All posts in “Gear”

This Absurd Backup Battery Can Charge Every Gadget You Own and Then Some

Portable power is a quickly evolving category, and Ecoflow’s Delta 1300 demonstrates just how far it’s come. Lithium-ion batteries are not just for your phone; this compact and powerful battery bank is a lightweight gas-free, emissions-free generator that’s powerful enough to run woodshop tools, office electronics, a portable refrigerator or medical device, and light enough to carry between locations. As an emergency back-up generator, it will keep you charged and comfortable in a power outage, but it has so much functionality it won’t gather dust while you’re waiting for the next blackout. In addition to charging phone, drone, and laptop, and to running circular saws, air compressors, and lights, Delta can charge an electric car enough to eke out another five to seven miles until you can get to a proper charger.

The Good: The Delta 1300 has 6 AC outlets, 2 USB-C PD ports, 4 USB outlets, and it’s rechargeable from a wall socket, carport, or solar panel. This unit plugs into the wall with the same cord you’d use to plug in a computer. There’s no specialized, device-specific power brick required, so you don’t have to worry about misplacing your charger. The Delta can juice 13 devices simultaneously, which means you’ll be popular at festivals and trade shows with one of these in your tent, van or booth. A large LCD screen tells you how much battery the lithium-ion bank has left, both by percentage and hours. The readout is based on the Delta’s activity at any specific time. For example, it’ll likely read 99 hours when you plug in your dead cell phone. If it’s charging a large Dometic fridge/freezer, the readout will more likely be 20-32 hours. It’s super portable at around 30 lbs and the size of a toaster oven with oversized handles that are easy to grab

Who It’s For: If you’ve ever considered a gas-powered generator as an emergency backup, you’re a candidate for Delta. If you want to run power tools away from a wall plug or without the hassle of ultra-long extension cords you need one of these. If you live off-grid, whether you’re stationary or mobile, Delta can power your lights, tools, electronics and appliances. In an emergency not only will it power a fan or heater, lights, and microwave, it can power a medical device like a CPAP. It can also give people who require electrical medical devices some freedom to roam.

Watch Out For: It’ll take you some time actually using the Delta before you’ll be able to get a good handle on how long it will actually last in various scenarios. Most electrical devices pull power at a variable rate, so the number of remaining hours of power displayed on Delta’s screen may change without notice if your gadgets suddenly get a bit hungrier. I plugged a Dometic fridge/freezer into the Delta, and the screen told me I had 38 hours of run time. Four hours later, the screen told me I had 20 hours of run time. The change makes sense. When the fridge needed cooling, its energy consumption was greater. The Delta records its own power output continuously and as it does, the unit adjusts its battery life readout. When the fridge reached temperature, then the remaining battery time on Delta’s screen went back up. That said, the battery life estimates shared by EcoFlow seem to be extremely accurate and not inflated.

Alternatives: There are other battery-powered generators out there, as well as gas-powered generators. Most gas generators are more expensive, as are other powerful battery generators. Gas generators are loud, smelly and you can’t run them safely inside because of their carbon monoxide emissions. They need annual maintenance. Delta requires no annual maintenance. The battery maintains its charge for a year untouched, and the only noise is a quiet hum. The only emission from Delta is a little bit of heat.

There are other battery power banks on the market, like the Goal Zero Yeti 1400. That unit takes 12 times longer to charge plugged into a wall, it weighs 50 percent more, and it’s slower to charge with a solar panel. EcofFow’s claimed power capabilities for the Delta 1300 are considerably greater than those claimed by Goal Zero for the Yeti 1400. The Yeti 1400 is twice the price and claims a lifecycle of 500 charges, versus EcoFlow Delta’s claimed life of 800 charges.

Review:

To use Delta, you press the power button and then press a second on/off switch for AC or DC power. The LCD screen, in addition to telling you hours and battery percentage remaining, indicates high and low temperature, whether the fan is working, input, output with an overload warning.

We ran every tool we had and charged every device: circular saws, table saws, shop vacs, computers, phones, fridges and more. We were only able to fully drain the battery during the course of normal use when we plugged in a full freezer trying to cool its contents from 14°F to 0°F. The battery lasted at least 20 hours; we woke up to it needing a recharge.

Delta goes from zero percent charge to 80 percent charge in an hour, and can fully charge with just two hours plugged into the wall. EcoFlow says Delta charges in four hours via a solar panel. In order achieve such short charge times, EcoFlow also developed a charging technology, bi-directional X-stream Charge, that allows alternating current AC from a wall outlet to be directly inputted into Delta’s inverter, increasing its charging power at the same time. “By passing through the inverter directly, we can increase charging speed to more than ten times of the traditional AC to DC adapter cable,” said EcoFlow found Eli Harris. The proprietary charging technology also integrates all direct current power supplies below DC 60V, from an adapter, solar or car DC output, into one input port. The result is that users don’t need to consider whether they recharge Delta with a wall plug or solar panel. The system automatically recognizes the power source.

In addition to a new charing technology, the company built an entire proprietary internal integrated architecture from the ground up to maximize Delta’s power storage efficiency. EcoFlow designed and developed every component inside Delta, which includes more than 100 battery cells. Harris said one of the company’s biggest challenge was effectively monitoring and managing the operation of the whole system in real-time. EcoFlow’s battery management system was key. Harris and his team built it so the main controller collects the temperature and power status of each battery cell in real-time and then adjusts the charging current and the voltage to ensure the safest, fastest charging rate. When the unit is in idle, the battery management system monitors and adjusts the unit’s power status to ensure lower power consumption and extended standby power storage, which is how the company achieved a shelf-life of a year plus.

Delta is designed to take a beating. The unit we tested was pre-production, so did not have the correct casing. But we know from testing EcoFlow’s River battery bank that they know how to make their power banks durable without a heavy, bulky full-steel casing. Harris says that Delta’s housing was inspired by Tesla, and that final production will use a combination of aerospace-grade aluminum and high-strength steel to give Delta maximum strength and structural rigidity. It will be combined with impact-absorbing plastic, protective rigid metal plates, and four aluminum pillar reinforcements so that Delta is worthy of withstanding the hazards of a job site, garage project or bouncing around in the back of an off-road vehicle.

Verdict: Harris says he created EcoFlow to build this generator, and while we expect the company to blow this battery’s capacity out of the water with future versions, this one is undoubtedly worth owning for anyone who needs a reliable source of power or backup power. The Delta raised over $1M in the first 48 hours on Kickstarter, and it’s currently nearing $1.5M. Delta 1300 is an awesome solution for home or home office, van life and for powering tools away from a wired source of electricity. None of the claims made on EcoFlow’s Delta Kickstarter page are exaggerated. We were impressed with Delta’s power, versatility, quick charge time and compact size. Support Delta before the campaign closes on October 19—and as thanks for your trust in the company’s technology, you get peace of mind via a lifetime battery warranty.

Key Specs

Weight: 30 lbs
Ports: 6 AC outlets, 2 USB-C PD, 4 USB
Shelf Life: 12 months
AC Output: 1600w (surge 3100w)
Charge Time: 1.7 hours
Type: Lithium-Ion
Price: $699

EcoFlow provided this product for review.

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Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

There’s No Terrain Too Tough for the 2020 Tomcar TX

The 2020 Tomcar TX is an ultra-aggressive off-road side-by-side powered by your choice of a 107 hp, 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine, a 120 hp electric model or a turbo diesel. This burly 4-seater has 4-wheel independent suspension boasting 13.5 inches of travel. Built on a bombproof proprietary frame, it can carry up to 3000 pounds of cargo through the roughest, toughest terrain you can handle.

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The Adventure Insurance You Never Knew You Needed

If you have a taste for adventure — which is probably a safe bet here — then you probably also think about taking safety precautions before heading out. And while you can buy all the best gear available and can be a seasoned expert, you still need peace of mind. Whether you are hitting the slopes, diving below the waves, or repelling down a sheer rock face, you should probably have injury insurance. This is where Spot comes in. A radical departure from the insurance companies you are used to dealing with, Spot offers a subscription service that pays up to $20,000 toward your out-of-pocket medical expenses for physical injuries. It starts at just $20 per month, and as long as your treatment was recommended by a licensed physician, you’ll be reimbursed the full cost of treatment.

No one plans on getting injured, but you can plan to be covered in the event that the worst-case scenario happens — whether you need reconstructive knee surgery or just a few stitches. From cycling and surfing to rock climbing and skiing, Spot delivers injury insurance policies that are great whether you have health insurance or not. The service is available in 17 states, and plans to be live in all 50 by 2020. There’s no deductible, co-pay or schedule of benefits that outlines the max amount you’d get back per injury. And best of all, you’re covered no matter where in the world your injury takes place — so get out there and explore.

This Company Will Make Your Custom Land Rover Defender Dreams Come True

Time to start thinking about cashing out that 401(k) early. Virginia-based classic car import firm Commonwealth Classics is collaborating with Portuguese restorers Unique Masterpieces on “The Commonwealth Line,” a run of restored, heritage-inspired Land Rover Defenders. Unique Masterpieces will build the trucks, while Commonwealth Classics will import and sell them to U.S. customers.

The Commonwealth Line offers a sumptuous, upscale take on the Defender. Unique Masterpieces sources the importable vehicles from around Europe. They stick with stock engines, but give them a full rebuild. All restoration work but for the custom-dyed canvas tops and leather wrapping is performed in-house by Unique Masterpieces.

Primarily, Commonwealth and Unique Masterpieces will use Defenders produced from 1991 to 1995 using 200 Tdi and 300 Tdi inline-four turbodiesel engines, though they also offer a 3.5-liter V8. They can source Defender 90, 110, and 130 models (including pickups) for a total of 30 different body and top configurations, as well as more than 40 different leather color options.

Related Video: The New 2020 Defender

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Commonwealth offers two different Defender finishes: the standard, more traditional “Heritage Finish,” and a more performance-oriented, design-forward “Signature Finish.” After the finish, customers can add on five different packages. “Performance” adds about 30 percent more power to the engine; “Trail” adds a winch, a hitch, heavy-duty front springs, and locking rear differentials; there’s also “Sound,” “Comfort” and “Tailgate.” (Don’t forget the 16-inch custom-painted Wolf steel wheels.)

Buying a Defender this exquisite is likely a lifestyle decision more than one made because you need a solid off-roader; as such, you likely have some fancier hobbies to go along with it. Commonwealth Classics has you covered. Potential add-ons for the Defender include a bespoke matching two-horse trailer and a cubby containing a cedar-lined humidor. If you want to make this Defender a real gentleman’s club on wheels, you can add some wood flooring.

As one would imagine, you’ll pay for quality. Optioning out a Commonwealth Line Defender won’t come cheap. Defender 90 builds start at $125,000, and Defender 110 builds start at $135,000. That price — more than twice the base cost of a new 2020 Defender — includes a 12-month warranty and 12 months of standard maintenance.

Commonwealth Classics is currently accepting two new Defender builds per month. The production process takes four months. Customers can monitor their build’s progress with a password-protected site, photos, and text updates. You can configure your build here.

The 2020 Harley-Davidson Low Rider S Is A Blast From The Past

With its latest bike, Harley-Davidson proves it never, ever forgets where it came from. The heritage vibes are real and immediately apparent with the Low Rider S, which brings back the good old knuckle-draggers the brand became highly vaunted for.

Any person with even a smidge of interest in bikes knows who Harley-Davidson is, and more importantly, what it represents. Long seen as a staple brand in the motorcycling world, the company has been trying to redefine its way forward by creating units that offer a mix of nostalgia and future-forward sensibilities.

Still, it’s important to always look back and know where you came from. The new 2020 Low Rider S does so unapologetically. The ride proves Harley-Davidson hasn’t burned its history book, and probably never will.

Though it may not arrive as the brand’s most powerful bike this year, here you’ll find an example of a more forward-thinking Harley-Davidson. The Low Rider S is a performance cruiser that tips its hat to the West Coast heritage of the customized lowrider Harleys of the ‘80s.

The new bike only comes in black and gray, adding to its formidable overall look. As for innards, you get a Milwaukee-eight 114 cubic inch V-twin, capable of making 119 pound-feet torque. For parts, you get a pair of big ol’ 300 mm disc brakes, with another disc in the back. Harley-Davidson also tucked in the front forks a bit, decreasing the rake to 28 degrees, two less than the Low Rider. Find out more when you hit the link below.

SEE IT HERE

The Best Upgrades to Your Cheap, Disposable Pens Are Pretty Cheap, Too

There are three inevitabilities we will experience during our time on this mortal coil: we are born, we will die, and sometime in between, we will use a BIC Cristal pen. The company claims to have sold over 100 billion of dirt-cheap pen since the design launched in 1950.

Despite its humble price, the Cristal is a bonafide design icon. The pen is on permanent display at the Museum of Modern Art and was revolutionary for its time. The hexagonal shape, modeled after a wooden pencil, provided better grip and wouldn’t roll from a tabletop. And assuming you could hold on to one long enough to be concerned about it running out of ink, the transparent fuselage easily showed the user how much ink was left inside. Few manage such a feat. This is the downfall of the BIC Cristal.

Cheap, disposable pens can bring out a lot of bad habits. We lose them, we chew on them and we toss them in the trash without a second thought. This is before considering that the cheap pen, while plenty useful, isn’t all that special to write with.

Enter, the moderate upgrade. We’re not talking three-figure Montblanc’s and gold-nibbed Parkers. There is a whole world of high-end ballpoints under the $20 mark. A fair bit more than a $3 package of BIC Cristals, for sure, but between their high-quality builds and refillable cartridges, they’ll last you eons longer. These are the best upgrades to your cheap pen collection.

OHTO Horizon

OHTO was established in Japan in 1929 and started making ballpoints 20 years later, so even if you haven’t heard of it, know it isn’t a spring chicken when it comes to the writing utensil game. OHTO’s well-known for making fine-tipped writers (including the absurdly slim Minimo), and the Horizon is no different coming stock with a 0.7mm tip and cartridge nestled in its sleek, aluminum barrel. Better still is the fact that the pen will take a multitude of cartridge refills, including Pilot’s Hi-Tec-C, revered among pen nerds for its smooth, consistent writing action and needle-thin tip.

Caran d’Ache 849

The Caran d’Ache 849 shares the BIC Cristal’s hexagonal fuselage, which gives it a similarly comfortable grip, but the aluminum construction is more durable and more satisfying to hold than the BIC’s cheap plastic. The overall effect is sleek, and since the 849 is Caran d’Ache’s mainstay products — it was introduced in 1969 — there are endless colors and finishes to choose from. One of the calling cards of the 849 is its stainless-steel “Goliath” cartridge, which the brand claims is good for 8,000 meters, or nearly five miles of writing line.

Pilot Metropolitan

Pilot’s Metropolitain is better known as an entry-level fountain pen, but it comes in a ballpoint guise, too. The body is thick and round, not all dissimilar from something you’d expect to see on an ‘80s executive’s desk, but the variety of monochrome matte finishes makes it look and feel more appropriate for the 21st century. The body is made from brass so it’s weighty; a good thing if you tend to write with a heavy hand.

Fisher Space Pen

You don’t need to be a certifiable pen dork to know the story of the Fisher Space Pen: developed in the 1960s, it was designed to write in zero gravity for astronauts. You’ll never go to space, but it’s nice to know that if Elon Musk’s idea for a moon colony pans out (it won’t) that at the very least you can write with it in any situation, in any orientation, on any surface. That makes it particularly suitable for EDC types who find themselves jotting notes anywhere that isn’t a flat desktop.

Kaweco Classic Sport Ballpoint

Like the Metropolitan, Kaweco’s Classic Sport is well known as a cheap fountain pen, but the ballpoint version is not to be slept on. Like it’s nibbed brethren, the fuselage is thick, hexagonal and made from a thick, durable plastic. Yes, it lacks the metallic composition of other pens on this list, but it allows for a girthy body without excessive weight and means you can opt for a clear variant if you appreciate the transparency of the BIC Cristal. It will also accommodate a massive amount of refills — Jet Pen, for instance, lists a whopping 77 cartridges that are compatible.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

The Best Upgrades to Your Cheap, Disposable Pens Are Surprisingly Affordable

There are three inevitabilities we will experience during our time on this mortal coil: we are born, we will die, and sometime in between, we will use a BIC Cristal pen. The company claims to have sold over 100 billion of dirt-cheap pen since the design launched in 1950.

Despite its humble price, the Cristal is a bonafide design icon. The pen is on permanent display at the Museum of Modern Art and was revolutionary for its time. The hexagonal shape, modeled after a wooden pencil, provided better grip and wouldn’t roll from a tabletop. And assuming you could hold on to one long enough to be concerned about it running out of ink, the transparent fuselage easily showed the user how much ink was left inside. Few manage such a feat. This is the downfall of the BIC Cristal.

Cheap, disposable pens can bring out a lot of bad habits. We lose them, we chew on them and we toss them in the trash without a second thought. This is before considering that the cheap pen, while plenty useful, isn’t all that special to write with.

Enter, the moderate upgrade. We’re not talking three-figure Montblanc’s and gold-nibbed Parkers. There is a whole world of high-end ballpoints under the $20 mark. A fair bit more than a $3 package of BIC Cristals, for sure, but between their high-quality builds and refillable cartridges, they’ll last you eons longer. These are the best upgrades to your cheap pen collection.

OHTO Horizon

OHTO was established in Japan in 1929 and started making ballpoints 20 years later, so even if you haven’t heard of it, know it isn’t a spring chicken when it comes to the writing utensil game. OHTO’s well-known for making fine-tipped writers (including the absurdly slim Minimo), and the Horizon is no different coming stock with a 0.7mm tip and cartridge nestled in its sleek, aluminum barrel. Better still is the fact that the pen will take a multitude of cartridge refills, including Pilot’s Hi-Tec-C, revered among pen nerds for its smooth, consistent writing action and needle-thin tip.

Caran d’Ache 849

The Caran d’Ache 849 shares the BIC Cristal’s hexagonal fuselage, which gives it a similarly comfortable grip, but the aluminum construction is more durable and more satisfying to hold than the BIC’s cheap plastic. The overall effect is sleek, and since the 849 is Caran d’Ache’s mainstay products — it was introduced in 1969 — there are endless colors and finishes to choose from. One of the calling cards of the 849 is its stainless-steel “Goliath” cartridge, which the brand claims is good for 8,000 meters, or nearly five miles of writing line.

Pilot Metropolitan

Pilot’s Metropolitain is better known as an entry-level fountain pen, but it comes in a ballpoint guise, too. The body is thick and round, not all dissimilar from something you’d expect to see on an ‘80s executive’s desk, but the variety of monochrome matte finishes makes it look and feel more appropriate for the 21st century. The body is made from brass so it’s weighty; a good thing if you tend to write with a heavy hand.

Fisher Space Pen

You don’t need to be a certifiable pen dork to know the story of the Fisher Space Pen: developed in the 1960s, it was designed to write in zero gravity for astronauts. You’ll never go to space, but it’s nice to know that if Elon Musk’s idea for a moon colony pans out (it won’t) that at the very least you can write with it in any situation, in any orientation, on any surface. That makes it particularly suitable for EDC types who find themselves jotting notes anywhere that isn’t a flat desktop.

Kaweco Classic Sport Ballpoint

Like the Metropolitan, Kaweco’s Classic Sport is well known as a cheap fountain pen, but the ballpoint version is not to be slept on. Like it’s nibbed brethren, the fuselage is thick, hexagonal and made from a thick, durable plastic. Yes, it lacks the metallic composition of other pens on this list, but it allows for a girthy body without excessive weight and means you can opt for a clear variant if you appreciate the transparency of the BIC Cristal. It will also accommodate a massive amount of refills — Jet Pen, for instance, lists a whopping 77 cartridges that are compatible.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Essentials You Need to Get Through the Weekend in Style

We put a lot of pressure on our weekends. They are cherished — often too few — days, when we need to, simultaneously get done everything we put off during the week, have fun, meet up with friends, head to the farmer’s market and also find some time to relax and throw back a brew or two. It’s a lot to do in a 48-hour span of time. That’s why we put together the collection of goods for doing it all on your weekend, from the plushiest fleece to the go-to, catchall bag. Everything is hardwearing, as comfortable as possible and darn good looking — exactly what you need for your weekend. These essentials will keep you comfortable and stylish, no matter what your day entails.

The Boots

What do you look for in a good weekend shoe? It’s got to be comfortable, easy to wear, as rugged as possible and of course, look good. Blundstones are a classic, and none more classic than the 550 Chelsea Boot, Rustic Brown, Style 585. These are tough as nails, ready for anything boots that still slip on with ease and are as light as a feather. They even come with an extra set of footbeds so you can get the perfect fit. These are the kind of weekend boots you can live in — You’ll want to wear them all through the week. So whether you are traipsing around the city to your favorite brewery or striking out somewhere off the beaten path, the Blundstone 550 won’t let you down.

The Other Essentials

Blundstone-Weekend-Carry-Gear-Patrol-other-product-slide-1-v2
Blundstone-Weekend-Carry-Gear-Patrol-other-product-slide-2
Everyday Pant in Athletic Fit by Hill City$128
Silver Crew Socks by American Trench $17
Sherpa Fleece Jacket by Filson $165
“Big Sur” Zippered Tote by Pacific Tote Co. $120
X Corduroy Field Cap by Alex Mills $40
The Standard Pocket Tee by Best Made Co. $48
Oktoberfest by Sierra Nevada Price varies

These Retro Tool Watches Perfectly Embody a Classic Brand’s History

Watch hunters who discover vintage Ollech & Wajs often like to think of the Zurich-based company as a well-kept secret from the best decades of last century’s watchmaking. Now, the brand has returned from obscurity determined to resurrect the retro glory of its 1960s and 1970s tool watches. Under new ownership, two new models have reinvigorated historic Ollech & Wajs, bolstered by a strong value for their solid Swiss construction and automatic movements. Released together, the OW P-101 and the OW P-104 watches have different designs, but similar features, and a ton of character.

Key Specs
Case Diameter: 39.56mm
Case Depth: 12.5mm
Water Resistance: 300m
Movement: Automatic ETA 2824
Price: P-101 ~$965; P-104 ~$1,066

Notable: The 2019 Ollech & Wajs watches are like a tribute to this obscure brand’s history. They look like they were genuinely conceived in the 1960s, but they’re not reissues of specific models. A lot of watch brands try to channel the ’60s-’70s mojo, but it’s hard to make it look as authentic as Ollech & Wajs’ does — and that is likely due, in part, to the use of actual new-old-stock vintage components. The “checkered” minute hands common to both models, in particular, help the design make a distinctive impact.

Who It’s For: These are watches made by a passionate brand fan and collector who is dedicated to paying tribute to the Ollech & Wajs history and personality that includes military watches, pilot watches, and record-breaking dive watches like the Caribbean 1000. They are full of care and details that are, in some sense, meant for like-minded watch nerds who will know the brand and look closely enough to appreciate them. The vintage tool watch aesthetic with some funky touches and respectable specs, however, can easily be appreciated by more casual enthusiasts as well. The modern models can be a way for a new crop of watch enthusiasts to discover the brand’s history, but can equally stand on their own.

Alternatives: Another brand with a strong ’60s-’70s presence that has recently been resurrected with a focus on “heritage” models is Yema. Rather than produce original designs based on vintage models, Yema focuses on reissues but they offer a similar period aesthetic and price point as Ollech & Wajs. The Yema Superman and more recent Speedgraf are fine examples.

Like Ollech & Wajs, Baltic is a small brand creating new designs with vintage cues. As a young brand, however, it doesn’t have its own history to draw upon like OW does — but Baltic does offer a neat look and decent bang for buck in models like the Bicompax chronograph and the Aquascaph dive watch.

Review

Ollech & Wajs has been in continuous operation since 1956 and has only ever made mechanical watches. However, it’s been a while since anybody heard from them. So, while its recent release of models under new ownership may resemble the situations of some historic brands that were resurrected after Quartz Crisis failure, Ollech & Wajs is a bit different. It was run by its founder Albert Wajs until being acquired in 2016 by a longtime brand distributor and enthusiast. With a number of quirky traits, the brand’s approach with its new P-101 and P-104 watches is a refreshing break from the familiar watch industry formula.

The P-101 and P-104 are easy to cover in a single review since they share most specs, with the same case, movement, and other components. Both models have an aviation theme, and are said to reference fighter jets from around Ollech & Wajs’ founding year. The P-101 is a more monochromatic military design with a 12-hour bezel and takes inspiration from the McDonnell F-101 Voodoo jet produced in 1956; and the P-104 has sporty orange highlights, a slide rule bezel, and is said to reference the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter whose first flight was the same year.

For aviation-themed watches, it’s interesting that Ollech & Wajs has given the P-101 and P-104 the 300m water-resistance of a professional dive watch — though it’s surely an appreciated extra promise of general durability. That’s just one of the many unusual but nice little touches the brand has up its sleeve. Powered by the ETA 2824-2 Swiss automatic movement (~38-hours power reserve), there is apparently a custom OW rotor and engraved main plate that you won’t see because it’s behind a solid case back. In all brushed, 39.56mm-wide steel cases, there is no shine or bling to these very tool-oriented watches, but it should be noted that they wear boldly for their measurements due to longish lugs and a thickness of 12.5mm. The raised but flat “box-style” sapphire crystal contributes to their height and adds some vintage flavor.

The brand doesn’t really broadcast it, but according to its Facebook page, Ollech & Wajs is using “vintage components in pristine condition from the OW vaults” in its modern watches — though it isn’t clear which components they are. That helps explain how these new watches look so much of another decade. The black-coated bidirectional rotating bezels are of the “friction” variety, meaning they turn freely without any clicks.

The slide rule bezel on the P-104 (the one with orange highlights) is a feature of many aviation watches, most famously the Breitling Navitimer. This can be used for all kinds of arithmetic, and pilots of yore would use it to calculate things like flight time and fuel consumption. Most people wearing such watches have no use for such information, of course, and modern pilots have more advanced and precise tools as well. One function that’s handy for modern watch-wearers, however, is as a restaurant tip calculator. So, it’s worth learning how to use, and certainly more relevant than something like the tachymeter still found on many chronograph watches, for instance.

Related Video: How to Maintain a Dive Watch

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One piece of the brand’s story is that when Breitling shut down in 1978 Ollech & Wajs bought its stock and equipment and continued to essentially produce the Navitimer under the “Aviation” name. The Selectron was another aviation-themed watch with a slide rule bezel, and the P-104 seems to perhaps reference both without really resembling either. The history can sometimes be confusing thanks to the inconsistent use of brand names, including their own branding as Ollech & Wajs, OW, OWZ (for Ollech & Wajs Zurich), and even A.I. Wajs at one point — as well as the existence of unbranded military watches.

The P-101 has a 12-hour bezel that can be used to track a second time zone, but this model recalls the brand’s watches that were popular among soldiers in the Vietnam War. General legibility is strong on both models, though stronger lume and more lumed elements would be appreciated. On the P-104, for example, only the orange highlights are lumed, but notably, these also include the date window’s frame. The “checkered” minute hand is not just an idiosyncratic retro touch, but helps make it easily distinguishable from the hour hand at a glance — a practical watch design detail often overlooked.

Another unusual feature of the cases is that they include two sets of spring bar holes. One set is drilled all the way through, presumably for thicker straps, and the other is closer to the case — and this can help you get a better fit or accommodate different sizes. Swapping out the supplied straps for some nicer ones from B&R Bands was an instant upgrade, and these are the kinds of watches that take to a variety of straps well. For this review, they are pictured on the ISOfrane rubber straps that we carry in the Gear Patrol Store.

Regarding “Swissness,” the brand claims: “over 90% of components of Swiss origin, assembled in Swiss Jura.” A number of small brands are offering similar specs for a similar prices, but Ollech & Wajs stands out for its character that doesn’t have much direct competition. Prices in Swiss francs of CHF956 and CHF1,056 reference the brand’s founding once again, which are equivalent to roughly $965 for the P-101 and $1,066 for the P-104 in current USD.

Verdict: The Ollech & Wajs P-101 and P-104 watches offer a lot of character, and even some depth once you look closer and consider the brand’s background. Since both have more or less the same specs, it’s a tough call to recommend one over the other, and it probably comes down to a matter of taste. The P-104 with its orange highlights and funky design visually stands out a little more as something unique, though the P-101’s 12-hour bezel is genuinely useful. Both watches offer a solid value and have a quirkiness and old-school charm that seems linked to their past in a way that’s unusually genuine in today’s watch industry.

The 1990 Lexus LS400, Driven Today: We Need Cars Like This Again

I was eight years old when the Lexus LS400 debuted at the 1989 Detroit Motor Show. My budding love for cars at that tender age manifested in my idolization of bella macchinas from Italy. I was aware Japanese cars existed — a Honda Accord and a Mazda 626 sat in my parents’ garage — but I didn’t fantasize about driving those slow, utilitarian boxes, not when I could drift away into posters of Testarossas and Countaches.

Three decades later, I’ve driven my pin-up heroes —  at least when they deigned to properly function and weren’t overheating or shaking to pieces on the side of the road. Then, a couple months ago during a Lexus event in Costa Rica, I sampled a pristine example of the 1990 LS400 — and realized I’d spent my boyhood worshipped at the wrong altar.

It shouldn’t really be a surprise that the LS400 still feels like an impossibly perfect vehicle 30 years after it was built. Any car that cost more than $1 billion in development over six years (in Reagan-era money, no less) and saw more than 450 prototypes precede the final iteration should emerge as a benchmark which future luxury sedan models ought to measure against.

Slipping into the plush driver’s seat today, it’s boggling how far ahead of its time this cabin was. Holographic, electro-luminescent gauges stare back at you, and there’s an electrochromic rear-view mirror at your disposal. Push-button dials for an equalizer for the radio were standard. There’s even a power switch for the height-adjustable seatbelt. The car is the epitome of omotenashi, a Japanese term that roughly translates into “anticipating your guests needs before they even know what they want — and exceeding them.”

The key turns over a 4.0-liter V8 engine that houses a stable of 254 horses — and, more importantly, simply purrs. The LS400 has the ability to run all the way up to 160 mph; sink your foot to the floor, and the shuffle from 0 to 60 transpires in 8.5 seconds. These numbers may seem paltry by today’s standards, but this car positively flew in 1990.

The main arterial highways of Costa Rica are clean and calm, but the pockmarked B-roads leave something to be desired…unless you’re in the LS400, that is. The luxobarge glides over the roughest crud with aplomb, a credit to the double-wishbone front and rear suspensions. (Air suspension was an option, too.) Toyota engineers nailed the steering feel and ratio; it’s direct and responsive, and you’re never adjusting or shuffling around to get a corner right. And the LS400 can hang in a turn, far better than some of its contemporary cousins.  When I sampled the new GX 460 (and its less-than-stellar road manners) afterwards, I pined for the comfort and handling of the LS400.

The LS400 was fabricated from sandwiched steel, in a bid to mitigate vibration; flush door handles and windows were employed to further reduce wind noise. The result is a cabin so quiet, it still rivals modern Mercedes-Benzes and Bentleys. In fact, the ride is so smooth, cushy and serene that were you to be blindfolded and asked if you were in the backseat of the LS400 or a Rolls-Royce Silver Spur from the same era, you’d be hard-pressed to determine which vehicle you were enjoying.

When Eiji Toyoda set out to create a luxury brand to recapture the buyers his business was losing when they graduated out of Toyota’s lineup, the marques that were defining the segment were Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Jaguar. The LS400 proves even today that Lexus had a winner right out of the gate. It had S-Class presence and drove every bit as well, but only set your wallet back the price of an E-Class.

When my short test drive ended — Lexus wants to keep the mileage on the vehicle low, though with unrivaled mechanical reliability, the brand needn’t fret — I didn’t want to relinquish it. Forget the LFA; create posters of the LS400.

Some of Our Favorite Camping and Climbing Gear Is 20% Off Right Now

The chilly fall air is quickly approaching, but you have time for one more weekend camping trip. Just to help you get out the door, Backcountry.com is offering 20% off some of the site’s stock of camping and climbing gear. This is a great chance to update some of those worn-out items you’ve been using for years with some of the best outdoor kit you can get your hands on. You can find almost anything you need for a weekend outdoors at Backcountry.com. We put together a few of our favorite items you can grab for 20% that will help you get outside again before autumn. These are just our favorite pieces, but you can also use the code yourself at checkout on a whole mess more of camping and climbing products. All you have to do is use CLIMBCAMP20 at checkout.

Marmot Limelight Tent



This homey three-person tent is a breeze to set up and takedown with the helo of color-coded clips. With a mesh canopy as well as a seam-taped fly, it’s as suited for stargazing as it is for a summer storm. The large D-shaped door makes it a whole lot easier to get in and out, making you one happy camper.

BioLite FirePit



This portable fire pit has it all. From its patented airflow technology to its included grill rack, this firepit will become one of your camping favorites. And it won’t be just you, its X-Ray mesh construction means everyone around the fire can enjoy the view — and the heat. It even includes access to a Bluetooth app that lets you control the flames from a distance.

La Sportiva TC Pro Vibram XS Edge Climbing Shoe



These are some of the most high-performing climbing shoes you can find, with light ankle padding to help stem the pain of vicious off-widths and Vibram XS Edge rubber soles for friction on the thinnest footholds. They also have a vented tongue to help ward off sweaty feet so you can go all day on the wall.

Mammut Phoenix Dry Climbing Rope



The Mammut Phoenix SuperDry 8mm Climbing Rope has you covered from mixed pitches to splitter alpine granite. With Coated Core and Coated Sheath technologies, the Pheonix will handle well and perform in both wet and dry conditions. This is the climbing rope you need for all your half and twin rope needs.

Ecoflow Delta 1300 Review: A Battery So Beefy It Can Change a Car

Portable power is a quickly evolving category, and Ecoflow’s Delta 1300 demonstrates just how far it’s come. Lithium-ion batteries are not just for your phone; this compact and powerful battery bank is a lightweight gas-free, emissions-free generator that’s powerful enough to run woodshop tools, office electronics, a portable refrigerator or medical device, and light enough to carry between locations. As an emergency back-up generator, it will keep you charged and comfortable in a power outage, but it has so much functionality it won’t gather dust while you’re waiting for the next blackout. In addition to charging phone, drone, and laptop, and to running circular saws, air compressors, and lights, Delta can charge an electric car enough to eke out another five to seven miles until you can get to a proper charger.

The Good: The Delta 1300 has 6 AC outlets, 2 USB-C PD ports, 4 USB outlets, and it’s rechargeable from a wall socket, carport, or solar panel. This unit plugs into the wall with the same cord you’d use to plug in a computer. There’s no specialized, device-specific power brick required, so you don’t have to worry about misplacing your charger. The Delta can juice 13 devices simultaneously, which means you’ll be popular at festivals and trade shows with one of these in your tent, van or booth. A large LCD screen tells you how much battery the lithium-ion bank has left, both by percentage and hours. The readout is based on the Delta’s activity at any specific time. For example, it’ll likely read 99 hours when you plug in your dead cell phone. If it’s charging a large Dometic fridge/freezer, the readout will more likely be 20-32 hours. It’s super portable at around 30 lbs and the size of a toaster oven with oversized handles that are easy to grab

Who It’s For: If you’ve ever considered a gas-powered generator as an emergency backup, you’re a candidate for Delta. If you want to run power tools away from a wall plug or without the hassle of ultra-long extension cords you need one of these. If you live off-grid, whether you’re stationary or mobile, Delta can power your lights, tools, electronics and appliances. In an emergency not only will it power a fan or heater, lights, and microwave, it can power a medical device like a CPAP. It can also give people who require electrical medical devices some freedom to roam.

Watch Out For: It’ll take you some time actually using the Delta before you’ll be able to get a good handle on how long it will actually last in various scenarios. Most electrical devices pull power at a variable rate, so the number of remaining hours of power displayed on Delta’s screen may change without notice if your gadgets suddenly get a bit hungrier. I plugged a Dometic fridge/freezer into the Delta, and the screen told me I had 38 hours of run time. Four hours later, the screen told me I had 20 hours of run time. The change makes sense. When the fridge needed cooling, its energy consumption was greater. The Delta records its own power output continuously and as it does, the unit adjusts its battery life readout. When the fridge reached temperature, then the remaining battery time on Delta’s screen went back up. That said, the battery life estimates shared by EcoFlow seem to be extremely accurate and not inflated.

Alternatives: There are other battery-powered generators out there, as well as gas-powered generators. Most gas generators are more expensive, as are other powerful battery generators. Gas generators are loud, smelly and you can’t run them safely inside because of their carbon monoxide emissions. They need annual maintenance. Delta requires no annual maintenance. The battery maintains its charge for a year untouched, and the only noise is a quiet hum. The only emission from Delta is a little bit of heat.

There are other battery power banks on the market, like the Goal Zero Yeti 1400. That unit takes 12 times longer to charge plugged into a wall, it weighs 50 percent more, and it’s slower to charge with a solar panel. EcofFow’s claimed power capabilities for the Delta 1300 are considerably greater than those claimed by Goal Zero for the Yeti 1400. The Yeti 1400 is twice the price and claims a lifecycle of 500 charges, versus EcoFlow Delta’s claimed life of 800 charges.

Review:

To use Delta, you press the power button and then press a second on/off switch for AC or DC power. The LCD screen, in addition to telling you hours and battery percentage remaining, indicates high and low temperature, whether the fan is working, input, output with an overload warning.

We ran every tool we had and charged every device: circular saws, table saws, shop vacs, computers, phones, fridges and more. We were only able to fully drain the battery during the course of normal use when we plugged in a full freezer trying to cool its contents from 14°F to 0°F. The battery lasted at least 20 hours; we woke up to it needing a recharge.

Delta goes from zero percent charge to 80 percent charge in an hour, and can fully charge with just two hours plugged into the wall. EcoFlow says Delta charges in four hours via a solar panel. In order achieve such short charge times, EcoFlow also developed a charging technology, bi-directional X-stream Charge, that allows alternating current AC from a wall outlet to be directly inputted into Delta’s inverter, increasing its charging power at the same time. “By passing through the inverter directly, we can increase charging speed to more than ten times of the traditional AC to DC adapter cable,” said EcoFlow found Eli Harris. The proprietary charging technology also integrates all direct current power supplies below DC 60V, from an adapter, solar or car DC output, into one input port. The result is that users don’t need to consider whether they recharge Delta with a wall plug or solar panel. The system automatically recognizes the power source.

In addition to a new charing technology, the company built an entire proprietary internal integrated architecture from the ground up to maximize Delta’s power storage efficiency. EcoFlow designed and developed every component inside Delta, which includes more than 100 battery cells. Harris said one of the company’s biggest challenge was effectively monitoring and managing the operation of the whole system in real-time. EcoFlow’s battery management system was key. Harris and his team built it so the main controller collects the temperature and power status of each battery cell in real-time and then adjusts the charging current and the voltage to ensure the safest, fastest charging rate. When the unit is in idle, the battery management system monitors and adjusts the unit’s power status to ensure lower power consumption and extended standby power storage, which is how the company achieved a shelf-life of a year plus.

Delta is designed to take a beating. The unit we tested was pre-production, so did not have the correct casing. But we know from testing EcoFlow’s River battery bank that they know how to make their power banks durable without a heavy, bulky full-steel casing. Harris says that Delta’s housing was inspired by Tesla, and that final production will use a combination of aerospace-grade aluminum and high-strength steel to give Delta maximum strength and structural rigidity. It will be combined with impact-absorbing plastic, protective rigid metal plates, and four aluminum pillar reinforcements so that Delta is worthy of withstanding the hazards of a job site, garage project or bouncing around in the back of an off-road vehicle.

Verdict: Harris says he created EcoFlow to build this generator, and while we expect the company to blow this battery’s capacity out of the water with future versions, this one is undoubtedly worth owning for anyone who needs a reliable source of power or backup power. The Delta raised over $1M in the first 48 hours on Kickstarter, and it’s currently nearing $1.5M. Delta 1300 is an awesome solution for home or home office, van life and for powering tools away from a wired source of electricity. None of the claims made on EcoFlow’s Delta Kickstarter page are exaggerated. We were impressed with Delta’s power, versatility, quick charge time and compact size. Support Delta before the campaign closes on October 19—and as thanks for your trust in the company’s technology, you get peace of mind via a lifetime battery warranty.

Key Specs

Weight: 30 lbs
Ports: 6 AC outlets, 2 USB-C PD, 4 USB
Shelf Life: 12 months
AC Output: 1600w (surge 3100w)
Charge Time: 1.7 hours
Type: Lithium-Ion
Price: $699

EcoFlow provided this product for review.

Read More Gear Patrol Reviews

Hot takes and in-depth reviews on noteworthy, relevant and interesting products. Read the Story
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Today in Gear: Coffee Luxury in Your Kitchen, an Iconic Nike Running Sneaker Is Back & More

Today in Gear is our daily roundup of all the latest product announcements, drops and deals. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at tig@gearpatrol.com.


Even though we all love a perfectly pulled espresso drink (we are partial to cortados around here), the idea of having a professional espresso machine of your own can seem daunting. The JURA GIGA 6 should put you at ease. This Swiss-made professional machine, crafted for your countertop, is easy to navigate with its touchscreen display — or even from JURA’s app for those planning ahead. The GIGA 6 is a completely programmable machine and can whip up 28 different drinks with just one touch, from cappuccinos and flat whites to Americanos and cortados. The two ceramic grinders also mean you can change up your beans with ease. To keep the JURA GIGA 6 spick and span, it also features automated cleaning and maintenance. With this machine on the market, you have every reason to bring a bit of luxury into your kitchen.

New & Noteworthy Releases

One of Our Favorite Affordable Military Watches Just Got an Update

One of Our Favorite Affordable Military Watches Just Got an Update

Inner minute and hour scales, as well as large sword hands and serious tool watch specs, make the new Hawkinge AGL a winning design.

Fiat Hopes This Giant Graphic Will Help Sell America’s Least Popular Car

Fiat Hopes This Giant Graphic Will Help Sell America’s Least Popular Car

This new Fiat appearance package might cause your next Tinder date to ask some questions.

This Affordable Watch Uses Metal from Salvaged Illegal Firearms

This Affordable Watch Uses Metal from Salvaged Illegal Firearms

Triwa is a Swedish brand making affordable, minimalist watches with a mission of reducing violence by using recycled metal from illegal guns.

One of Nike’s Most Iconic Running Shoes Is Back and Better Than Ever

One of Nike’s Most Iconic Running Shoes Is Back and Better Than Ever

Launched 42 years ago, the Waffle Racer never really goes out of style.

This Personalized Take On Grooming Is the Upgrade Your Skin Needs

This Personalized Take On Grooming Is the Upgrade Your Skin Needs

Customized skincare — without the custom price tag.

Conquer Trails in Style and Silence With Zero Motorcycles’ New Electric Bike

Conquer Trails in Style and Silence With Zero Motorcycles’ New Electric Bike

Zero Motorcycles is bringing the DSR Black Forest Edition—an upfitted version of its most powerful dual sport bike—to the US for 2020.

Ford’s New Upgrade Makes the F-150 and Ranger Far Better Off-Road

Ford’s New Upgrade Makes the F-150 and Ranger Far Better Off-Road

Ford will offer F-150 and Ranger buyers a lift (kit), to help their off-roading game.

Buffalo Trace Just Dropped Its Most Hyped Whiskeys of the Year — Here’s Everything You Need to Know

Buffalo Trace Just Dropped Its Most Hyped Whiskeys of the Year — Here’s Everything You Need to Know

The Buffalo Trace Antique Collection has landed.

These Award-Winning Knives Were Designed by One of America’s Best Chefs

These Award-Winning Knives Were Designed by One of America’s Best Chefs

Thomas Keller is one of the world’s best chefs and cookbook authors.


Fresh Deals

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Sony WH-1000XM3 Noise-Canceling Headphones
Save $150: Right now, eBay is selling refurbished Sony WH-1000XM3 noise-canceling headphones for under $200. That’s a pretty terrific deal considering these are arguably the best noise-canceling headphones you can buy, and new models typically cost around $350.

If you’ve been wanting to purchase some really great noise-canceling headphones, which are right up there with the Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 ($399) and the Bose QuietComfort 35 II, then you should jump on this eBay deal. — Tucker Bowe



Dyson V8 Cordless Vacuum
Save $120: Every year, Dyson charts new territory in the vacuum world with iterative improvements upon older models, usually in the form of more battery and power. This year’s V11 also brought additional space in the dustbin and a novel LCD display that tells users how much juice is left in the battery — both great features if you’re willing to pony up $699 for the latest and greatest in suction tech.

For the rest of us, Dyson’s discounted back catalog still boasts some of the most impressive vacuums ever known to man. And in 2019, none represents a better balance of price and performance than the three-year-old V8.

The V8 has plenty of suction (115 airwatts), up to 40 minutes of runtime (seven minutes on full power), a washable HEPA filter and, of course, it comes with Dyson’s legendary warranty. The cherry on top: you can buy the $450 vacuum directly from Dyson for just $330 today. — Will Price

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Anker PowerLine II Charging Cable
Save $7: The Anker PowerLine II is a three-in-one charging cable that features swappable heads for Lightning, USB-C and micro-USB. This means that with this one charging cable you’re able to charge your iPhone, Sony WH-1000M3 headphones or Nintendo Switch, or whatever else that still charges via micro-USB (like running headphones or a compact camera). If you’re traveling, the PowerLine II essentially eliminates the need for you to bring many of your other charging cables. Right now, you can purchase the normally $18 charging cable for just $11 on Amazon – just makes sure to enter the promo code ANKER8436 at checkout. You can never have too many. — Tucker Bower

The Internet’s Best Deal Motorcycle Helmet Deal Is Even Better, But Not for Long
Save Up to 65%: Five percent off may not seem like much of a bargain. It’s a nickel you don’t have to spend on a $1 purchase, or $1,250 off the price of a $25,000 car; it’s the sort of deal that you’re glad to eke out, but you’re not likely to feel as though you got away with something.

Add it on top of a larger bargain, however, and that 5% starts to feel way more important. Case in point: For a limited time, RevZilla is offering an extra 5% off all of its closeout deals — including the stellar motorcycle helmet deals it has on offer. If you don’t mind rocking previous seasons’ styles (or, in some cases, have a tiny head), you can get great helmets for as much as 65% off with this deal, knocking some expensive lids down to well below $500.

The trick? All you have to do is use the code 5OFFNOW at checkout. That’s it. Pop that in, and you just saved a few extra dollars on top of the rest of your savings.

Of course, the deal is also valid on everything else RevZilla has on clearance — amazing motorcycle jackets, solid boots, great gloves, even motorcycle parts, electronics and luggage. But helmets are one of the places where you can score the most notable deals at the site, so we’re highlighting them here. (Also, y’know, they’re kind of the most important piece of riding gear you should have.) — Will Sabel Courtney

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3 Awesome Fixed-Blade Knives Are on Sale
Save up to 50%: Recently, knife designers have proved that fixed-blade knives can be as versatile as folders. Here are three that are on discounted now. — Tanner Bowden
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Filson Bandera Backpacks
Save 43%: Founded in 1897, Seattle-based Filson made a name for itself outfitting some of the hardest workers in the West. It’s bags accompanied workers to the rugged Alaskan wilderness and were proven year after year. While Filson still makes its classic designs, it also makes some backpacks more suited to everyday use.

The Bandera backpacks are made in the USA from hardwearing twill. The 22L bag has a large U-shaped zipper, an interior laptop pocket and a front zip pocket. Normally priced at $175, this discontinued model is now 43-percent off and costs just $100 — act fast if you want a great everyday pack. — John Zientek

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Men’s Suits at Macy’s
Save up to 85%: Now during Macy’s Suiting Event, you can save up to 85 percent on a huge selection of suits. Choose basic options from Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Perry Ellis and more — the prices are too good to pass up. — John Zientek
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Seiko Prospex and Presage
Save 40%: The Prospex and Presage lines are perhaps best-known among Seiko’s wide-ranging watch universe, but other families offer the same signature Japanese value and quality. With a solar-charged, super-accurate quartz movement, the sporty Coutura chronograph watches pack some impressive build quality. At 45.5mm wide with an ergonomic fit and interesting “pixelated” dial pattern, these have a sporty and technical look on the wrist.

Right now, two slick versions are on sale at Macy’s for 20% off: one with a black case finish and soft silicone strap, and the other in steel with a steel bracelet. But for a special “VIP” promotion, you can take a further 25% off the reduced price by using the promo code “VIP” at checkout. That brings both versions down by around $200, to under $300 on the rubber bracelet and just a bit more in steel. — Zen Love


Today on Gear Patrol

8 Products our Readers Recommend, and One Thing They Want You to Avoid

8 Products our Readers Recommend, and One Thing They Want You to Avoid

We rounded up the gear that our readers tested lately, their thoughts on it and whether or not they would recommend it.

Is an E-Bike Better for Commuting than a Motorcycle? We Find Out

Is an E-Bike Better for Commuting than a Motorcycle? We Find Out

We take the 36-mile-per-hour Vintage Electric Roadster e-bike out for a lengthy spin.

This Is the Best Smartwatch for Anybody with an iPhone

This Is the Best Smartwatch for Anybody with an iPhone

The Series 5 is the best smartwatch that Apple has ever made. The problem is, if you already have a Series 4, is it worth the upgrade?

2019 Airstream Bambi Review: The Stylish, Easy Way into Camping Trailer Life

2019 Airstream Bambi Review: The Stylish, Easy Way into Camping Trailer Life

Craving that Airstream life? The Bambl brings all the joys of aluminum-bodied camping trailer living in a compact package at a lower price.

What You Need to Read to Get Ready for Fall Hiking & Camping

What You Need to Read to Get Ready for Fall Hiking & Camping

We’ve rounded up some of our best how-to guides, tips and expert advice to help you get the most out of your fall camping and hiking.

The Best Way to Keep Coffee Fresh Is Secretly the Easiest

The Best Way to Keep Coffee Fresh Is Secretly the Easiest

What is the best way to keep coffee fresher, longer? As it turns out, it’s probably best to just leave it in the bag.

RSVP Now For Your Chance to Test Pinarello’s Dogma F12 Bike in New York

RSVP Now For Your Chance to Test Pinarello’s Dogma F12 Bike in New York

If you’re a road cyclist in New York on Saturday, September 28, join us at Roula Cycling for a ride on one of New York City’s classic cycling routes.

We Get Hands-On with the iPhone 11, 11 Pro and Series 5 Apple Watch

We Get Hands-On with the iPhone 11, 11 Pro and Series 5 Apple Watch

We reviewed the new iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and Series 5 Apple Watch. Here’s what we thought.

The 30 Best Wallets for Men – Top Picks of 2019

The 30 Best Wallets for Men – Top Picks of 2019

From Tanner Goods, Pioneer Carry, Red Wing Heritage and more.

How Ultralight Backpacks Are Becoming Mainstream

How Ultralight Backpacks Are Becoming Mainstream

Ultralight has taken the long-distance backpacking world by storm, offering featherweight features, for a price.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Today’s Best Deals: Lab-Grown Diamonds with a Special Gift, the Only Charging Cable You’ll Ever Need & More

Welcome to Deals of Note, where Gear Patrol captures all the best deals of the day. You can also follow all our deal posts in the Deals section. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at deals@gearpatrol.com.

If you are in the market for an engagement ring, you don’t need us to tell you that it is stressful. From sourcing a diamond within your price range, picking a style and the mystery of whether or not you got a quality product — not to mention if the intended wearer will even like it — it’s a mountain to work through. But it doesn’t have to be so overwhelming. Couple is the first luxury brand selling lab-grown diamonds, making the process not only easier but actually enjoyable. The brand’s lab-grown diamonds are atomically identical to mined diamonds and they are 35% larger for your money. And buying online — with the help of Couple’s Diamond Concierge service — makes the whole process seamless and easy. The best part is if you spend more than $5000, Gear Patrol readers will get a complimentary set of Away The Carry-On personalized luggage for the honeymoon.

Home



Dyson V8 Cordless Vacuum
Save $120: Every year, Dyson charts new territory in the vacuum world with iterative improvements upon older models, usually in the form of more battery and power. This year’s V11 also brought additional space in the dustbin and a novel LCD display that tells users how much juice is left in the battery — both great features if you’re willing to pony up $699 for the latest and greatest in suction tech.

For the rest of us, Dyson’s discounted back catalog still boasts some of the most impressive vacuums ever known to man. And in 2019, none represents a better balance of price and performance than the three-year-old V8.

The V8 has plenty of suction (115 airwatts), up to 40 minutes of runtime (seven minutes on full power), a washable HEPA filter and, of course, it comes with Dyson’s legendary warranty. The cherry on top: you can buy the $450 vacuum directly from Dyson for just $330 today. — Will Price

Motoring


The Internet’s Best Deal Motorcycle Helmet Deal Is Even Better, But Not for Long
Save Up to 65%: Five percent off may not seem like much of a bargain. It’s a nickel you don’t have to spend on a $1 purchase, or $1,250 off the price of a $25,000 car; it’s the sort of deal that you’re glad to eke out, but you’re not likely to feel as though you got away with something.

Add it on top of a larger bargain, however, and that 5% starts to feel way more important. Case in point: For a limited time, RevZilla is offering an extra 5% off all of its closeout deals — including the stellar motorcycle helmet deals it has on offer. If you don’t mind rocking previous seasons’ styles (or, in some cases, have a tiny head), you can get great helmets for as much as 65% off with this deal, knocking some expensive lids down to well below $500.

The trick? All you have to do is use the code 5OFFNOW at checkout. That’s it. Pop that in, and you just saved a few extra dollars on top of the rest of your savings.

Of course, the deal is also valid on everything else RevZilla has on clearance — amazing motorcycle jackets, solid boots, great gloves, even motorcycle parts, electronics and luggage. But helmets are one of the places where you can score the most notable deals at the site, so we’re highlighting them here. (Also, y’know, they’re kind of the most important piece of riding gear you should have.) — Will Sabel Courtney

Outdoors and Fitness

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3 Awesome Fixed-Blade Knives Are on Sale
Save up to 50%: Recently, knife designers have proved that fixed-blade knives can be as versatile as folders. Here are three that are on discounted now. — Tanner Bowden
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Filson Bandera Backpacks
Save 43%: Founded in 1897, Seattle-based Filson made a name for itself outfitting some of the hardest workers in the West. It’s bags accompanied workers to the rugged Alaskan wilderness and were proven year after year. While Filson still makes its classic designs, it also makes some backpacks more suited to everyday use.

The Bandera backpacks are made in the USA from hardwearing twill. The 22L bag has a large U-shaped zipper, an interior laptop pocket and a front zip pocket. Normally priced at $175, this discontinued model is now 43-percent off and costs just $100 — act fast if you want a great everyday pack. — John Zientek

Style

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Men’s Suits at Macy’s
Save up to 85%: Now during Macy’s Suiting Event, you can save up to 85 percent on a huge selection of suits. Choose basic options from Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Perry Ellis and more — the prices are too good to pass up. — John Zientek

Tech

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Anker PowerLine II Charging Cable
Save $7: The Anker PowerLine II is a three-in-one charging cable that features swappable heads for Lightning, USB-C and micro-USB. This means that with this one charging cable you’re able to charge your iPhone, Sony WH-1000M3 headphones or Nintendo Switch, or whatever else that still charges via micro-USB (like running headphones or a compact camera). If you’re traveling, the PowerLine II essentially eliminates the need for you to bring many of your other charging cables. Right now, you can purchase the normally $18 charging cable for just $11 on Amazon – just makes sure to enter the promo code ANKER8436 at checkout. You can never have too many. — Tucker Bower
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Sony WH-1000XM3 Noise-Canceling Headphones
Save $150: Right now, eBay is selling refurbished Sony WH-1000XM3 noise-canceling headphones for under $200. That’s a pretty terrific deal considering these are arguably the best noise-canceling headphones you can buy, and new models typically cost around $350.

If you’ve been wanting to purchase some really great noise-canceling headphones, which are right up there with the Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 ($399) and the Bose QuietComfort 35 II, then you should jump on this eBay deal. — Tucker Bowe

Watches

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Seiko Prospex and Presage
Save 40%: The Prospex and Presage lines are perhaps best-known among Seiko’s wide-ranging watch universe, but other families offer the same signature Japanese value and quality. With a solar-charged, super-accurate quartz movement, the sporty Coutura chronograph watches pack some impressive build quality. At 45.5mm wide with an ergonomic fit and interesting “pixelated” dial pattern, these have a sporty and technical look on the wrist.

Right now, two slick versions are on sale at Macy’s for 20% off: one with a black case finish and soft silicone strap, and the other in steel with a steel bracelet. But for a special “VIP” promotion, you can take a further 25% off the reduced price by using the promo code “VIP” at checkout. That brings both versions down by around $200, to under $300 on the rubber bracelet and just a bit more in steel. — Zen Love

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Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Janis: Her Life & Music

The short, crazy and incredibly influential life of Janis Joplin finally gets its due in this new biography written by Holly George-Warren, one of the most highly regarded chroniclers of American music history. Based on unprecedented access to Joplin’s family, friends, band mates, archives, and long-lost interviews, Janis draws an intimate portrait of the one they called the Queen Of Rock n’ Roll.

Netgear’s Orbi WiFi 6 Mesh System Keeps Home Streaming Glitch Free

If you’ve got 4K/8K UHD streaming and online gaming to multiple screens simultaneously happening in your home, you don’t want frozen screens & spinning icons. You want crystal clear seamless streaming. That’s what the Orbi WiFi 6 Mesh home system can do. It consists of a powerful router and satellite capable of providing Gigabit-speed “Fast Wi-fi” for 6-or more rooms up to 5000 sq. ft. It features a 2.5Gbps WAN port & 8 gigabit Ethernet LAN ports and supports Alexa & Google voice control assistants.

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The Haven Hammock Tent is Better for Your Back

Combining the features of a camping hammock with the comfort of a flat, cushy bed, the one-person Haven Tent is suspended above the ground with a single anchor-point on each tree and has an inflatable mattress inside that keeps you from rolling up like a burrito. The whole weatherproof system weighs under 5-pounds, making it a great option for both backpacking & car camping. A funded Kickstarter.

RSVP Now For Your Chance to Test Pinarello’s Dogma F12 Bike in New York

If you’ve ever wanted to ride with Gear Patrol employees, see how they test road bikes and see behind the curtain of New York’s premier cycling concierge service Roula, now’s your chance. Oh, and did we mention you’ll have the opportunity to test the top of the line Pinarello Dogma F12 road bike*?

Join us on Saturday, September 28 for a 40-mile road bike ride along one of New York City’s classic cycling routes as part of our Stocked Product Showcase. You’ll need to bring your helmet, clipless pedals, cycling kit, road bike shoes and strong legs — Roula will provide you with one of its high-end road bikes to test on the ride. All intermediate to advanced road cyclists are welcome and encouraged to sign up. Space is limited, so sign up now for your chance at a place on the ride.

What: A 40-mile ride with Gear Patrol and Roula, complete with a test of Pinarello F12, F10 and Giant TCR road bikes (bikes subject to availability based on sizing)
When: Saturday, September 28 (time revealed with confirmed RSVP)
Where: Roula Cycling at 408 12th Ave, New York, NY 10018

Sign Up for a Chance to Join

*Bikes subject to availability based on sizing, and will be assigned on a first-come-first-served basis.

In addition to getting a chance to ride one of the best road bikes on the market, you’ll also be provided with a free injury insurance policy for the ride from our insurance partner Spot. To learn more about Spot, you can check out its website here.

3 Awesome Fixed-Blade Knives Are on Sale

The central aim of any fixed-blade knife is utility. Without a rotating joint, fixed blades are ultra-strong and capable of the most demanding cutting, chopping and prying tasks. That’s why these knives are often favored by hunters, survivalists, divers, emergency responders and armed forces. Fixed blades don’t have to be overtly tactical though; now more than ever, EDC knife makers are creating new silhouettes that prove there’s a place for a full-tang construction in daily life, too.

Tops Knives Mini Scandi 2.5

Tops’s Mini Scandi has a three-inch 1095 carbon steel drop-point blade that’s easy to maintain. It comes with a Kydex sheath, a chain lanyard and an emergency whistle.

Fallkniven A1X

At 6.3 inches, Fallkniven’s A1X’s blade is probably too long to use to open Amazon boxes, but it’s fully capable of handling tough chores in the outdoors, like processing wood for a campfire.

Esee Gibson Pinch

The Pinch is proof that a fixed blade can make an excellent daily driver. It’s only 3.4 inches long — the Wharncliffe blade is 1.3 inches — and it weighs just one ounce. That means it’ll fit snugly in a pocket or desk drawer or around your neck with its included magnetic sheath.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

You Can Get This Used 1972 Detomaso Pantera

The Detomaso Pantera never made much of a splash. Despite its incredible wedge shape and excellent performance, its era looked elsewhere and this did not catapult the ride into icon status. Everyone instead patronized the Ferrari and Lamborghini cars of that day, with this one promptly careening into near obscurity. Times have changed since. Plenty of people now admire this car. And you can have one. Check out this 1972 Detomaso Pantera.

When we say, admire, we really mean go berserk over. Once severely under-appreciated, the Pantera Detomaso now has a bevy of admirers who see it for what it truly is capable of. Underneath, you get a Ford V8 engine maxing out at 330 ponies, a lot for its day. The engine is mated to a five-speed transmission, as well.

Suffice it to say that the Detomaso Pantera did not come under-equipped when it came to either aesthetics or performance. The 1972 model here remains one of the best-kept samples in the world. This particular unit shows only 70 miles on the odometer, which means it’s got plenty of buck left to bang.

You also get a number of pretty cool modifications. For starters, you’ll find larger aftermarket wheels with staggered front and rear sizes. This, plus the period look, set off the whole look of the exterior. The interior, on the other hand, features custom bucket seats and an Alcantara trim in a black and blue theme.

Despite all those, the ride never made a huge name for itself back in the day. Scoop up an overlooked part of history when you hit the link below.

BUY IT HERE