All posts in “Gear”

This Awesome Motorcycle Helmet Is an Amazing Bargain, But There’s a Catch

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grab it while the deal is good


Choosing a motorcycle helmet can be tricky. After all, you’re picking a piece of gear that not only needs to protect your face and brain in the event of an accident, but also defines your look when you’re on the bike. Would you rather have the rush of air on your skin that comes with an open face helmet, or the superior protection of a full face lid? Have you considered what color might pair best with your bike? And do you want to look like a futuristic soldier, a retro rider, or a two-wheeled racer?

Should you prefer to paint the image of yourself as a MotoGP aspirant — or better yet, if you really do hit the track on your bike from time to time — well, then this is your lucky day. Right now, Bell’s Race Star Surge helmet is available on RevZilla for a massive 47 percent off.

The Bell Race Star Surge is made from carbon fiber to optimize both strength and lightness, with a novel three-layer impact liner inside to keep your skull safer than ever in the event you go down. The Panovision viewport helps reduce chances of being caught unawares by offering more visibility than on past versions of the helmet. And the liner even uses recycled jade in the fabric to keep you from overheating, delivering a claimed 10º Fahrenheit decrease in skin temperature as well as providing a rather entertaining conversation starter.

Normally, this helmet costs $750; however, move quickly, and you can snatch it up for nearly half price. What are you waiting for?

Gear Patrol also recommends:
Bell Eliminator ($400)
Biltwell Gringo S ECE Helmet ($220)
Schuberth C4 Spark Helmet ($400)
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

More by Will Sabel Courtney | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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The Fabled “Nintendo PlayStation” Only Costs $360,000 (So Far)

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Have a million dollars to drop?


Back before Nintendo decided to make the cartridge-based Nintendo 64 and before Sony decided to make its line of disc-based PlayStation consoles, there was a brief collaboration between the two giants. The result? The rare, prototype “Nintendo PlayStation.” It obviously never came to market, but a prototype is up for auction and may well go for upwards of $1 million.

Its original owners came into possession of the strange piece of video game history through a bankruptcy auction that included items from a former Sony CEO. The strange device, one of only about 200 hundred prototypes ever made, is the only surviving console known to have survived. The auction, which will continue for 21 more days, has already attracted big bids, with the price already up to over $300,000 and is attracting attention from people with mountains of cash, who you’d be hard-pressed to outbid.

The owners of the console reportedly turned down a $1.2 million offer to purchase the device outright, which says plenty about how high they expect the number to go. This could wind up being the most expensive video game console of all time.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Eric Limer

Eric Limer is Gear Patrol’s tech editor. A resident of Weehawken, NJ, his current obsessions include mechanical keyboards, mechanical pencils and Formula 1.

More by Eric Limer | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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IWC Updates a Classic with New Portugieser Chronograph Line

With its alligator leather strap and slim outline, IWC’s updated Portugieser Chronograph looks every bit the well-bred offspring of its renowned predecessor. The big differences are inside: the 41mm chrono is now powered by a new & custom-built 194-component 69000-calibre movement crafted by IWC horologists for this very watch. It is water resistant to 30 meters and boasts a 46-hour power reserve. Available in polished stainless or rose gold, with a white, black or blue dial.

Why an Iconic Czech Pilsner Is the Ultimate Grail Beer

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Brewer’s Pick


Maine is a state chock full of standout breweries. But you’d be hardpressed to find one that’s got their finger more consistently on the pulse than Oxbow Brewing Company. Founder Tim Adams has dedicated Oxbow “to the pursuit of crafting unique farmhouse ales of distinctively European influence.” His distinct, bright styles have been at the forefront of esteemed trends like Americanized Italian Pilsners (Luppolo) and Farmhouse Ales (Farmhouse Pale Ale). All brewers hold Adams in high regard and his own tastes run the gamut of American classics to iconic European styles. Here’s what Adams is drinking nowadays.

Favorite Everyday Beer: Allagash White

ABV: 5.2%
Beer Style: Witbier
Availability: National, year-round
“My favorite everyday beer is Allagash White. I live in Maine (where Allagash is brewed) and Allagash’s flagship White is available pretty much everywhere. Its ubiquity makes it an easy candidate for an everyday beer and its superb balance of flavor and drinkability make it a pleasure to enjoy day after day.”

Grail Beer: Pilsner Urquell

ABV: 4.4%
Beer Style: Czech Pilsner
Availability: International, year-round
“The best ‘grail’ beer that comes to mind is the unfiltered Pilsner Urquell that is served straight from the barrels in the underground labyrinth of the brewery’s old lagering caves in Pilsen, Czech Republic. I recently traveled to the Czech Republic and had many incredible beers and beer experiences, but the taste (and the setting) of that glass of pilsner was something that I will never forget. The young beer was still cloudy and exploding with classic Saaz hop aroma and flavor atop a doughy yeast character and soft carbonation from the cask conditioning. That’s my kind of hoppy hazy beer!”

Best Beer You Drank Recently: Threes Brewing Voluntary Exile

ABV: 8.1%
Beer Style: Baltic Porter
Availability: Local, seasonal
“I was in New York City recently and my favorite beer of the trip was Threes Brewing’s Voluntary Exile. This strong black lager is the brewery’s take on a Baltic Porter. The beer has the rich malt character and smooth body that one would hope for in an excellent Baltic Porter, but their version also had a smoky undertone that I was not expecting and made the experience for me that much more enjoyable.”

Beer You’re In Search Of (ISO): Notch Brewing Session Pils

ABV: 4%
Beer Style: Czech Pale Lager
Availability: Local, year-round
“Ever since I returned from my trip to the Czech Republic I’ve been craving a propery-brewed Czech pale lager poured from a side-pour faucet. Many Czech pubs have these special faucets that are mechanically quite different from regular American or European beer taps and they create a unique quality of foam that is extremely dense, drinkable and long-lasting. I’ve been a longtime fan of Notch Brewing in Salem, Massachusetts and I know that they pour their exceptional Czech-style lagers using these taps so I need to get down there and turn this ISO into a glass of beautifully foamy beer!”

Why Coors Banquet Is the Perfect Everyday Beer

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Since 2012, Nick Nunns of TRVE has made beers that aim to go “beyond the pale” (a fancy way of saying it’s not just IPAs), and his own tastes run the spectrum from classic macro-lagers to Belgian-style icons. Here’s what he’s drinking nowadays. Read the Story

Ryan Brower

Ryan Brower serves as a Project Coordinator for Editorial Operations and also writes about beer and surfing for Gear Patrol. He lives in Brooklyn, loves the ocean and almost always has a film camera handy.

More by Ryan Brower | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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16 Things You Need to Get Into Backcountry Skiing

Man’s greatest inventions are, in no particular order, the wheel, fire, farming, the letterpress and the backcountry ski. Each fills a basic and essential need — transport, food, knowledge and fresh tracks on a powder day.

You may ask, why a ski? Because, at the dawn of this new decade, there aren’t many blank spaces left on the map. Real adventure, and the freedom that comes with it, is a rare and highly coveted commodity — if you don’t believe me, just scroll through Instagram. One of the best ways to capture this elusive good is skiing out-of-bounds.

Picking the right alpine touring setup is the first big and likely overwhelming step. Mohair skins for uphill traction? Pin bindings and airbag packs? Waxless bases, transceivers and Crayola-colored waterproof shells? With technology rapidly improving, it can be challenging for weekend warriors to figure out what skis, tools, and clothing to invest in. The options are endless, price tags high and opinions abound.

We’re here to help you simplify. If you’re ready to ditch the lift line, here’s what you need to get started, sorted by how far from the resort you plan to go.

Sidecountry

Sidecountry is terrain you get to by using lifts to get up the mountain and then leaving the patrolled area to access the goods. Most ski areas require you to have backcountry safety gear — a shovel, probe, transceiver (and a partner) — with you to ski out of bounds. Even if they don’t require it, we strongly urge you to bring these tools along.

Mammut Pro X 35

The data strongly backs up the case for airbag packs — while they aren’t perfect, they do significantly improve your chances of survival if caught in an avalanche. There are many other factors, of course, but this isn’t an investment you’ll regret. At 35 liters, the new Pro X is a great all-around size, suitable for almost any type of ski touring. The removable airbag allows you to fly with it, and it comes with all the standard features of a good ski pack — goggle pocket, helmet, poles, and ice axe carry, and a pocket for avy tools.

Backcountry Access T S Avalanche Rescue Package

One of the most trusted names in the industry, Backcountry Access, offers this kit with the three essentials of backcountry skiing: a transceiver (also called a beacon), shovel and probe. Durable, lightweight and reliable, each component is a necessary tool to have while skiing out of bounds. I’ve used the Tracker S for a couple of years and love the ease of use, battery life, and extended search range.

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Smith Quantum MIPS

I’d recommend strapping on a helmet whenever you click into skis, whether at a resort or on a remote backcountry trip. The dangers may vary, but the risk is the same. If you crash and hit your head, bad things happen, and if you’re out of bounds, help is a lot farther away. To avoid this doom and gloom scenario, the new Quantum is comfortable, easy to use, light to pack and carry, breaths well (for those sweaty uphill climbs), and most importantly, offers high-level protection.

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Smith 4D Mag

A natural skeptic, I didn’t believe the marketing when I first read about the 4D launch. Twenty-five percent more vision than any other goggle? Psssh. Yet, curiosity eventually won me over, and I decided to test these new eye covers — and holy cow do they actually work! I’ve been impressed with their durable lens and lack of fogging, too.

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Slackcountry

Among skiers, slackcountry is understood as easy-to-reach backcountry terrain. Some say it’s the lazy man’s backcountry, but I believe it’s the smart man’s zone, too. If you want to avoid the chaos of a resort but still maximize your turns, find yourself an easy-to-access slackcountry area. My favorite is Teton Pass, just outside of Jackson, Wyoming. Drive to the parking lot, hike as high as you want, rip turns down to the road, hitch back to your car and repeat. You’ll need to add a few essentials to your kit.

BioLite HeadLamp 200

With no resort overlords forbidding turns before the lifts spin at 9 AM, you can wake up and ski as early as you want — even a lap or two before work. Dawn patrol in the winter often means hiking uphill in the darkness, though. Luckily, the newly launched HeadLamp 200 is featherweight and as bright as a car headlight, which should help you from losing your way. Even if you don’t start before dawn, stashing a headlamp in your backpack is a good idea, in case a day out proves longer than anticipated.

Patagonia Nano-Air Hoody

Heat management is essential for all off-piste ski missions. Staying warm while not overheating is a delicate balance for anyone to strike; sweating too much can lead to getting dangerously cold when you take a break and thus should be avoided. I’ve found the Nano-Air, a lightweight and breathable puffy for aerobic activities, adept at preventing such a scenario.

Hestra Army Leather Couloir

Finding the perfect glove can feel like finding a needle in a haystack. I generally run warm and prioritize dexterity — it’s nice to grab a snack or buckle a pack without taking my gloves off and exposing them to the cold air. For fast-and-light slackcountry touring, I use a pair of Army Leather Couloir gloves that are waterproof, durable and warm on both the up and the down.

Garmin Fenix 6

Great for a variety of outdoor sports, the Fenix 6 has become an essential tool in my backcountry ski kit. It has a ski-specific profile that can differentiate skiing from climbing and automatically shows metrics like total ascent and distance covered, whether you’re going up or down. More importantly, it has a robust GPS-supported mapping feature, so you can quickly figure out where you are.

Frontcountry

Easy access off-piste skiing is not to be looked down upon. Frontcountry ski zones are often close to urban areas, and they’re user-friendly, relatively safe and great for getting into the sport. You still have to hike or skin up to earn your turns, but if things do go wrong, it’s easy to hike back to your car. The frontcountry is where a dedicated touring setup starts to become essential.

Black Crows Ferox Freebird

The latest touring ski from Black Crows, the Ferox is a lightweight, floaty, fun-making machine. Designed for a variety of mountain adventures, the ski performs well on resorts and big mountains but truly excels in deep powder. Double rocker, classic camber, new lightweight fibers, and an extended sidecut add up to one of the best backcountry skis on the market. The Freebird makes touring easy on the way up and a party on the way down.

Marker M-Werks 12

Building on the success of its predecessor, the Kingpin, the M-Werks makes some critical improvements to weight and usability. This binding is the best crossover for the resort, as well as frontcountry and backcountry skiing. Efficient power transfer, easy transitions from uphill mode to downhill, burly build quality and an anti-icing design make the M-Werks my go-to binding for nearly everything.

Black Crows Duos Freebird

Sometimes less is more. The Duo uses a two-part alloy composite that adjusts easily and offers an extended grip that’s great for steep climbs and long traverses. Because these poles are durable, straightforward and functional, I use them for just about everything from hot laps to multi-day trips.

G3 Minimist Glide

The most under-appreciated yet necessary tool of a backcountry ski setup is a good pair of climbing skins. They need to stick to the base of your skis — lap after lap and season after season — and grip on steep slopes without adding a ton of weight or getting clumped up with snow and ice. I rely on G3’s Minimist Glide, made up of a mix of 70 percent mohair and 30 percent nylon, and it’s taken me up (and down) many a peak.

Backcountry

Technically, anywhere you ski without patrollers working to control avalanche risks is the backcountry. For our purposes here, backcountry skiing refers to far-out tours and overnight trips in remote places. Big mountain skiing requires a high level of skill, knowledge and risk assessment ability, not to mention trust in your partners. None of it should be underestimated. Neither should bringing the right gear.

Mountain Hardwear High Exposure Gore-Tex C-Knit Anorak & Bibs

An excellent waterproof shell keeps you dry on deep days while letting your body breathe on long climbs. It has ample vents and pockets while staying light and straightforward. It’s a sweet spot that’s hard to hit — and Mountain Hardwear’s new High Exposure kit nails it. After weeks of touring in these bibs and anorak, I’m impressed with how well it works in all conditions, without showing signs of wear and tear.

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Dynafit Hoji Pro Tour

It’s nearly impossible to have a lightweight and flexible backcountry boot that skis like a stiff and stable race boot, but the new Hoji Pro gets awfully close. The design provides a rigid boot that transfers power well while allowing a 55-degree cuff rotation for more natural uphill walking, giving you maximum freedom of movement. What’s more, the locking mechanism is easy and quick, making transitions a breeze.

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DPS Phantom 2.0

Of the entire list, Phantom wins the award for the best bang for your buck. Some waxing diehards may sneer, but this new waxless base is a real game-changer. Apply it once and have skis that slide faster on any surface, from hardpack to crud, corn and corduroy, forever. Even better, Phantom adds durability, and unlike most waxes, it doesn’t pollute the environment with nasty chemicals.

Pro Bar Meal

Last but not least, you should always bring food and water along while backcountry skiing. Whether it be an hour, a full day or more, extra snacks and water can be the difference between a fun and safe day out, and a giant, exhausting mistake. My go-to snack for long tours is a hardy Pro Bar Meal because it’s made of real food ingredients, is nutrient-dense and delicious.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Two Affordable Field Watches for Under $450

The origins of the field watch trace back to the early 20th century and the transition from the pocket watch to the wristwatch. Pocket watches simply didn’t suffice for the trench warfare of WWI — soldiers needed timekeeping devices they could access quickly and read easily without fumbling in a pocket. The original solution was to simply add wire lugs and leather straps to pocket watches, and this practice eventually evolved into one of producing dedicated wristwatches.

After the war, soldiers came home with their timepieces, and the stigma around wristwatches — which were originally marketed to women — started to shift: If they were rugged enough for battle, they were certainly rugged enough for the average gentleman. By the time WWII set in, nearly every major watchmaker was eager to produce timepieces for military use, marking the birth of the modern field watch.

It’s been 75 years since the Second World War, and the field watch is still an enduring design. In an era of watchmaking filled with infinite complications, avant-garde designs, and futuristic materials, the no-frills field watch holds a special place in our hearts and our collections.

Now, as it seems to fit in our modern lives so seamlessly, you’d think this type of timepiece was made specifically for the average millennial working at a startup in a uniform of jeans and t-shirt. But adaptability is the charm of the field watch, which once served an indispensable purpose on the battlefield. Nowadays, it’s an essential tool that everyone should have in their collections. Here, we have two stellar options for under $450.

The Competition

Nodus Sector Field


The Nodus Sector Field is a quintessential field watch, with high accuracy, good legibility, and solid water resistance. However, it’s been re-interpreted with modern style elements and contemporary engineering.
Diameter: 38mm
Water Resistance: 150m
Movement: Seiko (SII) NH38

Vaer A5 Field


The Vaer A5 Field balances the ruggedness of a field watch with a refined design. With an emphasis on water resistance, the model adopts an “ocean-to-office” functionality. All the while, it upholds Vaer’s commitment to American assembly, craftsmanship and local parts sourcing.
Diameter: 40mm
Water Resistance: 100m
Movement: Miyota 9015

The Test

Design

The Nodus Sector Field comes standard on a stainless steel tapered bracelet with button release clasp. (Though many field watches traditionally ship on fabric or leather straps, some well known models, such as the Rolex Explorer, ship on a bracelet.) To give it the true field test (pun intended) and to make for a more even comparison with the A5 Field, I tried it out on both the bracelet and a NATO strap. The bracelet gives the 38mm Sector Field a more substantial weight, with a feel similar to that of a modern tool watch. However, once you get it on a NATO, it’s instantly lighter and looks more like a classic field watch.

With the right tools, changing from a bracelet to a NATO strap was surprisingly easy on the Sector Field. This option really added to the versatility of the watch. (It’s a somewhat controversial opinion, but I tend to prefer bracelets to straps.) So, I enjoyed the Sector Field as it came — it paired perfectly with jeans and a sweater. That said, when I was ready to head upstate for a day hike, it was nice to have the NATO as an alternative.

With the A5 Field, you get a choice of two straps (either quick-release or single-pass), from which you can choose silicone, nylon, or Horween leather options. However, I was lucky enough to test all three. The supple Horween leather and silicone fit seamlessly. On the other hand, the nylon is a bit thicker and stiffer at first but will certainly mold to the wrist with wear.

Functionality

When it comes to the functionality of a field watch, durability and legibility are key. The Nodus Sector Field is a time-only watch with a clean, easy-to-read dial. In daylight, the white Arabic numerals and hands pop on the black dial, and in low-light, a healthy dose of Super-LumiNova keeps them equally legible. The thick 316L surgical-grade steel certainly gives the Sector Field a durable feel.

Adding to the overall readability and heft of the watch is a double-domed, tapered sapphire crystal treated with blue anti-reflective coating on the underside. The screw-down crown makes it easy to set the time while contributing to the water resistance of up to 150 meters. Inside, you’ll find the Seiko (SII) NH38 automatic movement.

With respect to functionality, the Vaer A5 Field is fairly comparable to the Sector Field. However, there are a few minor differences, chief amongst them being a date function at the three-o’clock position. For me, this was a nice bonus even though a traditional field watch is time-only. Despite the date, the dial layout is quite similar to that of the Sector Field: It features bold, white hands and Arabic markers on a contrasting black background, both with Super-LumiNova coating for high legibility in all conditions.

Though the A5 Field is also comprised of a 316L stainless steel and features a domed sapphire crystal like that of the Nodus Sector Field, it’s remarkably thin and wears lighter the Nodus, which I appreciated when using it in more active settings. Despite this light weight, the threaded, screw-down design of the crown and case back makes for 100 meters of water resistance.

The A5 Field’s case comes in slightly larger at 40mm, yet, it’s significantly thinner at 9.7mm compared to the Sector Field at 12.9mm. Inside this model, you’ll find the Miyota 9015 automatic movement, which you can see through the exhibition case back.

Build Quality

Nodus prides themselves in assembling watches like the Sector Field entirely in-house, which includes regulating their movements in four positions (+/-10 seconds/day) even though they don’t use their own calibers. The Seiko (SII) NH38 automatic is considered a reliable workhorse movement — a smart choice for the Sector Field. Externally, this model appears to have an equally substantial build quality: the bracelet clasp’s button release disengages and latches securely. The case itself also has a hearty construction, from the overall weight to the screw-down crown.

The Vaer A5 Field features equally solid construction. As previously mentioned, it houses the Japanese Miyota 9015 automatic movement, which is also considered a workhorse caliber, offering a minimalist design while being accurate and easy to service. The only potential downside to the A5 Field may be the quick-release straps: They’re certainly user-friendly and convenient. However, they’re not as secure as a bracelet or NATO strap, which could become an issue in more extreme conditions. Of course, if this is a concern, you can get the A5 Field with a single pass strap.

Verdict

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All in all, the Nodus Sector Field and Vaer A5 Field made for an admirable field watch match-up. If you have a NATO strap and feel comfortable swapping out a bracelet, the Sector Field is slightly more versatile, as the bracelet allows it dress up a bit more easily. On the other hand, it instantly becomes a true field watch on a NATO.

The A5 Field’s lightweight construction and slim build in combination with the strap options make it feel like a second skin. In this way, it serves as an ideal field watch. While elements like the date function and exhibition case back stray from its field watch roots, I personally appreciated these thoughtful and functional touches. You really can’t go wrong with either model if you’re looking to add a field watch to your collection.

Nodus and Vaer provided these products for review.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Motorcycles for Navigating City Streets in 2020

Consider this list your introductory guide to commuter motorcycles. No, it’s not an official motorcycles segment per se, but it’s worth looking at; after all, if you’re zipping into, out of and around an urban environment, a motorcycle is just about the best way to get from A to B.

The five motorcycles we discuss here vary in size, style and price, but they all have one thing in common: they’re all perfect for dealing with busy streets, angry traffic and tight spaces.

What Makes a Great City Motorcycle?

Surviving the forces that make up city traffic on a motorcycle requires patience, quick reflexes and steel nerves — and it’s crucial that the motorcycle can keep up. A compact, slender bike is a good place to start. Dodging potholes and traffic and shooting for narrow gaps between cars is the norm when cruising down a crowded street; a good city motorcycle needs to be lightweight and flickable, two qualities delivered well by smaller bikes.

Power is important, but only if it’s usable. There’s no use having chart-topping power and torque if you have to be flirt with the redline to see it. The motorcycles that work best on city streets have accessible power when you’re pulling away from a stoplight or puttering around at low speeds.

When dipping and diving and weaving your way through town, your attention needs to be on the road ahead, not how uncomfortable you are — so good ergonomics are key. That’s not just about the seating position; though it’s important that you’re not stuffing yourself onto the bike, riding comfort also comes from a good suspension setup. A super-stiff suspension that relays every rut, rock and crack can not only be bone-shatteringly uncomfortable, but can lead to a nervous, twitchy and unsettled bike.

It’s a tall order to build a bike that’s versatile enough to handle city streets and still have the capabilities to hop on the highway. But when manufacturers nail the formula, they create motorcycles that can be an incredible asset for fighting back the daily grind.

The Best Motorcycles for City Riding

Ducati Monster 821

The 821 risked falling into obscurity as the middle child of the Ducati Monster lineup. The 797 is prized as the approachable, entry-level Ducati; the 1200 might look almost identical to the little 797, but if you look closer, it’s a tech-laden superbike with no fairings and serious power. The 821, however borrows supersport-level tech from the 1200 and brings it down to an approachable level. It’s the best of both worlds — the controllable and lightweight nature of the 797, and the extra shove the top-of-the-line tech and control systems from the 1200.

Engine: 821cc V-twin
Horsepower: 109
Torque: 63 lb-ft
Price: $11,995+

Triumph Bonneville T100

Our very own Steve Mazzucchi has been riding a Bonneville around New York City for some time, so he’s able to vouch firsthand for its capability as a city bike. The combination of reasonable seat height and the placement of the pegs right under your feet give it great ergonomics and visibility, he says. The latest models add ABS and heated handgrips for added livability, without losing the classic looks. “The fact you can pretend to be Steve McQueen racing away from Nazis is just a bonus, really,” Mazzucchi adds.

Engine: 900cc parallel twin
Horsepower: 55
Torque: 59 lb-ft
Price: $10,450+

Zero Motorcycles SR/F

With their instantaneous torque and lack of a clutch or gears, electric motorcycles are practically tailor-made for city riding. (Also, unlike internal-combustion machines, they get better mileage around town than on the highway.) Zero’s SR/F — one of our most notable vehicles to go on sale last year — goes 161 miles on a charge in the city (or 200, with the optional Power Tank) and recharges in as little as an hour, yet still rips off a 0-60 mph run of well under three seconds. It’ll top out at 124 mph, too…should you find a city street that allows it.

Engine: 14.4-kWh lithium-ion battery and permanent magnet AC motor
Horsepower: 110
Torque: 140 lb-ft
Price: $19,495+

Honda CB300R

Hope you like matte blue, because that’s the only color Honda’s delightful little bike that lands between a naked standard and a sportbike comes in for 2020. (We do, for what it’s worth.) But if not, a can of Krylon is all that’ll be between you and one of the most delightful city motorcycles out there. Its compact size means even its small motor provides plenty of pep for around-town riding, while features like ABS and a 31.5-inch riding position make it friendlier for around-riding. Plus: it’s cheap, and it’s a Honda, so you know it’s built well.

Engine: 286cc single-cylinder
Horsepower: 31
Torque: 20 lb-ft
Price: $4,949+

Kawasaki Z650 ABS

In the middle-weight naked category, the bikes are so closely matched, any scrutiny requires a microscope. But the Kawasaki is one of the more affordable options compared to its Japanese rivals (even on the ABS model that starts at $7,649), and edges out the competition on styling. The Z650 really shines in mid-range power, though, delivering it right where you need it for passing traffic.

Engine: 649cc parallel-twin
Horsepower: 67
Torque: 49 lb-ft
Price: $7,649+

5 Best All-in-One Turntables that Simplify the Vinyl Experience

Listening to vinyl isn’t as simple as asking Alexa or opening Spotify on your smartphone, and that’s part of the reason why people love it. The act of choosing a record, placing it and dropping the stylus, that requires more attention. And as a result, you’re more likely to appreciate the music more. For those just starting out, building your own hi-fi system can be intimidating — we’re here to help.

Most entry-level hi-fi systems require more than just a turntable and a pair of speakers. In the past, most turntables needed a separate component, a phono preamp (or phono stage), to amplify the turntable’s normally weak signal. Otherwise, it wouldn’t be powerful enough to drive the speakers. According to Audio Advice, a turntable’s signal “is about 1,000x lower than the signal coming from a CD player or a streaming device.”

Today, it’s common for turntables to have their own built-in amplification, meaning they have a built-in preamp and don’t require you to have a separate component; you can hook the turntable directly up to passive speakers and it’ll just work. We call these “all-in-one turntables” and you really just need a pair of speakers and speaker cables to listen to music.

There are different kinds of “all-in-one” turntables. Most entry-level options have built-in Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, either of which affords you the option to stream music from services like Spotify or Apple Music to your system, without actually having to play a vinyl record. It combines the best of analog and modern streaming. Some all-in-one turntables even have speakers built right into them, but we probably wouldn’t recommend them.

The Downside of All-In-One Turntables

The big advantage of purchasing an all-in-one turntable is that it’s simple to use. You just get some cables, hook it up to your favorite bookshelf speakers and it’ll just work. As far as disadvantages, there are two that jump out.

First, an all-in-one turntable might sacrifice a little bit of audio quality. Since all of the components are built into the turntable, it could add extra noise and vibrations to the system, thus preventing the stylus to read the record as accurately. That said, a high-quality all-in-one turntable will be able to mediate this problem, with a sturdier platter and other higher-quality components.

Second, upgradeability. Most all-in-one turntables are designed to be the finished article, not to be tinkered with, and this kind of eliminates the fun of building out a system. This is especially for audiophiles who like to add separate components to the system, upgrading over time and improving/refining the sound signature. On the flip side, some all-in-one turntables actually allow you to turn off their built-in preamp and add your own. This way you can upgrade your system down the road without having to replace your turntable.

Passive vs Powered Bookshelf Speakers: Which to Choose?

When it comes to bookshelf speakers, you’re going to encounter a few different types — but not all are designed to work with an all-in-one turntable. Passive bookshelf speakers are your best and safest bet. These speakers have no built-in amplification and don’t need to be connected to a power source. You connect them to your turntable with its built-in preamp, and that’s basically it. It’s a pair of speakers that you can just plug into your all-in-one turntable (via RCA cables) and it’ll just work.

Powered bookshelf speakers are the other option, but we don’t really recommend them. They won’t work with most all-in-one turntables because these speakers have their own built-in phono preamp and amplification and they work with the turntable’s built-in preamp. The loop-around is that some all-in-one turntables allow you to turn off their built-in phono preamp. If your turntable does, then you’ll have to turn its preamp off in order for it to work properly with your powered speakers.

A Manual or Automatic Turntable?

You’re going to also decide whether to buy manual or an automatic all-in-one turntable, which simply refers to how the turntable operates. A manual turntable requires you to “manually” lower the tonearm and place the stylus, then pick it up when the record is over. While an automatic turntable does this “hard” work for you (after pressing a button).

The advantage of an automatic turntable is that it makes playing records even easier. It also eliminates any issue of placing the stylus incorrectly, which can then scratch and potentially ruin the record. The advantage of a manual turntable is that it makes listening to music feel more deliberate. It also requires you to pay more attention — picking tracks and then lifting the tonearm when the record is finished — which many people think is the point of listening to vinyl in the first place.

There shouldn’t be any difference in the sound quality of a manual and an automatic turntable.

Buying Guide

Best All-in-One: Pro-Ject Juke Box 3

Pro-Ject’s latest vinyl turntable, the Juke Box E, is really a terrific entry-level hi-fi system; if you’re willing to spend a little more, this is probably the best option for most people. It has a power amplifier and phono stage built right into its body, plus a Bluetooth receiver (which is a rarity) so you can stream music without actually playing any records. All you need is some cables and a pair of bookshelf speakers.

Key specs

Turntable: Belt drive
Automatic or Manual: Manual
Tonearm: 8.6″ aluminum
Preamp: Yes
Connectivity: Bluetooth

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Budget Pick: Audio-Technica AT-LP120XUSB

First things first: Audio-Technica’s LP120XUSB is a USB turntable, meaning you can play and record records at the same time. This is a great way to turn your vinyl into digital music files, so you can listen to them without a turntable or record nearby. More importantly, the LP120XUSB has a built-in phono preamp, so all you need is some passive or powered bookshelf speakers to hook up to it.

Key specs

Turntable: Direct drive
Automatic or Manual: COPY
Tonearm: S-shaped tone arm with hydraulically damped lift control
Preamp: Yes
Connectivity: USB (Mac- and PC-compatible)

Editor’s Pick: Fluance RT81

Fluance has always specialized in home theater systems and hi-fi speakers, but it wasn’t until 2016 that the Canadian-based audio company got into turntables when they introduced the Fluance RT81 and RT80. The RT81 is the higher-end model and features a solid wood body, as opposed to the RT80’s hollow one, and it’s a really beautiful –yet still affordable – turntable. It has a built-in Texas Instruments preamp that you can turn on or off, enabling you to buy upgraded external pre-amp and further customize your setup.

Key specs

Turntable: Belt drive
Automatic or Manual: Manual
Tonearm: S-shaped tonearm with an adjustable counterweight
Preamp: Yes
Connectivity: RCA

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Best USB Turntable: Sony PS-HX500

Like the Audio Technica LP120, this is a USB turntable that’s capable of playing and digitizing your vinyl records. But Sony’s PS-HX500 is more bespoke and is a direct-drive turntable – probably the better option if you don’t plan on spinning the record like a DJ. And, of course, it has a built-in phono preamp, which you can turn off or on depending on if you want to upgrade to better external preamp.

Key specs

Turntable: Belt drive
Automatic or Manual: Manual
Tonearm: straight tonearm
Preamp: Yes
Connectivity: USB (Mac- and PC-compatible)

The Grail: Symbol Audio Modern Record Player

The Modern Record Player by Symbol Audio is admittedly different from everything else on this list. That’s because it’s not just a turntable. It’s a true all-in-one system with an integrated turntable, a custom class AB amplifier and custom-engineered, built-in speakers. It’s designed with a unique three-phase isolation system to eliminate distortion. The feather in its cap is that by request Symbol Audio can add Bluetooth, Chromecast, Sonos Connect or Airport Express so you can wirelessly stream music the way you want. (It just looks classy as hell, too.)

Key specs

Turntable: Belt drive
Automatic or Manual: Manual
Tonearm: RB110 tonearm
Preamp: Yes
Connectivity: Bluetooth, Chromecast, Sonos Connect, Airport Express (add-ons)

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tucker Bowe

Tucker Bowe has been on Gear Patrol’s editorial team since 2014. As a Tech Staff Writer, he tracks everything in the consumer tech space, from headphones to smartphones, wearables to home theater systems. If it lights up or makes noise, he probably covers it.

More by Tucker Bowe | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip Debuts First Foldable Glass Screen

Samsung’s Android-powered Galaxy Z Flip phone is the first to feature a foldable screen made of glass. Bendable, “Ultra Thin Glass.” The 6.7-inch OLED display spans the phones hinge area, which has been greatly improved since the dismal performance of the original Galaxy Fold. Samsung says the new phone will deliver flawless function through opening & closing 200,000 times.

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These Are the Coolest Barbour Jackets You Can’t Buy in America

<!–These Are the Coolest Barbour Jackets You Can’t Buy in America • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Barbour x Kaptain Sunshine


The waxed jacket was perfected by Barbour over a century ago. While some have tried to outdo the British heritage brand at its own game, others have chosen instead to join them, producing some of the most interesting takes on their prized outerwear in the process. Focused on vintage Americana and militaria, Japanese brand Kaptain Sunshine has teamed up with Barbour for a waxed duo of limited parkas.

The Food Mountain Parka is a mid-length parka featuring a hood, snap button front with a storm placket, angled hand pockets, interior pockets, drawstring waist and rear game pocket. The Food Short Parka comes in a boxed and cropped fit detailed with a hood, two large chest pockets, interior mesh lining and drawstring hem.

Both jackets come in beige and black colorways, but you’ll have to go the proxy route if you want to snag them.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

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The 18 Best Style Deals to Shop This Week

We’re excited for all the shiny new spring clothes to hit our favorite retailers, but everyone’s favorite subterranean meteorologist says we’ve got another six weeks of winter. In the meantime there’s plenty good-good to be had in sale sections all around the web. And with Valentine’s Day happening this Friday, you could take advantage of a grip of discounted duds whether it’s for your love bunny or for your selfish self.

Barbour x Engineered Garments Upland Wax Jacket

This wonderfully weird take on a waxed jacket can only come from the dynamic duo of Barbour and Engineered Garments. Detachable hood for when you’re having a good (or bad) hair day, more pockets than you practically need and very much on sale.

Our Legacy Langoustine Vest

A lot of people have puffy vests. Not a lot of people have puffy vests as cool as this one.

J.Crew Organic Cotton Crewneck Sweater in Garter Stitch

I have a feeling spring is gonna sneak up on us. When it does, a cotton sweater like this one should be on-hand at the ready.

Filson Weatherproof Rolling Carry-on Bag

Oh, no big deal. Just some heirloom quality full-grain leather luggage at $800 off.

Oliver Peoples Isba Sunglasses

You’ve already got a pair of black sunglasses. Lighten things up with these pearly peepers.

Yuketen Tokyo DB Chukka

Calling this a chukka is almost as audacious as the fact that it’s 50 percent off.

Todd Snyder Slim-Fit 5-Pocket Stretch Italian Cord

The perfect cords don’t exi–

Allen Edmonds Wooster Street Penny Loafer

It’s loafer season, baby!

Nanushka Ronan Houndstooth Overcoat

This overcoat is so good, we’d wear it all year long. Thankfully, the fabric is all-cotton.

Polo Ralph Lauren Braided Leather Belt

Black leather belts can get formal real quick, but the braided weave and brass hardware on this one makes it an everyday deal.

Levi’s Vintage Clothing 551Z Customized Jeans

Perfectly distressed vintage jeans without the perfectly disturbing vintage smell.

ASICS Gel-Nimbus 21

For the cool dads who think other dad shoes are too popular.

L.L. Bean Graphic Boat and Tote

Two moose engaged in battle is objectively cooler than a monogram.

Patagonia Fjord Flannel Shirt

Who could be mad at this shirt? Two pockets, brushed organic cotton. Again, who?!

Needles Drawstring Easy Pant

These full-fleece easy pants are easy to get into, but hard to wear any other pant.

Anonymous Ism 2 Color Uneven Dye Crew Socks

Socks so trippy you’ll want to wear them with shoes that are really easy to put on…

Crocs Classic Realtree V2

…like these camo print clogs, for instance.

Todd Snyder Wool Houndstooth Hat

Suiting fabric turned into a baseball cap sounds like a good idea. As it turns out, it is.

Save $100 on This Limited-Edition Commuter Bike

Priority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter BikePriority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter Bike

The Gear Patrol Commuter, made in tandem with Priority Bicycles, was inspired by — and tested on — the streets of New York City. Streamlined for your everyday grind, it a pairs a durable, easy-to-maintain feature set with an understated colorway you won’t find anywhere else. Buy Now: $899 $799

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Safest American Cars You Can Buy for 2020

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Seiko’s Affordable New Bombshell Watch Is Awesome but Only Available in Japan

<!–Seiko’s Affordable New Bombshell Watch Is Awesome but Only Available in Japan • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Presage JDM


Feast your eyes on these delicious-looking new automatic watches from Seiko that are thus far reserved for the Japanese market only. They’re affordable at around $755, and they’re meant to reference the designs of notable chronographs the brand made back in 1964. (They’re not actually chronographs, but it doesn’t matter because they look so damn cool.)

Seiko divides a certain mid-range (though, typically affordable) tier of its offerings into sporty Prospex and formally styled Presage models. The bezel and bold dial elements make these Presage models, however, feel sportier than almost anything in the collection. They are, in fact, time-and-date versions of the Presage chronograph announced late last year, but with simple three-hand movements they cost a fraction of the price of their more complicated cousins.

Available in three dial colors and featuring a 41.3mm-wide steel case as well as a sapphire crystal, the new Presage is powered by the Seiko 6R35 automatic movement with a 70-hour power reserve. Currently information is available only on Seiko’s Japanese website, but it appears that the watches will be available in Seiko’s Japan boutiques starting Feb 21, 2020. Each variant is limited to 1,964 examples and has a price equivalent to around $755.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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Score One of Peak Design’s Best Backpacks for a Whopping $101 Off

In one of the most successful Kickstarter campaigns ever, the gang at Peak Design raised $6,565,782 for its Everyday collection of bags. Not too shabby, especially considering the goal was $500,000. The line includes a tote and sling, but the crown jewel is the just-about-perfect Everyday Backpack. Now, thanks to a Huckberry sale, you can snag it for an unheard-of 35 percent off.

What about this bag left literally thousands of crowdfunding fiends drooling? Like all things Peak Design, every feature is exceptionally well thought-out and executed. Intended as the ideal photographer’s bag, it boasts Velcro’ed FlexFlow dividers and internal pockets that allow for endless configurations, an independently accessible laptop sleeve and a sleek, secure MagLatch closure system.

A 500D Kodra shell makes the Everyday Backpack durable and weatherproof, while padded shoulder straps, a custom sternum strap and a tuckaway waist strap ensure the load remains balanced and comfortable throughout the day.

It’s one of those items that is endlessly satisfying in terms of both form and function, especially when you can score it at a deep discount. The 30L version is currently $101 off, while the 20L version is $91 off.

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Save $100 on This Limited-Edition Commuter Bike

Priority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter BikePriority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter Bike

The Gear Patrol Commuter, made in tandem with Priority Bicycles, was inspired by — and tested on — the streets of New York City. Streamlined for your everyday grind, it a pairs a durable, easy-to-maintain feature set with an understated colorway you won’t find anywhere else. Buy Now: $899 $799

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Steve Mazzucchi

Steve Mazzucchi is Gear Patrol’s outdoors and fitness editor. Outside the office, you can find him mountain biking, snowboarding, motorcycling or sipping a dram of Laphroaig and daydreaming about such things.

More by Steve Mazzucchi | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

Beats’s $350 Noise-Canceling Headphones Are Cheaper Than Ever

<!–Beats’s $350 Noise-Canceling Headphones Are Cheaper Than Ever • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Studio3 Wireless


The Studio3 Wireless are Beats’s flagship over-ear noise-canceling headphones, and right now you can buy a pair in numerous finishes for wicked cheap. The normally $350 headphones are selling on Amazon for $263. It’s the cheapest that these headphones have ever been.

The Studio3 Wireless were released in late 2017 and they are particularly good headphones for iPhone owners. Each pair is integrated with Apple’s W1 chip (the predecessor of the H1 chip that’s now in the AirPods Pro) that helps them quickly pair with an iPhone, Mac or iPad. They’re also integrated with Pure Adaptive Noise Canceling (Pure ANC) technology, which adjusts the noise cancellation depending on the environment you’re listening in (whether that’s a quiet room or a noise-y office) so that the music sounds its best.

The downside of the Studio3 Wireless is that each pair is a few years old, and Beats has since released the Solo Pro, which are the company’s first-ever pair of on-ear active noise-canceling headphones. The Solo Pro are nice because they charge via Lightning, while the Studio3 Wireless still charge via micro-USB. Plus they are a little cheaper.

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Save $100 on This Limited-Edition Commuter Bike

Priority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter BikePriority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter Bike

The Gear Patrol Commuter, made in tandem with Priority Bicycles, was inspired by — and tested on — the streets of New York City. Streamlined for your everyday grind, it a pairs a durable, easy-to-maintain feature set with an understated colorway you won’t find anywhere else. Buy Now: $899 $799

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tucker Bowe

Tucker Bowe has been on Gear Patrol’s editorial team since 2014. As a Tech Staff Writer, he tracks everything in the consumer tech space, from headphones to smartphones, wearables to home theater systems. If it lights up or makes noise, he probably covers it.

More by Tucker Bowe | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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The Best Insulated Jacket Available Is on Sale for the First Time We’ve Seen

<!–The Best Insulated Jacket Available Is on Sale for the First Time We’ve Seen • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Puffy Price-Drop


Every year, we test as many insulated jackets as we can get our hands on in an attempt to identify the best. For two years running, the honor went to Patagonia’s Micro Puff. This year though, that jacket lost the throne to none other than its younger brother, the Macro Puff. And for the first time that we’ve seen, it’s on sale for 50 percent off.

The quality that sets both jackets apart is PlumaFill, a synthetic insulation proprietary to Patagonia that expertly mimics the lightness and warmth of down. The primary difference between the two coats is that the Macro Puff has more of it, making it warmer. It also comes in a slightly longer fit, which imparts a more casual look. Together, these qualities make an already-great insulated jacket even better, whether you’re in town or high up on a mountain.

Note: the sale currently applies to two colorways, Balkan Blue and Oxide Red. Most sizes are available, although mediums are unfortunately sold out.

Save $100 on This Limited-Edition Commuter Bike

Priority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter BikePriority Bicycles x Gear Patrol Commuter Bike

The Gear Patrol Commuter, made in tandem with Priority Bicycles, was inspired by — and tested on — the streets of New York City. Streamlined for your everyday grind, it a pairs a durable, easy-to-maintain feature set with an understated colorway you won’t find anywhere else. Buy Now: $899 $799

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tanner Bowden

Tanner Bowden is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering all things outdoors and fitness. He is a graduate of the National Outdoor Leadership School and a former wilderness educator. He lives in Brooklyn but will always identify as a Vermonter.

More by Tanner Bowden | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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This Affordable Espresso Machine Has Everything You Need to Make Barista-Level Coffee at Home

<!–This Affordable Espresso Machine Has Everything You Need to Make Barista-Level Coffee at Home • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Breville’s Barista Express


To the frustration of many would-be espresso nerds, getting into espresso is no easy task. And by no easy task, we mean it’s expensive as hell. At a bare minimum, you need a decent espresso maker, a scale and a high-end burr grinder. That’s why all-in-one espresso makers equipped with scales and grinders represent the best value in espresso makers. And one of those machines, Breville’s Barista Express, is on sale today.

The usually $600 machine looks confusing but isn’t — turn the power on, choose single or double, press the corresponding brew button (denoted by symbols of one and two cups of coffee) and espresso is made in under a minute. Plus, Breville’s steam wand makes lush, foamy milk without any requisite skill or know-how. Get one for $120 off today at Amazon.

Gear Patrol also recommends:
Gaggia Semi-Auto 14101 ($349)
Delonghi La Specialista ($949)

Breville Oracle Touch ($2,000)

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Price

Will Price is Gear Patrol’s home and drinks editor. He’s from Atlanta and lives in Brooklyn. He’s interested in bourbon, houseplants, cheap Japanese pens, and cast-iron skillets — maybe a little too much.

More by Will Price | Follow on Contact via Email

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‘The French Dispatch’ Trailer

Wes Anderson has made an entire career out of being imitated but never duplicated. Whether it’s the style tips to steal from Wes Anderson and his movies to the iconic and classic actors he always…

       

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This Chronograph Watch Has a Feature Rarely Found at Its Price

<!–This Chronograph Watch Has a Feature Rarely Found at Its Price • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Frederique Constant Flyback


Chronographs are already infamously complicated mechanisms, but the flyback function generally takes them into the realm of high-end watchmaking. Hence why Frederique Constant’s Flyback Chronograph Manufacture watch with an in-house movement presents an impressive value. And you know what else? It’s also damn good-looking in its newest iterations, with a retro-inspired but restrained design featuring a “reverse-panda” (light-on-dark) motif for its prominent subdials.

What is a flyback chronograph? It allows the user to quickly restart the chronograph with a single button push rather than having to tediously stop, reset, and start again. (This process sounds simple, but this adds significant complexity to the already challenging stopwatch mechanics. And Swiss Frederique Constant does the whole thing in-house.)

The new Flyback Chronograph Manufacture watches come in two variants: one in steel with a blue dial and another in with a rose-gold-toned steel case and brown dial. Each is 42mm wide and features a transparent case back to display the automatic FC-760 movement inside. In steel the watch will have a price around $4,235, while the rose-gold-coated model will run about $4,560.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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One of the Biggest Tech Events of the Year Just Got Canceled

<!–One of the Biggest Tech Events of the Year Just Got Canceled • Gear Patrol<!– –>

Coronavirus is having a growing impact on consumer tech


Mobile World Congress, held annually in Barcelona, Spain, is one of the biggest international tech events of the year. The international show is typically home to (or at least concurrent with) announcements from some of the largest phone-making companies across the globe. Not this year, however, as it has been fully canceled on account of concerns about the coronavirus.

Yesterday, the governing body behind the event announced the cancelation citing “due regard to the safe and healthy environment in Barcelona and the host country today” and “the global concern regarding the coronavirus outbreak, travel concern and other circumstances.”

Mobile World Congress isn’t the only consumer tech event that coronavirus may have disrupted. Analysts have suggested that the supply chain disruptions the virus is causing in China could also impact the planned release of the new Xbox and Playstation consoles later this year, and potentially the new iPhone as well.

Further delays are only predictions at the moment, but the outbreak is making it increasingly clear to even casual consumers how the supply chains used to produce all your favorite gadgets is a global web with roots that almost always trace back to China in one way or another. It’s a good a reminder as any that these products don’t just grow on trees.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Eric Limer

Eric Limer is Gear Patrol’s tech editor. A resident of Weehawken, NJ, his current obsessions include mechanical keyboards, mechanical pencils and Formula 1.

More by Eric Limer | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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