was one of the closest cars to emulate the track experience on the road.

Read more: Lotus Esprit Sport 350.

Porsche 911 Turbo S (993)

Porsche 911 Turbo S (993)

19. Porsche 911 Turbo S (993)

All wheel drive. Twin turbo flat six engine. Over 400hp. Ludicrous performance. Porsche delivers a daily driver that destroys supercars. The ultimate air cooled 911.   

Power: 424bhp @ 6250 rpm / Torque: 423 lb-ft @ 4500 rpm / Engine: 3.6 L twin-turbo Flat-6 / Produced: 1997 / Base Price: N/A / Units sold: 183 cars produced / Top Speed: 183 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 4.4 seconds

Considered by many Porsche enthusiasts as the “ultimate 911”, the type 993 represented a unique blend of power and simple elegance. The car had a more streamlined look and was “lower slung” than earlier versions of the 911. The styling was perfect and it is still the best looking 911 series. This was the last of the “air-cooled” Porsche 911s (insert sad face here).

The turbo-version of the Type 993 Porsche 911 was also introduced in 1995 and featured a bi-turbo engine that was at the top of the performance pack for the time. For Turbo 993s the 3.6 liter got twin KKK K16 turbos and made 402 hp although you could customize your order (on Turbo S and GT2 models) to up that to 444 hp. The 993 Turbo was the first 911 Turbo with all wheel drive, essentially lifted from the 959 flagship model.

During the second to the last year of production of the 993 (1997), Porsche offered the 993 Turbo S. The X50 power pack had larger turbos, intake and exhaust upgrades, and a new computer. Power upgrade got it to 424 hp and included extras like carbon fiber decoration in the interior as well as very cool yellow brake calipers, a slightly larger rear wing, a quad-pipe exhaust system and air scoops behind the doors. This was the last of the air-cooled 911 Turbos and our favorite.

Read more: Porsche 911 Turbo S (993).

Nissan R390 GT

Nissan R390 GT

18. Nissan R390 GT

The fastest and most expensive Nissan road car ever developed. 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds and 0-100 mph in 6.5 seconds. Road car was capable of 220 mph.

Power: 549.9 bhp @ 6800 rpm / Torque: 470.0 ft lbs @ 4400 rpm / Engine: 3.5-litre twin-turbo V8 / Produced: 1998 / Base Price: ~US$1,000,000 / Units sold: 1 (road car) / Top Speed: 220 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.9 seconds

The ultra-rare Nissan 390R was basically a detuned Le Mans racer offered for sale to the public at a hefty $1,000,000. Only two were made. It was the fastest and most expensive Nissan road car ever developed was created to comply with the Le Mans GT1 Class regulations which required manufacturers to build at least one street-legal version of the race car.

Unlike many others, Nissan built the road car first and built the racing version from it. The R390 GT1 design was the work of Ian Callum at Tom Walkinshaw Racing. Behind the driver sits the heart of this true supercar, the VRH35L twin-turbocharged 3.5-litre double-overhead-camshaft V8 engine with electronic sequential port fuel injection which produces 549.9 bhp @ 6800 rpm while complying with all European market exhaust gas regulations. R390 GT1 performance as one would expect is staggering and includes a sub 4.0 second zero to 60 mph time and top speed north of 220 mph.

Inside are normal road car appliances such as full instrumentation and leather-covered driver and passenger racing seats. The short-throw gear lever for the Xtrac six-speed sequential gearbox and tiny racing steering wheel are reminders of the close alliance between the road car and the vehicle which captured four out of the top-ten spots in the 1998 Le Mans 24-hour race.

Read more: Nissan R390 GT

Aston Martin V8 Vantage 1990s

Aston Martin V8 Vantage 1990s

17. Aston Martin V8 Vantage

Big, bruising and totally nuts. This twin-supercharged V8 Aston was the most powerful car in the world for a while. Handling sucked, quality was iffy, but it was still very cool.

Power: 550.0 bhp @ 6500 rpm / Torque: 550.0 ft lbs @ 4000 rpm / Engine: Twin Supercharged V8 / Produced: 1993 – 2000 / Top Speed: 186 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 4.5 seconds / Base Price: NA / Units sold: 281 cars made

Bullish, aggressive and in many ways a tad ham-fisted when compared to today’s lithe, delicate yet calmly aggressive Astons, the Vantage battered its way to 186mph with the help of its 5.3-litre supercharged V8 mounted ahead of the driver and sending power to the rear.

The Vantage was one of the cars that emerged during the era of Aston Martin’s ownership by Ford Motor Company, and featured harsher edges to its styling than had been seen on many Aston Martins previously. This styling was taken a step further in 1999, with the release of the Aston Martin Vantage Le Mans. The special edition’s looks came somewhere between that of a bull and a shark, which fit the 600bhp machine’s personality quite well.

Read more: Aston Martin V8 Vantage

Ferrari F512 M

Ferrari F512 M

16. Ferrari F512 M

Last production mid-engine flat-12 model and the final iteration of the famed Testarossa. Updated chassis and engine massively improved performance and driving experience.

Power: 440 bhp @ 6750 rpm / Torque: 368.8 lb/ft @ 5500 rpm / Engine: 4.9 L Tipo F113 G Flat-12 / Produced: 1995–1996 / Base Price: N/A / Units sold: 501 produced / Top Speed: 196 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 4.6 seconds

We chose the F512 M over the 512 TR as our favorite Ferrari Testarossa. The result of constant evolution, the 512M shared almost all of its engineering from the 512 TR that came before it. The F512 M was the last version of the Testarossa.

The F512 M sports had the same 4.9-litre Tipo F113 G longitudinally mid mounted flat-12 engine with 440.0 hp at 6,750 rpm. Most of the changes were limited to slight body upgrades that many consider ruin the lines of the original design. In our eyes it looks better so it got the nod over the 512 TR. The front and rear lamps received a design change. The pop-up headlamps were replaced by two fixed square units. The rear tail lamps were round and the bumpers had been restyled to yield a more unified look as well as the addition of cool twin NACA ducts.

Read more: Ferrari F512 M in detail

Porsche 911 GT3 (996.1)

Porsche 911 GT3 (996.1)

15. Porsche 911 GT3 (996.1)

This is where the GT3 legend begins. Porsche wanted to go racing in the GT3 endurance category and developed this 3.6 liter Mezger engined masterpiece. Thank you Porsche.

Power: 360 @ 7200 rpm / Torque: 273 lb/ft @ 5000 rpm / Engine: 3.6L Water Cooled Flat-6 / Produced: 1999–2001 / Base Price: $90,000 / Units sold: ~1,868 cars produced / Top Speed: 187.7 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 4.5 seconds

The GT3 we love today all started in 1999 with the 996 model GT3 and it all started because Porsche wanted to enter the GT3 class of the FIA. Porsche began investing in developing both the race car and the road-going version which was required by GT class homologation rules and the GT3 was the result. The GT3 became the 996’s range-topping model until a new GT2 was launched.

Based on the 996 Carrera, the 996 GT3 was a really a track focused sports car that was lighter, sharper and more potent than its everyday sports model siblings. To help in the performance stakes, the GT3 the water-cooled flat six was loosely based on the GT1 and got a dry-sump crankcase with an external oil tank making it more powerful and higher revving. Gone were the rear seats, sunroof, air conditioning, radio and a boatload of sound deadening.

Major design changes included a more aggressive front end with larger headlamps shared with the Boxster, a sleeker body, and a more raked windshield. Design and aerodynamic features exclusive to the GT3 included slimmer air vents for the front bumper, a front splitter, new side skirts, a revised rear bumper, new wheels, and massive rear wing.

The GT3 quickly became the choice for drivers because of its remarkably sharp throttle response, better steering, steady balance, and amazing engine. While a Turbo had it beat for outright speed, this was the ultimate drivers Porsche. Its lighter body and race tuned suspension tuning also made it a perfect machine for attacking weekend drivers who wanted a track car.

If you are in the U.S you may at this point wonder why you can’t find any GT3s from the era for sale. Porsche did not bring the GT3 to the United States until 2004 (see the 996.2 model just below).

Read more: 2000 Porsche 911 GT3

Pagani Zonda C12-S

Pagani Zonda C12-S

14. Pagani Zonda C12-S

Brought back the magic to the supercar world

Power: 550 bhp @ 5500 rpm / Torque: 553.2 lb/ft @ 4100 rpm / Engine: Mercedes AMG V1 (7010 cc) / Produced: 1999-2002 / Top Speed: 210.1 mph (338.0 km/h) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.8 seconds / Base Price: NA / Units sold: US$325,000

My favorite car debuted in 1999. Most people think the Zonda was a car from the early 2000s. While it was the 2002 Zonda with the upgraded 7.3-liter V12 that people remember, Pagani had already been successfully marketing the Zonda for three years up till that point. It was originally launched as the C12-S in 1999.

Read more: Pagani Zonda posts / Pagani Zonda C12-S

Dodge Viper RT:10 ‘Phase II SR’

Dodge Viper RT:10 ‘Phase II SR’

13. Dodge Viper RT/10 ‘Phase II SR’

8 liters of truly brutal American muscle

Power: 415.0 bhp @ 5200 rpm / Torque: 488.0 ft lbs @ 3600 rpm / Engine: Naturally aspirated 8 liter V10 / Produced: 1996-2002 / Base Price: US$58,500 / Units sold: NA / Top Speed: 170.0 mph (273.6 kph) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 4.7 seconds

Some might not consider the original Dodge Viper a supercar, but at the time of its release it was a revelation with its aggressive looks and insane 8-liter V10 engine. The 1996 RT/10 could be referred to as a second generation Viper and it featured a host of upgrades over earlier Vipers produced from 1992 to 1995. It was a much better car. Outwardly the main difference to the 1996 Viper was the absence of side exhausts which were replaced with two standard exhausts exiting the rear. The three spoke wheels were also gone and replaced with 5-spoke counterparts. Inside, the cabin remained largely unchanged, but a removable roof was standard as was sliding plastic panels for the windows. Underneath, the chassis was stiffened, suspension geometry revised and a more robust rear differential was installed.

Our pick of the 1990s Viper’s was the GTS which was launched in 1996. It was a more powerful version of the RT/10 with 450 hp and a new double bubble coupe body. Beyond more power though, the GTS had over 90% new parts compared to the RT/10. In 1997 and 1998 model years the Viper would continue to receive minor updates and the GTS would get second-generation airbags, revised exhaust manifolds, and a revised camshaft for 1997, and the RT/10 would gain a power increase up to 450 hp (336 kW; 456 PS) for 1998.

Read more: Dodge Viper RT/10 ‘Phase II SR’

Toyota GT-One

Toyota GT-One

12. Toyota GT-One

A pure-bred Le Mans car, created specifically to contest the world’s most famous 24-hour race with no compromise in terms of design or engineering. Road version equally nuts.

Power: 600 bhp @ 6,000 rpm / Torque: 479 lb/ft / Engine: 3.6 liter 90-degree V8 twin-turbo / Produced: 1998 / Base Price: US$1,400,000 / Units sold: 2 / Top Speed: 236 mph (380 kph) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.2 seconds

The Toyota TS020, better-known in Europe as the Toyota GT-One, is a pure-bred Le Mans car, created specifically to contest the world’s most famous 24-hour race with no compromise in terms of design or engineering. The engine had its heritage in the twin-turbo V8 which powered Toyota’s Group C cars in the late 1980s.

In accordance with the FIA rules of the day, the GT-One had also to be developed as a legal road car. In fact the differences between the race and road versions were small: in road-going mode, the rear wing was set lower and the suspension ride height was raised. A smaller fuel tank was fitted and the addition of catalytic converters ensured the vehicle complied with emissions regulations. Toyota says the engineers at Toyota Motorsport GmbH created just two ‘production’ TS020 GT-Ones – one is on display in its museum, the other in Japan.

Read more: 1998 Toyota GT-One

Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion

Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion

11. Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion

Porsche wants race. Takes 993-based 911 and grafts it to the rear-end of a 962. Adds twin-turbo 3.2-liter water-cooled flat-six engine capable of developing 600 hp. Done.

Power: 544 bhp @ 7,000 rpm / Torque: 443 ft lbs @ 4,250 rpm / Engine: 3.2-liter twin-turbo flat-six / Produced: 1996-1998 / Base Price: ~US$900,000 / Units sold: 23 / Top Speed: 193 mph (310 kph) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.4 seconds

Porsche management wanted to compete in factory-based GT racing programs. It developed a brand new car. Basically it was 993-based 911 and essentially grafted it to the rear-end of a 962. dropped a twin-turbocharged 3.2-liter water-cooled flat-six engine capable of developing 600 hp. A futuristic 911-inspired carbon fiber shell finished the exterior packaging.

In order for Porsche to enter the highly competitive GT1 category back in 1996, a total of 23 road going-machines had to be built. To be specific there were two 1996 cars, 20 1997 cars and only one variant was built in 1998. The Strassenversion (road going) uses a 3.2-litre twin-turbo flat-six engine which puts out 536bhp and 443lb ft of torque. Now these might not seem like big numbers compared to modern supercars like the Porsche 918, but considering the GT1 only weighed 1120kg, the GT1 could get to 62mph in around 3.4 seconds. Unfortunately the GT1 was routinely beaten on track by Mercedes’ ferocious CLK-GTR. As a result, Porsche – along with a number of other manufacturers – pulled out of the GT1 class for 1999, effectively killing the championship class.

Read more: Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion

Ruf CTR-2 Sport

Ruf CTR-2 Sport

10. RUF CTR-2 & Ruf CTR-2 Sport

Might be based on a Porsche 911, but the Ruf CTR2 is far from a typical German sports car. Almost 520 hp from a Le Mans-derived twin-turbo engine. Straight line monster.

Power: 520 bhp @ 5800 rpm / Torque: 505.2 ft lbs @ 4800 rpm / Engine: 3.6 liter air-cooled twin-turbo flat-6 / Produced: 1995-1997 / Base Price: US$315,000 / Units sold: 16 standard CTR2, 12 CTR2 “Sport” / Top Speed: 220 mph (354 km/h) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.5 seconds

Based on the 993-chassis 911 Turbo the CTR2 featured either the standard rear-wheel drive or an optional all-wheel-drive. It had a totally upgraded and custom suspension system, uprated brakes and integrated roll-cage as well as a very custom and cool wing. The body was made out of kevlar to save weight. The heart of the CTR2 was the race derived air-cooled Porsche 3.6 litre. It had twin-turbos and was based on the engine used in the Porsche 962 Le Mans Group C car. The team at RUF tuned it to produce 520 hp 505 ft lbs of torque.

In addition to the “regular” CTR2 was the CTR2 Sport. Built up from a Porsche 911 Turbo body-in-white, RUF manufactured the CTR-2 Sport for ultimate outright performance. The specially built engine was tuned to produce almost 600 hp depending on boost. Options included a roll-cage, a clutchless RUF EKS transmission, adjustable torque bias, adjustable boost control. This is the ultimate in straight line insanity, able to accelerate to sixty in 3.5 seconds (in 1995) and onto a top speed north of 220 mph. Crazy.

Read more: 1997 Ruf CTR-2, 1997 Ruf CTR-2 Sport

Mercedes-Benz CLK-GTR

Mercedes-Benz CLK-GTR

9. Mercedes-Benz CLK-GTR

Homologation special madness by the crazy Germans at Mercedes-Benz. Only car here that can easily do a backflip for those fun “what-the-f**k” moments.

Power: 612.0 bhp @ 6800 rpm / Torque: 571.6 ft lbs @ 5250 rpm / Engine: 6.9 liter Mercedes-Benz M120 V12 / Produced: 1998–1999 / Top Speed: 191 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.4 seconds / Base Price: US$1,547,000 / Units sold: 20 coupes, 6 roadsters

The CLK GTR was born out of Mercedes-Benz desire to duke it out against Ferrari and Porsche in the FIA GT Championship. Essentially taking elements of a CLK racer and some road car trimmings and mashing them together, they produced the prototype in time for the 1997 season.

Although the 1999 GT1 class was cancelled, Mercedes-Benz had already promised 25 road-going homologation versions to customers and was obliged to produce these. Customer cars featured a 6.9-litre V12 which produced 604bhp, bestowing the GTR with ballistic performance – 0-60mph took 3.8 seconds, on the way to a top speed of 214mph.

This came at a steep price; despite comforts being kept to a minimum in an effort to save both weight and cost, the production CLK GTR was listed at the time as the most expensive production car ever built in the Guinness Book of World Records, costing $1,547,620.

In 1999, Mercedes-Benz were due to race a CLR – a track-focused version of the CLK GTR – at Le Mans, until in qualifying on the back straight of the Circuit du Sarthe Mark Webber’s car took off, flipping several times as it tumbled into the bushes. In the race itself, a second similar incident took place while Peter Dumbreck was at the wheel, leading Mercedes to withdraw from the event and move away from sports car racing.

Read more: 1998 Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR Straßenversion

Jaguar XJ220 - Best 90s SupercarsJaguar XJ220 - Best 90s Supercars

8. Jaguar XJ220

Jaguar’s first production supercar, the XJ220 was a bold step. Crappy sounding engine and huge turbo lag. Held top speed record till McLaren F1 came along.

Power: 542.0 bhp @ 7000 rpm / Torque: 475.0 ft lbs @ 4500 rpm / Engine: TWR 6R4 V6 (twin turbo) / Produced: 1992 – 1994 / Top Speed: 217 mph (349.2 kph) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.9 sec / Base Price: US$700,000 / Units sold: 281 cars made

The XJ220 started life as a mid-engine, four-wheel-drive concept car developed by Jaguar employees in their spare time. That initial concept was planned around a V12 powerplant. By the time the first customer cars were delivered in 1992, a twin-turbo 3.5-litre V6 sat mid ship, delivering 542bhp. The basic shape and aims of the car remained the same however.

With a top speed of 212mph, the XJ220 was the fastest production car from its launch through to 1993, when it was topped by another British-built speed machine. This peaked initial interest in the car, but between the 1990s financial recession and the car’s retail price of £470,000, few took up the offer of ownership and only 281 cars were produced throughout its run.

It was handy on the track too; it went straight to the top of the Nurburgring time sheets in 1991, recording a lap of 7:46:36; Hardly surprising, considering it was built with help from Tom Walkinshaw racing.

Read more: Jaguar XJ220

7. Lamborghini Diablo GT

Lighter, faster and better handling than all other Diablos. Race car modifications finally made the outrageous Diablo a serious road racing supercar.

Power: 575.0 bhp @ 7300 rpm / Torque: 465.0 ft lbs @ 5500 rpm / Engine: 6.0 liter 60 Degree V12 / Produced: 1999-2000 (Diablo GT) / Top Speed: 215 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.6 seconds / Base Price: US$309,000 / Units sold: 83 cars made

Lamborghini were never ones for making their own job any easier. This is the manufacturer that built the Miura then gave itself the task of following it; they managed that – in terms of impact if not necessarily driving experience – with the incredible Countach. Entering the nineties, they had to do it again.

Enter Diablo, the name literally translating as Devil (check). At launch it was fitted with a 5.7-litre V12 producing 485bhp, enough to launch its sleek and flash, yet still muscular body from 0-60 in 4.5 seconds and on to a top speed of 196bhp.

The Diablo, despite its nefarious name, was somewhat tamer than the car that came before it. It featured carbon fibre in the cockpit, but this was surrounded with luxurious leather trim.

That’s not to say it wasn’t without its evil side, most potent in later iterations the 510bhp SV and the rear-wheel-drive SE30 Jota – featuring that 5.7-litre V12 bumped up to 595bhp and various racing-focused changes that revealed the Diablo’s darker side. Only 15 Jotas were delivered from the factory, though 28 kits were produced, making this one of the rarest Lambos of the era.

Our pick of the litter is the Diablo GT. Lamborghini introduced the Diablo GT in 1998 based on the formula of the SE30 and the SE30 Jota. It combined the modifications of the GT2 race car with the outrageousness of the Diablo to offer serious road racing performance. So much so, it remains as the fastest road-going Diablo ever made by the factory. At the time of delivery in September 1999, the Diablo GT was also one of the fastest supercars as well, reaching a top speed of 215 mph (346 kph). It was easily the best Diablo made.

For the detailed oriented, about is a picture of the GTR. It took the GT and made it even crazier. Interior was stripped bare, it got a full roll cage and things like the stereo, soundproofing, and air conditioning were all removed. Add some Plexiglass windows, a fire suppression system, and single seat with a six-point harness. Hardcore. 

Read more: Lamborghini Diablo GT

Ferrari F50 Best 90s Supercars

Ferrari F50 Best 90s Supercars

6. Ferrari F50

Ferrari’s most undeservedly underrated supercar. Superb.

Power: 513.1 bhp @ 8500 rpm / Torque: 347 lb/ft @ 6500 rpm / Engine: 4.7 L DOHC 65 degree Tipo F130B V12 / Produced: 1995 – 1997 / Top Speed: 202 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.7 seconds / Base Price: $480,000 / Units sold: 349

So far in this countdown, we’ve had a lot of homologation-special racing cars repurposed for the road to meet the entry requirements for their respective championships. The F50 was different in that it featured components of an actual racing car, toned down only slightly for the road.

The Ferrari F50 began life with a tough act to follow. Its predecessor, the F40, had blown the motoring world away through the eighties and well into the nineties. Ferrari had to pull something very special out of their hats to follow Enzo’s final sign off for the company.

Their starting point was one of their old racing engines; the 3.5-litre V12 from the company’s 1990 F1 car. This was bored out to 4.7-litres before being mounted mid-ship in a carbon fibre monocoque chassis.

The resulting machine produced 513bhp, sent to the rear wheels in a car that weighed just 1320kg. The result? 0-60 in 3.8 seconds, a claimed top speed of 202mph and a deafening driving experience that shook owners to their cores. For those seeking an even more visceral experience, the roof could be removed.

Sadly the F50 could never live up to its legendary predecessor. In tests, its top speed came up far short of the F40’s 201mph, and the more bloated F50 was never as pure an experience as the car that went before it. Still, we feel it deserves a place on the list of the greatest supercars of the nineties.

Read more: Ferrari F50

Dauer 962 Le Mans

Dauer 962 Le Mans

5. Dauer 962 Le Mans

Dauer showed up to Le Mans with road and race versions and promptly won. FIA changed the rules to make sure the 962 wouldn’t be back in 1995. Now that is badass.

Power: 730.0 bhp @ 8250 rpm / Torque: 517.0 lb/ft @ 5000 rpm / Engine: 3 liter water-cooled twin turbo flat-six / Produced: 1994 / Base Price: $1,200,000 / Units sold: 13 / Top Speed: 253 mph (405 kph) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 2.7 seconds

One of the weirder footnotes in Le Mans history is the Dauer 962, which won the race in 1994 thanks to some creative rulebook interpretation.

From 1983 forward, the Porsche 956 and its 962 IMSA spec version dominated for a decade. Porsche manufactured nearly 150 956/962s and sold many of the cars to private teams. Dauer took a handful of these Porsche 962s and modified them for street use. It is one of the most extraordinary cars to be sold for the streets, but that’s what allowed Porsche to enter the 962 in the GT category at Le Mans in 1994.

Of the companies that have produced a 962 road car, the most successful has been Dauer. After displaying their first 962 at the 1993 Frankfurt Show, Dauer partnered with Porsche to manufacture a contender for the 1994 24 Hours of LeMans. At the 24 hour race, Dauer showed up with both a road version and race version of the Porsches 962, a design which had already won Le Mans six times. After winning the race, the FIA declared it would be creating rules to make sure the 962 wouldn’t be back in 1995. However, with a Le Mans win under their belt, and with support from Porsche, Dauer continued to build their road-going 962.

Read more: Dauer 962 Le Mans.

Porsche 911 GT2

Porsche 911 GT2

4. Porsche 911 GT2

Wide arches, rear wheel drive, Turbo engine. GT2 craziness begins here.

Power: 444 bhp @ 6000 rpm / Torque: 431.5 lb/ft @ 4500 rpm / Engine: 3.6 L twin-turbo Flat-6 / Produced: 1995–1996 / Base Price: NA / Units sold: 57 cars produced / Top Speed: 187 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.7 seconds

I dread to think what the nineties supercar scene would have been like had it not been for homologation requirements. The track-focused, road-going 911 GT2 was introduced in 1993, initially to meet the requirements for GT2 regulations.

The formula of ultra-light, high-power and track credentials seemed to strike a chord with Porsche’s customer base, as the German marque kept the twin-turbo track rocket on its order sheets all the way through to 2012.

424bhp came courtesy of the rear-mounted 3.6-litre power plant, fed air through neatly-positioned intakes at either end of the GT2’s colossal rear wing. Other contemporary road-going 911s of the day also had four-wheel-drive, though this was scrapped in the GT2 in favour of racier rear-wheel-drive.

This made the 993-generation GT2 quite the handful on track or on the road, and a certain level of driving prowess is required to keep one pointing in the right direction over a “spirited” series of bends. You know is good when it gets a top 20 finish in our best Porsche’s ever list.

Read more: 1998 Porsche 911 GT2

Bugatti EB110

Bugatti EB110

3. Bugatti EB110

With a quad turbo, 3.5-litre V-12 the Bugatti EB110 GT seemingly defined the term “supercar”. It was one of the most technologically advanced cars of the 1990s.

Power:  650.0 hp @ 8000 rpm / Torque: 477 lb/ft @ 4200 rpm / Engine: 60 Degree quad-turbo V12 / Produced: 1992 – 1995 / Top Speed: 217 mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.35 seconds / Base Price: US$380,000 / Units sold: 31 cars made

Initially revealed on the company’s founder, Ettore Bugatti’s 110th birthday in 1991, the EB110 came to be the last Italian-produced Bugatti before VAG took over the troubled automaker.

These days the Bugatti name stands purely for all-out speed and refinement, and though the EB110 was never a record breaker at the top end of the speed stakes, topping out at 216mph in the era of the McLaren F1, it was capable of reaching 62mph in just 3.2 seconds in 1992 Supersport trim – one of the fastest cars of its era over that dash.

That rapid acceleration was mostly thanks to the Bugatti’s 3.5-litre, quad-turbo V12, which transferred 604bhp to the road through all four wheels.

There’s something really appealing about all of the little design details on the EB110 which could be easily overlooked; from the cluster of circular air intakes just behind the doors, to the elegantly simple interior, all the way down to the gearshift layout positioned on the transmission tunnel, keeping the gear knob uncluttered.

Read more: Bugatti EB110

Honda / Acura NSX

Honda / Acura NSX

2. Honda / Acura NSX

The car that shook the supercar world. A supercar that could be driven every day, didn’t break down and anybody could drive. Thank this car for today’s supercars being usable.

Our Pick: 1998 ACURA NSX-T / Power: 290 bhp @ 7100 rpm / Torque: 224 lb/ft @ 5500 rpm / Engine: 3.2L VTEC 6 Cylinder 290 hp / Produced: 1990-2005 / Top Speed: 162.2-mph / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 4.8 seconds / Base Price: $88,725

1991 saw the launch of a supercar that caused a shock across the whole automotive scene. With the NSX project, Honda set out to build a true supercar that had none of the ergonomic issues or reliability problems that plagued exotica at the time.

Sold under the Acura brand in the States, and the Honda brand across the rest of the world, the NSX featured a 3.0-litre V6 with Honda’s trademark VTEC technology supplying the power, mounted mid-ship with extra consideration to the positioning of the seats and fuel tank for optimal weight distribution.

Honda’s pedantic construction of the car paid off; famous fans of the NSX included none other than Ayrton Senna himself, and the handling was enough to take the fight to the supercar elite of the day and cement the NSX’s place in supercar history – even becoming the reference point for a certain McLaren still to come on our nineties list.

Our pick of the range is the 1997 NSX-T. Acura increased the DOHC 24-valve VTEC V-6’s displacement from 3.0 liters to 3.2 and replaced the five-speed manual with a six-speed box for 1997. That meant 290 horsepower and 224 pound-feet of torque from the normally aspirated, 8000-rpm-redline engine. The immediacy of the NSX’s reflexes is matched with elegance and phenomenal precision and the engine’s flyweight reciprocating assembly loves to rev.

Read more: Honda/Acura NSX

McLaren F1

McLaren F1

1. McLaren F1

The best ever. Period. The end. Obsessive focus leads to the creation of the greatest supercar of all time.

Our Pick: McLaren F1 LM / Power: 671 bhp @ 7800 rpm (F1 LM) / Torque: 520 lb/ft @ 4500 rpm (F1 LM) / Engine: 6.1 L (6,064 cc) BMW S70/2 V12 / Produced: 1993–1998 / Top Speed: 240.1 mph (386.4 km/h) / Acceleration (0-60 mph): 3.2 seconds / Base Price: ~US$650,000 / Units sold: 106 cars

If cars like the Ferrari F40 and Porsche 959 began the chase for something beyond the supercar, then McLaren birthed it with the F1. Gordon Murray’s masterpiece was for a long time the fastest production car ever made. Its top speed of 240 mph puts much of even today’s supercar crowd to shame, and ergonomic features like the driver-centered, three-seat cockpit have rarely been seen since.

The technical challenge of getting a road car to such incredible speeds was one unlike any other manufacturer had undertaken. McLaren, after initially seeking out Honda power given the two company’s success together in Formula One racing, eventually settled on a 6.1-litre BMW V12. This was mounted in the middle of the car, and put 618bhp through the rear wheels.

The F1 was also the first production car to use a carbon fibre monocoque chassis, and gold famously lined the engine bay to aid with heat dispersal. This effort paid off, granting the F1 a staggering 0-60 time of 3.2 seconds and that all-important 240 mph top speed.

After delivering 100 customer cars McLaren stopped production after seven prototypes, 64 road cars, 5 special F1 LMs (built to commemorate victory at Le Mans in 1995), three F1 GTs (road going versions of the long tail 1997 F1 GTR race car) and 28 F1 GTR road cars. Of these, the Sultan of Brunei owns the most, and has two very special black F1 LMs with striking Pininfarina graphics as well as an exact replica of the F1 GTR that won LeMans.

Read more: All McLaren F1 posts

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Lamborghini Finds and Certifies the Miura P400 From the Original ‘The Italian Job’

After Five Decades

If you’ve ever seen the original “The Italian Job,” then you’ve probably drooled over the orange Miura P400 in the opening scenes. Then you probably cried when it was destroyed. However, the car wasn’t actually destroyed. The movie used an already wrecked Miura to shoot those scenes. The real car lived on, though nobody knew where. It was lost despite collectors trying to find it. 

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Lamborghini Polo Storico recently announced it found the car and certified it as chassis number #3586. According to Carscoops, Lamborghini didn’t have much to do with actually finding it. The owner brought it in. However, the company did do the arduous task of verifying it by searching through records and comparing what it did know about the car. 

Apparently, after the car was used in the film, it was driven back to the factory and then delivered to its first owner. From there it changed hands several times. Fritz Kaiser, the car’s current owner, bought the car in 2018 and decided to have Lamborghini Polo Storico take a closer look at it. He has to be happy with the results. 

The Missing Lamborghini Miura Resurfaces

Film buffs out there remember that a Lamborghini Miura P400 was destroyed in the opening scenes of The italian Job, released in 1969. Where has that vehicle been since?

Not many people know this, but there were actually two rides that day. One had previously been wrecked, and the other was a fully functioning Lamborghini Miura. That surviving variant didn’t see the light of day for decades after the movie’s release. You’re looking at it now, though.

Lamborghini has now confirmed that this is, in fact, the Miura from the movie. The automaker calls this its most wanted car in 1969, which is easy to believe. It looks incredibly sleek and refreshing, especially in that vibrant orange colorway. The movie made it even cooler.

A customer bought this Miura as new in Rome once the movie wrapped up and didn’t surface much ever since. In 2018, Lamborghini later found it, a number of hand-passing later, in Lichtenstein, from owner Fritz Kaiser. He shelled out a little over half a million dollars for it, just so you know. It’s probably worth more now, though.

“The car was sent to Lamborghini’s specialist historic department at its Sant’ Agata Bolognese headquarters, where Polo Storico’s reconstruction started from documentation in the company archives and from examining the car,” according to Lamborghini. Several testimonies and a rigorous process of evidence-checking later, the company confirmed its origins.

It now stands fully varnished in newness, a relic of automotive and cinematic excellence in with a modern coat of paint. Check out more photos of this dazzling ride below.

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Photos courtesy of Lamborghini

Why Exotic Super SUV’s Are The Way Of The Future

Less than a decade ago, the distinction between SUV’s and other vehicle types was clear. The introduction of SUV cross-overs brought about a new breed of SUV. An off-shoot of these cross-over SUVs came to being once sports car manufacturers entered the SUV market, creating the “Super SUV.”

The idea was to provide everything in one vehicle – a powerful engine, elegant design, luxury interior, and unparalleled performance with a 4×4 option. Lamborghini came up with the term Super SUV in 2017, when they released the concept of the Lamborghini Urus.

Following in their footsteps, other major sports car manufacturers also joined in.

The S-SUV Future

Range Rover Super SUV
[Image via Autocar]

Sports cars have traditionally featured two-seats, with some exceptions offering four passenger options as well. However, that’s not enough for some people. Super SUV’s are 5-7 seater vehicles, boasting powerful engines that make light work of the added weight.

Super SUVs deliver a faster, more comfortable off-road experience. Imagine sitting in the luxury of a Bentley while crossing the Himalayan plains, or cruising through the desert with a Ferrari roaring under you. As these super crossovers make their way into the mainstream, maintaining these vehicles also doesn’t demand much effort.

For instance, in Arizona, you can explore the Apache Trail in your S-SUV, or cruise the historic Route 66.

There’s no worry if you damage your windshield because SunTec’s Scottsdale windshield replacement crew will have you sorted in no time! SunTec Auto Glass specializes in repairing and replacing windshields and auto glass on exotics, supercars, and of course Super-SUV’s.

The future is all about convenience and this is precisely why Super SUVs are set to take over the automobile industry. An all-in-one option is an automotive enthusiast’s dream come true — spacious cabins, higher seats, and more driving options.

Eventually, it is estimated that future S-SUV’s will be more affordable, providing a luxurious and powerful alternative to sports cars and SUV’s alike.

The Lamborghini Urus

Lamborghini Urus Super SUV
[Image via Lamborghini]

Lamborghini’s first attempt at an SUV caused ripples across the automobile industry. A combination of Lamborghini’s classic style coupled with outstanding performance, the Urus starts out at $200,000.

Its twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8 delivers a whopping 641 horsepower on an all-wheel configuration alongside an eight-speed automatic transmission. This powerful engine boasts a 0-60mph time of 3.2 seconds!

The interior has a classic Lamborghini jetfighter-style design that has all the hallmarks of a luxury SUV and sports car. From leather seats to adjustable gauges, go from luxury to raw power in seconds, literally.

The Bentley Bentayga

Bentley Bentayga Super SUV
[Image via Bentley]

Bentley was looking to rock the SUV world and their introduction of the Bentley Bentayga blew everyone away with a top speed of 187 mph! With a price tag of $197,725, the Bentayga is a supercar in an SUV’s body – the very definition of a Super SUV.

A twin-turbo 6.0-liter W12 engine under the hood delivers a robust 600 horsepower. Along with the eight-speed automatic transmission and all-wheel drive, the Bentayga goes 0-60 mph in 3.6 seconds.

The entirely leather interior comfortably seats 5 people. The full-option Bentayga also offers 22-inch alloy rims as well as an absolutely ridiculous 1,950-watt, 20 speaker audio system and back-seat entertainment tablets.

The Maserati Levante

Maserati Levante Super SUV
[Image via Motor Trend]

Following the trend of Super SUV’s, Maserati came up with the relatively cheaper Levante starting at $77,475. Positioned as the reinvention of Italian luxury, the Levante is available in four varieties with individual engine capacities and features.

The base version has a twin-turbocharged V-6 capable of 345 horsepower. Maserati’s Trofeo version put out an unimaginable 550 horsepower but also costs an eye-watering $171,475. The all-wheel base version goes 0-60 mph in 5.1 seconds, rivaling mid-tier sports cars.

With a specific focus on the leather-intensive interior, Maserati has also splashed out on a fully automatic, state-of-the-art, all-inclusive infotainment system. While the Levante cuts corners on trunk space, it offers a world-class luxury experience.

Lamborghini To Introduce Fourth Model to Lineup?

A 2+2 GT Could be Coming

In a recent interview, Lamborghini’s CEO Stefano Domenicali said that a fourth model could be coming in the future. He spoke with Autocar recently and said that once the automaker can increase volume and then stabilize that volume that a fourth Lambo model would make sense.

He did not say how long this would take. “But we are not strong or stable enough to invest in a fourth model right now,” Domenicali told Autocar.

The company things volume with its current lineup could go as high as 8,000 units per year. This last year, the company sold a record-high 5750 vehicles, so there’s still a ways to go before they reach the point where a fourth vehicle could enter the lineup. When that does happen, though, the vehicle would likely be a 2+2 GT car.

“The idea is for a grand tourer, a 2+2,” Domenicali said. “That is something we are working on already.” What exactly that car will be like is yet to be determined. Lamborghini obviously knows, but it’s keeping the details of that development close to its vest at this point in the game.

Carscoops suggests it could be like the Lamborghini Estoque concept from a decade ago. That car would fit the profile for what Domenicali is talking about. It would likely be seriously updated from the original concept, though in many ways, including powertrain, technology, and styling. We wouldn’t be surprised to see Lamborghini make a hybrid variant of the car, too. By the time it comes out, hybrid and electric vehicle technology will have likely progressed considerably.