All posts in “Gear”

Leatherman’s Massive Multi-Tool Sale Is Still Happening

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It’s Tool Time


From a glance, Leatherman’s Free P2 and P4 multi-tools look pretty much just like its other pliers-centric tools. And in truth, they are, in all the ways that you’d want them to be. But thanks to a rethinking of the engineering process and the savvy inclusion of magnets, the Free tools are leaps better than their predecessors, primarily because you can open and operate every included implement, from pliers to scissors, with a single hand.

Leatherman used the technology invested in the Free P2 and P4 to create more models that won’t look as familiar. There’s the Swiss Army-like T Series and the blade-focused K Series, both awesome multi-tools in their own right. Leatherman unveiled these new tools throughout 2019, but they’re all on sale now, along with pretty much every tool the company makes.

Free P2 by Leatherman $120 $105

Free T4 by Leatherman $60 $50

Free K2X by Leatherman $80 $70
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tanner Bowden

Tanner Bowden is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering all things outdoors and fitness. He is a graduate of the National Outdoor Leadership School and a former wilderness educator. He lives in Brooklyn but will always identify as a Vermonter.

More by Tanner Bowden | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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10 Deals Not to Miss: Adidas Ultraboosts, OXO Pop Containers & More

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One More Thing…


On any given day there is an endless onslaught of great deals on the internet. We highlight the best of the best, but there are always some that just don’t find their way to our site. Rather than let them slip by, we’ve rounded them up here for you.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Ryan Brower

Ryan Brower serves as Commerce Editor and also writes about beer and surfing for Gear Patrol. He lives in Brooklyn, loves the ocean and almost always has a film camera handy.

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A New Knife Demonstrates the Best Emerging Trend in EDC

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Better Blades


One of the latest trends in the knife and EDC world is a new, thoughtful approach to the utility knife. Recently, we’ve seen the release of Gerber’s utility multi-tool, Grovemade’s solid-state desk knife and the launch of a new brand fueled by an ultralight blade that comes in a titanium frame. The latest in the lineup is Civivi’s Mandate, a utility knife that looks sleek enough to be mistaken for a prop from a Marvel movie set.

It’s about damn time. For too long, utility knives (you might know them as box cutters or X-Acto knives) have existed as cheap hardware store purchases. This new class of knife maintains the key attributes of the category — replaceable blades and a safe, straightforward design — while elevating it with high-end components and materials.

Civivi’s Mandate serves as the perfect example. Its handle closely resembles the kind you might find for $20, but it’s made of titanium that comes in different color finishes and includes a bottle opener, pocket clip and a lanyard hole that doubles as a hex wrench. In addition to the three 9Cr18MoV blades that it comes with, Civivi includes one made of Damascus steel, a type that’s well-suited to everyday use but often included on collector’s knives only. It’s precisely that sort of intersection that makes the utility knife trend so interesting.

The Civivi Mandate will go on sale this July, and you can purchase it at BladeHQ for $83.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tanner Bowden

Tanner Bowden is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering all things outdoors and fitness. He is a graduate of the National Outdoor Leadership School and a former wilderness educator. He lives in Brooklyn but will always identify as a Vermonter.

More by Tanner Bowden | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

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Some of the Best Workout and Running Shoes Are Deeply Discounted Right Now

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Swole Savings


Reebok Nano 9

Our all-time favorite workout shoe is a GP100 selection as one the best fitness products of 2019. Just the perfect mix of stability, breathability, durability and style.

Adidas Ultraboost 20

Searching for fresh motivation to pound the pavement? Ultraboost foam is an energy-returning wonder that will make every run a bit more fun.

Adidas Alphabounce Beyond 2.0

If you’re a HIIT lover who favors workouts that take you in all sorts of directions, this spinoff of one of the best gym shoes is an excellent option thanks to flexible cushioning and multidirectional support.

Adidas Adipower Weightlifting 2

A breathable woven upper, flexible forefoot, reinforced heel and grippy outsole mean the perfect combo of comfort and support when you’re going for the big lifts.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Steve Mazzucchi

Steve Mazzucchi is Gear Patrol’s outdoors and fitness editor. Outside the office, you can find him mountain biking, snowboarding, motorcycling or sipping a dram of Laphroaig and daydreaming about such things.

More by Steve Mazzucchi | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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Watch One of the Coolest Pickup Trucks of the Future Strut Its Stuff

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electric powerslide


If we had to rank all the upcoming electric vehicles in terms of how excited we are about them, the Rivian R1T pickup truck and R1S SUV would be at or near the top of the list. Sure, Porsche’s soft-roader Taycan wagon will surely be dynamite and Cadillac’s handmade Bentley-esque super-sedan delightful, but Rivian is moving the EV ball forward in ways like no one else, bar Tesla. Their vehicles promise not only sports car acceleration and truck-spec off-road capability, but innovative ideas like tank turns, multipurpose tailgates and pop-out kitchens that could leave other trucks feeling inadequate. (Y’know, if trucks had feelings.)

But you can’t make good on those promises without lots and lots of testing. As with every carmaker, the Rivian engineers have to torture the crap out of their prototypes to see when, where and how they’ll break…and then improve upon those limits. And as it turns out, that makes for some pretty compelling video — which Rivian recently posted to YouTube for all to see.

The video shows the R1T kicking rocks and taking names in the hot desert of Arizona: crawling up and down steep slopes, launching with four-wheel-drive vigor in the thick dust, and barreling down dirt roads at speeds that make us sad we haven’t had the chance to do any high-speed desert driving in ages.

The coronavirus pandemic has led Rivian to push production of the R1T back to the 2021 calendar year, but as long as the carmaker keeps on putting out snackable content like this for us to gaze upon, we don’t mind. At least, not too much.

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Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Will Sabel Courtney

Will Sabel Courtney is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Editor, formerly of The Drive and RIDES Magazine. You can often find him test-driving new cars in New York City, cursing the slow-moving traffic surrounding him.

More by Will Sabel Courtney | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

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The Iconic Chronograph Watches of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s

In the years following WWII, the Jet Age, the Space Race and motor racing assailed the public consciousness. Planes, rockets and fast cars drove technological innovation, but they also exemplified the human spirit in an era when people were looking to move beyond the war’s milieu austére. Where time was a factor in the development and functions of these machines, a special watch, the chronograph, which could record time-related data, became the tool of choice for pioneers.

Pushing boundaries required more than just a way to record basic times, and soon the chronograph was rethought, and redeveloped into a specialized tool. Throughout the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, dials and bezels became more functional, movements became more evolved and the chronograph watch traveled to places and performed functions no other timekeeping complication had gone or done before.

Along the way, their complex dials and dual push pieces became associated with cocksure professionals who wore them, like Jo Siffert and Neil Armstrong. These are five of the most the iconic, game-changing chronographs of their era, which to this day remain the most fascinating and distinguished watches of all time.

1952: Breitling Navitimer

Breitling-Pilot-Gear-PatorlBreitling-Pilot-Gear-Patorl

The Pilot’s Chronograph: By 1952 pilots were already familiar with Breitling — the company built onboard chronographs for aircraft cockpits, and Breitling’s Chronomat (released in 1942) was popular in the industry. In addition to its chronograph movement, it had a slide rule that could be used for simple calculations like division, multiplication and unit conversions, making it even more popular among engineers and mathematicians.

With the help of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), Breitling created a version, the Navitimer, specifically for pilots. It kept the slide rule of the Chronomat but added a third scale and borrowed functions from the E6B flight computer. The new Navitimer made completing speed and distance calculations quicker and easier, solidifying Breitling’s place as the de-facto watch brand for aviators.

1957: Omega Speedmaster

Omega-Gemini-Gear-PatorlOmega-Gemini-Gear-Patorl

The Space Chronograph: When the Speedmaster launched in 1957, motorsports were becoming increasingly popular and OMEGA was the official timekeeper of the Olympic Games. So at its launch the OMEGA Speedmaster was not intended for any use outside of timing motor races and sporting events.

But in 1962, after astronaut Wally Schirra wore his own personal Speedmaster during the Mercury-Atlas 8 mission, NASA realized the chronograph’s usefulness on future missions, and decided to submit the Speedmaster along with a selection of chronographs from brands like Rolex, Breitling and Longines for testing to see what would be best suited for NASA’s needs.

After testing for durability when subjected to extreme temperature, vibrations, shock, acceleration and other harsh conditions, the Speedmaster remained accurate within five seconds per day and was chosen as the official watch. This was no doubt thanks to its shock-proof and ant-magnetic case, making it one of the most durable chronographs of its time. Its toughness and its role in space exploration made it a favorite among enthusiasts and has since cultivated one of the strongest fandoms in the industry.

1962: Heuer Autavia

Autavia-Siffert-Gear-PatrolAutavia-Siffert-Gear-Patrol

The Racing Chronograph: The Heuer Autavia started life as a dashboard timer in the 1930s, used in both racing cars and aeronautics (Autavia is a portmanteau of both “auto” and “aviation”). The original Autavia was eventually replaced by the Monte Carlo and the Auto-Rallye, but in the early ’60s when Jack Heuer was looking to revamp his range of chronographs he returned to the Autavia name.

The resulting watch was the first Heuer chronograph with a rotating bezel. In 1967 when Heuer launched a new case design, it included a tachymeter scale, and the rotating tachy made more complex measurements (like average speed over long distances) easier.

Thanks to Heuer’s reputation on the dashes of earlier rally cars, the Autavia (and later Heuer Chronos) became a hit with racers like Mario Andretti, Jochen Rindt and Jo Siffert in the ’60s and through the’70s. And while Heuer’s Monaco and Carrera are considered the brand’s greatest racing chronographs, the Autavia started that foundation.

1969: Zenith El Primero

Zenith-Racing-Gear-PatorlZenith-Racing-Gear-Patorl

The Automatic Chronograph: Declaring a winner in the Zenith vs. Seiko vs. Heuer/Breitling/Hamilton-Buren/Dubois-Depraz race to create the first automatic chronograph is contentious business. Regardless, Zenith’s El Primero — first or no — was ahead of the competition in terms of innovation. While automatic watches from the other groups used a simpler modular, cam-actuated movement, Zenith opted for a more complex but much smoother column wheel movement and used a fully integrated design.

What’s more, the El Primero had a 36,000 vph high-beat movement that not only had a second hand with an appealingly smooth motion, but could record time within 1/10 of a second as well. Today the El Primero continues production as one of the very few high-beat chronographs on the market, and remains one of the most advanced chronograph movements of all time.

1971: Heuer “McQueen” Monaco

Monaco-Mcqueen-Gear-PatrolMonaco-Mcqueen-Gear-Patrol

The Avant-Garde Chronograph: After the Heuer/Breitling/Hamilton-Buren/Dubois-Depraz group completed their automatic Calibre 11, Heuer knew it would need a stunning package to launch the new movement. It secured a deal with case maker Piquerez to exclusively receive its large square cases to house the new movement, making it the first of many avant-garde chronographs to follow in the ’70s. Aside from the case design, the Monaco owes most of its notoriety to Steve McQueen, who wore a 1133B version in the 1971 film LeMans, making it one of the most well-known watches of the decade.

Somehow, a Whiskey Named After a Golf Course Is One of the Best Things I Drank Last Month

Every month, a huge amount of booze moves through the Gear Patrol offices — beer, wine and a whole lot of whiskey. This week: star-studded bourbon, a crushable IPA from Vermont and more.

Sweetens Cove Tennessee Bourbon

Sweetens Cove is a new spirits label and its first product is a 13-year-old bourbon blended by Marianne Eaves, a former blender at Brown-Forman (the company that owns Old Forester, Jack Daniel’s, Woodford Reserve and others). Its received praise from reviewers at Breaking Bourbon and whiskey writer Aaron Goldfarb and signed off on it.

That’s quite a CV for a new brand, but the whiskey in the bottle lived up to it. Its heavy on vanilla and oak characteristic (13 years will do that), but there’s a clear and powerful peanut butter flavor that works its way from the nose to the finish. It is an electric whiskey, which is even more surprising once you learn its technically a “celebrity” spirit. Among others, its backers include Andy Roddick, multiple Mannings and Jim Nantz. The cold bucket of water on the Sweetens Cove hype train is the price — it’s set to retail at a whopping $200. The brand says there are 14,000 bottles in the batch. If you’ve got money to spend or someone to get a unique gift, seek it out. —Will Price, Assistant Editor

Lawson’s Finest Liquids Little Sip IPA

The Sip of Sunshine family of East Coast IPAs is the backbone of Lawson’s Finest Liquids. And Sean Lawson has added a newborn to that family: Little Sip IPA. Still relying on the Citra hop to do the heavy lifting of floral and citrus flavors, Little Sip is more of the Session IPA of the family at 6.2 percent ABV. It’s clean, hoppy, a tiny bit of bite but nothing overpowering. It’s another example of liquid perfection from Lawson’s and one that’s paired perfectly with a summer day outside. —Ryan Brower, Commerce Editor

Basil Hayden’s 10-Year-Old Rye

Because of its low proofing, Basil Hayden’s isn’t looked at kindly by capital-W Whiskey Guys, but it was never meant for them. Its premium bourbon for the masses, and no expression to date has represented this as much as the 10-year rye. Its low proof means alcohol doesn’t get in the way of tasting the whiskey’s maturity, which comes through a pleasant dryness and hug of vanilla on the tongue. It’s delightfully nice to drink, and you can get it at most liquor stores. —Will Price, Assistant Editor

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Honey Canned Cocktail

Say what you need to say, but know that deriding canned bubbly-honey-lemonade-whiskey is a denial of happiness. It’s not artful and it’s not going to win awards, but it’s a wildly satisfying summer drink, and the perfect drink to reach for when your buddies pull out the Claws. —Will Price, Assistant Editor

Torch & Crown Brewing Company Tenement

Most newer craft breweries take a bit of time before releasing a lager because, as the old adage goes, there’s nowhere to hide in a lager. In its short time as a brand, Torch & Crown has not shied away from brewing crispy pilsners — and they’ve succeeded at it. The latest lager offering from the soon-to-be-first-brewery-in-Manhattan-since-1995 is Tenement and it’s hit the spot on warm summer days. It’s lagered for over 100 days and offers up crackery malts with a floral noble hop compliment for a smooth, clean finish. When you’re able to produce enjoy 4.9 percent ABV pilsners like Tenement before you even have a physical space, you know you’re on to something. —Ryan Brower, Commerce Editor

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Now You Can Customize Your Watch to Match Your Custom Porsche

Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

Want a customized Porsche 911? You can get that through Porsche’s car configurator, and now you can get a watch to match it perfectly — or in any combination of elements you choose. A similar configurator concept is being applied to Porsche Design’s distinctive chronograph watch, resulting in up to “1.5 million possibilities,” according to the brand.

In addition to making a range of sleek products from luggage to eyewear, Porsche Design has been producing watches since the 1970s. The brand’s first and most famous watch, the Chronograph 1, forms the base of the watch customizing program.

Equipped with a 42mm titanium case and a familiar chronograph dial layout, practically everything else about its aesthetics is up to you. There are choices of bezel and hand types, for example, as well as color options (including the original Porsche color palette) for just about every element. The case’s finish, however, is available only in bead-blasted or black-coated forms — and the Porsche Design Timepieces Managing Director Rolf Bergmann says “this originated with the designer of the Porsche 911, Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, and we will never change anything about it.”

Along with the watch configurator, Porsche Design is announcing a new, COSC chronometer-certified, in-house automatic movement called the WERK 01.100 with a 48-hour power reserve. It’s visible through the watch’s case back, and there’s even the option to customize the winding rotor.

Of course, the straps are also customizable with up to 300 possible configurations, all featuring a quick-change system. Leather straps are made from the same materials used for 911 interiors, so they can be matched precisely.

Porsche Design isn’t the first to offer such customization programs, but it might be the most comprehensive yet. With the combination of options, one can effectively expect a one-of-a-kind watch — something usually associated with bespoke projects by independent watchmakers, and with significantly higher prices.

The program launches today in Europe, but will only be available to the US and fully in English from September 1, 2020 — you can try it out here. Depending on the configuration, prices will range from $6,000 to around $12,500 and delivery takes eight to 12 weeks.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

Why Do So Many Seiko Watches Have Crazy Nicknames?

The many unofficial nicknames of Seiko watches are a testament to the Japanese brand’s following and cultural presence. Bestowed by an adoring international public, perhaps no other brand except Rolex has been given a similar tribute. While some nicknames are iconic and some are obscure, this phenomenon adds to Seiko’s personality alongside its many other quirks.

Seiko’s habit of naming its products with little more than a reference number certainly contributed to these aliases proliferating online and among fans — especially during a time when the company seemed less media-savvy than it is today. While the Cocktail Time and Alpinist, for instance, are rare examples of names that come from the brand itself, there are still many popular and worthy models waiting for a name that sticks.

Monster, Turtle, Tuna, Sumo, Samurai, Shogun, Arnie, Mohawk, Spork, Ashtray, Starfish, Atlas, Sea Urchin, Speedy, Willard, Pogue, Bond, Senna, Landshark, Stingray, Bottle Cap, Big Boy, Jumbo, Knight, Zimbe, UFO… All of these (and more) are names of Seiko watches, but none of them are used by the company itself. However, the very cool By Seiko Design website includes a few entries in which actual Seiko designers discuss the public’s nicknames of certain models: here and again here.

It’s beyond the scope of this article to cover all the nicknamed Seikos out there, many of which are no longer produced (though some remain available online). Below, however, are some of the most notable and fun examples you should know about.

Turtle

The nickname “Turtle” makes sense as soon as you see this watch’s curved, shell-like case shape. The Turtle, which currently lives in the Prospex collection and is one of the brand’s most popular affordable dive watches, is the descendent of a vintage watch (which has also recently been reissued) fans call the “Willard” or “Captain Willard” for the character who wore it in the film Apocalypse Now. There’s even a “Mini Turtle” and, more recently, a “King Turtle.”

Tuna

Also called “Tuna Can,” this name applies to a wide range of Seiko dive watches that have a certain distinctive case design. With a protective outer “shroud,” the strap attaches directly to the bottom of the case, and the result is a watch that sits high on the wrist with roughly the proportions of a can of tunafish. Pretty it is not, but it’s unique, ultra capable, and has an interesting story as well.

Monster

It could be its jagged bezel, with an appearance like the bared teeth of a predator, or that the watch overall just has that aggressive, ugly-cool appeal. Whatever the origin, the “Monster” nickname is fitting for this affordable dive watch that one would feel no hesitation in beating up. Having gone through several generations and redesigns, the brand recently released an update that places it in the Prospex line and takes it in a decidedly sleeker and slightly less “monstrous” direction.

Samurai

Do you see it? Even Seiko’s own designers seem a little bewildered as to why this particular model is called the “Samurai.” Does its case shape look like a samurai’s helmet or armor? Umm… maybe? Do the hands look like samurai swords? No. Maybe it’s just “the kind of design that would evoke a feeling of Japaneseness in the eyes of foreign people,” as one of the Seiko designers suggests. Somehow or another, though, the name stuck and it now sits alongside the Turtle as one of the brand’s core affordable dive watches in its Prospex collection. As with the Turtle, there’s also a more premium “King Samurai” version as well.

Arnie

The Arnie got its name from none other than Arnold Schwarzenegger having worn it in, not just one, but multiple iconic action films. Originally hailing from the ’80s but recently rereleased, it has a solar-charged movement, a bevy of buttons and an ana-digi dial with a no-nonsense, military look.

Sumo

The traditional dive watch known as the “Sumo” looks more like… well, kinda like a Rolex. Again, it requires a stretch of the imagination to find aspects or details that appear to have any connection to the Japanese sport. Presumably, its name is due simply to its substantial girth of 45mm. In any case, the nickname adds some fun to another handsome, solid, high-bang-for-buck dive watch you can potentially wear every day for many years.

Ripley

The “Ripley” was named for the character in the 1986 movie Aliens who wore this appropriately sci-fi-looking chronograph. One of the many striking designs resulting from the collaboration between Seiko and famed automotive designer Giorgetto Giugiaro, the Ripley’s popularity saw it come back as a reissue in 2015. Quartz-powered and affordable, the Ripley can still be found at reasonable prices.

Mohawk

Rather than simply emphasizing the critical first 15 or 20 minutes on the diving bezel with another color or markers, as most dive watches do, the “Mohawk” takes a unique approach. The first third of the bezel is actually dramatically raised. This also makes it easier to grip and turn, sure, but the result is yet another totally offbeat, asymmetric, almost ugly dive watch that nobody but Seiko could pull off.

Sea Urchin

The “Sea Urchin” comes from the ultra affordable Seiko 5 Sports collection of recent decades. These are basic dive watches that, like so many others from the brand, surprise their owners with the quality, value and personality that are at the core of Seiko’s wares and present global success. You can still get one for under $200.

Starfish

The “Starfish” is reminiscent of watches from the likes of Breitling and TAG Heuer with steel bezels and “rider tabs” — but exaggerated in characteristic Seiko form. Early examples featured Kinetic movements and two-tone designs, but later versions had automatic movements and sleeker looks. The aquatic animal connection is common for dive watches, and the pointed tabs make this nickname feel natural.

Ashtray

Again named for its bezel, the “Ashtray” probably has the least appealing and most irreverent name on this list, but it’s got some killer ’80s personality. These were tough Seiko divers with titanium cases and quartz movements that look genuinely ready for action. While the bezel’s grooves don’t quite look like you could rest a cigarette in them, the name seems appropriate.

Shogun

Like the Samurai and the Sumo, the “Shogun” dive watch’s nickname suggests its “Japaneseness,” but also reflects fans’ regard for it as a “high-ranking” diver: a shogun was a military dictator in feudal Japan. With its traditional design, the Shogun watch is like a premium version of Seiko’s beloved basic divers, with features such as the well-respected 6R15 automatic movement and a titanium case.

Zen Love

Zen Love is Gear Patrol’s watch writer. He avoids the snooty side of the watch world, and seeks out food in NYC that resembles what he loved while living in Asia for over a decade.

More by Zen Love | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

The Ultra Affordable Seiko 5 Sports Watches Are 23% Off

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Tudor’s Beloved Dive Watch Is Now Available in Blue

Editor’s Note: Watches & Wonders (formerly SIHH) has moved online and Baselworld 2020 is canceled, but that hasn’t stopped watch brands large and small from debuting their new wares. Stay on top of this year’s best new watch releases here.

Following the cancellation of this year’s Baselworld, it was anybody’s guess when — or, indeed, whether or not — Rolex, Tudor and Patek Philippe were going to release their 2020 wares. Rolex and Patek, it seems, are sitting this one out, but younger sibling brand Tudor has decided to give the world what it’s been waiting for since 2018: namely, another iteration of its most perfect dive watch, the Black Bay Fifty-Eight.

The new Black Bay Fifty-Eight (ref. M79030B-0001) is now available in navy blue, a color inspired by 1960s and ’70s Tudor Submariners that were issued to the French Marine National, among other navies. It’s got the same specs we all love from the original black and”gilt” edition — 39mm x 11.9mm stainless steel case, automatic, chronometer-certified cal. MT5402 (COSC) manufacture movement with a 70-hour power reserve, 200m of water resistance, domed sapphire crystal, and an anodized aluminum bezel. A riveted steel bracelet ($3,700) completes the vintage-inspired look, though the watch is also available on a blue “soft touch” leather strap or on a blue fabric strap ($3,375).

The Black Bay Fifty-Eight in navy blue is available at Tudor authorized detailers now, though given the constricted supply of the original black model, it’s anybody’s guess whether or not customers who are new to the brand (and are more than willing to pay for a timepiece will actually be able to get their hands on one. Hopefully, this won’t be the case, as this is truly a beautiful watch, and only expands upon what has become one of the most beloved dive watches of the past decade.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Compact Cameras to Buy in 2020

A new wave of compact digital cameras has been hitting the market steadily over the past few years, with each new release getting closer to pro-level DSLR’s in terms of optics quality and resolution. Pocket-sized and powerful, these compact cameras are changing the way that consumer and prosumer photographers capture moments while on the road. Before you head out on your next adventure, consider leaving the DSLR behind and opting for one of the more sensible options below.

The Smartphone Upgrade: Ricoh GR III

Sensor: 24.2MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
Lens: 28mm f/2.8 Lens (35mm Equivalent)
Date released: March 2019

The previous GR II was the first of Ricoh’s GR cameras to come with built-in Wi-Fi and NFC, so you could quickly upload photos to your smartphone, and the GR III is able to do the same thing. But it’s got way more in its locker. The GR III is a slightly smaller camera than GR II, and packs more megapixels (24.2 vs 16.2) and has two stops better ISO. It’s also Ricoh’s first GR with a touchscreen. The downside to the new GR III is that there still is no viewfinder; plus it’s fairly expensive.

This is a great entry-level travel camera for photo enthusiasts who want a nice upgrade from their smartphone camera.

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The Vlogger: Sony RX100 VII

Sensor: 20.1MP 1-inch Exmor RS BSI CMOS Sensor
Lens: Zeiss Vario-Sonnar f/2.8-4.5 Lens, 24-200mm (35mm equivalent)
Date released: August 2019

Sony’s RX100 line of compact shooters have long been a fan favorite and the VII is the latest and greatest model — it’s really just a great all-around compact shooter. With 4K HDR shooting capabilities, terrific advanced tracking and autofocus features, a flip-around viewfinder and an external mic port (a first for a Sony RX100), the VII is really the perfect camera for amateur (and even serious) vloggers.

Sony’s RX100 compact cameras are probably the best all-around travel cameras for most people. The new VII is the best option for vloggers, thanks to its built-in mic port; but the V and VI are almost equally good in terms of performance and 4K video shooting, and they’re most affordable.

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Big Zoom: Panasonic Lumix ZS200

Sensor: 20.1MP 1-inch High-Sensitivity MOS Sensor
Lens: Leica DC Vario-Elmar 15x Zoom Lens, 24-360mm (35mm equivalent)
Date released: March 2018

The standout feature of the Panasonic’s Lumix TZ200 (known abroad as the Lumix SZ200) is its zoom. Like many of the cameras on this list, it has a very good 1-inch 20-megapixel sensor, but it combines that with a 15x zoom lens — you can’t really find a better zoom lens in this good of a compact camera (without breaking the bank). Of course, the Lumix TZ200 is a good all-purpose travel camera, too; it can shoot 4K video and, in macro mode, it can capture 8K stills in bursts of 30 frames per second.

It’s an ideal travel camera for casual photographers looking for something pocket-friendly camera that also has excellent zoom.

DSLR Alternative: Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III

Sensor: 24.2MP APS-C
Lens: 15 to 45mm (35mm equivalent)
Date released: November 2017

Canon’s PowerShot G1 X III is essentially as close to a DSLR as you’re going to get in a compact shooter. It’s one of the only compact cameras that packs a large 24-megapixel APS-C sensor — in fact, it has the same same as in the company’s EOS 80D DSLR and its EOS M mirrorless cameras — as well as Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus technology, to help you shoot in-focus photos and videos. Additionally, it packs a bunch of manual controls, a 3x zoom lens and an articulated touchscreen display. And then it’s all packaged in compact and weather-proof body.

The G1 X III is a high-quality compact camera designed for most advanced shooters looking for DSLR-like controls and image quality.

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The Grail: Leica Q2

Sensor: 47.3MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor
Lens: Summilux 28mm f/1.7 ASPH. Lens
Date released: March 2019

The Leica Q2 is the company’s newest fixed-lens compact digital camera and it looks basically identical to the company’s original Q, which was a smash hit amongst photographers who valued portability, fast speeds, minimalism and, most importantly, could afford the Q’s immense price tag. Like its predecessor, the Q2 once again proves that a Leica can have autofocus, an electronic viewfinder and a fixed lens – and still be a real Leica. The new model is more durable (and now splash-resistant) and has better connectivity, but more importantly a significantly upgraded sensor, with almost double the resolution (47.3 vs 24.2), which helps the Q’s signature “rangefinder digital crop” feature work even better.

The Leica Q2 will likely be a grail item for most people. If money is no object (or you just want to splurge), however, this is a travel camera to buy if you want to be the envy of all your friends.

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The Interchangable Upgrade: Fujifilm X-T30

Sensor: 26.1MP APS-C X-Trans BSI CMOS 4 Sensor
Lens: multiple lens kits available
Date released: March 2019

Even though it’s not technically a point-and-shoot digital camera, you can think of Fuji’s X-T30 as the sensible upgrade. The interchangeable-lens mirrorless camera is a pretty perfect travel camera for a lot of photographers, professionals or just an enthusiast. It’s small and lightweight, plus it’s not terribly expensive, but the performance levels you get with this thing are off the charts. It has a huge image sensor, fast processor, incredible autofocus (on par with Sony’s APS-C offerings) and shoots 4k video at 30 frames per second.

Professional photographers looking for an excellent travel camera and who don’t want to lug around their heavy gear. It’s also for casual shooters who want to shoot more with manual controls.

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Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tucker Bowe

Tucker Bowe has been on Gear Patrol’s editorial team since 2014. As a Tech Staff Writer, he tracks everything in the consumer tech space, from headphones to smartphones, wearables to home theater systems. If it lights up or makes noise, he probably covers it.

More by Tucker Bowe | Follow on Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

Perfectly Simple: 10 Great Minimalist Watches

If there were a global ranking for tired clichés, “less is more” would probably be right near the top. In the world of watch design, however, it still rings true. Tasteful minimalism can bring out the best elements of a watch, instead of burying them in a sea of unnecessary detail; its very nature makes a watch more comfortable to wear, and more versatile in the styles it’s paired with. Above all, a well-executed minimalist watch is an artful accent, rather than a flashy main course. With that in mind, here are our picks for ten of the best.

Eone Bradley

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There aren’t too many watches made for the blind, for obvious reasons. With the Eone Bradley, however, this niche market has been making waves in the sighted world. Once you see it, you’ll understand why: this minimal, tactile approach is a completely different way of telling time, with magnetic bearings instead of hands. By engaging touch as well as sight, it’s engaging on a new, unique level.

Movement: Ronda Quartz
Diameter: 40mm
Price: $260+

Mondaine Helvetica No1 Light



Over the past 70 years, Helvetica has become the most widely used typeface in the world, and a Swiss design icon in its own right. Mondaine, famous for creating the Swiss railway clock, decided to pay tribute to a fellow design legend with the Mondaine Helvetica, which has a minimalist bent that still retains a bit of playfulness. This version, the Helvetica Light, takes the simple theme even further, and creates a beautiful design in the process.

Movement: Ronda 515 Quartz
Diameter: 38mm
Price: $285

Braun AW 10 EVO



First off: yes, that is the same Braun that makes your electric shaver. The brainchild of Braun Chief Design Officer Dieter Rams, the AW 10 EVO brings the brand’s signature functionalist aesthetic to the watch world. The integrated bracelet and lugs along with the sterile numerals give it an industrial, slightly futuristic feel on the wrist, while the unique one-piece case construction makes this a durable, streamlined choice. It might be stark, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t pretty.

Movement: Quartz
Diameter: 39mm
Price: $380

Unimatic U1-FM



Unimatic has established a unique, recognizable style that marries minimalist design and tool watches. Powered by the Seiko NH35A automatic movement, the U1-FM comes in around $800, features 300m of water resistance and offers eye-catching looks with a sterile rotating bezel (a single pip ensures it remains functional). Unimatic also offers other options, such as a black, DLC-coated case or other (less minimal) bezel iterations.

Movement: Seiko NH35A Automatic
Diameter: 40mm
Price: ~$800

Hamilton Intra-Matic

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Looking for a splash of restrained Mad Men cool on your wrist? The Hamilton Intra-Matic has you covered. Available in either a retro 38mm or more modern 42mm size, the Intra-Matic’s silver sunburst dial gives off a slick mid-century vibe. The ETA 2892-2 movement powering the Intra-Matic is impressive in itself, and its decorated rotor is on display through a wide sapphire case back.

Movement: ETA 2892-2 Automatic
Diameter: 38mm
Price: $845

Sinn 556 A



Not every minimalist design is some waifish dress watch. Minimalist watches can be tough and sporty too, as evidenced by the Sinn 556 A, which features subtle updates for 2020. A solid 200m of water resistance, a bold, super-legible dial and a generous helping of glowing green lume make this watch as functional as it is handsome. Its pared-down pilot-watch looks blend classic military themes with an ultramodern vibe, and render it a natural choice for more casual wear.

Movement: SW200-1 Automatic
Diameter: 38.5mm
Price: $1,420

Georg Jensen Koppel Automatic

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Summed up in one sentence, the Koppel is a nearly perfect expression of Danish design. Everything here is pared down, not just minimal but almost skeletal. The hands are elegantly thin needles, and you won’t find any text or numerals here. The only markers are a ring of tiny black dots, unobtrusive but still easily legible. It’s the kind of thing you expect to see on the wrist of a famous architect.

Movement: ETA 2824
Diameter: 41mm
Price: ~$1,607

Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope



The modern minimalist design movement started at the Bauhaus school in Germany in the early 20th century, and Max Bill was one of its greatest students. Responsible for one of the most famous pieces of designer furniture ever, the multipurpose Ulm Stool, Bill also laid the groundwork for a watch in 1961. It’s remained nearly unchanged since, and this 2020 version takes an appropriately minimalistic approach to its colors and details.

Movement: ETA 7750 Automatic
Diameter: 40mm
Price: $2,095

Nomos Ahoi Datum



Marine chronometers have have sported fairly consistent design language for well over a century — even after they were adopted into wristwatch form. Nomos changes this up with their gorgeous Ahoi Neomatik, featuring a simplified nautical look and gorgeous dial in this 2020 version for Doctors Without Borders. Its in-house caliber Epsilon movement is a work of art itself, richly decorated with Geneva stripes.

Movement: Nomos DUW 5101 Automatic
Diameter: 40.3mm
Price: $4,780

Ochs und Junior Moonphase

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Moonphase watches are considered by many to be some of the greatest expressions of watchmaking prowess. What they aren’t usually considered, however, is minimal — most moonphases are ornate, finely detailed pieces. The Ochs und Junior Moonphase bucks that trend in favor of a clean, simple design that also includes a novel date-indicator track. Even more impressively, it’s one of the most accurate moonphases in the world, needing readjustment every 3,478 years.

Movement: Modified ETA 2824-2 Automatic
Diameter: 39mm
Price: ~$11,817+

I Love My Japanese-Style Iced Coffee More Than Air Conditioning

Forget your cold brew and your stale day-old iced coffee. The best cold coffee is iced pour-over coffee, otherwise known as Japanese-style iced coffee. And it’s the only kind of coffee I drink in the summer.

A few years ago, cold brew became the leading variety of cold coffee — so much so that it’s now a staple at Dunkin’ and Starbucks. A bastardized version even appears at McDonald’s. But cold-brewed coffee produces a beverage that lacks any zippy acidity and is too rich and chocolatey for my tastes — especially when I want something refreshing in the summer.

Iced pour-over coffee, considered Japanese-style because the country popularized the method, is also called flash-chilled coffee. This method of brewing involves brewing a regular pour-over coffee, but subbing in a third of the hot water for ice, which is placed in the carafe. The method of brewing hot and immediately chilling it locks in the coffee’s flavor before it has time to oxidize and get stale.

“Brewing with hot water lets you extract more flavor from the grounds, giving you a complex and interesting cup of coffee that captures the flavors that give you some idea where and how that coffee was grown,” James Hoffmann, author of The World Atlas of Coffee, 2017 World Barista Champion and all-around cool Youtube coffee person, says.

Cold brew takes hours to make because it takes time for the cool water to extract enough quality flavors from the ground coffee. On the other hand, iced pour-over coffee takes under five minutes for a drink that’s more flavorful. Many baristas used cold brew as a way to get usage from past-their-prime beans since cold brew results in the same one-note flavor profile regardless of what beans are used.

“Brewing with cold water tends to produce a slightly more generic coffee flavor, and you can also have some issues with oxidation. The longer you leave coffee, water and air together the more oxidization you will get,” Hoffmann says.

You can’t make a large batch of coffee like you can with cold brew, but iced pour-over coffees don’t take any more time than making a regular cup of pour-over. I use a Chemex for my iced pour-over because it’s the only coffee maker I have and it’s gotten me through four years of daily coffee brewing. I prefer a single-origin bean for its lighter, fruiter flavor, which results in a crisper, more refreshing beverage. And my preferred 1:16 coffee to water ratio produces a coffee that has a bold enough flavor that doesn’t feel too heavy for summer drinking.

Using less hot water in the brewing process won’t result in a watered-down beverage. As Hoffman says, most of the coffee’s flavor comes out in the beginning of the brewing process. “Once you’ve brewed coffee once, even with less water than usual, you’ve got most of the good stuff out.”

My salvation for the hot and humid New York City summer months has been, and always will be, iced pour-over coffees. When I want to give my air conditioning a break, my coffee is a pleasant respite from the intolerable weather. And even when fall comes around, these iced pour-overs are a cool treat because it’s always a perfect time for iced coffee.

How to Make Iced Pour-Over Coffee

1. Boil water between 195°F and 205°F.

2. For a Chemex, or other brewer with a paper filter, rinse the filter with hot water to remove any papery flavors.

3. Add 165 grams of ice and add the filter to your brewer along with 30 grams of coarsely ground coffee.

4. Slowly pour 60 grams of hot water evenly over the grounds to allow the coffee to bloom. Wait 45 seconds.

5. Pour another 150 grams of hot water of the grounds making sure to hit any dark spots to ensure proper extraction. Allow to drip for about a minute before adding another 105 grams of hot water.

6. Allow the water to fully drip through the filter. Remove the filter and grounds, and swirl the carafe to meld all the flavors together, then pour into an ice-filled glass to drink.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tyler Chin

Tyler Chin is Gear Patrol’s home writer. He’s from Queens, where tempers are short and commutes are long. But nothing can get in the way of his love of coffee, beer and random home goods.

More by Tyler Chin | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

The Best New Knives and EDC of July 2020

It’s official. Summer, that is; the solstice has come and gone, and the next few months should serve as a clear palette upon which you should slather plans for cookouts, hikes and trips to your local swimming hole. (Local is the operative word here because travel is still a dicey proposition.)

Whatever you do, do it with a mask. Think of it as the newest addition to your EDC — there are enough out there now that you’ll be able to find one to match your kit. To prove our point, we even included one in this roundup of the best and brightest new releases.

Recently, Drop teamed up with Quiet Carry, Field Notes released a heavy-duty notepad, Benchmade revealed a unique tool and more.

Benchmade Tengu Tool

Benchmade teamed up with designer Jared Oeser to produce his wildly unique Tengu Tool on a larger scale. The tiny multi-tool’s construction uses a friction pivot to deploy either a 1.14-inch tanto blade or a bottle opener/pry bar. Both are made of premium CPM-20CV steel while the handle is contoured G10.

Drop x Quiet Carry Collaboration

Drop is teaming up with Quiet Carry to produce a limited run of two of its popular items: the iQ folding knife and the Shorty key organizer. Both feature the same skilled use of titanium components that characterize so many of Quiet Carry’s tools but Drop added knurled scales that make for a more tactile experience. While Drop’s previous knife collaborations have been more robust items, the iQ and Shorty both fall squarely in the discreet EDC category.

The collaboration will be available at Drop on July 7. The iQ will cost $198 and the Shorty $75.

Field Notes Heavy Duty

Field Notes strayed from its typical notebook format in its most recent release. The Heavy Duty is a rugged, spiral-bound pad with 80 pages that are ruled on one side and graph on the other. At 3.5 by 5.5 inches, the new pads are still small enough to fit in a pocket and include a wide rubber band to keep it shut when not in use.

Ashley Watson Blakeney Knife

The Blakeney Knife calls back to the clasp knives used by the British military, which were made in Sheffield and featured a can opener and marlinspike along with a sheepsfoot blade. Ashley Watson’s design pares the tool down to just the knife blade, leaving the Blakeney slim and lightweight.

Gerber Asada

Gerber is staking a strong claim on the pocket cleaver category with the Asada, refining what the brand did previously with the Flatiron. The Asada’s blade is shorter at roughly three inches and features a large finger choil as well as a swooping front end that comes to enough of a point to be of use. The knife uses Gerber’s B.O.S.S. ball-bearing pivot system for a smooth opening and an anti-pinch plate to back its frame lock.

Outdoor Research Essential Face Mask Kit

We weren’t kidding, and while Outdoor Research’s Essential Face Mask Kit isn’t new for this month, it did get a recent restock. We’ve tested a handful of masks made by outdoor gear companies, and OR’s is the sleekest and most adjustable we’ve come across, which makes it perfect for your EDC.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.
Tanner Bowden

Tanner Bowden is a staff writer at Gear Patrol covering all things outdoors and fitness. He is a graduate of the National Outdoor Leadership School and a former wilderness educator. He lives in Brooklyn but will always identify as a Vermonter.

More by Tanner Bowden | Follow on Instagram · Contact via Email

The Cars We Desperately Wanted to Drive in High School

High school is a formative time for car enthusiasts — and a frustrating one. It’s the time when having a car is vitally important as both a source of autonomy and a signifier of identity. It’s also the time when most of us are furthest away from the cars we really want — stuck instead with a hand-me-down ride, or left borrowing our parents’ car.

We at Gear Patrol were no different. Some of us were budding rally drivers in our minds in high school; others should have paid a bit more attention in math class. But we all shared a burning desire for cars outside our reach. Here are the cars we wish we had been able to drive when we first had our licenses.

Subaru Impreza WRX

“Subaru unleashed the first Impreza WRX on America when I was a senior in high school. The WRX was a perfect match for my 18-year-old blend of heedlessness, hormone levels and ability to operate a manual transmission. The WRX was also relatively affordable, which made owning one — at least, in my head — feel tantalizingly close to being realistic.” – Tyler Duffy, Motoring Writer

Ferrari 575M Maranello

“I’ve loved cars since before I can remember, but only one car earned the honor of having its picture taped to the cover of my Ti-83+ — the Ferrari 575M. Front-engine V12 Ferraris have a charm like none other for me. If I had a nickel for every fact I missed in math class while daydreaming about driving that 575M, I’d be able to buy one.” – Will Sabel Courtney, Motoring Editor

Nissan Xterra

“I wasn’t a car guy then, and I’m not now, but it’s difficult to put into words how much I wanted a Nissan Xterra. In hindsight, the SUV’s discontinuation just a short while after my lust phase ended meant my inability to buy one could be played as my really impressive knowledge of fuel economics, emissions and safety features. But really it’s just the car everybody who was — seemed? — cool had.” – Will Price, Assistant Editor

RUF CTR2 993 (in silver)

“My taste since high school hasn’t changed much, and it’s quite simply the most gorgeous car ever.” – Hunter Kelley, Associate Designer

Volvo 245DL Wagon

“My parents had one when I was a toddler, two of my uncles had one when I was growing up, and my other uncle had a 244GL sedan. Needless to say, the 240 model was the pinnacle of car cool for me growing up. When I really got into surfing in middle school, I had hoped for eventually finding a Volvo wagon just like the one my parents had (why they ever got rid of it, I do not know). Instead, I settled for a 1988 Toyota Camry sedan as my first car. A long cry from the cool of the ’80s Volvo wagon.” – Ryan Brower, Commerce Editor

1985 Lamborghini Countach LP5000 Quattrovalvole

“I was not super-into cars back then, but I most definitely had a poster of this one in white with those scissor doors wide open, silhouetted on a black background. It was gorgeous and Italian and fast and totally unattainable, and I gazed at it longingly every day. Many years later, I did a Gotham Dream Cars tour with a bunch of Lambos…and, damn, I would still take one in a heartbeat if I had a garage to store it. And a separate bank account to cover the insurance.” – Steve Mazzucchi, Outdoors & Fitness Editor

Tyler Duffy

Tyler Duffy is Gear Patrol’s Motoring Staff Writer. He used to write about sports for The Big Lead and The Athletic. He has a black belt in toddler wrangling. He’s based outside Detroit.

More by Tyler Duffy | Follow on Facebook · Instagram · Twitter · Contact via Email

The Sitka Lantern Elevates Your Outdoor Lighting

The 500-lumen rechargeable Sitka Lantern from UCO offers bright LED light for after-dark ambiance, plus its extendable arm brings the tabletop lantern up to 26”—a level that positions the light perfectly for stuff like campsite dinners & card games. An Infinity Dial allows users to fine tune the light’s output from low to high, and features a Northern Lights mode that cycles through red, green, and blue lights.

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Panerai’s Luminor Legacy Lives On in the Marina 44

Retaining the iconic outline and design details that have made it a classic, Panerai’s latest Luminor variant, is the Marina 44 (PAM 01313). Within its large, high-spec and heavy lugged matte finish case, an automatic Swiss Made Cal. P.9010 movement powers the dial, date window & seconds sub-dial & delivers 3-days of power reserve. A blue satiné soleil face is matched with a Dark blue alligator strap for a refined yet sporty look.

Today in Gear: The New Seiko 5 Collection, the Best Coffee Makers for Camping & More

Today in Gear is our daily roundup of all the latest product announcements, drops and deals. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at tig@gearpatrol.com.

A watch qualified for everyday wear needs to offer two things: insane durability and a varied aesthetic that matches your day-to-day style. The new Seiko 5 Sports collection hits both of those on the head. The watches build on the success of the iconic Seiko 5, a Seiko staple since 1963. The latest example comes in a host of colorways and strap options, but a few of our favorites are the all-black, black and blue and black and red — each with a matching black nylon strap. But if those don’t catch your eye, there truly is something for everyone. Each watch is based on a dive watch silhouette with a unidirectional bezel, a crown located at four o’clock and a 100M water resistance rating. The Seiko 5 Sports also offers a 24 jewel automatic movement that provides incredible value — just ask any watch enthusiast for the best buy in everyday watches and you’ll hear “Seiko 5 Sports” more often than not. So if you’re looking to replace a worn-out daily driver or just to expand on your existing collection of watches, the Seiko 5 Sports collection is the way to go.

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The IWC Ingenieur has been both a tech-forward timepiece on par with the Rolex Milgauss and a bold sport watch as envisioned by a legendary designer.

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Coffee tables, end tables, lamps and more, all with a classy mechanical influence.

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Stop the French presses. Buy one of these five great cold brew coffee makers instead.

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Before you pack all your winter clothing into a box bound for the attic, stop, think and take that puffy jacket back out. Yes, an insulated jacket is great for summer use. Here’s why.

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From Todd Snyder, Everlane, Bills and more.

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At a time when home fitness is especially relevant, two new products promise to help you sweat without crowding your house. Our testers check them out and weigh in.

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Bottoms up — wait, what’s that dent?

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It prevents wrinkles, lets people know if you’re spoken for and it’s on the back of your favorite button up shirt.

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One part of this, we expected. The other? Not so much.

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Support a great cause — and potentially win the most remarkable Range Rover on the market.

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The Baltic Aquascaphe now comes with a steel 12-hour bezel, larger hands and indices and your choice of rubber strap or bracelet.

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But there’s a catch.

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13 Sneaky Secrets Your Favorite Products are Hiding

You may think you understand everything there is to know about something so simple as a shirt, but do you really? You might be surprised.

Toyota Might Be Planning Massive Changes to Its Trucks and SUVsToyota Might Be Planning Massive Changes to Its Trucks and SUVs

Toyota Might Be Planning Massive Changes to Its Trucks and SUVs

The next few years should be pretty exciting at Toyota.

These 30+ Products Just Got Awarded One of the Most Prestigious Prizes in DesignThese 30+ Products Just Got Awarded One of the Most Prestigious Prizes in Design

These 30+ Products Just Got Awarded One of the Most Prestigious Prizes in Design

You may not know too many specifics about the Red Dot Design awards, but you likely know they’re something to brag about. Check out 2020’s winners.

A whole mess of vacuums are currently up to 65 percent off at eBay. All vacuums ship for free, and if you use the code

before July 4, you’ll save an additional 20 percent.

, Burrow’s sofas ship in pieces that can be assembled in about 15 minutes, making it the perfect renter’s sofa. While not as low as Ikea, its prices are fair (full-size couches start at

).

This Fourth of July, get a great deal on a mattress and sleep better knowing you saved a chunk of change. This is still part of its Father’s Day promotion, but we’ll take it. Check out our roundup of other

, too.

Haynes Automotive Manuals are the gold standard of DIY car-repair books. Right now, a year’s subscription to the interactive online version of

— running you $15 versus $30.

Everything the LeBron James-backed brand sells is discounted with the promo code BETTEREVERYDAY, include loads of

. Warning: this sale ends today.

This little gadget is like a portable deep-tissue massage. Three vibration frequencies plus high and wide ridges allow you to hit every muscle just right.

has just begun and you can save a 70 percent off everything from jeans, jackets and more.

All the best style deals of the summer are here, including these Taylor Stitch shorts. Check out all the style deals

.

On any given day there is an endless onslaught of great deals on the internet. We highlight the best, but there are always some that just don’t find their way to our site. Rather than let them slip by, we’ve rounded them up here for you..

Today’s Best Deals: An Easier Way to Buy an Engagement Ring, a Discounted Vibrating Foam Roller & More

Welcome to Deals of Note, where Gear Patrol captures all the best deals of the day. You can also follow all our deal posts in the Deals section. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at deals@gearpatrol.com.

With all the anxiety that comes with planning a wedding (and, you know, getting married), shopping for an engagement ring should be a moment of fun and excitement — right up there with, you know, getting married. But given the state of things, heading to a jewelry store to try on engagement rings right now may feel more “yikes” than “yes!” Nonetheless, if you’re ready to pop the question, you’ll be happy to hear that Couple has reimagined the entire process of shopping for an engagement ring — from sourcing conflict-free, lab-grown diamonds to offering free 3D design renders and customization options, as well as complimentary resizing and returns. Best of all, you can schedule a one-on-one video call with Couple’s Diamond Concierge if you need a bit of guidance, and just booking an appointment will earn you 10 percent off an engagement ring or wedding band.

Home


Ebay Vacuum Sale
Save up to 65%: A whole mess of vacuums are currently up to 65 percent off at eBay. All vacuums ship for free, and if you use the code PLUS20 before July 4, you’ll save an additional 20 percent.


Burrow Sofas
Save up to $500: Available upholstered and in leather, Burrow’s sofas ship in pieces that can be assembled in about 15 minutes, making it the perfect renter’s sofa. While not as low as Ikea, its prices are fair (full-size couches start at $1,395).


Fourth of July Mattress Deals
Save up to $800: This Fourth of July, get a great deal on a mattress and sleep better knowing you saved a chunk of change. This is still part of its Father’s Day promotion, but we’ll take it. Check out our roundup of other Fourth of July mattress deals, too.

Motoring



The Best DIY Manual for New Mechanics Is Only $15 Right Now
Save 50%: Haynes Automotive Manuals are the gold standard of DIY car-repair books. Right now, a year’s subscription to the interactive online version of Haynes manuals are on sale for 50 percent off — running you $15 versus $30.

Outdoors and Fitness



Ladder Supplement Sale
Save 30%: Everything the LeBron James-backed brand sells is discounted with the promo code BETTEREVERYDAY, include loads of awesome protein products. Warning: this sale ends today.


TriggerPoint Charge Vibe Foam Roller
Save 38%: This little gadget is like a portable deep-tissue massage. Three vibration frequencies plus high and wide ridges allow you to hit every muscle just right.

Style



Levi’s Warehouse Sale
Save 70%: The
Levi’s Warehouse Sale has just begun and you can save a 70 percent off everything from jeans, jackets and more.


Best Style Deals
Save 75%: All the best style deals of the summer are here, including these Taylor Stitch shorts. Check out all the style deals
here.

Tech



Apple Watch Series 3
Save $30: Amazon is selling the Apple Watch Series 3 (38mm) for $169. If you’ve been thinking about buying an entry-level Apple Watch (or you know somebody who would like one), now is the best time to buy one.
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Watches



Seiko SNA Flight Alarm Chronograph Watch
Save 55%: The Seiko SNA Flight Alarm Chronograph looks badass, as well as offering a ton of features and value, and it’s available now for just $215.

More Deals


11 More Deals Not to Miss
Save Big: On any given day there is an endless onslaught of great deals on the internet. We highlight the best, but there are always some that just don’t find their way to our site. Rather than let them slip by, we’ve rounded them up here for you..

See More Deals

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.