All posts in “Gear”

Mission Workshop Introduces the Ultimate Commuter Bag: Khyte Messenger

Hand-built to last a lifetime, the Khyte Messenger bag from Mission Workshop features 2-layer weatherproof construction to keep out the elements & safely, securely transport all your gear for work & life. From the bicycle commute to the meeting room, it keeps your laptop, tablet, & other daily essentials within reach. The 24-liter design features 3 Arkiv rails for attaching MW’s range of specialized accessories, Fidlock magnetic fasters, & 2 shoulder straps for custom carry.

Run Into Winter with Nike’s Air Pegasus 36 Trail GTX

Integrating a waterproof & breathable Gore-Tex membrane into the Air Pegasus 36 Trail gives Nike’s popular runner a lightweight winter coat that will keep out rain & snow. At the same time, Gore-Tex allows sweat to be transported away from your feet to keep you dry & comfortable as the days get colder. Double Air zoom cushioning insures comfort for many miles. Available 10/10.

Today’s Best Deals: Save on Our Favorite Running Earbuds, a 2-For-1 Knife Deal & More

Welcome to Deals of Note, where Gear Patrol captures all the best deals of the day. You can also follow all our deal posts in the Deals section. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at deals@gearpatrol.com.

Motoring



At Just $399, This Iconic Motorcycle Jacket Is an Absolute Steal
Save 43%: Belstaff has been producing legendary motorsport apparel for nearly 100 years. Born from motorcyclists’ universal need for sturdy all-weather gear, Belstaff made a name for itself with its waxed-cotton-and-leather equipment. Developed for racers and adventurers, these jackets largely lived on the fringes until they were carried into the mainstream on the back of actor/racer/badass Steve McQueen. And if, like McQueen, you have your eye on a Belstaff, now is the time to pick one up at RevZilla.

The Belstaff Brooklands Jacket is an eight-ounce waxed cotton classic buzzing and ready for two-wheeled adventure. The Brooklands is made with removable armor in the shoulders and elbows, as well as a sleeve in the back to insert further protection. The Brooklands jacket was made with its namesake race track in mind, with an added padded layer for extra safety.

The jacket is not only made for a tightly-tucked cafe racer, it’s such a stylish design, it can be worn right off the track and straight to dinner. (There’s also a leather version, though it costs a fair amount more, especially with this sale in effect.) Buy this piece of gear as beautiful as it is rugged while the getting’s good. And the getting’s real good. — Peter Corn

Outdoors and Fitness



Kershaw Shuffle II Folding Knife
Save $28: We all know the feeling: you need to cut something, so you reach for your favorite EDC knife… only to realize it’s in your other bag. Or it’s in your car. Or it’s at the office. It’s not the end of the world, but it’s frustrating problem with an easy solution: two favorite knives. And right now The Drop is making that solution even easier by offering up a two-pack of the popular Kershaw Shuffle II for $28 off.
The second iteration of this unassuming 3-ounce knife has much to offer, inclined a 2.5-inch blade with a piercing tanto profile, a bottle opener and a flathead screwdriver. It’s also available in three colors (black, olive and tan) and you can get any color combo you desire. Stash one Shuffle II on your nightstand and one in another go-to spot (bag, car, office or elsewhere), and no matter where you find yourself, your favorite EDC knife will always be within easy reach. — Steve Mazzucchi

Arc’teryx Alpha SV Jacket
Save $224: The best ski deals tend to surface at the end of the season, as retailers look to move out the current inventory to make room for next year’s crop. But every once in a while, a sweet deal surfaces on the eve of a new season, a golden opportunity for those with the alacrity to pounce. Such is the case with Arc’teryx’s top-of-the-line Alpha SV jacket, which Backcountry is currently moving at a 30 percent discount.
Weighing in at just over a pound, this jacket is the choice of many a powder hound, mountain guide and expert alpinist for several reasons. First of all, it boasts the unmatched waterproofing and breathability of a Gore-Tex Pro 3-layer membrane, ideal for off-piste adventures. The Alpha SV also features tough N100p-X face fabric, WaterTight pit zips, an adjustable storm hood and an array of pockets to ensure your touring gear is always within easy reach.

The only catch? The huge discount only applies to the Zevan colorway, a pretty sharp-looking dark green with fluorescent yellow accents that’s available in small, medium and large. But if that causes you a moment’s pause, just think how many après-ski beers you can buy with that extra $224. — Steve Mazzucchi

Tech

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Bose SoundTouch 300 Soundbar
Save $250: The Bose SoundTouch 300 is an excellent soundbar that will work well with any of the latest 4K TVs. It supports Alexa as well. When it was released in 2017, Bose was selling the SoundTouch 300 for $699 — but being two-years-old, Amazon has dropped its price to $449, which is the cheapest it has ever been. It’s a pretty solid deal, especially considering the soundbar is very similar in price, size and capabilities to the Sonos Playbar ($699); actually, according to CNET‘s Ty Pendlebury, the SoundTouch 300 has the Playbar beat “in terms of both sound stage and ‘you are there’ detail.” If you love Bose speakers and are looking for a home theater upgrade, this is a solid soundbar to consider. — Tucker Bowe

Watches

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Seiko Prospex “Monster” Dive Watch
Save 28%: Right now, Seiko’s newest-generation Prosper “Monster” is on sale for 20% off in two versions: one (SRPD27) with a black dial and Seiko Prospex’s excellent and soft silicone strap, and the other (SRPD25) with a blue dial, black bezel, and steel bracelet. But wait! In an additional promotion, you can take a further 10% off the reduced price by using the promo code “SHINE” at check out. That brings both versions down by around $140 each. — Zen Love

Marathon Watches
20% Off
Marathon has been filling contracts for various military groups for decades. Offering simple quartz and mechanical watches designed for the field, beefy stainless steel dive watches built for Search and Rescue operation and wrist-borne compasses, Marathon Watches are a perfect fit for robust field use. For a limited time, get 20% off and free shipping on our favorite models, only in the Gear Patrol Store.— Gear Patrol Store

See More Deals

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Today in Gear: An Eye-Catching Geometric Down Jacket, a New OS for Your Mac & More

Today in Gear is our daily roundup of all the latest product announcements, drops and deals. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at tig@gearpatrol.com.


When it’s time to upgrade your winter jacket, don’t get stuck with the same old down squares. The Structure Jacket from Aether breaks up the 800-fill-power goose down in arresting geometric shapes that you won’t find on any other outerwear. The Structure is designed to perfection with custom bonded baffling and an outer shell that’s sewn from Schoeller 2-layer four-way-stretch twill. Treated with DWR, the insulated jacket is also water and wind-resistant. You can also zip the Structure jacket all the way up to your chin, a welcome feature as the inside of the collar is lined with brushed cotton flannel to keep you cozy. Even with its sleek design, there is still plenty of storage with its zippered chest and handwarmer pockets. Don’t blend in with the mass of dull down jackets this winter — you can stand out and keep warm with the Structure Jacket from Aether.

New & Noteworthy Releases

Luminox’s New Fall Releases Feature Dive, Field and Pilots Watches

Luminox’s New Fall Releases Feature Dive, Field and Pilots Watches

The Commando Frogman, Nighthawk and Jolly Roger watches take inspiration from Luminox’s history of building watches for the military.

These $1 Tablets Could Be the Future of Cannabis

These $1 Tablets Could Be the Future of Cannabis

The company that made the ideal cannabis vape just released a cannabis mint dispenser.

Ram’s New Diesel Pickup Truck Packs Mind-Blowing Range

Ram’s New Diesel Pickup Truck Packs Mind-Blowing Range

With a max highway range of more than 1,000 miles per tank, odds are good you’ll need to stop well before the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel does.

These Are the Big Winners from America’s Biggest Beer Competition

These Are the Big Winners from America’s Biggest Beer Competition

2,295 breweries submitted 9,497 entries into 174 different beer styles for the 2019 Great American Beer Festival. Here are the medal winners.

This New Grand Seiko Watch Features an Unlikely Inspiration

This New Grand Seiko Watch Features an Unlikely Inspiration

Grand Seiko celebrates the iconic 1954 movie Godzilla with a new Sport model SBGA405 featuring its innovative Spring Drive movement.

Subaru Moves One Step Closer to Dropping the Stick Shift

Subaru Moves One Step Closer to Dropping the Stick Shift

Subaru buyers looking to row their own gears now have one fewer option.

The 5 Best New Features of macOS Catalina (Which You Can Download Right Now)

The 5 Best New Features of macOS Catalina (Which You Can Download Right Now)

You can finally update your Mac computer with the latest operating system, macOS Catalina, right now.

This Military Dive Watch Is Available with a Striking White Dial

This Military Dive Watch Is Available with a Striking White Dial

Marathon’s TSAR dive watch is a robust, reliable military diver. For the first time, an exclusive white version is on offer from Huckberry.

Reader Survey: What Gear Have You Tested Out Lately?

Reader Survey: What Gear Have You Tested Out Lately?

We want to know what products our readers have used recently. Like it, love it or hate it, we want your input on the gear you’ve been testing out lately.


Fresh Deals



At Just $399, This Iconic Motorcycle Jacket Is an Absolute Steal
Save 43%: Belstaff has been producing legendary motorsport apparel for nearly 100 years. Born from motorcyclists’ universal need for sturdy all-weather gear, Belstaff made a name for itself with its waxed-cotton-and-leather equipment. Developed for racers and adventurers, these jackets largely lived on the fringes until they were carried into the mainstream on the back of actor/racer/badass Steve McQueen. And if, like McQueen, you have your eye on a Belstaff, now is the time to pick one up at RevZilla.

The Belstaff Brooklands Jacket is an eight-ounce waxed cotton classic buzzing and ready for two-wheeled adventure. The Brooklands is made with removable armor in the shoulders and elbows, as well as a sleeve in the back to insert further protection. The Brooklands jacket was made with its namesake race track in mind, with an added padded layer for extra safety.

The jacket is not only made for a tightly-tucked cafe racer, it’s such a stylish design, it can be worn right off the track and straight to dinner. (There’s also a leather version, though it costs a fair amount more, especially with this sale in effect.) Buy this piece of gear as beautiful as it is rugged while the getting’s good. And the getting’s real good. — Peter Corn



Marathon Watches
20% Off
Marathon has been filling contracts for various military groups for decades. Offering simple quartz and mechanical watches designed for the field, beefy stainless steel dive watches built for Search and Rescue operation and wrist-borne compasses, Marathon Watches are a perfect fit for robust field use. For a limited time, get 20% off and free shipping on our favorite models, only in the Gear Patrol Store.— Gear Patrol Store

Kershaw Shuffle II Folding Knife
Save $28: We all know the feeling: you need to cut something, so you reach for your favorite EDC knife… only to realize it’s in your other bag. Or it’s in your car. Or it’s at the office. It’s not the end of the world, but it’s frustrating problem with an easy solution: two favorite knives. And right now The Drop is making that solution even easier by offering up a two-pack of the popular Kershaw Shuffle II for $28 off.
The second iteration of this unassuming 3-ounce knife has much to offer, inclined a 2.5-inch blade with a piercing tanto profile, a bottle opener and a flathead screwdriver. It’s also available in three colors (black, olive and tan) and you can get any color combo you desire. Stash one Shuffle II on your nightstand and one in another go-to spot (bag, car, office or elsewhere), and no matter where you find yourself, your favorite EDC knife will always be within easy reach. — Steve Mazzucchi

Arc’teryx Alpha SV Jacket
Save $224: The best ski deals tend to surface at the end of the season, as retailers look to move out the current inventory to make room for next year’s crop. But every once in a while, a sweet deal surfaces on the eve of a new season, a golden opportunity for those with the alacrity to pounce. Such is the case with Arc’teryx’s top-of-the-line Alpha SV jacket, which Backcountry is currently moving at a 30 percent discount.
Weighing in at just over a pound, this jacket is the choice of many a powder hound, mountain guide and expert alpinist for several reasons. First of all, it boasts the unmatched waterproofing and breathability of a Gore-Tex Pro 3-layer membrane, ideal for off-piste adventures. The Alpha SV also features tough N100p-X face fabric, WaterTight pit zips, an adjustable storm hood and an array of pockets to ensure your touring gear is always within easy reach.

The only catch? The huge discount only applies to the Zevan colorway, a pretty sharp-looking dark green with fluorescent yellow accents that’s available in small, medium and large. But if that causes you a moment’s pause, just think how many après-ski beers you can buy with that extra $224. — Steve Mazzucchi

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Bose SoundTouch 300 Soundbar
Save $250: The Bose SoundTouch 300 is an excellent soundbar that will work well with any of the latest 4K TVs. It supports Alexa as well. When it was released in 2017, Bose was selling the SoundTouch 300 for $699 — but being two-years-old, Amazon has dropped its price to $449, which is the cheapest it has ever been. It’s a pretty solid deal, especially considering the soundbar is very similar in price, size and capabilities to the Sonos Playbar ($699); actually, according to CNET‘s Ty Pendlebury, the SoundTouch 300 has the Playbar beat “in terms of both sound stage and ‘you are there’ detail.” If you love Bose speakers and are looking for a home theater upgrade, this is a solid soundbar to consider. — Tucker Bowe grey_placeholder

Seiko Prospex “Monster” Dive Watch
Save 28%: Right now, Seiko’s newest-generation Prosper “Monster” is on sale for 20% off in two versions: one (SRPD27) with a black dial and Seiko Prospex’s excellent and soft silicone strap, and the other (SRPD25) with a blue dial, black bezel, and steel bracelet. But wait! In an additional promotion, you can take a further 10% off the reduced price by using the promo code “SHINE” at check out. That brings both versions down by around $140 each. — Zen Love


Today on Gear Patrol

Samsung Galaxy Fold Review: A Futuristic Phone That Made Me Nostalgic

Samsung Galaxy Fold Review: A Futuristic Phone That Made Me Nostalgic

Under rigorous real-world scrutiny, the ingenious-but-flawed Galaxy Fold bends but does not break.

Following in NASA’s Footsteps in a Pair of High-Tech Porsche Cayenne Hybrids

Following in NASA’s Footsteps in a Pair of High-Tech Porsche Cayenne Hybrids

We take both plug-in hybrid Cayennes to the lunar-like landscape of Oregon, where NASA trained Apollo astronauts before heading to the moon.

Here’s How to Make Your Outdoor Gear Last Forever

Here’s How to Make Your Outdoor Gear Last Forever

These expert-recommended tips will save you a chore next spring — and help your stuff last longer, too.

These Badass Leather Jackets Were a Well-Kept Nashville Secret

These Badass Leather Jackets Were a Well-Kept Nashville Secret

Once only custom-made, these jackets are now available in a range of stock sizes.

If You’re Going to Scuba Dive with a Mechanical Watch, Do It with This One

If You’re Going to Scuba Dive with a Mechanical Watch, Do It with This One

The Bremont S2000 can take anything you throw at it. It’s a watch you’ll never have to worry about, no matter what you’re doing.

16 Tools That Pro Chefs Can’t Cook Without

16 Tools That Pro Chefs Can’t Cook Without

From a extra-large cast-iron skillet to a charcoal firestarter to a vacuum sealer, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Reader Survey: What Gear Have You Tested Out Lately?

The Magazine

Each issue of Gear Patrol Magazine is a deep dive into product culture. Inside, you’ll find seasonal buying guides, rich maker profiles and long-form dispatches from the front lines of product design. The stunningly designed Gear Patrol Magazine is ready for your coffee table. Quarterly. $39

The Newsletter

Get the best new products, deals, and stories from across the world, in your inbox daily.

Here’s How to Make Your Outdoor Gear Last Forever

Our warm-weather playground is closing for the season, which means that soon, you’ll be trading wheels for skis and waders for down jackets. We know — the winter stoke is real. But resist the urge to shove all your gear into the garage to be dealt with next spring; there’s work to be done.

Dirt and grime do a good job of hiding damage that’s accumulated over six months of fun. When it comes to something like a mountain bike, that buildup can impede the function of your drivetrain and other components. “Nothing’s more frustrating than trying to ride when the weather clears and getting stopped by surprise mechanical issues,” notes Nick Martin, founder of The Pro’s Closet, the largest e-retailer for pre-owned bikes and cycling gear.

And when it comes to a sport like climbing, poorly cared for gear can become a safety issue. “Taking a couple of hours in between seasons to go through all your gear is what sets you up for success — and safety — next season,” says Matt Hickethier, senior outdoor instructor for REI’s Denver location. Plus, you paid serious money for some of this stuff. “If you take care of high-quality hiking boots season after season, they can last you 20 years,” he adds.

Caring for your gear might not be as simple as leafing through the instruction manual (which you probably threw in the trash anyway). Below, you’ll find the best way to clean, dry, care for and store all your favorite summer gear so it’s ready for action at the first sign of a thaw next year.

Camping Gear

Sleeping Bags

Clean: You want to wash your sleeping bag as little as possible, especially if it’s down, since it makes the insulation clump and reduces its lifespan. (Hickethier likes to sleep with a liner and just washes that every few trips.) At the end of the season, place the bag in a front-load washing machine and use a mild detergent. The centralized spin on top-load machines can tear the stitching apart; if that’s all you have, lay your sleeping bag out and scrub it with an abrasive plastic brush and mild detergent. Then hose it off.

Dry: Hang to dry.

Care: If your bag came waterproof from its maker, use a spray (like Nikwax TX-Direct Spray-On) to restore that repellency.

Store: Once it’s completely dry, either hang the bag in your gear closet or put it in a mesh or breathable cotton bag that’s larger than the stuff sack you keep it in for trips. You want to keep the insulation as high a loft — that’s the fluffiness — as possible. Compression compromises the bag’s resilience, Hickethier says.

Cooking Equipment

Clean: Wipe down stoves and pots just like you would those in your kitchen, getting rid of any food particles that could breed bacteria or mold over the winter months. If you have a gas line, light the stove, then shut the gas off at the bottle rather than on the stove. According to Hickethier, this lets the gas flush through the line to the burner completely, and when it stops, you know the line is clear.

Dry: Let all components air dry. If the stove uses jet fuel, dry upside down so water isn’t pooling through the system.

Store: Your stove and cooking gear should be stored inside, away from the elements, which can erode the metal. Regulations for storing fuel vary by state and area, but if you have a flammables closet in your garage, that’s ideal. Otherwise, make sure it’s in an area that’s well ventilated, well contained and not going to overheat.

Tents

Clean: It’s important to get all the dirt off and out of your tent before storing it — any sand will act like sandpaper and degrade all your soft materials including stitching, Hickethier says. Turn the tent inside out, shake it, then scrub both it and the rainfly with a mild detergent (like Dawn) and a soft-bristled brush. Clean the ends of the poles that go into the ground and the stakes. Hose everything down.

Dry: Reassemble the entire tent and let it dry out somewhere indoors like in the garage, basement, even living room — UV rays actually wear down the materials over time, and since your tent obviously sits in the sun most of its erected life, you want to limit exposure as much as possible, Hickethier says.

Care: Put a UV treatment on the outside of the tent and the rainfly to extend its life. If there’s any peeling on the rainfly, treat with a waterproofing material like Nikwax. Check all your seams and cover any tape that’s peeling with silicone glue.

Store: Break down the poles and load them into the tent bag first. Never store poles under tension since they can start to wear out if taut over time, Hickethier says. Next, stuff the rainfly in the bag randomly, in a kind of circular pattern, followed by the body of the tent, then the footprint. Contrary to common sense organizational instincts, folding your tent is a no-no. “Every time you fold your tent, you’re creating constant wear on the same spots which will eventually break down the material, waterproofing and seams,” Hickethier explains.

Sleeping Pads

Clean: Inflate the pad, then hose it down, scrubbing with a mild detergent if it’s dirty.

Dry: Dry inside, out of UV light and inflated to ensure no water gets caught in creases.

Store: If it’s pillow style, pack the pad back down and store in its stuff sack. If it’s foam and self-inflatable, store the pad partially inflated with valves open to prevent the foam from breaking down under compression.

Hiking Gear

Hiking Boots

Clean: At the end of the season, do a thorough version of what you should do after every hike: Pull out the insoles, then give your boots a light wash with water, mild detergent or leather cleaner (if applicable) and a soft brush.

Dry: Hang boots upside down to allow air to flow in and excess moisture to drain out until they’re completely dry.

Care: Check all materials for degradation. If your boots are leather and puckering, turning a lighter color, or starting to look like dry skin, apply leather conditioner (Nikwax makes a good one) and let that set, then re-waterproof with a wax-based solution or silicone-based wax. Unlace your boots and check the strings’ conditions — if they’re fraying anywhere (it’ll likely be where they’re crossing a grommet) replace them. Check all metal components, like the hooks that help cinch the ankle cuff, and make sure there’s no damage or warping there. If the soles are separating anywhere, use a silicone glue (though if your soles are Vibram, contact the manufacturer because they should put a whole new one on for you).

Store: Keep boots in a dry, low-light spot, like the bottom of your closet or in a container in a low-humidity garage.

Backpacks

Clean: At the very least, empty your pack, turn it inside out and shake it to get all the small pieces of dirt and food out. If your pack has seen a lot of mud, turn it right side out and use a mild soap (like Dawn), a vinyl or plastic scrub brush and lukewarm water, scrubbing in a circular motion until all the dirt is gone. Make sure the water isn’t too hot, so it doesn’t shrink the material, Hickethier says. Check the straps and the buckle components for embedded mud or dirt.

Dry: Lay flat outside to dry.

Care: Check that the stitching isn’t fraying or peeling anywhere and that all hard components (i.e., plastic buckles) are still functioning correctly. Replace before storing.

Store: Don’t hang the bag — leaving the straps under tension, even lightly, will cause the material to stretch over time. Instead, compress the pack in a storage bin and store it somewhere with low moisture.

Water Reservoirs

Clean: A poorly cleaned, sealed reservoir is the perfect environment to breed mold and bacteria, Hickethier says. If your bladder had anything other than water in it (like an electrolyte drink) or there are signs of mineral buildup from hard water, use a dissolvable tablet, like Bottle Bright or CamelBak Cleaning Tablets, which create a bubble effect to scrub the inside of the reservoir. Run through the line, then rinse the whole thing out. (You can also use warm water, silicone-safe soap like Dawn and a soft brush, but the soap is harder to get out completely.)

Dry: Disconnect the line (if it has one), drain all the water, then hang vertically to dry (like over a hook). Some newer bladders will turn inside out, which is ideal. Otherwise, invest in a reservoir hanger (like this one from Camelbak) which is designed to keep the rubber and silicone components open so the bladder can drip dry completely.

Store: Keep the cap off, then fold the hose in half and tuck the bend into the mouth of the bladder to keep it open. Store it with the rest of your hiking gear. Some people also like to store the whole thing in their freezer to ensure no mildew develops.

Biking Gear

Road and Mountain Bikes

Clean: It’s definitely possible to wash a bike too much or too hard, says Martin. “Bikes are full of moving parts that are small and delicate,” he explains. “Overzealous washing can actually force crucial lubricants out of these parts and push dirt and grime in.” Be gentle: fill a spray bottle with warm water and a little mild dish soap (this, according to Martin, works just as well as bike-specific degreasers) and spray the whole thing down. Use a soft brush or cloth to agitate dirt and grime, especially on the chain and drivetrain. “A dirty or unlubricated drivetrain will cause a lot of premature wear, noise and shifting issues,” he adds. Rinse the frame and components with a hose or a bucket of clean water.

Dry: “Leaving your bike dripping wet is a recipe for corrosion,” Martin says. Take a small cloth and wipe down everything you can reach, including the chain and drivetrain. You can use a detailing spray (like Pedro’s Bike Lust) on the painted surfaces for an extra sheen and help in repelling dirt and dust during storage and on your next ride.

Care: Once dry, apply a chain lubricant to your drivetrain. “Only the chain needs lubrication and only on the rollers,” Martin warns. Use a rag to wipe away any excess lube that lands outside the chain or on the cassette, chainrings and derailleur pulleys. Run your shifter up and down through all the gears to make sure it doesn’t need any more tuning before you store. Then, take an inventory of what maintenance you can do during the off-season. For mountain bikes, you want to service the suspension once a year, either on your own or at a bike or suspension shop, Martin advises. On any bike, check all your consumable components like the chain, tire and brake pads for wear, and replace them if needed.

Store: Store your bike indoors — namely somewhere dry and shielded from the weather, because sun, wind, rain and snow will damage and shorten the lifespan of every component on your bike, Martin says. (If you have no choice but to keep it outside, get a waterproof cover and maintain it regularly.) You can keep it on the ground, but the most convenient way to store a bike is on a hook. For road, cyclocross or gravel bikes, hang them however you like (i.e., upside down or vertically from the ceiling or wall). Mountain bikes with suspension forks should be hung vertically — never upside down — with the front wheel up to keep the seals and foam rings in the fork from drying out.

Cycling Shoes

Clean: Pull out the insoles and wash with water, mild detergent or leather cleaner and a soft brush.

Dry: Stuff with newspaper and set in an airy space to let dry. Be sure they dry completely before storing.

Store: Keep shoes in a dry, shady spot, like a container in a low-humidity garage.

Helmets

Clean: Take a brush and clean with warm water and a gentle soap or shampoo, since you already know that won’t irritate your skin, Martin points out.

Dry: Hang to dry in a well-ventilated area.

Store: Store in a container in a low-humidity garage (out in the open risks dust and cobwebs).

Fishing Gear

Fly Lines

Clean: “Your line is exposed to dirt, sand, rocks and all kinds of funky stuff in the water that wants to decrease slickness and start breaking down the line,” observes Shawn Combs, Director of Product Development for Rod & Tackle at Orvis. Run the entire line through a Scientific Anglers cleaning pad — or a paper towel if you’re in a pinch.

Dry: Air dry.

Store: Re-spool your reel and store.

Rods

Clean: Wipe down with a clean, dry cloth. Wash reel in warm water with a soft cloth.

Dry: Air dry.

Store: Store in a rod tube.

Waders and Boots

Clean: River water should be rinsed off with a hose, and any mud on your boots scrubbed off with a soft brush and gentle dish soap.

Dry: Hang your waders to dry. Stuff boots with newspaper and leave in a well-ventilated area.

Store: Fold waders and store alongside boots in a container.

Climbing Gear

The most significant care aspect of climbing gear is to adhere to the manufacturer recommendations of life expectancy since your life depends on the reliability of these products. “Even if a rope was never used, it still has a life expectancy for how long that piece of gear is serviceable,” Hickethier explains. Info for harnesses, ropes and protective equipment can all be found on the manufacturer’s website.

Harnesses

Clean: You may still use your harness inside during the winter, but you want to clean all the dirt and grime from the outdoor season off. Always handwash it to prevent fraying and breaking, Hickethier says. Scrub the soft material and metal parts with warm, soapy water.

Dry: Hang inside to dry.

Care: Before you store it, as well as before each use, inspect the stitching, lacing and hard components of your harness. Fix anything immediately — if you forget and head out with a broken buckle, it’s hazardous, Hickethier points out.

Store: Pack flat, somewhere dry, so the material doesn’t stretch out.

Climbing Shoes

Clean: Since bouldering shoes get more dusty than dirty and have a particular grip to them, skip the soap and rinse with warm water until it runs clear.

Dry: Stuff with newspaper and set in a well-ventilated area to dry.

Store: Store alongside the rest of your climbing gear.

Ropes

Clean: Fill your bathtub or sink with warm water and add rope wash (like this one from Beal) and let it soak according to the package instructions. If the water is exceptionally dirty, drain and repeat until the water runs clear.

Dry: Set rope outside to dry.

Store: Wrapping a rope tightly can create kinks and degrade the fibers over time, Hickethier says. Instead, coil it loosely on the ground or hung on two supports (like nails). Store away from UV light.

Cams

Clean: If the metal parts have gunk built up inside, rinse with hot water and mild soap.

Dry: Wipe dry with a cloth.

Care: Lubricate the metal parts you washed, as well as any clean cams in need of some slickness (use a product like Metolius Cam Lube). Check the webbing to ensure it’s clean and not wearing down. If it’s degrading, most companies will re-sling it for you, Hickethier says.

Store: Attach to a carabiner to keep organized, then store with the rest of your climbing gear.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

These Great Cars We Love Are Being Killed Off for 2020

The 2019 automotive model year is ending, and as usual, automakers have been trimming their model trees as the leaves fall. Many of the vehicles vanishing, well, are no great loss — but some are simply delightful ones that we’re sorry to see go. So we’ve picked six new cars that will not be coming back for 2020 that we’re really going to miss.

That said, if you like any of these, keep an eye out for any 2019 models sitting around in your local dealer inventories. You may be able to snag a great deal.

Fiat 500 Abarth

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The classic Fiat 500 was a work of art. With this 21st Century version, Fiat put forth a solid remake with a manual transmission for a reasonable price. The Abarth was the tuned-up version with aggressive styling and a tuned-up 160-horsepower turbocharged engine. The 500’s main drawback was that it was horrifically impractical for American requirements, unless you were Charlie Sheen shredding tires under house arrest.

Jaguar XJ

The XJ is Jaguar’s iconic four-door sedan. Famed designer Ian Callum reinvented it for the modern era. But luxury buyers stopped wanting sedans in recent years, and the XJ is now departing after more than 50 years in continuous production. Expect Jaguar to revive the XJ nameplate next year, though the car should have electric propulsion like a Tesla, and may not even be a sedan.

Volkswagen Beetle

After two generations and more than 20 years in production, New Beetle nostalgia has run its course. The second-generation (also known as the A5) New Beetle was the beneficiary of a less-cutesy, more-macho redesign. It put up a strong fight for the manual transmission, holding onto it until 2017. Sadly, VW is now looking toward its vibrant future of electric cars, Tiguans, and having far fewer Golf options in the U.S.

Volkswagen Golf Sportwagen

Speaking of fewer Golf options: Volkswagen is eliminating its entire wagon lineup from the American market. That means the Golf Sportwagen, one of the best-value cars on the market, is departing after this year. Guess Americans didn’t want a superb-handling long roof with great gas mileage and a six-speed manual.

Cadillac ATS-V

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Cadillac regrouped after the GM bankruptcy last decade and built a badass performance sedan/coupe — precisely when Americans stopped buying them. The ATS-V had 464 horsepower, an available manual transmission, 0-60-mph acceleration in under four seconds, and was a legitimate competitor to cars like the BMW M3, but with a lower sticker price. Goodnight, sweet prince.

Mercedes-AMG S65

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Mercedes-AMG is ditching the V12 engines. That’s costing us perhaps Mercedes’s purest testament to extravagance, the AMG S65. The AMG S63 is already a 600-plus-horsepower implement of destruction; for an additional $83,000,  the AMG S65 “upgraded” buyers to a 6.0-liter twin-turbo V12 putting out a dash more horsepower and a stunning 738 lb-ft of torque. Sure, it was nearly $100,000 more for a car that was less efficient and the better part of a second slower from 0-60 mph, but you got to make this noise.

The Complete Full-Size Truck Buying Guide: Every Model, Explained

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F-150, Ram, or Silverado? Here’s all the info you need to decide in one place. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

This Peugeot Boxer 4X4 Concept Is A Full-Fledged Van

The Peugeot Boxer concept varies greatly from most 4x4s in that it doubles as a fully functional van. It’s great if you’re serious about going to different adventures, less so if you like your 4x4s slick-looking.

This doesn’t have the world’s greatest design, to be sure, but surely most people can let aesthetics fly by in favor of optimum utility. Even still, the Peugeot Boxer campervan concept probably has everything you’d ever need for all your off-roading shenanigans.

Underneath, you’ll find a BlueHDi 165 engine and a six-speed manual, which translates to 273 lb-ft of torque. You also get a part-time four-wheel-drive system, which makes this beastly monstrosity able to climb up any terrain, even the most unforgiving ones. The Peugeot Boxer stands a bit taller with 1.18 inches of extra height and 1.97 inches in the rear. It sits on BF Goodrich off-road tires, which offer great traction under any condition.

Inbuilt LED lighting makes it perfect for camping trips, you’ll find them just above the windshield. Go inside and you’ll find 107.6 square feet of living space, complete with Alcantara upholstery. This area includes a sleeping area, kitchenette, and bathroom. You even get a Peugeot eM02 FS Powertube electric mountain bike on the mounted rack out back. Plus, a canoe on the roof rack will surely give you more amazing outdoor adventures.

The only downside is that this is just a concept at the moment. There’s no telling when this beastly overlander will enter production, if it’s ever headed there, that is.

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Photos courtesy of Peugeot

The Carmel Is Vanderhall’s Luxurious Two-Passenger Three-Wheeler

Nobody does three-wheelers like Vanderhall and the latest one to roll off the production floor is another showstopper. Let’s just say that its design might not appeal to everyone in general. Nonetheless, those who appreciate unique rides will love what it offers. It’s 2020 catalogue showcases the Carmel, which just like other models in the lineup are for open-top cruising. However, it’s clearly a tier above the rest when it comes to luxurious embellishments.

While almost every other carmaker is switching over to all-electric platforms, traditional combustion engines are still very much in demand. As such, Vanderhall is giving its clients a choice between the Venice, Carmel, and Edison 2. The first two are your gas-guzzling options, while the latter is the zero-emission superstar. We can talk about the eco-friendly version another day so let’s get back to what makes the Carmel an awesome machine.

Hearing that it is powered by a 1.5-liter LFV turbocharged straight-four engine with a six-speed automatic transmission might sound underwhelming at first. However, after understanding the potential numbers 194 horsepower can deliver with a lightweight aluminium unibody frame, jaws will drop. Performance and handling should be top-tier with its F1-inspired pushrod suspension system.

The Vanderhall Carmel is available in three trims starting at $34,950 and peaking at $43,950 for the range-topper. A removable cap shade is ready to protect you from the elements, but owners will likely want to keep the top open for maximum enjoyment. Finally, for extra comfort, the seats come with built-in heating so you don’t freeze to death driving in colder climates.

Order yours now: here

Images courtesy of Vanderhall

Luminox’s New Fall Releases Feature Dive, Field and Pilots Watches

Coinciding with the brand’s 30th anniversary and celebration of their first U.S. retail location at 430 Broadway in New York City, Luminox has released its fall 2019 watch collection. Several product lines are represented, which include dive, field and pilots watches.

Commando Frogman 3300 by Luminox

The Commando Frogman 3300 (~$548) series was developed with a military and law enforcement specialist who helped create the Luminox Recon line. Featuring a 46mm case, it’s a burly yet lightweight diver with a count-up dive bezel and no-decompression scale aimed at military and police professionals as well as outdoor enthusiasts.

F-117 Nighthawk 6440 Series by Luminox

Adding to the F-117 line of watches designed for use by Nighthawk pilots, the F-117 Nighthawk 6440 Series (~$794) is made from Carbonox, a carbon-based material exclusive to Luminox. Featuring a bi-directional 24-hour bezel, a quartz-powered Ronda GMT movement and a date display at 3 o’clock, the 6440 Series provides the wearer with access to two time zones.

Jolly Roger Limited Edition 3800 Series by Luminox

The Jolly Roger Limited Edition 3800 Series ($794) features a 46mm Carbonox case with 300m of water resistance and a unidirectional dive bezel, as well as Luminox’s tritium tube-based lighting technology. A Ronda quartz movement with 96 months of battery life powers the watch.

Audemars Piguet Quietly Presents The Royal Oak Perpetual Calendar Openworked

Audemars Piguet is touting a new drool-worthy timepiece for its discerning clientele. Instead of drumming up publicity for its arrival, the watchmaker is opting for a more subtle surprise. Those logging in the official website to browse through the brand’s luxurious collection are seeing a new model grace the pages. The Royal Oak Perpetual Calendar Openworked is on full display with all the upscale elements you would want from a watch of this calibre. By the time most of our readers know about it, the waiting list could well impossible to squeeze into.

Ceramic is the material of choice for Audemars Piguet to craft such an attractive piece. For keen-eyed collectors out there, the new model takes everything its predecessor did right and elevated the design even further. As the name already implies, this time around, we are looking at an open-work dial on this version of the Royal Oak Perpetual Calendar.

It flaunts a striking 41 mm black ceramic case with glare-free sapphire crystal lens. The exceptional craftsmanship allows the exquisite material of the case seamlessly shifts into the titanium case back. Moreover, the sapphire window offers an unobstructed view of skeletonized rose gold rotor of the Royal Oak Perpetual Calendar.

The showstopper is definitely the skeleton dial, which in turn hosts four sub-dials. Each one features pink gold elements along with the indices and hands. The top three shows the date, while the bottom one is an eye-catching moon phase complication. The Royal Oak Perpetual Calendar Openworked is powered by Audemars Piguet’s self-winding calibre 5135 with a 40-hour power reserve. Finally, the black ceramic bracelet comes with a titanium folding clasp.

Learn more about it: here

Images courtesy of Audemars Piguet

Elemental House Lets You Have Free Off-Grid Living

The Elemental House rests high on a ridge that overlooks the majestic plains, valleys, and mountains of Victoria. This off-grid dwelling focuses on “shedding the excess of modern society,” according to Ben Callery Architects. It uses “only what is needed.”

The idea behind the Elemental House is pretty simple. Imagine you’re someone going abroad, with everything you need neatly tucked behind you in a convenient backpack. It wants to trigger a similar feeling of fulfillment, or the idea that everything one needs, one must only reach back and find. Nothing more, nothing less.

The house belongs to a semi-retired couple who, after a busy professional career in Melbourne, now want to retreat to their own wedge of backcountry peace and live less. The clients had purchased a 100-acre property in the rugged site in High Camp, fifteen minutes outside of Kilmore. The place looked beautiful but lacked main services. Ben Callery Architects had to design a house that would operate successfully off the grid, in other words.

The challenging conditions in the environs proved challenging, and they ended up influencing the final design. The designers made use of the so-called passive solar design, with deep eaves provide shade from the sun in summer. Still, it can capture the winter sun, and a burnished concrete floor provides thermal mass.

They also incorporated windows that open freely and positioned them to facilitate cross-ventilation. As a result, the windows provide natural cooling, and the size of the glazing can withstand the forceful gusts of wind that visit the ridge. Hit the link below to learn more.

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Photos courtesy of Ben Callery Architects

16 Tools That Pro Chefs Can’t Cook Without

There are no gear testers more rigorous than the commercial chef. Can openers, skillets, thermometers, mixing bowls and all manner of other essential gear are put through the ringer night in, night out. So when chefs talk about the gear they couldn’t cook without, we listen. Here are the kitchen tools four pro chefs can’t get enough of.

Rick Ortiz

Rick Ortiz is the chef and owner of Antique Taco, a three-location string of Mexican restaurants in Chicago, Illinois. Ortiz’s background, like his restaurant, is a deep mix of high- and low-brow sensibility — the chef worked at two Michelin-starred Relais Sainte Victoires and in the kitchens of Chicago’s Soldier Field.

La Caja China Roaster

“I love my Caja China. It took some time and some pointers to get it right, but I continue to learn more and more of its many uses. It is great for cooking for family and friends in your backyard or at outdoor events. We’ve cooked cochinita pibil low and slow and turkeys for Thanksgiving dinner. I like to use the exposed hot charcoal or wood embers on top for direct cooking a pot of frijoles charros or posole. Be sure to add the grill grate attachment to cook your favorite Vegetables. I love it for elotes with spicy mayo, grated Parmesan and a sprinkle of ground champulines (grasshoppers).”

Hedley & Bennett Aprons

“I’m also obsessed with my Hedley & Bennett Aprons. I have quite a few. They are comfortable and hold up to the wear and tear of the kitchen or just make you feel fresh. I have one for each season and for different types of work. I have a few brighter and lighter Hedley’s for the spring and summer when I am cooking carne asada or seafood over a hot grill, and darker heavier thread Hedley’s for the fall and winter when we are making hot caldos and smoking meats.”

Three-Pack of Tongs

“The tool I use most frequently are my tongs. Small, medium and long should do the trick. I use small tongs for garnishing, medium tongs for serving vegetables and proteins and long tongs for cooking over high heat. If you have a hot pot with handles and one side towel you can use your tongs to hold the other handle. You can use your tongs to spread out the hot charcoal and wood. If you use your tongs enough they eventually become an extension of yourself.”

5 Rabbit Beer

“My favorite ingredient is beer. Not just any beer but 5 Rabbit Beer. 5 Rabbit is an artisan latino cerveceria in Bedford Park, Illinois. I like to use it in my Marinades and for finishing sauces and beans. The 5 Lizard Cerveza helps make a great brine for chicken cooked asado style and their Xicago is great for rounding out beans and guisados. Enjoy one or two while you cook. It makes everything taste better.”

Craig Koketsu

If you’ve been in New York City for more than a week, there’s a good chance you’ve eaten something with Craig Koketsu’s fingerprints on it. The partner and executive chef of the city’s Quality Branded restaurant group develops recipes, techniques and processes for each of its five neighborhood spots (Quality Meats, Park Avenue Summer (Autumn, Winter, Spring), Quality Italian, Quality Eats and Quality Meats). His style is classic with a touch of modern flair and he’s been named one of NYC’s top up-and-coming chefs by both New York Magazine and Esquire.

Vollrath Heavy Weight Mixing Bowls

“The curve of and depth of these bowls is perfect. You can mix and whisk aggressively in them and don’t have to worry about spillage. The heavier gauge of the stainless steel also makes for more even heat distribution when you use them as a double boiler to make hollandaise. I have one in almost every size, and since they nest, they don’t take up a lot of space.”

LamsonSharp Slotted Turner

“Hands down my favorite offset spatula. I use it mostly when I’m working the griddle — its sharp edge makes sure that every bit of the golden brown sear stays on the scallop. It’s also the perfect size and ridgidity to fillet Dover sole tableside. Lastly, it’s ideal for cutting and scooping out brownies from the pan.”

Mac Professional Series Bread Slicer

“Deadly sharp, it’s equally adept at slicing through roast beef as it is through a crusty baguette. And it passes the overripe tomato test with flying colors. The long blade also allows you to make longer strokes which result in cleaner slices.”

Field Cast Iron Skillet (No. 12)

“The cooking surface of this incredibly well-made pan is practically non-stick. I also love its straight sides which make for perfectly round parmesan fricos and old-fashioned cornbread. When considering sizing, my advice is to go big, especially since the pan is easy to handle because it’s lighter weight. Also, you can always cook less in a larger pan, but you can’t always cook more in a smaller pan — the 12-inch diameter allows me to cook four medium-sized pancakes at the same time which saves loads of time when I have friends over for brunch.”

Jimmy Papadopolous

In the last five years, Jimmy Papadopolous has earned an Eater Chef of the Year award in Chicago, a Zagat ’30 Under 30′ designation and various ‘Best New Restaurant’ awards for his 2017 opening of Bellemore in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood. Papadopolous describes the restaurant, a temple of dark woods, woven cane chairs and brass, as “artistic American.”

Japanese Water Stones

“I have long built my knife kit over my career to where it is. Collecting one of the most important and basic tools to great cooking; a knife. Right behind having a knife, the second most important thing is keeping it sharp. I like sharpening my knives to the point of being able to shave the hair off the back of my hand with a single stroke — a feat that wouldn’t be as easily attainable without the technique and skill that comes from mastering Japanese water Stones.

Polyscience Immersion Circulator

“I cannot stress enough how convenient, precise and how much these machines shrink the margin of human error in professional and home kitchens alike. An absolute must in my kitchen.”

Vita Prep Blender

“They literally can turn a brick to dust. Well, I have never tried to powder a brick in one so, not literally. But they are amazingly versatile. From silky purées, to powders, to emulsifications, my kitchen could not function without one.”

Minipack Vacuum Sealer

“One of the best inventions ever. Vacuum sealers have become complete commonplace in professional kitchens — I could not picture our kitchen functioning without one. From cooking sous vide to tight storage of all prepared food products, a vacuum sealer is an absolute essential.”

David Shim

David Shim’s Cote in Manhattan’s Flatiron District is one-part American steakhouse, one-part Korean barbeque. It features classic gas-fired yakiniku grills from Shinpo at the center of every table and effectively merges American steakhouse favorites with Korean ingredients and flavors (a shrimp cocktail with gochujang being the clearest example). The result of Shim’s cuisine blending was a strong review from the New York Times’ Pete Wells, a place on GQ’s Best New Restaurants of 2018 list and a Michelin star.

Weber Lighter Cubes

“If you ever find yourself outdoors with a charcoal grill, these mini cubes are a must. How many times have you seen people stuffing paper, small pieces of boxes or pouring liquid charcoal lighter? Everyone has their own way making the fire but many times isn’t as easy as one thinks. With the mini lighter cubes all you need to do is put the lighter cubes in between the charcoal and wait till it starts to light, give a light fanning and you are ready to go.”

Kizen Instant-Read Thermometer

“A digital thermometer is one thing that I always have when grilling. Everyone has their own way of telling if the steak is done but it is always great to have a backup plan. There are some with basic temperatures on the thermometer itself so that you don’t have to google what a medium-rare steak is supposed to be.”

Peugeot Pepper Mill

“There are many different pepper mills out there, but this is the one that you want to have. I have used this throughout my career in NYC working at a lot different restaurants and this is also the one that we use at home. Peugeots are great because they can handle the usage of a professional kitchen and it also has different settings to either make it finer or more coarse. It also looks beautiful.”

Iwatani Aburiya Portable Gas Grill Stove

“This is the ultimate portable grill that anyone can have. Living in NYC, not many people have the luxury to grill in the backyard but with this small gadget, you can practically grill anywhere. It has different inserts to either grill steak, seafood and vegetables or make yakitori or skewers. It gets hot enough to make really nice grill marks on steaks as well. This has always been my portable go-to grill.”

More Chef-Approved Kitchen Gear

From a lava stone molcajete to a disposable thermometer to a very, very old-school pasta maker, these four professional chefs reflect on the gear they couldn’t do their jobs without. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

If You’re Going to Scuba Dive with a Mechanical Watch, Do It with This One

WWhat is to be gained from SCUBA diving in a mechanical watch? I’ve struggled with this question, even doubting the enterprise, but my hunch was that there was value in it. So I kept diving with watches, kept writing up my findings, and I’ve finally come to realize something that feels important: the aesthetics of a dive watch will never exceed the prowess of its functionality.

How would you feel about a Land Rover Defender that had the mechanical guts of a Honda Civic? A Ferrari with a VW 4-cylinder engine? What about a chromed-up, air-brushed, fancy-ass espresso machine that only made lame drip-coffee? How about a leaky boat?

Herein lies the crux of why the Bremont Supermarine S2000 ($5,5995) is such a compelling dive watch: it’s functionality underwater easily matches its tasty aesthetics. The S2000 is in the same class as a real Defender, a real Ferrari, an actual La Marzocco espresso machine. We may never take a Ferrari up over 200mph, and we will (hopefully) never rely on a mechanical watch while diving, but knowing that these machines — however beautiful — can deliver as machines is a major part of their sex appeal. Their functionality doesn’t just amplify their beauty; it is essential to it.

The Bremont S2000 As a Desk Diver

For well over a decade, Bremont has consistently created colorways that delicately balance pop and restraint. Moreover, their colorways are warm and inviting, like hygee on the wrist or staring at a campfire. Specifically, it’s been Bremont’s restrained use of red on small details — here the bezel pip, the top of the rehaut, and the tip of the lollipop seconds hand — that has been so consistently compelling. The other splash of color comes from the tip of the minute hand matching the 20-minute timing array under the sapphire bezel, a design move that creates a sense of intention and unity in this otherwise monochromatic watch.

The dial is a beauty, using vintage-inspired round and rectangular markers, a raised and etched center sector that contains the white text, a discrete and nicely framed date window, and a 60-minute rehaut. The hands are proportionately large, and divided into sections that are filled with ultra-bright Super-LumiNova.

The fit of any 43mm Bremont watch (and many are 43mm) is always surprisingly comfortable on even the narrowest wrists. This is because of Bremont’s unique three-piece Trip-Tick case, which sandwiches a ribbed, DLC-coated middle case section between the top unit with the lugs and the case back.

These unique lugs dive downward toward your wrist, but without looking too small in proportion to the watch (an aesthetic problem for a number of large-format dive watches). And even though the S2000 is a full 18mm thick, it manages to hug the wrist comfortably. Importantly, only the bezel rises above the lugs, making this a well considered design that avoids the “cat food can” effect we’ve seen on other thick dive watches.

The integrated rubber strap goes a long way toward giving the S2000 a finished look, and it accentuates those unique lugs while also curving downward for a snug and comfortable fit. The case back is adorned with a ship’s propellor, so deeply carved into the hardened steel that we have to call this a sculpture, not an engraving, and the crown at 2-o’clock is set into a bolted-on, polished crown guard that’s reminiscent of an exposed frame on a badass motorcycle — grunt and all.

Beating Up The Bremont S2000

The true test of a dive watch’s durability has to be how much of a beating it can take above the water. We don’t tend to beat watches up underwater, but hauling heavy tanks, getting in and out of boats being tossed by ocean swells, climbing out of the ocean onto rocks when shore diving, and making one’s way around the obstacle course of a dive boat can beat the shit out of a dive watch. You want to be able to bang the thing indiscriminately and then plunge to 100’ without worrying. It’s a tool, after all, and the S2000 is entirely up to the abuse.

Bremont uses a hardened steel that I can tell you from experience is nearly impossible to scratch. The bezel can be a weak spot on a dive watch, especially if it overhangs the case. It makes sense, then, to just keep the bezel inside the width of the case, but that results in bezels that are hard to get a grip on. Bremont splits the difference, with the S2000’s bezel overhanging just enough to bite into your fingertips, but not enough to get caught on anything (like a bit of boat rigging, or, in my case, the gate on a pick-up truck while hoisting tanks in and out).

Bremont hardens the hell out of the crystal, too, which is a positive because there is a slight dome to this crystal. Perhaps a flat crystal would be a better option for a wrist-banger like me, but keep in mind that domed crystals offer greater structural support under pressure, which helps this watch achieve its 2000 meters of water resistance. As a point of reference, the Rolex Sea Dweller DEEPSEA, which went to the deepest point of the Pacific Ocean, also has a domed crystal.

In short, the S2000 can take anything you throw at it — literally. It’s a watch you’ll never have to worry about, no matter what you’re doing. And that is sexy.

The Bremont S2000 Underwater

This is a seriously capable dive watch. The three things you’ll want when underwater are (1) water resistance, (2) legibility, and (3) good bezel grip and action. The S2000 delivers all three as well as any watch I’ve worn.

Water-resistance on the S2000 is 2000 meters. That’s 1.243 miles, or 2 kilometers. No, you won’t ever go that deep. Nor will you likely get your Ferrari over 200mph, or take your Land Rover Defender across the desert. But, unlike these vehicles, there are times when a watch can encounter high water pressure at recreational depths. This can happen when water moves across the watch at high speeds, causing the pressure to increase dramatically.

It’s more likely to happen if you’re diving in a cave with intense currents or if you were welding a submerged oil rig, sure, but the water resistance not only feels badass because it’s there, like some fall-out shelter full of freeze-dried food, but also because you’re simply never going to flood this watch, no matter what happens above or below sea level.

Legibility is a no-brainer. It’s bright as it gets, and the markings are smart, familiar, and obvious. The Super-LumiNova lit up inside a swim-thru (a small coral tunnel) at 100’ down, where light was simply gone for a moment. In fact, the watch provided some comfort during that descent into the dark.

Thirdly, the bezel is fantastic. Just enough overhang to bite into the fingers, even when they’re cold as hell and numbing up, but not enough that you’d catch the bezel on anything and hurt the watch.

“The S2000 can take anything you throw at it. It’s a watch you’ll never have to worry about, no matter what you’re doing. And that is sexy.”

Tools Are Beautiful

In the final analysis, as much as this watch is a luxurious and beautiful thing, it felt like a real tool underwater. Just as knowing that the V12 under the hood could launch you into the next county — even if it never will — it was thrilling to wear such a capable dive watch at depth.

I’d struggled to understand why some watches didn’t give me that “endless horsepower” feeling until I took the S2000 into the deep. Even a week diving in the Rolex Sea Dweller DEEPSEA didn’t give me that feeling, perhaps because I knew one had been to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, thus making a mockery of my recreational diving depths. But the Bremont doesn’t brag like the Rolex DEEPSEA; it doesn’t compete for world records; and it doesn’t pose at all. No one likes a poseur, but who doesn’t love a beautiful and overbuilt tool?

How to Clean and Store All Your Summer Outdoor Gear

Our warm-weather playground is closing for the season, which means that soon, you’ll be trading wheels for skis and waders for down jackets. We know — the winter stoke is real. But resist the urge to shove all your gear into the garage to be dealt with next spring; there’s work to be done.

Dirt and grime do a good job of hiding damage that’s accumulated over six months of fun. When it comes to something like a mountain bike, that buildup can impede the function of your drivetrain and other components. “Nothing’s more frustrating than trying to ride when the weather clears and getting stopped by surprise mechanical issues,” notes Nick Martin, founder of The Pro’s Closet, the largest e-retailer for pre-owned bikes and cycling gear.

And when it comes to a sport like climbing, poorly cared for gear can become a safety issue. “Taking a couple of hours in between seasons to go through all your gear is what sets you up for success — and safety — next season,” says Matt Hickethier, senior outdoor instructor for REI’s Denver location. Plus, you paid serious money for some of this stuff. “If you take care of high-quality hiking boots season after season, they can last you 20 years,” he adds.

Caring for your gear might not be as simple as leafing through the instruction manual (which you probably threw in the trash anyway). Below, you’ll find the best way to clean, dry, care for and store all your favorite summer gear so it’s ready for action at the first sign of a thaw next year.

Camping Gear

Sleeping Bags

Clean: You want to wash your sleeping bag as little as possible, especially if it’s down, since it makes the insulation clump and reduces its lifespan. (Hickethier likes to sleep with a liner and just washes that every few trips.) At the end of the season, place the bag in a front-load washing machine and use a mild detergent. The centralized spin on top-load machines can tear the stitching apart; if that’s all you have, lay your sleeping bag out and scrub it with an abrasive plastic brush and mild detergent. Then hose it off.

Dry: Hang to dry.

Care: If your bag came waterproof from its maker, use a spray (like Nikwax TX-Direct Spray-On) to restore that repellency.

Store: Once it’s completely dry, either hang the bag in your gear closet or put it in a mesh or breathable cotton bag that’s larger than the stuff sack you keep it in for trips. You want to keep the insulation as high a loft — that’s the fluffiness — as possible. Compression compromises the bag’s resilience, Hickethier says.

Cooking Equipment

Clean: Wipe down stoves and pots just like you would those in your kitchen, getting rid of any food particles that could breed bacteria or mold over the winter months. If you have a gas line, light the stove, then shut the gas off at the bottle rather than on the stove. According to Hickethier, this lets the gas flush through the line to the burner completely, and when it stops, you know the line is clear.

Dry: Let all components air dry. If the stove uses jet fuel, dry upside down so water isn’t pooling through the system.

Store: Your stove and cooking gear should be stored inside, away from the elements, which can erode the metal. Regulations for storing fuel vary by state and area, but if you have a flammables closet in your garage, that’s ideal. Otherwise, make sure it’s in an area that’s well ventilated, well contained and not going to overheat.

Tents

Clean: It’s important to get all the dirt off and out of your tent before storing it — any sand will act like sandpaper and degrade all your soft materials including stitching, Hickethier says. Turn the tent inside out, shake it, then scrub both it and the rainfly with a mild detergent (like Dawn) and a soft-bristled brush. Clean the ends of the poles that go into the ground and the stakes. Hose everything down.

Dry: Reassemble the entire tent and let it dry out somewhere indoors like in the garage, basement, even living room — UV rays actually wear down the materials over time, and since your tent obviously sits in the sun most of its erected life, you want to limit exposure as much as possible, Hickethier says.

Care: Put a UV treatment on the outside of the tent and the rainfly to extend its life. If there’s any peeling on the rainfly, treat with a waterproofing material like Nikwax. Check all your seams and cover any tape that’s peeling with silicone glue.

Store: Break down the poles and load them into the tent bag first. Never store poles under tension since they can start to wear out if taut over time, Hickethier says. Next, stuff the rainfly in the bag randomly, in a kind of circular pattern, followed by the body of the tent, then the footprint. Contrary to common sense organizational instincts, folding your tent is a no-no. “Every time you fold your tent, you’re creating constant wear on the same spots which will eventually break down the material, waterproofing and seams,” Hickethier explains.

Sleeping Pads

Clean: Inflate the pad, then hose it down, scrubbing with a mild detergent if it’s dirty.

Dry: Dry inside, out of UV light and inflated to ensure no water gets caught in creases.

Store: If it’s pillow style, pack the pad back down and store in its stuff sack. If it’s foam and self-inflatable, store the pad partially inflated with valves open to prevent the foam from breaking down under compression.

Hiking Gear

Hiking Boots

Clean: At the end of the season, do a thorough version of what you should do after every hike: Pull out the insoles, then give your boots a light wash with water, mild detergent or leather cleaner (if applicable) and a soft brush.

Dry: Hang boots upside down to allow air to flow in and excess moisture to drain out until they’re completely dry.

Care: Check all materials for degradation. If your boots are leather and puckering, turning a lighter color, or starting to look like dry skin, apply leather conditioner (Nikwax makes a good one) and let that set, then re-waterproof with a wax-based solution or silicone-based wax. Unlace your boots and check the strings’ conditions — if they’re fraying anywhere (it’ll likely be where they’re crossing a grommet) replace them. Check all metal components, like the hooks that help cinch the ankle cuff, and make sure there’s no damage or warping there. If the soles are separating anywhere, use a silicone glue (though if your soles are Vibram, contact the manufacturer because they should put a whole new one on for you).

Store: Keep boots in a dry, low-light spot, like the bottom of your closet or in a container in a low-humidity garage.

Backpacks

Clean: At the very least, empty your pack, turn it inside out and shake it to get all the small pieces of dirt and food out. If your pack has seen a lot of mud, turn it right side out and use a mild soap (like Dawn), a vinyl or plastic scrub brush and lukewarm water, scrubbing in a circular motion until all the dirt is gone. Make sure the water isn’t too hot, so it doesn’t shrink the material, Hickethier says. Check the straps and the buckle components for embedded mud or dirt.

Dry: Lay flat outside to dry.

Care: Check that the stitching isn’t fraying or peeling anywhere and that all hard components (i.e., plastic buckles) are still functioning correctly. Replace before storing.

Store: Don’t hang the bag — leaving the straps under tension, even lightly, will cause the material to stretch over time. Instead, compress the pack in a storage bin and store it somewhere with low moisture.

Water Reservoirs

Clean: A poorly cleaned, sealed reservoir is the perfect environment to breed mold and bacteria, Hickethier says. If your bladder had anything other than water in it (like an electrolyte drink) or there are signs of mineral buildup from hard water, use a dissolvable tablet, like Bottle Bright or CamelBak Cleaning Tablets, which create a bubble effect to scrub the inside of the reservoir. Run through the line, then rinse the whole thing out. (You can also use warm water, silicone-safe soap like Dawn and a soft brush, but the soap is harder to get out completely.)

Dry: Disconnect the line (if it has one), drain all the water, then hang vertically to dry (like over a hook). Some newer bladders will turn inside out, which is ideal. Otherwise, invest in a reservoir hanger (like this one from Camelbak) which is designed to keep the rubber and silicone components open so the bladder can drip dry completely.

Store: Keep the cap off, then fold the hose in half and tuck the bend into the mouth of the bladder to keep it open. Store it with the rest of your hiking gear. Some people also like to store the whole thing in their freezer to ensure no mildew develops.

Biking Gear

Road and Mountain Bikes

Clean: It’s definitely possible to wash a bike too much or too hard, says Martin. “Bikes are full of moving parts that are small and delicate,” he explains. “Overzealous washing can actually force crucial lubricants out of these parts and push dirt and grime in.” Be gentle: fill a spray bottle with warm water and a little mild dish soap (this, according to Martin, works just as well as bike-specific degreasers) and spray the whole thing down. Use a soft brush or cloth to agitate dirt and grime, especially on the chain and drivetrain. “A dirty or unlubricated drivetrain will cause a lot of premature wear, noise and shifting issues,” he adds. Rinse the frame and components with a hose or a bucket of clean water.

Dry: “Leaving your bike dripping wet is a recipe for corrosion,” Martin says. Take a small cloth and wipe down everything you can reach, including the chain and drivetrain. You can use a detailing spray (like Pedro’s Bike Lust) on the painted surfaces for an extra sheen and help in repelling dirt and dust during storage and on your next ride.

Care: Once dry, apply a chain lubricant to your drivetrain. “Only the chain needs lubrication and only on the rollers,” Martin warns. Use a rag to wipe away any excess lube that lands outside the chain or on the cassette, chainrings and derailleur pulleys. Run your shifter up and down through all the gears to make sure it doesn’t need any more tuning before you store. Then, take an inventory of what maintenance you can do during the off-season. For mountain bikes, you want to service the suspension once a year, either on your own or at a bike or suspension shop, Martin advises. On any bike, check all your consumable components like the chain, tire and brake pads for wear, and replace them if needed.

Store: Store your bike indoors — namely somewhere dry and shielded from the weather, because sun, wind, rain and snow will damage and shorten the lifespan of every component on your bike, Martin says. (If you have no choice but to keep it outside, get a waterproof cover and maintain it regularly.) You can keep it on the ground, but the most convenient way to store a bike is on a hook. For road, cyclocross or gravel bikes, hang them however you like (i.e., upside down or vertically from the ceiling or wall). Mountain bikes with suspension forks should be hung vertically — never upside down — with the front wheel up to keep the seals and foam rings in the fork from drying out.

Cycling Shoes

Clean: Pull out the insoles and wash with water, mild detergent or leather cleaner and a soft brush.

Dry: Stuff with newspaper and set in an airy space to let dry. Be sure they dry completely before storing.

Store: Keep shoes in a dry, shady spot, like a container in a low-humidity garage.

Helmets

Clean: Take a brush and clean with warm water and a gentle soap or shampoo, since you already know that won’t irritate your skin, Martin points out.

Dry: Hang to dry in a well-ventilated area.

Store: Store in a container in a low-humidity garage (out in the open risks dust and cobwebs).

Fishing Gear

Fly Lines

Clean: “Your line is exposed to dirt, sand, rocks and all kinds of funky stuff in the water that wants to decrease slickness and start breaking down the line,” observes Shawn Combs, Director of Product Development for Rod & Tackle at Orvis. Run the entire line through a Scientific Anglers cleaning pad — or a paper towel if you’re in a pinch.

Dry: Air dry.

Store: Re-spool your reel and store.

Rods

Clean: Wipe down with a clean, dry cloth. Wash reel in warm water with a soft cloth.

Dry: Air dry.

Store: Store in a rod tube.

Waders and Boots

Clean: River water should be rinsed off with a hose, and any mud on your boots scrubbed off with a soft brush and gentle dish soap.

Dry: Hang your waders to dry. Stuff boots with newspaper and leave in a well-ventilated area.

Store: Fold waders and store alongside boots in a container.

Climbing Gear

The most significant care aspect of climbing gear is to adhere to the manufacturer recommendations of life expectancy since your life depends on the reliability of these products. “Even if a rope was never used, it still has a life expectancy for how long that piece of gear is serviceable,” Hickethier explains. Info for harnesses, ropes and protective equipment can all be found on the manufacturer’s website.

Harnesses

Clean: You may still use your harness inside during the winter, but you want to clean all the dirt and grime from the outdoor season off. Always handwash it to prevent fraying and breaking, Hickethier says. Scrub the soft material and metal parts with warm, soapy water.

Dry: Hang inside to dry.

Care: Before you store it, as well as before each use, inspect the stitching, lacing and hard components of your harness. Fix anything immediately — if you forget and head out with a broken buckle, it’s hazardous, Hickethier points out.

Store: Pack flat, somewhere dry, so the material doesn’t stretch out.

Climbing Shoes

Clean: Since bouldering shoes get more dusty than dirty and have a particular grip to them, skip the soap and rinse with warm water until it runs clear.

Dry: Stuff with newspaper and set in a well-ventilated area to dry.

Store: Store alongside the rest of your climbing gear.

Ropes

Clean: Fill your bathtub or sink with warm water and add rope wash (like this one from Beal) and let it soak according to the package instructions. If the water is exceptionally dirty, drain and repeat until the water runs clear.

Dry: Set rope outside to dry.

Store: Wrapping a rope tightly can create kinks and degrade the fibers over time, Hickethier says. Instead, coil it loosely on the ground or hung on two supports (like nails). Store away from UV light.

Cams

Clean: If the metal parts have gunk built up inside, rinse with hot water and mild soap.

Dry: Wipe dry with a cloth.

Care: Lubricate the metal parts you washed, as well as any clean cams in need of some slickness (use a product like Metolius Cam Lube). Check the webbing to ensure it’s clean and not wearing down. If it’s degrading, most companies will re-sling it for you, Hickethier says.

Store: Attach to a carabiner to keep organized, then store with the rest of your climbing gear.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Steel Speaker Is Handcrafted Perfection

Remember the super awesome Transparent Speaker? Well, the folks behind that made another jaw-dropping product — the Steel Speaker. It comes part of an extremely limited range of handcrafted speakers called Upcrafted, which consists of three speakers.

One in wood, one in ceramics, and one in steel, with each crafted from recycled materials. The Steel Speaker is arguably the most awe-striking of the three. Jonas Majors did the dirty work for this slick-looking speaker. It was made with only the most essential elements and showcases the raw metal texture of aged steel, here repurposed to perfection.

The limited-edition piece comes with offers high-fidelity sound via two 3-inch drivers. Also here to beef up sound quality? A 6.5-inch woofer and a built-in amplifier. The Steel Speaker also features Bluetooth, which means you can connect it to phones, tablets, and computers. It even supports all the major casting platforms like Apple AirPlay, Sonos, plus digital assistants including Amazon Echo and Google Assistant.

Design comes courtesy of Transparent Sound, the genius folks behind the aforementioned Transparent Speaker. The clean-lined Steel Speaker features a highly minimal look, but not minimal sound quality. If you’re into brutalist interior design, this would make a perfect addition to your living room. The black metal accents shine as the cherry on top of an already gorgeous unit.

Check out the Steel Speaker’s specs when you hit the link below. May we remind you that this doesn’t come cheap. Expect to shell out a couple of thousand dollars to get this bad boy.

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Seiko’s Popular ‘Cocktail Time’ Automatic Watches Are 36% Off

Presage

Seiko’s Popular ‘Cocktail Time’ Automatic Watches Are 36% Off


In Seiko’s popular Presage family of watches, the “Cocktail Time” series makes dress watches fun again. It offers not only the brand’s signature bang-for-buck value and solid build, but also some captivating dial executions that don’t have much competition at their price level. With Seiko automatic movements and a classic but lively style, the Cocktail Time watches have been a massive hit among collectors and casual fans alike. Right now, some stunning dial variations are on sale at Macy’s for 36% off, making an already affordable and attractive watch even more seductive. See some great options below.

Presage “Cocktail Time” SRPB41 by Seiko $450 $287

Presage “Cocktail Time” SRPD37 by Seiko $425 $271

Presage “Cocktail Time” Limited Edition SRPD36 by Seiko $595 $379

Presage “Cocktail Time” SRPB46 by Seiko $495 $316
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Bishops Hill Encampment Is Modern But Old-School Camping

The Bishops Hill Encampment, from Fearon Hay Architects, would like to bring back old-school camping, but with a modern twist.

The camp consists of a pair of small structures resting on an estuarine headland. Each building features a mixture of exposed timber framework with matching timber shutters, topped off with natural oil finish. The resulting look is soothing, outdoorsy. Faithfully evincing the vibe of those good old days of classic camping glory.

The space perches on a sloping land that descends to the waterline, which adds authenticity to the whole setup. Placement, after all, is an often overlooked element in architecture. The space surrounding a structure is often just as important. The structure comes spaced, too, which creates a sheltered central space for outdoor hangouts.

Don’t let the word “camping” make you think this looks any less beautiful or refined, though. If not for the deliberately quaint timber work, this would qualify just as any fancy glamping spot would. But instead, we get something in the middle, with design elements reminiscent of classic camping but fitted for the modern era via modern aesthetic touches.

You’ll see it in the vintage natural-oiled cladding that intertwines with the open-air atmosphere, working together to bring back the vibe of a bygone camping era without losing the spirit of a new one. If you ever find yourself in the Tawharanui Peninsula, make sure to stop by and see the Bishops Hill Encampment for yourself. More information when you hit the link below, and check out more photos of the space, too.

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Photos courtesy of Fearon Hay Architects

This Kawasaki Bobber Was Built With No Limits In Mind

You know what makes custom builds actually interesting? Not possibilities. Limits. Be it budget constraints or technical challenges, these substances can really render some fascinatingly clever workaorunds. Which is all to say they can bring out true creativity. This custom Kawasaki Bobber isn’t one such build, though.

Taiwan’s 2LOUD latest handiwork came from a childhood dream. Luckily, that child turned our very, very successful later in life, and wanted to realize their dream bike without any sort of identifiable limit. The result? A tremendously beautiful build that literally bears not a single shortcoming.

2LOUD’s custom Kawasaki Bobber fits the man who already has everything in life. He has all kinds of supercars in his ultra-fancy garage. He wears expensive perfume. His timepiece collection? To die for. And he’s the kind of person who buys sneakers then promptly forgets about them forever. The bike has a no holds barred design, thanks to the fact that the owner in question gave no restrictions on the custom build. He allowed them to go bonkers and let the bike evolve to whatever shape or form they wanted it to.

Here, you’ll find a fully customized stainless steel swingarm and handmade steel handlebars. Also, a clean-up of all the electrics, plus new custom leather upholstery, and a reshaped tank and rear fender. The shop also did a repaint and refinish from nose to tail, among other refinements. If you’ve ever wondered what a bike made without limits looks like, you’re looking at it. Hit the link below to learn more.

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Photos courtesy of 2LOUD

It’s Settled, This Is the Tastiest Trail Mix You’ll Ever Eat

Gorp or trail mix — whatever you call it, some variation of the nuts, fruits and oats mixture has been a mainstay in daypacks and thru-hiking packs since the early 1900s. One of the first recorded appearances of trail mix was published in Horace Kephart’s book, The Book of Camping and Woodcraft. Kephart, who was a traveller, outdoorsman, National Park advocate and writer for Field and Stream wrote: “A handful each of shelled nuts and raisins, with a cake of sweet chocolate, will carry a man far on the trail, or when he has lost it.” Kephart had it right: Trail mix provides the perfect combination of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and sugars to keep you energized between more formal meals on the trail.

Kephart’s recipe is functional, but basic. To get something that fits today’s elevated food standards, we tapped Jen Scism, co-founder and chef of Good To-Go, which makes gourmet dehydrated food for camping. Scism spent years in New York working as a chef in highly acclaimed French restaurants before starting her own highly praised New York restaurant, Annisa. Scism now runs Good To-Go in Kittery, Maine — and she gets out hiking as much as possible. She says trail mix is one of the mainstays in her pack, and she has developed her own recipe over the years.

“For me, it’s a combination of sweet and salty,” Scism said. “You need little things that balance each other out.” Despite Kephart’s chocolate recommendation, you won’t find any cacao in Scism’s recipe. “I don’t like anything that can melt. If you set your pack down in the sun, you’re going to find melted chocolate. So I like stuff that won’t be compromised by the weather,” she said. Scism starts with a base of a favorite granola recipe and then builds from there. In this recipe she uses a granola composed of almonds, pumpkin seeds and thick-cut oats tossed with honey and maple syrup. Then she builds on top of it, adding different dried fruits like pineapples or yogurt-covered raisins.

‘David’s Favorite Trail Mix’ by Jen Scism

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Ingredients for the granola base:
1/4 pound thick-cut rolled oats
1 cup whole almonds
1 cup halved pecans
1/2 cup raw, unsalted sunflower seeds
1/2 cup shelled, raw pumpkin seeds
1 1/2 tablespoon sesame seeds
2 tablespoon ground flax seed
1 ounce honey
2 ounce maple syrup
1 ounce grapeseed oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cups dried cranberries
1/2 cup dried cherries
1 cup yogurt-covered raisins

Add-ins:
3/4 cups dried cranberries
1/2 cup dried cherries
1 cup yogurt covered raisins

Optional additions:
Dried apricots
Dried pineapple
Dates

Preparation:
1. Toss all of the ingredients for the granola base together in a large bowl.

2. Put the mixture onto two cookie sheets with sides and bake at 300°F for 30 minutes.

3. Remove the cookie sheets from the oven and move the mixture around so that it cooks evenly. Put them back in the oven, switching the top and bottom cookie sheet. Repeat this step twice, once every 10 minutes — or until the mixture is toasted but not brown.

4. Let the mixture cool, then add the dried fruit, mixing thoroughly. Keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator or cool, dry place.