All posts in “Gear”

Today in Gear: Coffee Delivery Made Easy, Dyson’s New Air Purifier & More

Today in Gear is our daily roundup of all the latest product announcements, drops and deals. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at tig@gearpatrol.com.


With many of us sequestered at home for the foreseeable future, your home coffee setup is as important as ever. Trade Coffee delivers an elevated at-home coffee experience directly to your door. Trade’s coffee subscription is perfect for the new homebrewer in all of us, with over 400 different coffees from some of the top independent roasters in the country — so you can help to support local companies during this hard time. Its website also offers a variety of how-tos, tips and tricks for those new to making their coffee at home, so you can quickly become an expert. Right now, Trade is also donating $2 for every first coffee bag purchase to roaster employees impacted by the coronavirus. On top of that good news, you also get 30 percent off your first bag and free shipping. So get your brew on and help out some independent roasters, too.

New & Noteworthy Releases

This Box Changed My Whole Relationship to My PhoneThis Box Changed My Whole Relationship to My PhoneThis Box Changed My Whole Relationship to My Phone

This Box Changed My Whole Relationship to My Phone

I’d expected the primary pain point would be that I’m a big whiney baby who throws a tantrum without his glow-screen. So I’ve been surprised that in fact the opposite is the case: I actually…

This Watch Is Made for Surfing in Detroit, of All PlacesThis Watch Is Made for Surfing in Detroit, of All Places

This Watch Is Made for Surfing in Detroit, of All Places

Shinola’s The Duck is a sub-$1,000, quartz-powered diver available in four colors meant for riding the waves of the Great Lakes.

Have Your Bose QC35s Been Sounding Weird? You’re Not Alone (and There’s a Fix)Have Your Bose QC35s Been Sounding Weird? You’re Not Alone (and There’s a Fix)

Have Your Bose QC35s Been Sounding Weird? You’re Not Alone (and There’s a Fix)

For the first time ever, Bose is letting QuietComfort headphone owners downgrade the software to fix noise-canceling buds. Here’s how.

Panerai’s New Blue Dials Recall the Beautiful Mediterranean SeaPanerai’s New Blue Dials Recall the Beautiful Mediterranean Sea

Panerai’s New Blue Dials Recall the Beautiful Mediterranean Sea

Two new Radiomir watches join Panerai’s linup in 42mm and 45mm versions, both with striking Mediteranean-blue dials and in-house movements.

Dyson’s New Air Purifier Casually Fixed the Biggest Problem with HumidifiersDyson’s New Air Purifier Casually Fixed the Biggest Problem with Humidifiers

Dyson’s New Air Purifier Casually Fixed the Biggest Problem with Humidifiers

It does everything but tuck you in at night.

Rivian’s Badass Electric Adventure Pickup Won’t Arrive This YearRivian’s Badass Electric Adventure Pickup Won’t Arrive This Year

Rivian’s Badass Electric Adventure Pickup Won’t Arrive This Year

One of 2020’s most anticipated EVs won’t be arriving in 2020.

Instead of an Average New Car, Why Not Buy This 5-Person Camper Van?Instead of an Average New Car, Why Not Buy This 5-Person Camper Van?

Instead of an Average New Car, Why Not Buy This 5-Person Camper Van?

You could spend $39,000 on a new car. Or, you could buy this camper van (and have thousands left over).

You Can Finally Buy Peak Design’s Innovative Travel TripodYou Can Finally Buy Peak Design’s Innovative Travel Tripod

You Can Finally Buy Peak Design’s Innovative Travel Tripod

Last year we named the Peak Design Travel Tripod as one of the “best travel products” of the year.

Could This Tiny Pickup Be Ram’s Answer to the Ford Ranger?Could This Tiny Pickup Be Ram’s Answer to the Ford Ranger?

Could This Tiny Pickup Be Ram’s Answer to the Ford Ranger?

Ram has been out of the small pickup game since 2011. Could the next one come from an unexpected place?

Alton Brown’s Unhinged YouTube Channel Is My Antidote to Quarantine AnxietyAlton Brown’s Unhinged YouTube Channel Is My Antidote to Quarantine Anxiety

Alton Brown’s Unhinged YouTube Channel Is My Antidote to Quarantine Anxiety

Alton Brown is providing much needed food entertainment while the world grapples with the spread of COVID-19.

In the Age of Coronavirus, This Tech Startup’s Weird Wearable Hack Could Save Your LifeIn the Age of Coronavirus, This Tech Startup’s Weird Wearable Hack Could Save Your Life

In the Age of Coronavirus, This Tech Startup’s Weird Wearable Hack Could Save Your Life

Slightly Robot’s Immutouch may not be the Fitbit we want, but it’s the Fitbit we need.


Fresh Deals

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Sur La Table Cast-Iron Cookware
Save up to 55%: Sur La Table’s cookware sale includes markdowns on celebrated brands like Staub, Le Creuset and All-Clad.


Naglev Unico Hiker
Save 30%: Naglev created the Unico to function as a middle ground between a hiking boot and a trail running sneaker. This construction creates a remarkably durable shoe that’s unexpectedly comfortable, and entirely unique.


Adidas Ultraboost 20s
Save 40%: With the promo code ADIFAVS, these beloved, exceptionally cushioned running sneakers can be yours at a borderline insane discount.


3 Awesome Wood Handle Knives Are on Sale
Save 30%: Wood used to be one of the most basic materials for pocket knife handles, but now it tends to be expensive, which is why this sale is one not to miss.


Levi’s Jeans, Jacket and More
Save 40%: Levi’s is offering 40 percent off a wide range of items on its website including clothing, shoes and more. Just use the code SILVER40 to take advantage of the savings.


August Smart Lock Pro
Save $91: In our smart lock buying guide, we named the August Smart Lock Pro as the best overall smart lock — and right now it’s on sale. The normally $280 smart lock is just $189 on Amazon right now.
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Filson Field Watches
Save 71%: Filson Watches is offering 71 percent off five timepieces and 67 percent off three others, from time-only watches in different dial and case colors to chronographs on leather or rubber straps.


Today on Gear Patrol

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Today’s Best Deals: Savings on Healthy Snacks, Half Off Cookware from Sur La Table & More

Welcome to Deals of Note, where Gear Patrol captures all the best deals of the day. You can also follow all our deal posts in the Deals section. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at deals@gearpatrol.com.

We are all trying to keep our pantries stocked through this unexpected time, and that may seem harder than ever. But thanks to The Feed, we can avoid the grocery store as much as possible. With The Feed, you can stock up on healthy shelf-stable snacks like Clif Bars, Honey Stinger waffles and Taos Bakes. Everything ships from its warehouse and your order ships the same day, so you can be sure of a timely arrival. Plus, The Feed is offering free shipping and a 15 percent discount (automatically applied at checkout) to help people get through COVID-19.

• Half off linen sheets from Upstate [50% OFF]
• Half off a bomber from J.Crew with code REFRESH [50% OFF]
• Save on Filson’s original briefcase [35% OFF]
• An adjustable temperature kettle from Oxo Brew with code HOME20 [20% OFF]
• A writing desk from Target [15% OFF]

Home

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Sur La Table Cast-Iron Cookware
Save up to 55%: Sur La Table’s cookware sale includes markdowns on celebrated brands like Staub, Le Creuset and All-Clad.


Home and Design Deals
Save up to 50%: The best deals on coffee essentials, cookware and more. Give the list a scroll and you’ll be sure to find something you want and something you need.

Outdoors and Fitness



Naglev Unico Hiker
Save 30%: Naglev created the Unico to function as a middle ground between a hiking boot and a trail running sneaker. This construction creates a remarkably durable shoe that’s unexpectedly comfortable, and entirely unique.


Adidas Ultraboost 20s
Save 40%: With the promo code ADIFAVS, these beloved, exceptionally cushioned running sneakers can be yours at a borderline insane discount.


3 Awesome Wood Handle Knives Are on Sale
Save 30%: Wood used to be one of the most basic materials for pocket knife handles, but now it tends to be expensive, which is why this sale is one not to miss.


Best Outdoor and Fitness Deals of the Week
Save up to 70%: From home workout goods to hiking gear, here are the best action- and adventure- oriented discounts to score this week.

Style



Levi’s Jeans, Jacket and More
Save 40%: Levi’s is offering 40 percent off a wide range of items on its website including clothing, shoes and more. Just use the code SILVER40 to take advantage of the savings.


Best Style Deals of the Week
Save 70%: The best style deals of the week, from head to toe. Whatever your style is, there’s a little something for everyone.

Tech



August Smart Lock Pro
Save $91: In our smart lock buying guide, we named the August Smart Lock Pro as the best overall smart lock — and right now it’s on sale. The normally $280 smart lock is just $189 on Amazon right now.


Best Tech Deals of the Week
Save Up to $170: We’ve rounded up the best deals on electronics we could find on the internet: from noise-canceling headphones to portable power banks, smartphone accessories and wireless speakers.

Watches

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Filson Field Watches
Save 71%: Filson Watches is offering 71 percent off five timepieces and 67 percent off three others, from time-only watches in different dial and case colors to chronographs on leather or rubber straps.

See More Deals

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

This Box Changed My Whole Relationship to My Phone

I make a point of not blaming myself for falling into my phone for hours at a time. I try not to consider it a personal failing. Social media is a societally-mandated Skinner Box and I did not choose to have a positive physiological reaction to dopamine. I do, however, sometimes wish I did not lose so many hours to Twitter, and so long as its servers remain operational, my only option is to take matters into my own hands. That is why I got the Ksafe.

The Ksafe is a wonderful device you should maybe hope to not need to use, but which will come in handy if you do need it. Just take your temptation, throw it in the bin, and use the rotating dial on top to set yourself a lockout time from a single minute to 9 days 23 hours and 59 minutes. Once you’re done, tap the button and a five second countdown — your last chance to abort with a quick second tap — begins. After that, your goodies are locked inside for the duration, baring the extreme measure of breaking open the thick-unibody plastic case, in which case the KSafe’s documentation states that its help line will provide guidance as to how to accomplish this most effectively, but it goes without saying you don’t want to resort to this embarrassing and expensive solution if you can avoid it.

Originally designed for locking up sweets (the “K” stands for “Kitchen”), the KSafe is also great for locking up your phone, which I have gotten in the habit of doing a few times a week. (Make sure you get at least a 5.5-incher for larger phones!) The results, I’d say, are frustratingly good.

I’d expected the primary pain point would be that I’m a big whiney baby who throws a tantrum without his glow-screen. So I’ve been surprised that in fact the opposite is the case: I actually love being forcibly phoneless for an hour or two in the evenings or on the weekend. I read, I cook! Sometimes I just play Xbox! The complications so far have been fairly small and sometimes even fun: like listening to whatever was last queued up on the Sonos because, welp, all I can do is hit the on-speaker play button! Whatever I wind up doing, it’s improved by a freedom from choice — I don’t have to spend the entire time choosing not to look at my phone for an countless moments at a stretch. The choice is already made. Even if I come up with what I deem to be an acceptable excuse to renege on my commitment, tough luck buddy!

What’s frustrating is actually that I can’t go longer. I want to go 24 hours, or even a full weekend phone-free, but puzzling out the logistics has really driven home how many simpler, indispensable gadgets my phone has assimilated like a tiny little Borg cube: alarm clock, GPS, television and stereo remote, my stopwatch, MP3 player, morning newspaper, typewriter, notepad and stationary, and of course, telephone. It is no wonder I keep staring at the damn thing! The only reason I even get to look away is because I have a laptop, a tablet, and a phone-toting spouse to help me fill in the gaps. I may eventually try, but it will take some planning and probably some assistance!

The endeavor so far has left me less sure than ever that the screentime problem is something that any one app, gadget, or Rube Goldberg machine can solve for me or anyone else. But I am still in love with taking a occasional, physically-enforced vacations from cyberland. I highly recommend you take some too — if you’re lucky enough to be able.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Eric Limer

Eric Limer is Gear Patrol’s tech editor. A resident of Weehawken, NJ, his current obsessions include mechanical keyboards, mechanical pencils and Formula 1.

More by Eric Limer | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

You Could Be the First Owner of This Perfect 2002 Mercedes-Benz SL-Class

As anyone who’s glanced at their dealership or website in the last couple years can tell you, Mercedes-Benz offers a ton of different models. Of course, it’s only natural that, with so many cars being developed, some might wind up receiving a little less attention than others. The SL-Class roadster has been sandwiched into an awkward place for the last few years; buyers seeking a sportier convertible wind up tempted by the topless Mercedes-AMG GT, while those looking for a more luxurious option have the newer, roomier S-Class cabriolet in front of them.

Two decades ago, though, the Sl-Class was the créme de la créme of Mercedes-Benzes — the Three-Pointed Star car that epitomized class and elegance like none other. And right now, Mercedes-Benz itself is offering a chance for one lucky buyer to become the very first owner of a brand-new, limited-edition 2002 Mercedes-Benz SL500.

This isn’t just any SL500, mind you, it’s an SL500 Silver Arrow, one of a limited number of special edition cars commissioned for the last model year of the model-defining R129 generation sold from 1989 to 2001. Just 1,515 Silver Arrow SL500s were made for the U.S., each boasting sexy ultra-metallic silver paint, polished aluminum trim, six-spoke alloy wheels, and silver-painted brake calipers on the outside. Inside, a two-tone black-and-silver leather adds a surprising amount of elegance, as does the metallic-effect black maple wood trim, machined aluminum trim and special Silver Arrow badging.

R129-era SLs aren’t hard to find online, if you simply want to get into a vintage Mercedes roadster. What makes this one particularly special is that it’s never been titled. It is, effectively, a brand-new car — even though it’s old enough to vote. (Don’t let the 142 miles on the odometer put you off.) It’s being offered as part of Mercedes-Benz Classics’s All-Time Stars collection, a handful of old, pristine vehicles that can be snapped up from Benz itself. Unsurprisingly, it’s not cheap; if you want to take this Silver Arrow home, you’ll need to fork over $135,000 — about $20,000 more than the price of a brand-new SL550.

From what we hear, the SL-Class’s fortunes are soon to turn around; AMG has reportedly taken up the development of the next model, using a modified version of the GT sports car’s chassis to create a more athletic roadster, and the S-Class convertible is expected to expire along with the current generation that’s set to be replaced. But no matter how good it is, it’s not likely to have the charm of this brand-new vintage ride.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

More by Will Sabel Courtney | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

9 Deals Not to Miss: A Filson Briefcase, Nike Killshot 2 Sneakers & More

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The 14 Best Sweatshirts for Men

Last Updated April, 2020.

The best sweatshirts are both comfortable and durable. It’s a balance not every brand gets right. Thankfully, there are plenty of brands that do make a good sweatshirt, enough to make a list out of it, anyway. We’re focusing our attention on our favorite crewneck sweatshirts, the ones we’ve been living in. The ones we wear with every outfit, whether it’s jeans and a t-shirt or with suit trousers at your home office. They don’t have to be expensive, but they also don’t have to be cheap. They just have to be good. Here are our picks for the best crew neck sweatshirts on the market.

Uniqlo U Wide Fit Long-Sleeve Sweatshirt

Inspired by vintage sweatshirts, the Wide Fit Long-Sleeve Sweatshirt is part of Uniqlo’s U sublabel, designed by the famed Christoph Lemaire. The fabric is substantial for what you get at the price point and the fit is exceptional. If the relaxed fit scares you, we also liked the classic version (which is also a notch cheaper).

Everlane The French Terry Crew

Everlane’s crewneck sweatshirt is unsurprisingly part of its Uniform collection, a range of garments requisite for your daily ‘fits. It’s made from 100 percent cotton French terry fabric and is as comfy as it is affordable.

Gap Oversized Sweatshirt

Sometimes, you don’t want a clean-fitting sweatshirt to go with your slim jeans. Sometimes, you want to feel as free and as comfy as possible. Gap’s Oversized Sweatshirt is the right amount of slouch while avoiding a messy look.

Outerknown Sur Sweatshirt

Outerknown’s Sur Sweatshirt sticks out for good reason. The hemp and organic blend terry fabric make it a hefty-yet-soft option, not to mention one of the most eco-friendly on the market.

Alex Mill Standard Lightweight Sweatshirt

Every sweatshirt need not be beefy. Alex Mill proves that with its spring-ready version, made from a lightweight cotton terry fabric with vintage details like a bound collar and raglan sleeves.

Todd Snyder x Champion Heavyweight Pocket Sweatshirt

This one is a modern-day classic. Todd Snyder’s Pocket Sweatshirt is one of the best designs to come out of his ongoing partnership with Champion. It’s substantial, it’s super cozy and it can hold your wallet.

Reigning Champ Core Crewneck

Reigning Champ’s Core Crewneck is what the company was built upon. It’s made in Canada (where some of the best sweats are made) and designed with quality details like inset-raglan sleeves and flatlock stitching for seams that are flush against the skin.

Knickerbocker Gym Crew Fleece

These take after vintage sweatshirts of the midcentury, featuring a year-round fleece weighing 15 ounces, a classic V insert and a mounted collar. They come in a handful of colors as well as with graphics.

NWKC 002

NWKC’s crewneck ain’t like the others. That’s because of its dual cloth fabric with links 100% merino wool outer layer with a luxurious cotton-poly-rayon blend inner layer. The result is a temperature-regulating wool sweater with a silky-smooth feel.

Sunspel Cotton Loopback Sweatshirt

If you want a crewneck with supreme fabric and a tailored fit, Sunspel should be in your wheelhouse. Known for its high-quality cottons, the heritage brand has been in the business of luxury knits for over 160 years and its Cotton Loopback Sweatshirt continues its tradition. It’s a classically trim silhouette made with some of the softest cotton you’re likely to come across.

Lady White Co. ’44 Fleece

Made entirely in southern California, Lady White Co.’s seminal sweatshirt features flush, flatlock stitching, bar tack reinforcements and custom-knit ribbing you won’t see on any other sweatshirt. And, it’s garment-dyed for a wabi-sabi lived-in feel.

Merz B. Schwanen Heavyweight Crewneck Sweater

Germany-based Merz b. Schwanen is known for its secret weapon: loopwheel knitting machines. These machines are extremely rare and produce fabric in a continuous, seamless loop that’s unbelievably dense and soft. Put it into a sweatshirt and you’ve got yourself a grail sweatshirt.

Cushman Lot. 26903 Freedom Sleeve Sweatshirt

These made-in-Japan sweats are truly special and up the ante on other loopwheeled sweatshirts. Inspired by 1930s sweatshirts, Cushman’s version features a freedom sleeve which is as comfortable as a raglan sleeve, but with a better shape. A high, bound collar, v-insert, flatlock seams and long, vintage ribbing make this sweatshirt a dream for vintage heads.

RRL Double V Crewneck Sweatshirt

From the passion project of Ralph Lauren, the RRL Double V Crewneck Sweatshirt is one that’s meant to age and age well. It’s dyed with true indigo and meticulously washed for a vintage look and feel, while leaving you enough to fade it yourself.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

3 Awesome Wood Handle Knives Are on Sale

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Go with the Grain


Knife handles materials run a gamut from plain to showy, commonplace to rare. Synthetic materials like G10 and Micarta are practical and affordable, while makers prize carbon fiber for its lightness and strength. There are more unusual handle materials yet, like this one that uses mesh suspended in colored resin. And that’s not to mention metals: steel, aluminum, titanium, and all their finishes and coatings. But somehow we’re always drawn back to the simplest of knife handles — wood.

Wood was among the first materials makers used to make folding pocket knives, but now it’s often a luxury ingredient in the company of stone, minerals and bone. It tends to come with the price tag to match, which is why we’re going out of our way to point out three wood handle pocket knives that are currently on sale for 30 percent off.

Helle Kletten

The Kletten is Helle’s first actual EDC pocket knives, and one of the few folders in its collection. The small 2.17-inch blade may break with the company’s outdoor-oriented tradition, but its handle certainly doesn’t — it’s made of the same curly birch as Helle’s other knives.

Castillo Knives Muralla

Castillo Knives complimented the Muralla’s 2.75-inch drop-point Sandvik 14C28N steel blade with curly birch, but its pattern is quite different from that of the Kletten. This knife also comes with a Spanish leather sheath and a sharpening stone.

Santa Fe Stoneworks Damascus 3″ Folder w/ Cholla Cactus Skeleton Handle

Beneath the spines of some cactus species is wood. And its that wood, harvested dead from a particularly spikey variant called cholla, that Santa Fe Stoneworks used to adorn this folder. It almost makes you ignore the equally-impressive Damascus steel blade.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tanner Bowden

Tanner Bowden is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering all things outdoors and fitness. He is a graduate of the National Outdoor Leadership School and a former wilderness educator. He lives in Brooklyn but will always identify as a Vermonter.

More by Tanner Bowden | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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Take a Whopping 71% Off Filson Field Watches

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Like Denim? Levi’s Has a Massive Sale Right Now

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All the Denim on Sale


If the change of seasons has you dreaming of a new wardrobe, you’re in luck. Levi’s is offering 40 percent off a wide range of items on its website including clothing, shoes and more. Just use the code SILVER40 to take advantage of the savings. So if you want to get a classic western shirt, a denim trucker jacket or even just a great pair of jeans, you won’t have to break the bank to do it.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
John Zientek

John Zientek is Gear Patrol’s style editor and in-house guitar authority. He grew up on the West Coast.

More by John Zientek | Follow on Contact via Email

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Rivian’s Badass Electric Adventure Pickup Won’t Arrive This Year

<!–Rivian’s Electric Overland Pickup Truck Won’t Arrive Until 2021 • Gear Patrol<!– –>

postpone those electric adventure plans


2020 was supposed to be the year of the EV, with many exciting new electric vehicles flooding the market. But the COVID-19 pandemic has put automotive plans everywhere on the planet on hold — and that includes one of the EV debuts we were most anticipated for. American electric car startup Rivian, we’ve learned, has pushed back the launch of its overlanding-ready adventure pickup truck to 2021.

Rivian had originally scheduled R1T pickup production to start in late 2020. However, the company told its employees — and confirmed to the Chicago Tribune — that production will now begin sometime in 2021, as the pandemic has delayed retooling at Rivian’s Normal, Illinois plant. (That delay, presumably, will also push back the launch of Rivian’s R1S SUV, which had been scheduled for early 2021.)

Rivian’s R1T and R1S have generated a lot of anticipation. They’re expected to be supremely capable overland vehicles, with top-tier models putting out close to 800 horsepower. Rivian will price base models competitively to take on established internal combustion players in the full-size truck and three-row SUV segments. The company also has backing from major companies like Amazon and Ford.

The R1T and R1S are far from the only vehicles delayed by the present crisis. Reports have GM putting off changes to multiple vehicles, and Bollinger has deferred its electric truck and SUV timeline to 2021 as well.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tyler Duffy

Tyler Duffy is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Staff Writer. He used to write about sports for The Big Lead and The Athletic. He has a black belt in toddler wrangling. He’s based outside Detroit.

More by Tyler Duffy | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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Dyson’s New Air Purifier Casually Fixed the Biggest Problem with Humidifiers

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Dyson Humidify + Cool


Whether it’s vacuums, air purifiers or hair straighteners, Dyson’s product evolution holds to a neverending cycle of one-upping itself. Its new fan, the Pure Humidify+Cool, continues that trend.

The machine is an air purifier, humidifier and oscillating fan all at once. It’s the first in the brand’s air treatment product range to address humidity levels, and it already has a leg up on the vast majority of humidifiers available because it knows when it needs to be cleaned, and it (mostly) cleans itself. A notification will appear on the machine’s display when it requires cleaning. From there, you pop the evaporator out of the machine and drop in into the water tank with a packet of (included with purchase) citric acid. The machine does the rest.

Dyson says the machine monitors the air around it and can adjust humidity levels based on the temperature to create maximum comfort. Like all Dyson’s new fans and purifiers, it can be controlled via remote control or through the Dyson Link app.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Price

Will Price is Gear Patrol’s home and drinks editor. He’s from Atlanta and lives in Brooklyn. He’s interested in bourbon, houseplants, cheap Japanese pens, and cast-iron skillets — maybe a little too much.

More by Will Price | Follow on Contact via Email

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Panerai’s New Blue Dials Recall the Beautiful Mediterranean Sea

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Radiomir Mediterraneo


Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) and Baselworld 2020 are canceled but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. To stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases, visit our tag page.

Across Panerai’s collections, its winning formula and iconic look is regularly tweaked to offer a seemingly endless range of variations and options. Now, the brand’s relatively conservative and retro-styled Radiomir is getting two new additions, both with gradient blue dials.

Both new models have the same “Mediterraneo” dial treatment and the familiar Radiomir look. At first glance they might be almost indistinguishable from one another, but Panerai wants you to look closer. In fact, they come in two case sizes and materials: one is 42mm wide in steel, and the other is a bold 45mm but in lightweight titanium. But that’s not where the differences end.

The 42mm PAM1144 has a hand-wound P.1000 movement, while the PAM1078 has the P.4000 automatic movement with a micro-rotor. Utilizing the same base calibre, these are in-house Panerai movements, both offering a solid three days of power reserve. They’re visible through sapphire crystal display case backs, partially obscured by a wave pattern.

All this Italian flare and Mediterranean vibes don’t come cheap, but as is always the case with Panerai, you’re buying serious quality: The Radiomir 42mm Mediterraneo Edition PAM1144 is priced at $7,900 while the titanium Radiomir 45mm Mediterraneo Edition PAM1078 is $11,200.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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Here’s How to Score Adidas Ultraboost 20s for a Borderline Insane 40% Off

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Boost a Move


OK, we admit it: as running sneaker fiends, we are prone to getting overly excited about such products. And there’s no question that sending shoe materials to space is a rather over-the-top flex by Adidas. But all hype aside, the brand’s Ultraboost line is a wonder — the perfect blend of socklike fit, ample support and responsive cushioning truly brings joy back to the act of running. And now select colorways of the latest iteration, the Ultraboost 20, are 40 percent off.

The best feature of Ultraboosts is, of course, Boost foam in the midsole. And these new shoes boast 20 percent more foam than the beloved Ultraboost 19s, for even greater energy return than before.

How can you score this insane discount? 1. Click the link below, where we’ve isolated the nine colorways that are eligible. 2. Enter code ADIFAVS at checkout to score the sweet deal. Happy savings.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Steve Mazzucchi

Steve Mazzucchi is Gear Patrol’s outdoors and fitness editor. Outside the office, you can find him mountain biking, snowboarding, motorcycling or sipping a dram of Laphroaig and daydreaming about such things.

More by Steve Mazzucchi | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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Save Over $90 on the Best Smart Lock for Most Homes

<!–This Is the Best Smart Lock for Most Homes (And Now It’s on Sale)<!– –>

Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2019


In our recent smart lock buying guide, we named the August Smart Lock Pro as the best overall smart lock — and right now it’s on sale. The normally $280 smart lock is just $189 on Amazon right now, that’s a discount of just over $90.

It’s a great deal for anybody that wants to buy a smart lock, considering it’s easy to install and works with August’s and Nest’s line of smart home products (both of which are extremely popular). The Smart Lock Pro can work with Alexa, Google Assistant or Siri, meaning you can use voice commands to lock and unlock your door. Though, if you’re ok without those voice control features, you can save even more with a $90 Wyze Lock.

The on-sale bundle includes August’s Connect Wi-Fi Bridge ($62), which you need if you want to be able to control your door remotely.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tucker Bowe

Tucker Bowe has been on Gear Patrol’s editorial team since 2014. As a Tech Staff Writer, he tracks everything in the consumer tech space, from headphones to smartphones, wearables to home theater systems. If it lights up or makes noise, he probably covers it.

More by Tucker Bowe | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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Why in the Hell Would You Spend More Than $15 On A Wine Opener?

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Pulltaps or Nothing


It’s a story as old as time. Maybe it’s Mother’s Day, maybe you’re struggling with what to get some newlyweds, maybe you turned 30 and decided that you needed to live a “classier” life. All of these situations lead to an inevitable, regrettable purchase: the elaborate wine opener.

Search “wine opener” on Amazon and you’ll get over 6,000 results topping out at around $650. There are wing ones, electric ones, lever ones, twist ones and hundreds with a strange amount of LED lighting. Just about every iconic design company makes one — Alessi’s are famously cheery — and Pottery Barn — famed purveyor of reasonably affordable home goods — sells this 21-pound monstrosity for $284.

So, There’s One Exception

Strictly speaking, there is one very expensive wine opener worth getting, but it’s for a fairly specific fringe case. When it comes to very old bottles of wine (think legal drinking age or older) you’ll oftentimes need a way of removing what is now a very fragile cork. There’s none better for this task than the heinously expensive Durand ($125), which combines a traditional corkscrew with a prong style opener called an Ah So.

This madness needs to stop. To be clear, there is a lower limit where wine openers are actually garbage, spend $3 on that plastic thing that comes in two parts and you’ll be upset and without wine. However, you absolutely do not need to spend more than $12 to get all the wine opener you’d ever need. The Pulltaps Double Hinged Waiters Corkscrew is universally lauded, under 15 bucks and is more or less perfectly designed. It will open wine seamlessly and easily without shredding corks or running out of battery and you will forget about wine openers for the rest of your life, and you will be liberated. If $15 is too rich for your blood, the Truetap is a perfectly acceptable knockoff of the Pullltaps that starts at about $6 (plus it comes in fun colors).

So please, stop buying elaborate motorized and geared gizmos that take up space, don’t work well and generally project an air that you’re going to launch into a missive about why you named your dog Mourvedre. And if you’re ever in doubt about what to gift a wine lover? Just get them a goddamn bottle of wine.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

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12 Brand-New, Damn Fun Automobiles That Cost Less than the Average New Car

Americans spend a lot of money on new cars. The average sticker price for a new vehicle in 2019 was $37,183 — about the price of an entry-level BMW or Mercedes-Benz. Those pickup trucks and SUVs we love so much can get pricey.

We can leave debates about whether those are smart outlays of capital to economists. What we can discuss, though, is that you don’t need to spend nearly that much to buy a great, enjoyable car — even before you factor in the incentives manufacturers have begun offering and likely will continue to for the next few months.

Indeed, many of our favorite sports cars, purpose-built off-roaders and other entertaining rides can be had for less than the average new vehicle price. Below, we present 12 of them worth your hard-earned money.

2020 Volkswagen Golf GTI

The current (although outgoing) GTI is a legend — it’s one of the best-handling cars on the road, period. You can upgrade to the mid-grade SE trim, score LED headlights, a panoramic sunroof and leather seats, and still come in comfortably under our price ceiling.

2020 Mazda MX-5 Miata

Mazda’s best car just keeps getting sportier, and the performance-minded Club trim starts at just $30,920.

2020 Honda Civic Si

The souped-up Civic sedan is as much fun to drive as any car on the road —  and it’s an absolute steal at a well-equipped price of just over $25,000.

2020 Jeep Wrangler

Jeep Wranglers can get pricey, but you can still buy a two-door model for under $30,000 before incentives. That means you can still have some cash left over for luxury options…like that sweet three-piece removable hardtop.

2020 Toyota 86

The poor man’s Supra is one of the best pure driver’s cars on the market — at a far cheaper price point.

2020 Ford Mustang 2.3L EcoBoost HPP

Granted, the 2.3-liter EcoBoost does not have quite as nice of an engine note as the 5.0-liter V8. But this car is still quite the performance bargain, with legit sports car speed and handling for thousands less than the average new car price.

2020 Toyota Tacoma

Being a bro can be fun. You can get your pick of lower-trim Tacos for less than the average American vehicle price, or even juuuuust squeeze into a TRD Off-Road with a six-speed manual for less than the average new car price. (Who needs floor mats?)

2020 Hyundai Veloster N

The should-be-standard Performance Package boosts the Veloster N up to 275 horsepower and adds other fun-to-drive goodies, and still lets the MSRP come in below $30,000.

2020 Subaru WRX

The Subaru WRX is the preferred choice for driving connoisseurs who enjoy running afoul of traffic cops. You can build out a WRX Limited for less than the average vehicle price, but you’ll have to go without the added power of the WRX STI; jumping up to that 310-hp version will push you over.

2020 Toyota Camry TRD

You don’t often see “fun” and “Toyota Camry” in the same sentence. But the iconic midsize sedan’s new TRD trim is a lot sportier than your dad’s Camry — and the cheapest way to get a V6-powered version of the car.

2020 Fiat 124 Spider Abarth

2020 model Fiat 124 Spiders do still exist, and the starting MSRP for the Abarth trim is less than $30,000. Of course, that’s before a Fiat dealer rejoices at having a customer and offers you five figures in incentives and discounts to relieve them of their poor-selling roadster.

2020 Mini Cooper S JCW

The Mini John Cooper Works no longer has a manual, and you need to upgrade to the Clubman JCW for the 300 -p hot hatch engine. But you can build a hardtop Mini JCW for less than $35,000.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tyler Duffy

Tyler Duffy is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Staff Writer. He used to write about sports for The Big Lead and The Athletic. He has a black belt in toddler wrangling. He’s based outside Detroit.

More by Tyler Duffy | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

The First Pilot’s Watch Ever is Also One of the Best Dress Watches Ever

Welcome to Watches You Should Know, a biweekly column highlighting important or little-known watches with interesting backstories and unexpected influence. This week: the Cartier Santos.

At the turn of the 20th century, wristwatches were women’s jewelry and “aviation” referred in no small part to airships. With the advent of the first aircraft and a watch made for a fearless pilot and inventor, however, all this was about to change.

Before the first airplanes, the Brazilian-turned-Parisian Alberto Santos-Dumont designed and built flying machines of the ligher-than-air, gas-buoyed variety. Somewhat eccentric and certainly not risk-averse, he was also famous for publicly demonstrating his inventions himself. And he was buddies with jeweler-to-royalty Louis Cartier.

This era often looks stiff and unsmiling in its sepia photographs, so it can be easy to forget that men like Santos-Dumont were nothing short of daredevils. Exposed to the elements high in the air, he could be found at the helm of experimental contraptions often filled with explosive hydrogen. You wouldn’t want to have to fish a handheld watch from a pocket in this kind of situation, right? Wanting a timepiece that would leave his hands free for the controls while flying, he went to Cartier.

The year following the Wright Brothers’ famous flight, the first pilot’s watch was born in 1904: Dubbed by Cartier the “Santos,” the watch was small (by modern standards) and square. The exact watch worn by Santos-Dumont himself is lost, but surviving early examples show basic elements that are present in today’s Santos and other Cartier watches.

Original features included the famous cabochon crown as well as Roman numerals and railroad track-style markers. The distinctive exposed screws on the bezel (preceding the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak by many decades) could be seen to reference airplane rivets. At the time of its introduction, its square shape helped emphasize its wrist-worn purpose and set it apart from round pocket watches.

This is the watch that would have been on Santos-Dumont’s wrist as he made the 1906 flight of his 14-bis Oiseau de Proie aircraft, considered by some to be the first “true airplane,” rather than the Wright Flyer. This is just part of what makes Santos-Dumont, who never patented his inventions in the belief that they would benefit humanity, a significant and truly fascinating character.

Cartier Santos from 1912

The Cartier Santos’s most unusual feature, however, was that it was a men’s wristwatch. Though uncommon, the idea wasn’t altogether unheard of. Soldiers at the time are reported to have been repurposing pocket watches for use on the wrist, and there were even some companies that sold them that way from the factory. However, many early wristwatches were essentially just pocket watches with wire lugs soldered on, whereas Cartier’s out-of-the-box, integrated design was built from the ground up as a wristwatch — and this was game-changing.

Alberto Santos-Dumont

Whether or not you consider the Cartier Santos the “first wristwatch,” it was most certainly the first pilot’s watch. Pilot’s watches today tend to be associated with military watches of several decades later with highly technical or practical designs that focus on legibility. The Cartier Santos is nothing like them (indeed, Cartier seems incapable of producing anything other than the most elegant of watches), but this just makes it feel all the more unique among modern watches.

In Santos-Dumont the men’s wristwatch had a worthy ambassador, but it didn’t catch on right away, and was initially looked upon with disapproval. The Cartier Santos was eventually made available to the public (around 1911), but it was another Cartier watch that would help give the wristwatch mainstream appeal. Seeming to build upon the Santos’s angular design, the rectangular 1917 Cartier Tank watch helped wristwatches become a 20th-century phenomenon.

Today, the Santos is a core, popular collection among Cartier’s watches. It’s seen a range of variations over the years, from quartz, automatic and hand-wound versions to skeletonized avant-garde iterations. A sub-collection called Santos-Dumont retains an elegant feel, while the Santos itself was reinvented in 1978 as a sport watch with crown guards and sometimes even a steel bracelet. Among the brand’s overwhelmingly formal watches, the Santos has a masculine appeal.

As late as 1916, wristwatches were, according to a New York Times article, considered a “silly ass fad” in the United States (though they caught on a little earlier in Europe), but perceptions were beginning to change. Of course, the rest is history: Cartier’s 1904 watch was ahead of its time, as was the adventurous pilot who wore it, and it’s one of the most unique and important watches still produced today.

Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

The Future of Outdoor Gear Is Already in Your Closet — and Mine

This story is part of our Summer Preview, a collection of features, guides and reviews to help you navigate warmer months ahead.

One evening last fall, I found myself after hours at King Garment Care, a dry cleaner located in downtown Manhattan. Despite a tagline that reads “Fit for Royalty,” there’s nothing remarkable about the store. Like the thousands of other dry cleaners in New York City, it has halogen lights, a white tiled floor, a wood-paneled counter and, at any given time, a conveyor of bagged button-downs, suit jackets and delicate dresses all awaiting retrieval by their owners.

On this particular night, though, the chairs and coffee table that usually populate a makeshift waiting area were stashed somewhere in the back, the halogens replaced with moody neons. And the place was packed. The long counter stood resolute as designers, social media influencers, writers, bloggers and other denizens of New York City’s fashion world bumped up against it, and instead of tailoring services, its attendant offered up cocktails encased in miniature plastic garment bags. At the back of the room, I popped a plant-based hors d’oeuvre — an imitation of a quesadilla, or perhaps a quiche — into my mouth. “Any good?” a voice to my left wondered. “Yeah, actually, it is,” I sent back, looking up to find its owner to be Alysia Reiner, who plays Fig in Orange Is the New Black.

In 2020, it might come as no surprise that such an event was held in celebration of a new app, Wardrobe. The platform allows luxury fashionistas to rent out the expensive contents of their closets for a small profit. It is, to drop an overused comparison, the Airbnb of fashion (in fact, Nathan Blecharczyk, one of Airbnb’s founders, is an investor).

Unlike similar services such as Rent the Runway, Wardrobe harnesses the sharing economy to put exclusive items in the hands of those who might otherwise not be able to afford them. Airbnb and Uber may have pushed privacy norms against the wall by letting strangers into our homes and our vehicles, but Wardrobe smashes through them by letting them into, yes, our clothing.

As ironic as the dry-cleaner setting was, it’s also key to Wardrobe’s formula. Dry cleaners serve as the “hubs” where lenders drop off clothing, and renters pick it up. They also earn a little dough themselves through cleaning fees. It’s a win-win-win. The catch? Wardrobe only operates in New York City (for now). The other catch? To lend, you need at least 20 items, each with a retail value of $250 or more. That night at King Garment Care, the only piece of my outfit to come close was my Patagonia Steel Forge Denim Jacket, which retails new for $199.

Steel Forge Denim Jacket, $199, by Patagonia

Come to think of it, nothing in my closet meets Wardrobe’s value minimum. Not unless you count down jackets or three-layer ski bibs. And yet, there’s still a place to monetize my Patagonia denim: Patagonia. The company has a program that allows customers to exchange used gear in good condition for store credit. Here, my denim jacket is worth $40.

The trade-in program is part of Patagonia’s larger Worn Wear initiative. Forever cognizant of sustainability issues, Patagonia’s aim with Worn Wear is to create a circular economy in which its gear is used over and again by multiple owners until it’s no longer fit for outdoors adventures. Patagonia isn’t alone here; in recent years, similar programs from other titans of the outdoors have sprung up. The North Face has Renewed, Arc’teryx has Used Gear and REI has Good and Used.

Each of these programs employs the same return-repair-resell model to keep everything from tents and sleeping bags to hiking shorts and technical tees in circulation. And save for The North Face, all of them rely on the same curtain-enclosed wizard to make it happen — an eight-year-old Northern California company called Yerdle.

Yerdle’s space calls to mind the warehouse at the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Roughly 10 miles from San Francisco’s Embarcadero, Yerdle sits in a compact business park near the water, sandwiched between the Bayshore Freeway and San Bruno Mountain State Park. Its structure is squat and broad with relatively few windows given the roughly 40,000 square feet of its interior space. It is not a stereotypical Silicon Valley dwelling, gleaming with technological promise and replete with on-staff baristas and meditation chambers, but rather a warehouse, and perhaps an unlikely ground zero for the next great shift in how we buy stuff.

Yerdle’s proposition is far less complicated than its operation. The company partners with apparel and gear brands — in addition to Patagonia, Arc’teryx and REI, it also works with Nordstrom, Eileen Fisher and Taylor Stitch — to take in unwanted items, refurbish them and ship them out to new owners.

In a typical warehouse, a shipment from a supplier might contain 200 of the same exact thing, such as a green polyester t-shirt in size large. An employee unpacks the box while another stores the shirts together in a designated spot on a shelf, and when an order comes in, a third employee picks the shirt while a fourth packages it and sends it on its way. Nobody has to know where anything is to know where everything is.

It’s like finding a needle in a haystack, if the hay were also made of needles.

The steps to this dance are numbered differently at Yerdle. A box that arrives at 3775 Bayshore Boulevard likely has 200 different items in it, unique not just in brand, model, size and color but also in wear issues like scuffs and blemishes. How does one person organize a warehouse filled with tens of thousands of unique items so that another person, let alone an entire staff of other people, can locate one specific thing at any given moment? It’s like finding a needle in a haystack, if the hay were also made of needles.

That’s why brands as established as Patagonia and Eileen Fisher come to Yerdle; not for its endless stacks of boxes on shelves that call to mind the warehouse at the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark, but for the invisible technological infrastructure the company has built to manage them.

Yerdle doesn’t rely entirely on backend technological innovation. Sometimes there’s a more straightfor- ward solution — like hang- tags that communicate whether a bin is full (red dot) or has space remaining (green dot).

Here’s how it works: Boxes — large ones — arrive at Yerdle filled with used gear. These go to receiving stations, where employees begin the inspection process by scanning each item’s tag. That taps them into the digital catalog of whichever brand, be it REI, Arc’teryx or Taylor Stitch, manufactured the item. It’s a complex integration between Yerdle and the companies it works with, and crucial to how the system works, particularly at the outset. It allows a Yerdle employee to quickly answer the question: what am I holding in my hands right now?

Inspectors check clips, zippers and other functional elements, making a note of anything amiss. (These observations eventually pass through to the item’s online description for customers to see before making a purchase.) Then the employee assigns the item a grade, from A for new to F for, well, very well-loved.

Next, gear that needs repair or additional cleaning goes through those processes. And then, in some situations, an item goes to Yerdle’s on-staff photographers. Individualized photography might serve to align with one brand’s way of displaying a piece, or to highlight defects.

After it’s patched up, cleaned and photographed, a piece of gear goes on the shelf to await its new owner making that fateful click. Yerdle uses what it calls flexible binning — employees can put any item anywhere and, by scanning its tag and the bin it’s in, it can be quickly found later, when a picker goes to fill an order.

Yerdle’s unique strength in the recommerce process is that it has untied the knot that forms when you reverse warehouse logistics. “We’ve managed these things at half a trillion dollars,” says Andy Ruben, Yerdle’s CEO. “Oftentimes, you see overly complex systems that don’t provide the value you’d expect.” What Ruben downplays is the bespoke technological systems that underpin the entire thing.

This classic blend of style and performance, Patagonia’s Lightweight Synchilla Snap-T Pullover, normally goes for $119. In used form, it’s $52.

Before visiting Yerdle as a guest of REI, I placed an order through REI’s Good and Used site to gear up for a two-night camping trip in nearby Pinnacles National Park as though I were starting from scratch. Nothing about Good and Used belies that it’s anything but another page on REI’s site — it looks the same and has similar menus to sift through the pile of gear available.

I quickly found myself digging deep through the digital bins in search of something unique or rare that I might not purchase at full price. It became a treasure hunt, an experience akin to sliding hangers at my local Brooklyn vintage store. After some time — the filters aren’t quite as granular as they are on REI’s main site — I checked out with my loot, which included an insulated jacket from The North Face that I’d seen Conrad Anker wear on an expedition to Antarctica. Nothing beyond a slight fading of its canary-yellow hue suggested that it had ever been worn, and it was available for $50 less than its original price.

It proved to be the ideal layer for chilly nights in Pinnacles National Park, which consists of 26,000 beautiful, federally protected Salinas Valley acres. Only miles from Steinbeck’s vision of Eden — endless avocado, citrus and garlic fields — the park forges a sharp contrast to the surrounding farmland, a high-desert landscape dotted with narrow talus caves and pillars of stone left behind by an ancient volcano and carried 200 miles north by the San Andreas Fault.

It is, by definition, an island, home to more fauna than any tropical paradise in the Pacific. Over two days, we spotted quail, lizards, tarantulas, coyotes and a threatened species of frog. We chased raccoons out of our camp and observed a flying insect called a tarantula hawk that, somehow, looks more menacing than its name already implies. The strange and thriving wilderness could be a set location on Avatar.

Still, there remains an overhanging feeling that its proximity to California’s mill of technological industry, just a few hours’ drive away, leaves it fragile and exposed. Unfortunately, this situation isn’t as unique as Pinnacles itself.

This used Arc’Teryx Consular Jacket, circa 2012, features a backcountry-ready Gore-Tex Paclite shell, fully taped seams… and a price tag of $134.

REI knows this. Its identity is wrapped in the belief that “a life outdoors is a life well-lived,” and it asserts its purpose is “to awaken a lifelong love of the outdoors, for all” — two mottos found on REI’s “Who we are” page online. The company is known for symbolic gestures such as closing on Black Friday, and more tangible actions, like setting concrete sustainability standards for every item it sells, forcing brands to comply or set up shop elsewhere.

Recommerce — collecting and re-selling used gear — is the next, and perhaps grandest, step in this mission. In the outdoor industry, sustainability initiatives like donating profits, repairing products for free or planting a tree for every item purchased abound. They are noble and worthwhile objectives, but none fully live up to their Earth-saving promise. Using recycled materials to make gear is at the top of the list, but still doesn’t prove to be the ultimate solution. For instance, a jacket made of recycled materials may still require a harmful manufacturing process — and may not itself be recyclable. That circle is broken. To “optimize the life cycle of a product with recyclability at the end of life is an important point on that closed loop,” says Peter Whitcomb, who spearheaded REI’s used gear initiative before recently becoming chief of staff at Yerdle.

Ruben agrees, adding that he doesn’t believe consumers are going to put up with rosy, ultimately empty claims much longer. “There’s an increasing expectation, especially with younger customers, that pushes on more innovative business models,” he says. Innovation, not in business but in the creation of new gear, might also be a result of recommerce. Shoddily made items that fail or break easily drop out of a circular economy, whereas the best things remain, like lumps of gold in a pan. “It keeps higher-quality gear in people’s hands,” observes Ruben. Recommerce highlights the things that are made well and the brands that are making them, drawing attention to the seemingly contradictory notion that something used might actually be better than something new.

As part of its Renewed program, The North Face has clothing designers turn damaged and used items into unique pieces. This one-of-a-kind Thermoball Eco Snap Jacket costs $100.

During his tenure as REI’s director of new business development and circular economy, Whitcomb says he was often asked how the brands that REI carries react to its Good and Used program. His response: “They generally love it, because it keeps their product in use longer.” A better question might be: how does REI react to it? Isn’t the goal of any retail operation to sell as many things as possible?

“[REI] is kind of disrupting [its] own business model,” he admits. “Optically, systematically, process-wise, it’s truly disruptive and uncomfortable for a lot of people. This type of transformation is a huge challenge.” REI’s mission of promoting lifelong access to and enjoyment of the great outdoors, as well as its status as a member-owned cooperative, helps it clear that obvious barrier. According to Whitcomb, REI’s used-gear program has yet to threaten the company’s in-line sales.

The secondhand market hit $24 billion in 2018. By 2023, it’s projected to more than double to $51 billion.

That surface-level concern exists across the movement, but it’s as deceptive as a thin sheet of ice. Not only does the secondhand market not affect sales of new items, it’s also a backdoor for shoppers to access reputable brands. “By offering our Restitch items at a lesser price, the program also works as an introduction to Taylor Stitch to those who might not be able to pay the full retail price, so it’s expanding our customer base,” observes Michael Maher, CEO and cofounder of the menswear brand. “It has created an exciting way for us to follow some of our favorite pieces year after year, throughout their lifespan as they wear in, not out.”

It also doesn’t hurt that the fashion industry has already proven that selling used stuff is a pretty damn good way to make money. According to a 2019 Fashion Resale Market and Trend Report by Thredup, a digital secondhand marketplace offering clothing from over 35,000 brands, the secondhand market hit $24 billion in 2018. By 2023, it’s projected to more than double to $51 billion. Thredup, StockX, Poshmark, Rebag, Grailed, Stadium Goods, GOAT and Yerdle are in fact the freshmen class of companies participating in the surging secondhand wave. Long gone are the days when the only online places to save a buck on a used pair of Redwing boots or some vintage Levi’s were eBay and Craigslist.

Before founding Yerdle, Ruben worked at Walmart as a corporate strategist, then as chief sustainability officer and finally as VP of global e-commerce strategy. “In the late Nineties, I was part of these conversations when e-commerce was just starting,” he says. “And I remember the conversation when Walmart was deciding whether it would have its own e-commerce platform or be on the Amazon platform.” With hindsight, the answer is obvious.

That’s where Ruben believes recommerce is today. He compares the value and convenience that it provides to Spotify and Airbnb. “Ten years from now, it’ll feel the same way as me looking back at e-commerce in 1998; of course it’s that big, of course it’s the way it’s gone.”

Perhaps fittingly then, Yerdle shares its parking lot with The RealReal, a marketplace for secondhand luxury goods, and the first such business to go public.

Arc’teryx built this Velaro 35 Backpack with its waterproof Advanced Composite Construction fabric. It cost $199 in 2015, but now, lightly used, it’s $139.

Ruben says that in 2018 he could count the number of applications to Yerdle’s program “on one hand.” Within the first half of 2019, he had 50, and whereas in the past, those applications were filed by sustainability managers, now it’s executives grasping the benefits. And since they began working with Yerdle, Taylor Stitch has taken in over 5,000 articles of used clothing, Patagonia has resettled over 130,000 items and REI sold nearly one million pieces of used gear in 2019 alone.

In a 2019 equity research report, Wells Fargo jumped on board with numbers of its own, stating that it estimates that by 2022, 40 percent of the contents of our closets will be secondhand buys. Surely, this is a future that neither eco-conscious outdoors enthusiasts nor trend-watching fashionistas expected. And perhaps partying at a New York City dry cleaner makes just as much sense as spending a night in the California wilds, kept awake by invading raccoons and hellish insects.

A version of this story originally appeared in a print issue of Gear Patrol Magazine. Subscribe today.

Tanner Bowden

Tanner Bowden is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering all things outdoors and fitness. He is a graduate of the National Outdoor Leadership School and a former wilderness educator. He lives in Brooklyn but will always identify as a Vermonter.

More by Tanner Bowden | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

The Future of Outdoor Gear Is Already in Your Closet

This story is part of our Summer Preview, a collection of features, guides and reviews to help you navigate warmer months ahead.

One evening last fall, I found myself after hours at King Garment Care, a dry cleaner located in downtown Manhattan. Despite a tagline that reads “Fit for Royalty,” there’s nothing remarkable about the store. Like the thousands of other dry cleaners in New York City, it has halogen lights, a white tiled floor, a wood-paneled counter and, at any given time, a conveyor of bagged button-downs, suit jackets and delicate dresses all awaiting retrieval by their owners.

On this particular night, though, the chairs and coffee table that usually populate a makeshift waiting area were stashed somewhere in the back, the halogens replaced with moody neons. And the place was packed. The long counter stood resolute as designers, social media influencers, writers, bloggers and other denizens of New York City’s fashion world bumped up against it, and instead of tailoring services, its attendant offered up cocktails encased in miniature plastic garment bags. At the back of the room, I popped a plant-based hors d’oeuvre — an imitation of a quesadilla, or perhaps a quiche — into my mouth. “Any good?” a voice to my left wondered. “Yeah, actually, it is,” I sent back, looking up to find its owner to be Alysia Reiner, who plays Fig in Orange Is the New Black.

In 2020, it might come as no surprise that such an event was held in celebration of a new app, Wardrobe. The platform allows luxury fashionistas to rent out the expensive contents of their closets for a small profit. It is, to drop an overused comparison, the Airbnb of fashion (in fact, Nathan Blecharczyk, one of Airbnb’s founders, is an investor).

Unlike similar services such as Rent the Runway, Wardrobe harnesses the sharing economy to put exclusive items in the hands of those who might otherwise not be able to afford them. Airbnb and Uber may have pushed privacy norms against the wall by letting strangers into our homes and our vehicles, but Wardrobe smashes through them by letting them into, yes, our clothing.

As ironic as the dry-cleaner setting was, it’s also key to Wardrobe’s formula. Dry cleaners serve as the “hubs” where lenders drop off clothing, and renters pick it up. They also earn a little dough themselves through cleaning fees. It’s a win-win-win. The catch? Wardrobe only operates in New York City (for now). The other catch? To lend, you need at least 20 items, each with a retail value of $250 or more. That night at King Garment Care, the only piece of my outfit to come close was my Patagonia Steel Forge Denim Jacket, which retails new for $199.

Steel Forge Denim Jacket, $199, by Patagonia

Come to think of it, nothing in my closet meets Wardrobe’s value minimum. Not unless you count down jackets or three-layer ski bibs. And yet, there’s still a place to monetize my Patagonia denim: Patagonia. The company has a program that allows customers to exchange used gear in good condition for store credit. Here, my denim jacket is worth $40.

The trade-in program is part of Patagonia’s larger Worn Wear initiative. Forever cognizant of sustainability issues, Patagonia’s aim with Worn Wear is to create a circular economy in which its gear is used over and again by multiple owners until it’s no longer fit for outdoors adventures. Patagonia isn’t alone here; in recent years, similar programs from other titans of the outdoors have sprung up. The North Face has Renewed, Arc’teryx has Used Gear and REI has Good and Used.

Each of these programs employs the same return-repair-resell model to keep everything from tents and sleeping bags to hiking shorts and technical tees in circulation. And save for The North Face, all of them rely on the same curtain-enclosed wizard to make it happen — an eight-year-old Northern California company called Yerdle.

Yerdle’s space calls to mind the warehouse at the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Roughly 10 miles from San Francisco’s Embarcadero, Yerdle sits in a compact business park near the water, sandwiched between the Bayshore Freeway and San Bruno Mountain State Park. Its structure is squat and broad with relatively few windows given the roughly 40,000 square feet of its interior space. It is not a stereotypical Silicon Valley dwelling, gleaming with technological promise and replete with on-staff baristas and meditation chambers, but rather a warehouse, and perhaps an unlikely ground zero for the next great shift in how we buy stuff.

Yerdle’s proposition is far less complicated than its operation. The company partners with apparel and gear brands — in addition to Patagonia, Arc’teryx and REI, it also works with Nordstrom, Eileen Fisher and Taylor Stitch — to take in unwanted items, refurbish them and ship them out to new owners.

In a typical warehouse, a shipment from a supplier might contain 200 of the same exact thing, such as a green polyester t-shirt in size large. An employee unpacks the box while another stores the shirts together in a designated spot on a shelf, and when an order comes in, a third employee picks the shirt while a fourth packages it and sends it on its way. Nobody has to know where anything is to know where everything is.

It’s like finding a needle in a haystack, if the hay were also made of needles.

The steps to this dance are numbered differently at Yerdle. A box that arrives at 3775 Bayshore Boulevard likely has 200 different items in it, unique not just in brand, model, size and color but also in wear issues like scuffs and blemishes. How does one person organize a warehouse filled with tens of thousands of unique items so that another person, let alone an entire staff of other people, can locate one specific thing at any given moment? It’s like finding a needle in a haystack, if the hay were also made of needles.

That’s why brands as established as Patagonia and Eileen Fisher come to Yerdle; not for its endless stacks of boxes on shelves that call to mind the warehouse at the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark, but for the invisible technological infrastructure the company has built to manage them.

Yerdle doesn’t rely entirely on backend technological innovation. Sometimes there’s a more straightfor- ward solution — like hang- tags that communicate whether a bin is full (red dot) or has space remaining (green dot).

Here’s how it works: Boxes — large ones — arrive at Yerdle filled with used gear. These go to receiving stations, where employees begin the inspection process by scanning each item’s tag. That taps them into the digital catalog of whichever brand, be it REI, Arc’teryx or Taylor Stitch, manufactured the item. It’s a complex integration between Yerdle and the companies it works with, and crucial to how the system works, particularly at the outset. It allows a Yerdle employee to quickly answer the question: what am I holding in my hands right now?

Inspectors check clips, zippers and other functional elements, making a note of anything amiss. (These observations eventually pass through to the item’s online description for customers to see before making a purchase.) Then the employee assigns the item a grade, from A for new to F for, well, very well-loved.

Next, gear that needs repair or additional cleaning goes through those processes. And then, in some situations, an item goes to Yerdle’s on-staff photographers. Individualized photography might serve to align with one brand’s way of displaying a piece, or to highlight defects.

After it’s patched up, cleaned and photographed, a piece of gear goes on the shelf to await its new owner making that fateful click. Yerdle uses what it calls flexible binning — employees can put any item anywhere and, by scanning its tag and the bin it’s in, it can be quickly found later, when a picker goes to fill an order.

Yerdle’s unique strength in the recommerce process is that it has untied the knot that forms when you reverse warehouse logistics. “We’ve managed these things at half a trillion dollars,” says Andy Ruben, Yerdle’s CEO. “Oftentimes, you see overly complex systems that don’t provide the value you’d expect.” What Ruben downplays is the bespoke technological systems that underpin the entire thing.

This classic blend of style and performance, Patagonia’s Lightweight Synchilla Snap-T Pullover, normally goes for $119. In used form, it’s $52.

Before visiting Yerdle as a guest of REI, I placed an order through REI’s Good and Used site to gear up for a two-night camping trip in nearby Pinnacles National Park as though I were starting from scratch. Nothing about Good and Used belies that it’s anything but another page on REI’s site — it looks the same and has similar menus to sift through the pile of gear available.

I quickly found myself digging deep through the digital bins in search of something unique or rare that I might not purchase at full price. It became a treasure hunt, an experience akin to sliding hangers at my local Brooklyn vintage store. After some time — the filters aren’t quite as granular as they are on REI’s main site — I checked out with my loot, which included an insulated jacket from The North Face that I’d seen Conrad Anker wear on an expedition to Antarctica. Nothing beyond a slight fading of its canary-yellow hue suggested that it had ever been worn, and it was available for $50 less than its original price.

It proved to be the ideal layer for chilly nights in Pinnacles National Park, which consists of 26,000 beautiful, federally protected Salinas Valley acres. Only miles from Steinbeck’s vision of Eden — endless avocado, citrus and garlic fields — the park forges a sharp contrast to the surrounding farmland, a high-desert landscape dotted with narrow talus caves and pillars of stone left behind by an ancient volcano and carried 200 miles north by the San Andreas Fault.

It is, by definition, an island, home to more fauna than any tropical paradise in the Pacific. Over two days, we spotted quail, lizards, tarantulas, coyotes and a threatened species of frog. We chased raccoons out of our camp and observed a flying insect called a tarantula hawk that, somehow, looks more menacing than its name already implies. The strange and thriving wilderness could be a set location on Avatar.

Still, there remains an overhanging feeling that its proximity to California’s mill of technological industry, just a few hours’ drive away, leaves it fragile and exposed. Unfortunately, this situation isn’t as unique as Pinnacles itself.

This used Arc’Teryx Consular Jacket, circa 2012, features a backcountry-ready Gore-Tex Paclite shell, fully taped seams… and a price tag of $134.

REI knows this. Its identity is wrapped in the belief that “a life outdoors is a life well-lived,” and it asserts its purpose is “to awaken a lifelong love of the outdoors, for all” — two mottos found on REI’s “Who we are” page online. The company is known for symbolic gestures such as closing on Black Friday, and more tangible actions, like setting concrete sustainability standards for every item it sells, forcing brands to comply or set up shop elsewhere.

Recommerce — collecting and re-selling used gear — is the next, and perhaps grandest, step in this mission. In the outdoor industry, sustainability initiatives like donating profits, repairing products for free or planting a tree for every item purchased abound. They are noble and worthwhile objectives, but none fully live up to their Earth-saving promise. Using recycled materials to make gear is at the top of the list, but still doesn’t prove to be the ultimate solution. For instance, a jacket made of recycled materials may still require a harmful manufacturing process — and may not itself be recyclable. That circle is broken. To “optimize the life cycle of a product with recyclability at the end of life is an important point on that closed loop,” says Peter Whitcomb, who spearheaded REI’s used gear initiative before recently becoming chief of staff at Yerdle.

Ruben agrees, adding that he doesn’t believe consumers are going to put up with rosy, ultimately empty claims much longer. “There’s an increasing expectation, especially with younger customers, that pushes on more innovative business models,” he says. Innovation, not in business but in the creation of new gear, might also be a result of recommerce. Shoddily made items that fail or break easily drop out of a circular economy, whereas the best things remain, like lumps of gold in a pan. “It keeps higher-quality gear in people’s hands,” observes Ruben. Recommerce highlights the things that are made well and the brands that are making them, drawing attention to the seemingly contradictory notion that something used might actually be better than something new.

As part of its Renewed program, The North Face has clothing designers turn damaged and used items into unique pieces. This one-of-a-kind Thermoball Eco Snap Jacket costs $100.

During his tenure as REI’s director of new business development and circular economy, Whitcomb says he was often asked how the brands that REI carries react to its Good and Used program. His response: “They generally love it, because it keeps their product in use longer.” A better question might be: how does REI react to it? Isn’t the goal of any retail operation to sell as many things as possible?

“[REI] is kind of disrupting [its] own business model,” he admits. “Optically, systematically, process-wise, it’s truly disruptive and uncomfortable for a lot of people. This type of transformation is a huge challenge.” REI’s mission of promoting lifelong access to and enjoyment of the great outdoors, as well as its status as a member-owned cooperative, helps it clear that obvious barrier. According to Whitcomb, REI’s used-gear program has yet to threaten the company’s in-line sales.

The secondhand market hit $24 billion in 2018. By 2023, it’s projected to more than double to $51 billion.

That surface-level concern exists across the movement, but it’s as deceptive as a thin sheet of ice. Not only does the secondhand market not affect sales of new items, it’s also a backdoor for shoppers to access reputable brands. “By offering our Restitch items at a lesser price, the program also works as an introduction to Taylor Stitch to those who might not be able to pay the full retail price, so it’s expanding our customer base,” observes Michael Maher, CEO and cofounder of the menswear brand. “It has created an exciting way for us to follow some of our favorite pieces year after year, throughout their lifespan as they wear in, not out.”

It also doesn’t hurt that the fashion industry has already proven that selling used stuff is a pretty damn good way to make money. According to a 2019 Fashion Resale Market and Trend Report by Thredup, a digital secondhand marketplace offering clothing from over 35,000 brands, the secondhand market hit $24 billion in 2018. By 2023, it’s projected to more than double to $51 billion. Thredup, StockX, Poshmark, Rebag, Grailed, Stadium Goods, GOAT and Yerdle are in fact the freshmen class of companies participating in the surging secondhand wave. Long gone are the days when the only online places to save a buck on a used pair of Redwing boots or some vintage Levi’s were eBay and Craigslist.

Before founding Yerdle, Ruben worked at Walmart as a corporate strategist, then as chief sustainability officer and finally as VP of global e-commerce strategy. “In the late Nineties, I was part of these conversations when e-commerce was just starting,” he says. “And I remember the conversation when Walmart was deciding whether it would have its own e-commerce platform or be on the Amazon platform.” With hindsight, the answer is obvious.

That’s where Ruben believes recommerce is today. He compares the value and convenience that it provides to Spotify and Airbnb. “Ten years from now, it’ll feel the same way as me looking back at e-commerce in 1998; of course it’s that big, of course it’s the way it’s gone.”

Perhaps fittingly then, Yerdle shares its parking lot with The RealReal, a marketplace for secondhand luxury goods, and the first such business to go public.

Arc’teryx built this Velaro 35 Backpack with its waterproof Advanced Composite Construction fabric. It cost $199 in 2015, but now, lightly used, it’s $139.

Ruben says that in 2018 he could count the number of applications to Yerdle’s program “on one hand.” Within the first half of 2019, he had 50, and whereas in the past, those applications were filed by sustainability managers, now it’s executives grasping the benefits. And since they began working with Yerdle, Taylor Stitch has taken in over 5,000 articles of used clothing, Patagonia has resettled over 130,000 items and REI sold nearly one million pieces of used gear in 2019 alone.

In a 2019 equity research report, Wells Fargo jumped on board with numbers of its own, stating that it estimates that by 2022, 40 percent of the contents of our closets will be secondhand buys. Surely, this is a future that neither eco-conscious outdoors enthusiasts nor trend-watching fashionistas expected. And perhaps partying at a New York City dry cleaner makes just as much sense as spending a night in the California wilds, kept awake by invading raccoons and hellish insects.

A version of this story originally appeared in a print issue of Gear Patrol Magazine. Subscribe today.

Tanner Bowden

Tanner Bowden is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering all things outdoors and fitness. He is a graduate of the National Outdoor Leadership School and a former wilderness educator. He lives in Brooklyn but will always identify as a Vermonter.

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The No-Nonsense Grooming Routine of a World Champion Surfer

Gabriel Medina takes to a surfboard like nobody else. The Brazilian phenom first drew major attention when he became the youngest person to enter the World Surf League. Since then, the hotshot surfer has garnered coveted accolades including the WSL’s world champion title and the honor of being one of Time magazine’s “100 Most Influential People.”

Having very nearly swam before he could run, Medina’s training regimen is as calculated and rigorous as the waves he conquers. But all that time spent in the salty water, exposed to the sun and wind takes a toll on his skin and hair. So we talked with the two-time WSL champ to discuss how he trains and his grooming routine.

How do you prep physically and mentally for a competition day?
My prep for a competition starts weeks before the event. Usually, I have a strong pre-season beginning one to two months prior. As we get closer to each competition, I usually arrive to the event location 10 days before in order for my body to adapt to travel, time differences and new food.

Physically, I do light maintenance before each competition — most work now is on the water and surfing. Mentally, I usually tend to stay isolated within my team at the hotel and think positively, this keeps me focused. On competition day, I block all outside information and focus 110 percent on the waves, reading the ocean and figuring out the best angle to take for each wave.

Is your morning grooming routine different than your post-surf regimen?
Yes, since I go out to surf super early (before sunrise) I just go straight from my bed to the ocean. So, my grooming routine is predominantly after surf.

So, what’s your post-surf grooming routine like?
A good warm shower, use of hair products (good old hair conditioner) and some skin products. We surfers have to deal with sunburns frequently. Surfers are exposed to the sun every day, so it is something we have to be very careful with. Sunscreen at all times!

Read more:
The Best Sunscreen for Every Need

Does your routine have a specific order?
I usually like to shave after I surf, followed by a warm shower. Lastly, but most importantly, you have to have a nice smell, so a good spray of Polo Deep Blue is my final touch — overall, I lean toward energizing and refreshing scents. I love that it’s inspired by the ocean.

Polo Deep Blue Parfum Spray by Ralph Lauren $105

How do you relax after surfing?
A good stretch, a lot of food (I come out of surfing starving) and some power naps.

When you’re traveling, what do you pack in your Dopp kit?
I bring with me the essentials: toothbrush and paste, hair comb and always Polo Deep Blue Parfum when I travel because it gives me a boost of energy and confidence.

Read more:
9 Essential Grooming Products for the Frequent Flyer
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