All posts in “Gear”

These Are the Seven Watches We’re Obsessing Over in July, 2019

As watch lovers, we spend our afternoons pitching, researching and writing stories, poring over the new timepieces coming in and out of our office, and hunting for deals on used and vintage pieces online. When a new watch comes across our radar, one that particularly resonates with our tastes, we can’t help but obsess over it. We talk about them, debate their relevance, orate on their greatness and rail against their faults. So, here’s a taste of that process — seven timepieces our watch-loving staff are obsessing over right at this very moment:

Apple Watch Series 4

The idea of the Apple Watch always fascinated me, but it seemed like too much of a compromised proposition in early forms. With the Series 4, however, it finally felt advanced and independent enough to warrant consideration. Between the fitness and health benefits, the added functionalities of cellular connectivity, the revised design — it was enough to get me hooked. There are plenty of cool watches, but not many pack the potential to improve my life the way this one might. –Will Sabel Courtney, Editor

Sinn 356 Flieger Acrylic on Bracelet

Lately, whenever I spot a Sinn 365 pop up in my feeds, I find myself staring for an exorbitant amount of time. There’s something about the no-nonsense, function-defines-form vibe of this watch. I like that it’s 38.5 mm with an acrylic crystal. I love the contrasty, ultra-legible syringe-style hands. And I dig the clean H-link bracelet and drilled lugs. This one has utility meets simplicity written all over it. –Kyle Snarr, Head of Marketing

1973 Grand Seiko 5645-7005

Vintage? Check. Grand Seiko? Check. Linen dial? Check. For those following this series closely, you’ll know this watch ticks all of my boxes. The solid 18k gold case is just added value. One day I’ll add a vintage Grand Seiko to my watch collection but for the moment, daydreaming will have to do. –AJ Powell, Project Manager, Gear Patrol Studios

Shinola Canfield Sport 40mm

Right now, I’m loving the Canfield model, and the fact that this one has “Sport” in the name makes it speak to me at a deeper level. As an Outdoors and Fitness writer, it makes me chuckle that the one watch I pick out alludes to my profession. The almost blonde leather looks sleek next to every color I wear (New York-approved black and navy), and the gold PVD-finished stainless steel 40mm case with white ceramic top ring insert caught my eye the last time I meandered through the TriBeCa store. As someone who has worn an Apple watch since it first launched, Shinola’s understated yet beautiful option may be the one watch that forces a new tan line on my wrist. –Meg Lappe, Staff Writer

Cartier Tank Louis Cartier Manual Wind

Small by today’s standards, relatively thin, and with enough history behind it to make your non-watch friends tell you to shut up about it, this is the height of elegance in my opinion. It looks great under a dress shirt cuff and a well-fitting suit, and even cooler with the perfect washed tee and a leather motorcycle jacket. It goes well with both J.Press and John Varvatos — how many other watches can truly do that? –Brian Louie, Head of Commerce

The Omega Speedmaster Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Limited Edition

I can’t fault anyone for being jaded about limited edition Speedmasters. Omega’s never been sheepish about using any conceivable space-related milestone as a reason to roll out an exclusive take on its iconic chronograph. But I’m into this new tribute to the 50th anniversary of the lunar landing — arguably the single greatest technological accomplishment in the history of humanity.

The watch’s grey dial with black sub-dials, combined with a paler 18-karat Moonshine Gold detailing offers just the right amount of stealthy bling to wear semi-regularly. It’s also part of an extremely limited club of Speedmaster’s to feature the new Cal. 3861 Master Chronometer-Certified movement (which ironically, hasn’t been certified by NASA for professional manned space flight) as well as Neil Armstrong’s iconic “That’s one small step for a man — one giant leap for mankind” on the case back. My favorite detail though might be the included Velcro strap in blackened cork with golden marks. The unique design salutes the Apollo-era “boost protective cover” that shielded the crew from heat during launch. Since it’s priced at $9,650, you also don’t need NASA level funding to own one yourself.
–Ben Bowers, Co-Founder/Chief Operating Officer

Smiths W10

This is one of those “coulda, woulda, shoulda” things, the “shoulda” in this case being “I shoulda bought one of these when they were around $1,000 and under.” Alas. One of the last serially produced, made-in-Britain watches (let alone British military watches), the W10 is, to me, essentially a perfect timepiece. All business, great-looking, and purpose-built. What’s more, Smiths crafted the movements in-house. A legendary watch from a legendary comapny. –Oren Hartov, Assistant Editor

Some of the Best Backpack Coolers of Summer 2019

Backpack coolers are ideal for summer travels. You stock up on six-packs, cans of wine and some snacks and then load it with ice to carry on your standup paddle board, the back of your jeep or on your shoulders as you walk into that private little lake you stumbled upon last year. Straps on coolers is not a new thing, but comfortable, padded ones with extra bands to secure the pack to your waist are relatively new.

While we likely wouldn’t want to hike Mt. Baker or Mt. Washington with any of these cooler backpacks, we wouldn’t mind kayaking to a small island and setting up camp for the night with all our preferred beverages. They’re easier to carry than hard-sided coolers and allow you some creature comforts (half and half! cheese! yogurt! eggs! butter!) without the noose that car-camping provides.

Seemingly in the last year, every brand that we know and love for adventure coolers now has a backpack cooler, too. Here are a few of our favorites right now.

Yeti Hopper Backflip 24L

Yeti and durability go hand in hand, and that extends to the brand’s first backpack cooler. Molle straps on the sides and front make it easy to add attachments or loop through a few carabiners or bottle openers. During testing, we liked how hard the top of this cooler was; we used it as an extra table while camping.

Otterbox Trooper LT 30 Cooler

With dual straps, you can quickly convert this Trooper LT Cooler from a backpack to a shoulder carry, meaning you won’t feel any discomfort over a long hike to the campsite. Of the ones we’ve tested, this is one of the most comfortable at the largest size. A bright interior helps you spot the food you’re looking for right away. So when you get to camp, it’s a breeze to grab those Reese’s cups you stashed for your reward.

Hydro Flask Unbound Soft Cooler Pack

At 22 liters, the Unbound is slightly smaller than both the Yeti and the Otterbox coolers but is the sleekest of the three. The slim side pocket holds your phone or speaker so you can blast tunes while you get to where you’re going. In a pinch, this one also works as a regular backpack. It can even serve as a carry-on if your hiking adventure extends past an airplane ride.

Orca Podster

The Orca Podster is one of our best coolers of 2019, but thanks to padded shoulder straps it works double duty as a backpack cooler as well. The bright color stands out in a sea of green, grey and black bags, plus the plethora of molle-webbing adds infinite storage capabilities. While the shape is a bit unconventional, it still leads the pack thanks to its 14.25-quart interior that stays just as cold as its competitors.

IceMule Classic Medium

The heavy-duty IceMule Coolers Boss also made our list for Best Coolers, but if you’re looking for something slightly smaller and more comfortable to carry in addition to a board or on a boat, this 15-liter Classic Medium is for you. The roll-top and single strap make this cross-body bag extremely portable. If you’re spending the day picnicking at the park or the beach, this bag will carry all the snacks and booze you need.

Pelican Dayventure Backpack Cooler

Two distinct compartments on this Dayventure Cooler provide more versatility than any other backpack on this list. The 13-liter bag has a bottom section ideal for carrying six-packs, and then the rolltop works as more cold storage — or a place to stuff a change of clothes, pots and pans or a towel for an easy overnight. We like the breathable straps and back panels that keep this cooler airy while you carry.

Built NY Welded Soft Cooler

This Built NY rolltop backpack is very similar to the Large Welded Cooler we recognized in our Best Coolers of 2019, just with more straps and a way to carry on your back. The large front pocket offers storage for extra cords, batteries, wallets and phones, while the molle straps above feature a bottle opener, which is always, always handy.

Corkcicle Eola Bucket Bag

When we tested out this padded, adjustable cooler bucket bag, we were pleasantly surprised by how cold everything stayed. It’s likely the smallest of the bunch, but also the best looking. Black camo is our pick: fill it with 12 cans or a couple of wine bottles, plus cans, and you’re good to go into the wild.

Coleman Soft Backpack Cooler

Coleman soft coolers are leak-proof with a 28-can capacity that’s shockingly easy to carry in a backpack. The bungee cord front means you can stash an extra pair of sneakers or sandals for any water crossings you may encounter as you hike into the perfect location.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Bose Frames Rondo Audio Sunglasses

This spring, Bose introduced a new kind of wearable apparel: audio sunglasses. Seemingly a counter-argument to Google’s impressive but underwhelming Glass from several years past, the Bose Frames Rondo is a pair of sunglasses with wireless technology.

Wearable technology is currently somewhere in the interim between “technology” and “design.” As for the tech, there’s no question about the potential. But it gets spotty when it comes to design. Everyone wants the latest wearable gear without looking like a robot. So far, most, if not all, wearable gear have failed to deliver. So, the team at Bose decided to make a product that, while high-tech, doesn’t skimp on aesthetics.

We mentioned that these are audio sunglasses. They don’t actually have buds that you wear as you would do with any conventional pair of earphones. Instead, the open-ear design directs the sound to your ears, minimizing what nearby people can hear. This is real sound, by the way, not some weird vibrations or anything like that, as on other gimmicky options. And because this is Bose we’re talking about here, the sound is no short of topnotch.

It does take some time getting used to. Honestly, the technology is so amazing you’ll be paranoid that people can hear what you’re listening to. But they can’t.

The Bose frame design features easy access to controls. You can change to volume, skip songs, pause, play, and even accept calls via the built-in mic. Oh, and it works with smart assistants as well. At $199, this is a risky buy considering it’s still early tech. But it’s worth a try.

BUY HERE

7 Things Streetwear Mogul Bobby Hundreds Is on the Hunt for Right Now

Editor’s Note: Welcome to In My Cart, a regular series in which we ask some of the coolest guys we know what they’ve recently acquired, are thinking about buying, or need to buy more of — but for whatever reason don’t have in hand just yet. This week, Bobby Hundreds, the streetwear mogul behind brand The Hundreds.

Bobby Kim, more commonly known as Bobby Hundreds, is responsible for one of the most influential streetwear brands ever. In 2003, he co-founded The Hundreds with Ben Shenassafar. The brand initially sold its T-shirts at Fred Segal in Santa Monica and created street-culture editorial content on its website. Now after over 15 years in business, the brand is carried by 400 retailers worldwide, is responsible for countless collaborations and is considered one of the leading brands in the industry. Bobby Hundreds new memoir — This Is Not a T-Shirt — reflects on this journey and lessons learned along the way.

A Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, the book chronicles the brand’s growth in tandem with the development of the streetwear industry. According to Kith founder Ronnie Fieg, This Is Not a T-Shirt “maps out how to start and brand and blow it up while maintaining a core community — it’s like a streetwear bible slash history book.” After 34 chapters of compelling prose, the book has a straightforward FAQ section with questions like, “How do I pick a name for my brand?” and “How important is social media?” and “Somebody stole my idea. What do I do?”

To support the book — currently, a best seller on Amazon — Bobby Hundreds is speaking at upcoming events in L.A., San Francisco, New York and Chicago. We caught up with him before the book launch to learn what products he’s currently eyeing. From new Air VaporMax sneakers to a custom puffer jacket to a surfboard, the items reflect a man who cares deeply about thoughtful designs and people behind them. But he explains it best.

Nike Air VaporMax 2019: Cactus Plant Flea Market 

“This is my favorite sneaker thus far this year. It can be polarizing (Ben hates it), but I love modern technical trainers. I like black sneakers contrasted with pop colors. And something about this collaboration is reminiscent of the DeLorean time machine from Back to the Future. The distorted happy face sets it off.”

Half Evil “Piss On Your Brand” Chain

“Half Evil is one of my favorite newer streetwear brands in the space. We’ve done a couple flips of the Calvin pissing through The Hundreds, but a chain is so smart and collectible. As you know, Bill Watterson never licensed out Calvin & Hobbes for official merchandise, so there’s always been this subversive attitude to the Calvin pissing bumper stickers. Right on-brand for Half Evil.”

Etai Custom Puffer Jacket

“Etai used to work for us back when he was a kid. Now, he’s become one of the most noted customizers in fashion, mostly surrounding his deconstruction of luxury goods and appropriating them into new bags and silhouettes. He also takes vintage towels and bedsheets and makes unique clothing out of them. My favorite is this Bambi puffer jacket, which marries my love for old Disney and contemporary streetwear. Never seen anything like it.”

Amanita Surfboards 7’7 Macrodose

“Not only is Keegan Gibbs a talented photographer and cultural organizer, he is a remarkable surfboard shaper. His company Amanita offers personalized takes on classic shapes — it speaks to Keegan’s style and artistry. I’ve been dying to pick one up and there are a few available right now at Boardriders in Malibu.”

Babylon Acid Marble Half Zip

“Babylon is bringing some of the most distinct design to streetwear right now, whether you can even classify the skate/high-fashion brand in that silo. This is one of my favorite pieces from their current collection, and suitable for any wild climate fluctuation. I like that the garment is conservative and sensible, but the graphic treatment is forward and progressive.”

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

“This book hasn’t arrived just yet but I got an advance copy from my friend Miwa at Barnes & Noble. I’m already halfway in and engrossed by it — a magical, historical fantasy set in Mexico during the Jazz Age. So, I thought I’d just drop this right here and tell you what your favorite summer read is gonna be. Well, aside from my book of course.”

“Testify” by Matt McCormick

“Matt McCormick also used to work for us, but at some point became one of the most watched fine artists, working with Grateful Dead to operating his own brand of merchandise under One of these Days Co. “Testify” is Matt’s latest piece. He’s most often regarded for his cowboy/western flash-sheet-style work, but I love when he brings that aesthetic to ’80s and ’90s pop culture references like Pam Anderson and Chris Farley. I’m gonna get him to paint Jennifer Connelly for me next.”

7 Things Vic Mensa Is on the Hunt for Right Now

Despite Mensa’s busy schedule, he took a few minutes to share some products he’s currently got his eye on. Ranging from bottled green tea to a vocal effects processor to a vintage t-shirt, the things reflect a life based in music and fashion. Read the Story

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

2019 Ducati Panigale V4S Review: Is This Superbike Too Super for the Real World?

In the late Nineties and early Aughts, superbikes dominated the headlines. They were the hook and line which reeled in customers, bringing them into showrooms. Times change, though; by the end of 21st Century’s first decade, the plastic fairing-clad speed machines were still every manufacturer’s test bed for engineering, but a steady decline in sales was indicative of their flagging popularity.

In 2009, I bought a brand-new 2008 Kawasaki ZX-10R for $10,000 to use as a daily motorcycle. Granted, by modern standards, it seems outdated; it didn’t have the ABS, complex traction control systems or the handful of riding modes today’s liter bikes come laden with. (That said, don’t hold your breath waiting for a superbike to come with that sort of price tag in 2019.) But it was a simple machine that was civilized enough for daily use, with a relatively low cost of ownership. Although the high-strung overpowered flagships of today may look similar, they’re a different breed than the superbikes of 10 years ago.

Case in point: the the Ducati Panigale V4S, which costs as much as a family car and packs as much speed and technology as a supercar. Numbers aren’t everything, but have bikes like this engineered and priced themselves out of “cheap speed” contention — and thus relevance?

The Good: There’s no denying how much of an engineering marvel Ducati’s new 1,103-cc V4 is, and how well it translates all of its 214 horses into acceleration. Ducatis always had a decent amount of power, but with the amount of rattling, rumbling and high-end bellows they’re known for, it’s fair to say their bark didn’t match their bite. The V4S, if anything, turns that notion inside out.

Who It’s For: Despite a price flirting with the $30,000 mark, the V4S makes a better second bike in the stable than it does a first. The V4S is for the rider who wants the ultimate weekend canyon carver, or — skill level permitting — a track bike that’ll blow away the rest of the paddock.

Watch Out For: The 1,103-cc V4 pumps out a ton of heat on a regular basis; get stuck in traffic or a tunnel, and it goes nuclear. Not only will your inside thigh start to roast, but those high temperatures can also wreak havoc on the bike (and as such, your bank account).

And don’t think about offering rides. Where competitors at least offer optional passenger seats and pegs, the Ducati is a solo-only machine.

Last but not least, a $28,000 motorcycle should have a fuel gauge. With all the readouts and analytics math the Bosch TFT display can compute the rider, the fuel level isn’t one of them? If I’m paying nearly $30,000 for a motorcycle, I shouldn’t have to do odometer-versus-mpg guesstimates.

Alternatives:
Honda CBR1000RR ($16,499)
Yamaha YZF R1-M ($22,999)
Aprilia RSV4 RF ($23,499)

Review: Manhattan rush hour traffic in June can break people, let alone the engines of motorcycles. The Ducati Panigale V4S’s tightly-packaged engine, with its exhaust wedged between the engine and the rear wheel, runs hot on a regular basis, it’ll cook your inside thigh should you get stuck in traffic–which I did almost every day for two weeks going back and forth from New Jersey to New York. My prior ZX-10R ownership led me to believe it’s possible to daily a superbike…or at least, it was 10 years ago. But today, with a bike like the V4S, does it — can it — still make sense to use a top-flight motorcycle as a daily?

On the first day, it was apparent the city is no place for the Panigale. It was narrow and balanced enough to scythe through traffic, and the riding position wasn’t so bad that my legs were cramping up after a full day in the saddle. But the on-off nature of the throttle at low RPM and the stress of constantly feathering the hydraulic clutch made stop-and-go traffic exhausting. Imagine a cheetah trying to stretch its legs in your living room — that’s what it’s like poking through urban streets on this bike.

The electronics suite on the V4S that lets you tailor the bike’s attitude is a cutting edge system from Bosch; engine mapping, engine braking, suspension stiffness, wheelie control, ABS and traction control are all customizable with multiple levels of aggressiveness. But even with everything dialed down to its tamest, it’s still not enough to hide the fact that there’s so much more on tap than a daily commute allows.

A weekend ride up to the mountains, then, was what I needed rto try and put the Panigale in its element. Before getting on the highway, I dialed back the electronic restrictions to free up more of the engine’s capability; it took a few tries to get to the ride mode and specific settings where I wanted, however, as the menu and interface isn’t all that intuitive. (I reset the clock and trip odometer by accident multiple times.) Even after a few times of fiddling with the settings I still had to remind my self which toggle-switch did what.

Still, all that ceased to matter once I hit the open road. One quick, smooth twist of the throttle, and I was accelerating faster than anyone would ever need to. Which is when I realized I was only at about 50 percent power.

After that, and a full day of carving up the roads contouring the lakes north of Manhattan, the Panigale started to make more sense. It’s pointed and light, but forces you to be smooth in and out of corners. It’s not a bike to learn on by any means, but it’s well-sorted enough to give you a generous safety net when you want to wring it out on public roads.

With the day almost over, I decided to call it quits and head back on the highway, I had an empty stretch of road in front of me and a little more courage, so I cranked the throttle wide open. The way the V4S gathered speed was almost instantaneous; at full throttle, it’s less of a feeling of acceleration and more like you’re defying the laws of space and time. The distant point down the road I was looking at when I got on the throttle? I found myself there before I ever would have thought possible.

Verdict: Is the Panigale a lot to handle? Yes. It’s not meant for the humdrum grind of daily riding, unless your commute involves 20 miles of empty, winding two-lane where the cops inexplicably fear to lurk. But on the right road, at the right time…it’s everything you want it to be and more.

2019 Ducati Panigale V4S

Powertrain: 1,103-cc 90-degree V4, six-speed sequential transmission
Horsepower: 219
Torque: 91.5 lb-ft
Weight: 430 lbs

Ducati provided this product for review.

Read More Gear Patrol Reviews

Hot takes and in-depth reviews on noteworthy, relevant and interesting products. Read the Story
Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Everything You Need to Outfit Your Home for Airbnb

Listing a place on Airbnb and actually getting it ready for guests are two different things, the latter of which takes some serious thought and research. Not only should a short-term rental have all of the things a visitor might expect from a hotel room — coffee-making supplies, a comfortable mattress and clean, crisp linens — but, if you want to maximize your bookings, you should consider items that also add comfort and style.

We scoured forums and tested products from a handful of companies to come up with a list of the stuff we think hits the sweet spot in terms of looks, quality and affordability. Outfitting a rental space doesn’t have to mean buying the best-quality goods, but your guests don’t have to know that.

Bedroom Essentials

Target Threshold 400 Thread Count Printed Performance Sheet Set

Soft, silky and, most importantly, starting at $30 a set, Target’s cotton sateen sheets come with fresh prints and absolutely no harmful chemicals (in fact, they’re Oeko-Tex certified). You’ll want to keep at least two sets of sheets per bed on-hand so you can rotate them per guest. They’ll wear out faster than you think, so it makes sense to keep the price tag low.

Brooklinen Classic Hardcore Sheet Bundle

To up the quality but still score a bang for your buck, opt for Brooklinen’s 270-thread count cotton bundle, which includes a sheet set and a matching duvet cover. Buying the bundle will take 25 percent off the retail price, which comes in handy when you start pricing out individual duvet covers.

H&M Cotton Duvet Cover Set

Duvet sets usually run upward of $100, so it’s smart to spend less when you need at least two for rotating. H&M’s Cotton Duvet Cover Set is just as comfortable and stylish as its more expensive offerings, and it won’t break the bank.

Target Duvet Cover Set Linen – Hearth & Hand with Magnolia

If you have to have linen, check out this Target set designed in conjunction with Hearth & Hand, Chip & Joanna Gaines’s exclusive line for Target. There’s nothing course about it, which is sometimes an issue with linen.

L.L. Bean Ultrasoft Cotton Comforter

If you live in a place with multiple seasons, having something you can layer up or down is key. L.L. Bean’s Ultrasoft Cotton Comforter is stuffed with polyester and fiberfill, which means it works in the summer, unlike down. Once the white stuff falls outside, you can layer it with a toasty Polar Fleece Blanket from L.L. Bean ($59).

Buffy Breeze Comforter

For something less puffy, try Buffy’s comforters, which optimize warmth while minimizing volume — The Cloud is good in cooler weather and The Breeze is optimal for warm nights because it has more seams for releasing warm air. Guests may be allergic to down, so it’s smart to explore alternative insulators; The Breeze is made from eucalyptus fibers but there’s none of the scratchiness that sometimes comes with natural materials.

Ikea Jordrök Pillows

You’ll want a variety of pillows on-hand — some soft and smushy, some firm and voluminous. We like Ikea’s Jordrok pillows — which come in both soft and firm. At $13 a pop, they pair perfectly with straight-up polyester-filled pillows from Target ($4) and give your guests a variety of options.

Tuft & Needle Mint Mattress

This bed is engineered with layers of gradual support and 30 percent more cooling beads than other foam mattresses. And it starts at just $445.

Kitchen Essentials

Oxo Uplift Tea Kettle

Just as in a hotel, guests expect to be able to make coffee and tea in your rental space so having supplies on-hand is a must. No tea kettle is more reliable than this one from Oxo. It’s well-designed, doesn’t require any fuss and the water won’t volcano out when its piping hot.

Oxo 9-Cup Coffee Maker

Counter space matters. That’s why we like Oxo’s 9-cup coffee maker. It’s not too big but it can brew up one sophisticated cup of coffee.

AmazonBasics Mixing Bowls

Your guests may eat out every night or they may cook dinner. You have to be prepared for both. AmazonBasic’s Mixing Bowls come with lids so it’s easy for guests to store leftovers.

Ikea Flitighet Bowls

These shallow bowl-plates work for things that require bowls, like soup, or things that don’t, like pasta. And they’re just cheap enough that you won’t be upset if a few get broken.

Brandless Silicone Utensil Tools Bundle

Brandless makes it easy to make your kitchen look super stylish for very little money. Its Silicone Utensil Tools Bundle comes with matching wood-and-silicone utensils and an Acacia wood box for storing them.

Other Household Necessities

Nest Thermostat E

Being able to control the temperature remotely is important. If guests leave and forget to turn off the air conditioner or heat, you’ll want access — especially if you can’t be there in person. A Nest Thermostat can be controlled by app from your phone. And, you can also set a range of acceptable temperatures so your guests can’t crank the heat to 90 and then forget it after they’ve checked out.

Shark Wandvac Handheld Vacuum

Keeping cleaning supplies on-hand for guests is vital just in case they have an accident and want to tidy things up before your house cleaner gets to it. Today’s Dustbuster is the Shark Wandvac Handheld Vaccuum. It’s sleek, mountable, dependable and easy to use.

Dyson V8 Absolute

If you’d rather just keep one vacuum on-hand, make it a cordless stick vacuum like Dyson’s V8, which is more affordable than their latest top-of-the-line vacuum, the V11. The V8 will get the job done as well as any Dyson vacuum, won’t take up space and makes cleaning up easy because there are no cords to unhook from furniture.

Today In Gear: Oris Dive Watches for Clean Oceans, the Outdoor Gear of the Future & More

Today in Gear is our daily roundup of all the latest product announcements, drops and deals. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at tig@gearpatrol.com.


It can be hard to think there is a connection between beautiful timepieces and efforts to keep our oceans clean. But Oris has brought the two together with the limited edition Oris Ocean Trilogy set, complete with a display case made of recycled plastic that’s been collected from the ocean. Limited to only 200, each box includes three of the Swiss watchmaker’s diver watches that are part of the company’s mission to bring change for the better, to the world’s oceans. Two of the watches in the set are the Oris Great Barrier Reef Limited Edition III and the Clean Ocean Limited Edition, which have been made in partnership with the Reef Restoration Foundation and Pacific Garbage Screening. The third timepiece available exclusively in the set is the Blue Whale Limited Edition — the first Aquis chronograph with a three, six and nine dial layout — which is focused on protecting the world’s largest animal. Three great watches, helping keep our oceans clean.

New & Noteworthy Releases

John Mayer Played This $1.9 Million Guitar with Dead & Co. in NYC

John Mayer Played This $1.9 Million Guitar with Dead & Co. in NYC

With Dead & Company at Citi Field.

Rapha’s New Collection Is the Crit

Rapha’s New Collection Is the Crit

Get ready to race… or just look like it.

Summer Travelers, This Versatile New Adidas Running Shoe Is for You

Summer Travelers, This Versatile New Adidas Running Shoe Is for You

The newest Adidas running shoes should go immediately into your suitcase for whatever trips you have planned.

Heaven Hill Is Bringing Back a Beloved, Discontinued Bourbon

Heaven Hill Is Bringing Back a Beloved, Discontinued Bourbon

Heaven Hill discontinued its quietly covetable Bottled-in-Bond bourbon last year. It’s coming back.

This French Camper Trailer Might Make You Want to Move to Europe

This French Camper Trailer Might Make You Want to Move to Europe

The Carapate camper trailer is a French twist that includes an all-wood exterior, but it’s only available in Europe for the time being.

These Go-Anywhere Shorts Are a Summer Necessity

These Go-Anywhere Shorts Are a Summer Necessity

An affordable basic for everyday wear.


Fresh Deals

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Patagonia Black Hole Duffel
Save 30%: If you’ve never heard of Patagonia’s Black Hole duffel bags, you’ve likely spotted one in an airport, foreign train station or strapped to the roof of an overlander. Patagonia built the weather-resistant and sturdy bags to last decades with a rugged TPU-laminated ripstop nylon. They also include removable backpack straps that make carrying one a breeze, even when it’s fully loaded. The 60-liter version is arguably the most versatile size; it’s big enough to pack everything you’ll need for a weekend or a week, and it still fits into the overhead bins on planes. We’ve put this bag through its paces on all kinds of adventures, from a ski weekend in Vermont to a month-long trip to Ecuador. It’s one of the best rugged duffel bags available, and right now it’s also 30 percent off at Backcountry in nearly every volume. — Tanner Bowden grey_placeholder

Brooks Brothers Clothing, Shoes and Accessories
Save up to 50%: Off-season sales are an ideal time to invest in wardrobe classics you can wear for years to come. A great example is the Brooks Brothers Summer Sale, one of the iconic retailer’s biggest sales of the year, where discounts are up to 50 percent on a range of well-made garments. Pick from blazers, shirts, shoes and more, but don’t wait — the sale ends June 28. — John Zientek
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Red Wing Heritage Shoes and Boots
Save up to 52%: It’s a rare occurrence when you can find discounted footwear from Red Wing Heritage. But every so often, Nordstrom Rack offers a range of shoes and boots from the brand at highly-reduced prices. Often, the styles are European or Japanese market styles or factory seconds, and the savings are usually at least half off. Currently, you can save up to 52 percent on shoes and boots from Red Wing Heritage. For the widest range of sizes, check out the derby shoes and work oxfords — they’re all $150 or less. — John Zientek


Wüsthof’s Classic Chef’s Knife
Save 45%: The market for chef’s knives is made of tiers. Every major knife manufacturer has a value knife that goes for $30 to $45 that’s typically made of hardwearing, easy-to-dull stainless steel (think Victorinox’s Fibrox knife). The second tier, priced just under $100, is filled with knives made with steel that keep an edge longer, but aren’t forged and thus susceptible to chipping. Starting around $150, the third tier is where you’ll find sturdy, forged chef’s knives that remain sharper for longer and pay greater attention to handle ergonomics. This tier is typified by knives like Wüsthof’s Classic 8-Inch Chef’s Knife — a forged, wide bevel knife designed in a classically German style.

Today on Ebay, you can get it for 45 percent off — or a savings of $75. That’s $60 cheaper than its listed price on Amazon. — Will Price



Seagate Backup Plus Portable (5TB)
Save $60: Right now, Amazon is selling the Seagate Backup Plus Portable hard drive with 5TB of storage for less than $100. It’s a pretty great deal that saves you $60. The portable hard drive can be hooked up to either a Mac or Windows desktop or laptop via a simple USB cable (included), so you can backup all your files. This is ideal for anybody that doesn’t want to rely on (or pay for) a Cloud-based storage solution. Also, 5TB is a huge amount of storage — most likely enough to backup your entire computer and then some.

BioLite Headlamp and More Sale
Save 35%: We’re big fans of Biolite’s HeadLamp that dropped earlier this year, thanks to its lightweight, easy to adjust and extremely comfortable design. We reviewed it late last year and were impressed with its abilities to shine on Mt. Marcy in upstate New York and along the dark streets of Brooklyn on night runs. If you’re planning a camping adventure this summer, now’s the perfect time to stock up on whatever lights you need to stay seen and see. Biolite’s HeadLamp is currently 15 percent off on BioliteEnergy.com. While you’re there, check out the additional products for up to 35 percent off, like the CampStove, FirePit and our favorite, the SunLight. — Meg Lappe


Today on Gear Patrol

This Hybrid Pack Is The Best Travel Companion You Can Ask For

This Hybrid Pack Is The Best Travel Companion You Can Ask For

Kathmandu’s Hybrid 50L Trolley is game for any far-flung journey. It is always ready to roll — or you can throw it on your back.

The Best Hair and Skincare Products for the Beach

The Best Hair and Skincare Products for the Beach

The best protection and recovery products for a day in the sun.

The Best Travel Pants for Summer Adventures

The Best Travel Pants for Summer Adventures

We tested pairs upon pairs of pants created to function on the road to find the ones that expertly balance comfort, function and style.

These 12 Amazing Products Will Revolutionize Your Next Outdoor Adventure

These 12 Amazing Products Will Revolutionize Your Next Outdoor Adventure

At the country’s biggest outdoor trade show, we picked a dozen awesome items we can’t wait to see hit shelves in the year ahead.

Everything You Need to Know for a Remote Trip to the Channel Islands

Everything You Need to Know for a Remote Trip to the Channel Islands

In the latest edition of our Off the Beaten Path series, we’re giving our tips on how to visit the Channel Islands yourself and some key gear to pack.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Today’s Best Deals: Save 30% on Patagonia’s Best Bag, the Brooks Brothers Summer Sale & More

Welcome to Deals of Note, where Gear Patrol captures all the best deals of the day. You can also follow all our deal posts in the Deals section. Comments or concerns? We’d love to hear from you at deals@gearpatrol.com.

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Apple Watch Series 3 (38mm)
Save $80: The Apple Watch Series 3 is on sale on Amazon right now for $199, which is $80 off its normal price. It’s the lowest price that Apple’s smartwatch has dropped to, and it’s a great deal for most people looking to buy their first Apple Watch. The catch is that this on-sale Series 3 is only available in a 38mm model, meaning you probably need to have a small wrist to wear it. (The 42mm model is not on sale.) grey_placeholder

Patagonia Black Hole Duffel
Save 30%: If you’ve never heard of Patagonia’s Black Hole duffel bags, you’ve likely spotted one in an airport, foreign train station or strapped to the roof of an overlander. Patagonia built the weather-resistant and sturdy bags to last decades with a rugged TPU-laminated ripstop nylon. They also include removable backpack straps that make carrying one a breeze, even when it’s fully loaded. The 60-liter version is arguably the most versatile size; it’s big enough to pack everything you’ll need for a weekend or a week, and it still fits into the overhead bins on planes. We’ve put this bag through its paces on all kinds of adventures, from a ski weekend in Vermont to a month-long trip to Ecuador. It’s one of the best rugged duffel bags available, and right now it’s also 30 percent off at Backcountry in nearly every volume. — Tanner Bowden grey_placeholder

Orient Ray II Dive Watch
Save 60%: Japanese brand Orient offers some of the best value in mechanical watches, of which the Ray II Automatic is a perfect example. Legible, water-resistant to 200m, topped with a mineral crystal, and packing an automatic movement with 40 hours of power reserve, this is a handsome and highly wearable diver with a 41.5mm case. — Oren Hartov
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Brooks Brothers Clothing, Shoes and Accessories
Save up to 50%: Off-season sales are an ideal time to invest in wardrobe classics you can wear for years to come. A great example is the Brooks Brothers Summer Sale, one of the iconic retailer’s biggest sales of the year, where discounts are up to 50 percent on a range of well-made garments. Pick from blazers, shirts, shoes and more, but don’t wait — the sale ends June 28. — John Zientek
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Red Wing Heritage Shoes and Boots
Save up to 52%: It’s a rare occurrence when you can find discounted footwear from Red Wing Heritage. But every so often, Nordstrom Rack offers a range of shoes and boots from the brand at highly-reduced prices. Often, the styles are European or Japanese market styles or factory seconds, and the savings are usually at least half off. Currently, you can save up to 52 percent on shoes and boots from Red Wing Heritage. For the widest range of sizes, check out the derby shoes and work oxfords — they’re all $150 or less. — John Zientek
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Orient Bambino Dress Watch
Save $200: We love the Orient Bambino for its vintage-inspired dial, domed crystal and, not least of all, its automatic movement. With a retail price around $300, it’s always been a great value for the money (it’s one of our favorite watches under $500), but now you can grab one on Amazon for about $100 (depending on dial color), making it an even more affordable dress watch option. — Oren Hartov


Wüsthof’s Classic Chef’s Knife
Save 45%: The market for chef’s knives is made of tiers. Every major knife manufacturer has a value knife that goes for $30 to $45 that’s typically made of hardwearing, easy-to-dull stainless steel (think Victorinox’s Fibrox knife). The second tier, priced just under $100, is filled with knives made with steel that keep an edge longer, but aren’t forged and thus susceptible to chipping. Starting around $150, the third tier is where you’ll find sturdy, forged chef’s knives that remain sharper for longer and pay greater attention to handle ergonomics. This tier is typified by knives like Wüsthof’s Classic 8-Inch Chef’s Knife — a forged, wide bevel knife designed in a classically German style.

Today on Ebay, you can get it for 45 percent off — or a savings of $75. That’s $60 cheaper than its listed price on Amazon. — Will Price



Seagate Backup Plus Portable (5TB)
Save $60: Right now, Amazon is selling the Seagate Backup Plus Portable hard drive with 5TB of storage for less than $100. It’s a pretty great deal that saves you $60. The portable hard drive can be hooked up to either a Mac or Windows desktop or laptop via a simple USB cable (included), so you can backup all your files. This is ideal for anybody that doesn’t want to rely on (or pay for) a Cloud-based storage solution. Also, 5TB is a huge amount of storage — most likely enough to backup your entire computer and then some.

BioLite Headlamp and More Sale
Save 35%: We’re big fans of Biolite’s HeadLamp that dropped earlier this year, thanks to its lightweight, easy to adjust and extremely comfortable design. We reviewed it late last year and were impressed with its abilities to shine on Mt. Marcy in upstate New York and along the dark streets of Brooklyn on night runs. If you’re planning a camping adventure this summer, now’s the perfect time to stock up on whatever lights you need to stay seen and see. Biolite’s HeadLamp is currently 15 percent off on BioliteEnergy.com. While you’re there, check out the additional products for up to 35 percent off, like the CampStove, FirePit and our favorite, the SunLight. — Meg Lappe

See More Deals

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Summer Travelers, This Versatile New Adidas Running Shoe Is for You

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These 12 Amazing Products Will Revolutionize Your Next Outdoor Adventure

Sure, “Faster, Higher, Stronger” may be the Olympic motto, but at Outdoor Retailer Summer 2019, it was all about “Lighter, Smaller, Sleeker.” Booth after booth lured our wandering eyes with new products that shave weight, save space and appear as streamlined as humanly possible. 

And it’s not just hype. From a kayak that folds into a suitcase and a tent that weighs less than a pound to a backpack that compresses to the size of an egg and tripods and camp stools no bigger than a water bottle, these items deliver on their promises. No wonder they dominate our list of the top 12 stars of the show. 

There are outliers of course: custom trail running shoes (sweet), a super-cool lunch box (no joke) and a gorgeous pocketknife (naturally). But in the end, all 12 Editors’ Picks are unified by a common goal: making getting outside and adventuring smarter, easier and more fun than ever before.

Additional contributions by Tanner Bowden, Meg Lappe and Steve Mazzucchi.

We were at the Outdoor Retailer Summer Show 2019 and covered the show extensively. To see all of our product coverage, not just our award winners, you can head: here.

Tecnica Origin trail Running Shoe

When Tecnica released its in-store custom-fit Forge hiking boot last year, we loved it so much that we named it the best available. This year, it came out with a low-cut hiking shoe called the Plasma and, after more than six months of testing it, we named that the best hiking shoe available. We were surprised to learn that in 2020, Tecnica will build its heat molding tech into a trail running shoe, but we weren’t surprised that it’s awesome, too. Like the hiking shoes, the Origin will come with a footbed and upper that’s moldable through an in-store process that takes roughly 15 minutes. We’ve already put some miles on a pair in the mountains around Boulder, CO, and can attest that it’s pretty damn good.

Peak Design Travel Tripod

Peak Design has a habit of taking elements of a product — the adjustment hardware on a camera strap, for instance — and making them better in a way that makes you wonder why nobody did so before. That’s what it did with just about every piece of the Travel Tripod, which, unlike the other items on this list, is available for purchase now on Kickstarter. There’s a lot to love about the Travel Tripod, but here are the highlights: latches to extend the legs (instead of annoying twisting knobs), a single adjustment ring that releases the ball head to move in all directions, a quick-release button for mounting and removing a camera, a built-in smartphone mount. Oh, and its construction makes it smaller than any other DSLR-capable travel tripod we’ve seen, too (it’s about the size of a tall water bottle).

Unnamed Oru Kayak

The main idea behind Oru’s kayaks is accessibility. Inspired by an article that he read in The New Yorker, founder Anton Willis set out to make a boat that he could keep in a tiny San Francisco apartment. He succeeded; Oru’s four current models all pack up small enough to fit into the trunk of a sedan or the back of a closet. But the company’s upcoming model, which is as yet unnamed, transforms from a boat to a box that’s nearly half that size. That’s thanks to a new folding pattern (the first time Oru has deviated from the original crease pattern) that also makes it much easier to put together. Also, Oru’s cheapest kayak to date costs $1,299, but the company is aiming for less than $1,000 for the new vessel, which will help more people get out on the water. Oru plans to launch the new kayak later this year on Kickstarter.

Patagonia High Endurance Kit

This five-piece kit consists of a short, pant, jacket, vest and pullover to help you handle any terrain or weather the trails bring. The Endless Run Short has three pockets built into the sides and back, so you don’t have to worry about your cell phone and gels bouncing around. The Airshed Pro Pullover (shown above) dries quickly and features dual zippers along the quarter-zip opening to help with venting. The Slope Runner Endurance Vest will hold all the soft flasks you can carry, and its fully adjustable internal compression system makes for the perfect fit. A three-layer construction makes the Storm Racer Jacket a burly choice for the trails — if there are any flash weather issues, the waterproof emergency shell is your hero of the day. When the weather really does turn, pull on the Strider Pro Pants to help protect your legs and stay warm. Unsnap at the ankles to pull off in one motion.

Yeti Daytrip

Yeti does what Yeti does best: overhauls a product you likely don’t think about all too often and gives it the Yeti treatment. The Daytrip is a lunch bag to end all lunch bags. Yeti knows insulation — and the aptly named coldcell flex will keep food safe all day whether you’re hitting the beach, enjoying the river or hiking. There are two closure points: a ‘thermosnap’ magnetic one and then an adjustable grid, so you can fold it down as much as you need to eliminate air inside (which warms everything up). And once you’re totally satisfied from the perfect packed lunch, the bag folds down flat, so you can throw it in the bottom of your pack. Thanks to the food-safe interior and smooth exterior, the bag is easy to clean, too.

The Day Trip has Yeti’s premium price point to match — one lunch bag will go for $80, but you’ll likely never have to buy another one. Pick one up in a navy, grey or river green in 2020.

Priumus Firestick Stove

At just over four inches long and weighing well under four ounces, the Primus Firestick is the sleekest canister stove we’ve seen. It’s barely noticeable when retracted, yet ferociously awesome when unleashed. The Firestick features a recessed burner to guard the flame, recessed air intake holes for maximum fuel efficiency and wide pot supports for optimal wind protection. And don’t let its sexy looks fool you — the Firestick pumps out a toasty 8,530 BTUs. There are two versions: steel and titanium (pictured), which is more expensive but also lighter and just a bit cooler looking. Either option makes for an excellent upgrade to any hungry outdoorsman’s food prep kit.

Big Agnes Scout Platinum 1P

This is the lightest three-season one-person tent we saw at OR. Built for backpacking and fast packing, the Scout 1P Platinum weighs just 13 ounces and packs down to 16 inches by 4.5 inches. What shocked us the most, and inspired this award, is that in most one-person tents, you feel like you have to army crawl to get inside, and once you’re zipped into your sleeping bag, you feel like you can’t move around at all. With Big Agnes’s Scout 1P, it’s different. There’s more space inside than we’ve come to expect in a one-person tent — and way more considering how much it weighs.

The base is seven feet long, with a width that narrows from 32 inches to 22 inches (at your feet). There’s a larger awning so you can store your gear outside the tent without fretting over rain or variable weather conditions; the silicone-treated nylon rip-stop material is waterproof, as are the seams. Your trekking poles work overtime to keep the “crazylight” tent anchored up front, and there are multiple built-in loops inside so you can hang a lantern or small light.

Rab Mythic Ultra

The breakthrough that allowed Rab to build a sleeping bag that’s 32 percent warmer but no heavier is in the liner. The interior of the Mythic Ultra is shiny — that’s so it can contain radiant heat loss — but unlike other garments and products that solve the same problem, the bag doesn’t get its sheen from a foil or layer of extra material. Instead, the liner fibers are coated with titanium at the fiber level thanks to a technology called TILT (Thermo Ionic Lining Technology), which won’t flake off or deteriorate over time. We expect Rab to incorporate TILT into other products further down the line (fingers crossed for a down jacket that has it).

Hillsound BTR Stool

Up till now, Vancouver, Canada-based Hillsound has been best known for producing affordable crampons and gaiters for adventurous outdoorsmen. That all changes with the amazingly light and compact Hillsound BTR. It weighs a mere 12.2 ounces and is just 11.4 inches long. But when you pull out the telescoping legs (which magically lockout thanks to PhantomLock technology) and unfold the mesh seat, you’ve got a 14.4-inch tall stool perfect for relaxing next to a campfire, at a Sunday picnic feast or, heck, in a crowded airport. Hillsound has also designed a slightly larger model that’s still only 13.7 ounces and 13.4 inches long, yet offers a more comfortable 17.7-inch tall seat. Both versions can support up to 265 pounds — and make relaxing at the end of a long hike so much more pleasant.

Hydro Flask Trail Series Ultra Light Bottle

You may be thinking, what could Hydro Flask possibly do to make its legendary bottles even better? The brand’s answer: make them lighter. Which brings us to the new 21 oz. Ultralight Titanium flask, which is 35 percent lighter than its stainless steel counterpart — and the lightest vacuum insulated bottle money can buy. You don’t sacrifice quality, either, as the classic double-wall insulation still keeps cold drinks cold for 24 hours (and hot drinks hot for six). As you might expect, the combo of weight savings and performance doesn’t come cheap: the new bottle will cost $100. If you’re not feeling that spendy, Hydro Flask is also releasing 24 oz. and 32 oz. Trail Series Lightweight bottles, which are 25 percent lighter than their inline counterparts and will retail for $45 and $50, respectively.

Black Diamond Cirrus 9 Pack

For $45, you can grab this light-as-a-cloud pack — aptly named the Cirrus 9 after the wispy ones. At just one ounce, this stuff sack compresses down to an egg-sized ball (as shown in the image), then expands to carry nine liters. It’s the perfect travel pack for when you don’t know exactly what you’ll need, or you want to stash an extra bag in case you buy too many souvenirs at the duty-free shop. A single zipper opens up to the main pocket, and the Splice Adjust shoulder straps — a Black Diamond innovation — are easy to tighten or loosen depending on your size and how much is stuffed in the pack. The pack will come in a black, light blue or grey in 2020.

Helle Kletten Knife

Throughout its 87-year history, Helle has primarily produced fixed-blade knives that Discovery Channel survivalist types might use to start a fire or build a shelter. The Kletten is explicitly not for that; with a 2.1-inch drop-point blade, it’s a pocket-friendly option that’s capable of handling the common tasks you might encounter during any given day. The Kletten is only Helle’s third folding knife and the most EDC-worthy of the bunch, but it maintains the brand’s heritage looks with gorgeous curly birch handles.

John Mayer Played This $1.9 Million Guitar with Dead & Co. in NYC

On June 23 at Citi Field in NYC, John Mayer played Jerry Garica’s famous Wolf guitar onstage with Dead & Company. This was the first time Mayer performed with one of Garcia’s instruments. “It wasn’t time until it was,” he said in an Instagram post. “NYC, we were all holding Jerry’s guitar tonight. I cherished the responsibility.”

The guitar was built by California luthier Doug Irwin and first used by Garcia at a private party for the Hell’s Angels in NYC in 1973. The instrument was made with a purpleheart and curly maple body, a 24-fret neck and an ebony fingerboard inlaid with African ivory (except for the first fret which is mother-of-pearl).

Irwin built the guitar with a plate system for mounting pickups so Garcia could experiment with traditional Fender Stratocaster pickups and humbuckers — the guitar now has humbuckers in the bridge and middle positions and a single-coil in the neck. To control the pickups, the guitar has a five-position selector, tone controls for the front and middle pickups and a master volume control (two mini-toggle switches control pickup coils). The guitar also has two output jacks: one went directly to the amp and another went to an effects loop (another mini-toggle switch brought the effects loop in or out).

Garcia used the instrument throughout the ‘70s and then used it to experiment with MIDI synthesizer technology in ’89. He last played it onstage with the Grateful Dead in Oakland in 1993.

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In 2017, the guitar sold for over $1.9 million at a Guernsey’s auction benefiting the Southern Poverty Law Center. Brian Halligan, the Boston-based CEO of HubSpot, placed the winning bid with intentions that the guitar be played. “I think it is best served by being played, so I plan to do so,” he told Rolling Stone. “I plan to lend it out to the Garcia family whenever they want it.”

Mayer’s Signature PRS Guitar

John Mayer’s new Paul Reed Smith signature model takes cues from vintage ’63 and ’64 Strats. Blending the precision PRS is known for with the best qualities of the vintage guitars, this is a magical instrument. Read the Story

Tesla Truckla

Given enough time, Elon Musk will eventually push Tesla to add more EV models to its lineup. Right now, we’re looking at the Model S, Model X, and Model 3 as its available offerings. Meanwhile, the Roadster, Semi, And Model 3 are on its way soon. So far, we have a sedan, a coupe, a crossover SUV, and a semi-trailer truck, but we know there will be more. On the other hand, if you have the skills, the time, the tools, and the willingness to destroy a perfectly good Model 3, then check out the Tesla Truckla.

What we’re looking at here is a custom all-electric single-cab pickup truck. To give credit where it’s due, this is one impressive work that showcases what Tesla can potentially offer in the future. The mad scientist behind this project is Simone Luna Louise Söderlund Giertz or just Simone Giertz for short. This Swedish mechanical maven loves to tinker around with robotics and also dabbles around as an inventor, TV host, and a YouTuber.

Her DIY masterpiece takes a brand new Tesla Model 3, an angle grinder, a welder, and some elbow grease to complete. In our opinion, the process is cringe-worthy because you’re seeing a pristine sedan getting cut up like it’s in a gory slasher movie. The part of the video where she starts to key the trunk makes us tear up. Anyway, her team started off by stripping off the interior of the vehicle then proceeded to remove the beams and the rear structure of the car. Thankfully, after installing the bed as well as the cargo rack, the Tesla Truckla becomes one awesome ride

Check out her YouTube channel here

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Image and video courtesy of Simone Giertz

Electric Ford Mustang By Charge Automotive

We all know that most major automotive manufacturers are shifting production away from conventional petrol-driven engines. However, your favorite car brand might not be on the list just yet. Although concept models are on show, production might not start until a few years from now. On the other hand, you might want to rely on other means to get what you want. Thankfully, one company is a step ahead with the electric Ford Mustang by Charge Automotive.

You read that right, this awesome ride is the work of a British group that specializes in upgrading classic automobiles. Gearheads all over know that the Ford Mustang is one of the most iconic American sports car ever.

Others might disagree, but the Blue Oval certainly made a masterpiece of a muscle car with this model. Charge Automotive is preparing only 499 examples of this all-electric machine. Furthermore, what’s noticeably cool about it is the pure retro aesthetics of these 1960 pony cars.

However, if you’re looking for the galloping horse emblem, it’s not there. Despite the familiar form factor, Charge Automotive is slapping their own logo onto this EV. Perhaps, it’s intentional to let the world know that you’re not inside a gas-guzzling beast, but cruising along on board an eco-friendly coupe.

The electric Ford Mustang features cutting-edge technology within that will be obvious inside the cabin. Instead of a vintage interior, you’re getting a modern setup with touch displays and the works. The electric powertrain promises up to 536 horsepower with 5,532 lb-ft of torque. Top speed maxes out at 149 mph with a 0-60 mph sprint of a little over three seconds. Charge Automotive claims that the 64 kWh battery should be good for at least 200 miles.

Find out more about it here

Images courtesy of Charge Automotive

This Hybrid Pack Is The Best Travel Companion You Can Ask For

Sure, a lot of bags are marketed as being able to “do it all” but rarely are they truly up to scratch. But the Hybrid 50L Trolley is one of those exceptions — though it is hardly exceptional that Kathmandu is behind this wonder. Hailing from the rugged terrain and made for the always adventure ready people of New Zealand, Kathmandu has been making some of the most practical and ingenuity designed pieces of outdoor kit for thirty years. These folks certainly know their way around designing a bag for any adventure.

Key Specs

Dimensions: 70cm x 30cm x 37cm
Capacity: 50L
Weight: 6.9lb

The Hybrid 50L Trolley is game for any far-flung journey regardless of what you need from it. Incredibly lightweight, outfitted with rugged wheels and collapsible handle, it is always ready to roll. But, when the going gets tough, you can throw this easily organized 50L on your back, quickly converting into a ruck. Kathmandu has been perfecting the design of the Hybrid Trolley for 15 years and this newest iteration is the best it has ever been.

Improved Fold-out Harness

The Hybrid 50L Trolley has a newly improved harness system, that allows it to go from wheely to back-born seamlessly. The harness is zipped into a forward-facing compartment so it doesn’t get in the way or become an eye-sore when you are rolling along. When you do deploy those stellar straps, it reveals comfortable breathable mesh back panel and cushioned hip belt that will help you schlep with ease. But when you are back on somewhat even ground, the wheels can.

Durable Wheels

The most important part of any bag with wheels is, well, the wheels. Naturally, if the wheels on a wheel-based bag give out, that’s it, regardless of how many other ways it can be carried. That is why Kathmandu gave the Hybrid 50L Trolley durable wheels that can take you anywhere you need to go — no matter the terrain. These two wheels that can take you most places are also discreet. Tucked out of the way, you can hardly notice the two wheels that give this pack so many miles. The extendable handle means that trundling along will be a breeze on your back.

Internal Organization

With the exterior of the back locked down, you need to make sure you can lock down your effects on the inside. All too often with backpacks, your contents just get lost and shift around and every time, the one thing you need is at the very bottom. To counteract the gravity of the situation, Kathmandu has put a few smart bits in place. First thing first, you have an added external pocket along with an internal pocket and a mesh compartment to help you keep things straight. Now to keep things place in the spacious main compartment, you have some nifty compression straps then let you cinch your load down to the smallest size and keep it all locked in place.

Attachment Points

If the Hybrid 50L Trolley is still not enough room for your adventure, there is a handy added feature. Because Kathmandu knows that sometimes one bag just isn’t enough, the Hybrid 50L comes equipped with attachment points for Kathmandu’s Gluon Daypack. That way you can use your Hybrid 50L to pack for the trip and use the daypack for your smaller jaunts — all while being seamlessly integrated for easier travel.

9 Great Solar-Powered Watches for Summer Sun

Without the constant winding required of mechanical watches or the dead batteries associated with quartz, solar-powered watches represent some of the most practical, useful, and reliable watches made today. The inclusion of solar charging gives the wearer all the benefits of current quartz watch technology without the looming feeling of an expiration date on your watch determined by its battery life.

Solar-powered watches absorb light through solar cells and convert it into energy that is stored in the batteries. You knew that. Perhaps not everyone knows, however, that while the common term is “solar,” any light source will do the job — and not just the sun. One can identify solar cells on the dials of many watches by their purplish tint, but some companies, like Citizen, have developed clever technology whereby the solar cells are hidden but light absorption remains efficient, resulting in more options for traditional dials.

It is important to note one small caveat to the assertion that one “never” needs to change the battery of a solar-powered watch. Parts of any watch, including batteries, will age just like every other item or material does. So while they will not run out of juice if kept sufficiently exposed to light, many batteries have an expected life of about 30 years before they begin to corrode. In comparison, the many moving parts of mechanical watches mean that they will also most likely require multiple services and often even part-replacement during the same period of time.

The solar watch market is today dominated by the major Japanese brands, namely Casio, Citizen, and Seiko — though the first solar watch was invented by an American engineer. Solar-charging technology can be found in some very affordable watches, but is generally a feature that adds to the price of similar models without it. Many high-end quartz watches from Japanese brands combine a range of technologies and features including solar charging. The below list includes inexpensive examples as well as luxury-priced solar watches with many other features and levels of refinement, and even a couple from European brands.

Casio G-Shock GW6900-1

Always look for the Tough Solar technology when shopping Casio G-Shock watches, as many of them offer it. The GW6900-1 is one of the most classic G-Shock forms, and it’s also an example of the quite affordable end of Casio’s solar-powered range. The Tough Solar does, however, command a premium over otherwise very similar models that do not offer solar charging. This is a robust watch that can be beat up and worn for years without worry, hassle, or much financial investment — one reason it is a top choice among soldiers and police.

Case Diameter: 50mm
Water Resistance: 200m

Citizen Eco-Drive Promaster Diver

Notice that Citizen’s vast range of solar-powered watches, designated by their technology which they call Eco-Drive, are mostly analog, and that no solar cells are visible. This solid dive watch is a great example of an affordable and rugged offering from Citizen that will serve you well for years with no winding and no need for battery replacements.

Case Diameter: 42mm
Water Resistance: 200m

Seiko Prospex Solar Diver

Seiko’s Prospex collection distinguishes itself from the brand’s more basic models with premium materials and more robust construction. The Solar Diver offers a practical, tough, and handsome option with all the Prospex quality, and it’s a great solar option from Seiko without going for the full-featured, premium Astron line.

Case Diameter: 43.5mm
Water Resistance: 200m

Casio Protrek PRG-600

Don’t be shocked that Casio has multiple spots on this list: they represent some of the best options at multiple price points for solar watches. Protrek is like a brand of its own within the Casio universe, and like other watches that include the brand’s Tough Solar technology, it incorporates multiple other features like censors, a compass, and more. Protrek watches are made for outdoor activities, so plenty of sun will keep them healthy.

Case Diameter: 51.5mm
Water Resistance: 100m

Junghans Milano Solar

Junghans is an interesting brand from Germany that stands out in several fields. They are one of the very few European companies that has invested in technology like solar charging and radio controlled watches while also being strong in design (Bauhaus-influenced design, specifically, is their biggest claim to fame) and mechanical watches. They offer a different aesthetic and approach from the vast majority of their competitors, and watches like the Milano Solar remain relatively affordable.

Case Diameter: 37mm
Water Resistance: 50m

Casio G-Shock MT-G B1000

While one can dive well into luxury pricing territory with the G-Shock MR-G range, the MT-G offers many of the same premium features and construction — Tough Solar being one of them, of course. G-Shock is known for its toughness, functionality, bold designs, and affordable prices, but the MT-G and other higher range collections feature things like steel cases, more features, and fewer concessions to cost, resulting in a maximal G-Shock experience.

Case Diameter: 51.7mm
Water Resistance: 200m

Tissot T-Touch Expert Solar II

Tissot’s T-Touch collection is interesting and unusual in the wider world of watches, with a touch screen to operate a host of features. It’s also unusual as one of the few Swiss brands focusing on this kind of watch and technology. T-Touch watches are rugged and seem made for actual outdoor use, but the addition of solar charging on more recent models really rounds out a strong package.

Case Diameter: 45mm
Water Resistance: 100m

Seiko Astron 5x

In the race among Japanese watch companies to make the ultimate practical watch with satellite and radio- synching technology (among other practical features), consumers win. The mighty Seiko’s entrant is the Astron, and its latest edition is the Astron 5x with a more compact titanium case than ever at 42.9mm wide and 12.2mm thick, solar charging, Seiko’s zaratsu polishing, sapphire crystal, and essentially every premium detail the brand offers at this price level.

Case Diameter: 42.9mm
Water Resistance: 100m

Citizen Eco Drive One

The world’s thinnest light-powered watch is the Eco-Drive One, and Citizen emphasized the achievement by making it a luxury product, not holding back on refinement or materials. At just 2.98mm thick and 40mm wide with a refined design, this is not only technically interesting, but wears elegantly and comfortably — it even made our list of best men’s dress watches.

Case Diameter: 40mm
Water Resistance: 30m

Alpinestars Supertech M10 Helmet Review: The Off-Road Rider’s Featherweight Champ

It’s rare for any company to get things right on their first attempt. Entering into unexplored territory with a new product can be tricky; hell, even well-established car companies usually need to give a new model a couple iterations or model years to iron out the kinks.

Which is why I was a bit tentative to slide my gray matter into Alpinestars new Supertech M10 Helmet. It’s not that there’s any reason to doubt Italian motorcycle gear manufacturer’s commitment to safety, of course. But helmets need to be more than safe to be effective. They need to fit well, be comfortable, offer adequate venting and be light enough to not induce fatigue on a ride.

So, how does this company’s first diallance into protective headgear stack up? Does Alpinestars have a hit on their hands with the Supertech M10, or should buyers wait for the next generation?

The Good: Alpinestars clearly set a high safety bar for themselves to clear with the Supertech M10 — and they’ve cleared it on a number of deliverables. This helmet is a marvel of technology. Integrations such as MIPS (Multi-Directional Impact Protection System) combine with a slip layer between the EPS foam liner and the interior padding to further reduce the rotational forces associated with crashing. The EPS liner itself is comprised of a four-part construction, meaning the most impact prone sections can react with a different density of protection.

Meanwhile, under the chinbar, a clavicle relief cutout has been made to help mitigate collarbone injuries. The moisture-wicking interior is also set up with an ERS (Emergency Release System) at the cheek pads to ensure paramedics can toss off the M10 without adding to potential problems. On top of this, the visor is held on via a trio of quick-release fasteners that surrender their hold at near lyany impact.

Who It’s For: Since its both DOT- and ECE-certified, any street rider looking for a well-ventilated, lightweight summer helmet could happily don the Supertech M10. But riders that are hell-bent on exploring single-tracks and trekking down paths less travelled will see the greatest benefits of Alpinestars’s development work.

Watch Out For: Despite the integrated A-Head Adjustment feature, if you don’t carry an intermediate oval-shaped melon on your shoulders, the SM10 isn’t the bucket for you. Also, some of the vents either don’t have screens (the nostril vents) or the screening is inset from the outer shell (the upper eyeport vents), which makes them a mud magnet. One roost too many and the earth’s goo will be trapped too tight for a wipe on the fly, restricting airflow.

Alternatives: This may be Alpinestars’s first production helmet, but the off-road and motocross space is already pretty packed; alternatives from well-established helmet manufacturers and other do-all brands abound. The Arai VX4 Combat ($665) meets both DOT and Snell ratings and offers their unique Facial Contour System to ensure a snug fit. The ATR-2 from 6D ($695) is a touch heavier than the Supertech M10 but boasts a beefy list of safety integrations that 6D developed during work in the NFL’s Head Health Challenge. Another great choice is the F5 Koroyd from Klim ($649); equipped with MIPS and built using Klim’s patented Koroyd energy-absorbing technology, it too boasts leading-edge safety tech and a lightweight design.

Review: The original plan was to take the Supertech M10 out to an off-road riding school north of Toronto, but Mother Nature had other ideas. At the time of this writing, all nearby trails had yet to be opened due to unseasonable flooding. No matter. Since it was graced with street legality, I went to find out how this MX lid performed around town and during lighter-duty ADV riding.

Right out of the included tote bag, it’s hard not to be impressed with just how light the Supertech M10 is: deceptively so, even for a motocross lid. The interior is soft, plush and supportive; I could feel a bit of a hot-spot at my forehead initially, but after experimenting with the fitment system, was able to find a fit that worked just right.

On the street and in the breeze, the M10 offers an expansive view from the eyeport. I experimented with both goggles and sunglasses during on-road testing, and both fit well enough to keep my peepers protected without stifling airflow. From behind a windshield, buffeting and wind noise is quieter than expected; a few hours of interstate slog would be perfectly tolerable it on. That said, it’s certainly not as quiet a headspace as a full-face cocoon, and the visor will induce lift at speed.

Off-road, the M10 comes into its own. The combination of 16 intake vents and five exhaust ports keep things cool, while its near-imperceptible weight means keeping your noggin on a swivel won’t wear you down. The eyeport is well-sized for proper off-roading goggles, and despite not being adjustable, the visor is well-positioned to cut glare without becoming too much of a sail.

Verdict: It may be Alpinestars’s first entry into the segment and designed primarily for motocross, but the Supertech M10 — the product of more than five years of design and development — has far broader appeal. This is a lid that dual-sport and ADV-riders should have on their radar. But what really has me salivating is the assumption that this won’t be the only helmet Alpinestars creates: With an incredibly strong presence in MotoGP, World Superbike and product lines that fill near every niche of riding, it seems like only be a matter of time before dedicated street and track helmets see the light of day. And given how well the Alpinestars did with the Supertech M10, we should all be in for a treat.

What Others Are Saying:

• “The Alpinestars Supertech M10 helmet is DOT- and ECE-approved. It features a multi-density foam liner, composite shell, MIPS rotational impact device, impact release visor system and comes in six different sizes. There is no doubt that the styling, design and construction are cutting edge.” — MOTOCROSS ACTION MAGAZINE

• “We’ve enjoyed the time spent so far in the M10, and we’ll continue wearing it. Testing helmets for a review is one thing, but continually reaching for it every time we ride or race is another – it speaks much more to the helmet’s value not only in terms of comfort and looks, but to the peace of mind that comes with knowing and trusting the protective qualities it provides.” — BRENT JASWINSKI, MOTORCYCLE.COM

• “With any helmet hitting north of the $500 mark, the bar for features is very high. Thankfully the S-M10 exceeds expectations in all areas and confirms that Alpinestars really did overdeliver with their first foray into the dirt helmet world.” — ESSENTIAL MOTO

Alpinestars Supertech M10 Meta Helmet Key Specs

Construction: Three-layer composite
Weight: 2.77 pounds (size medium)
Number of Shell Sizes: Four
SPEC4:
SPEC5:

Alpinestars provided this product for review.

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The Best Travel Pants for Summer Adventures

Any article of clothing that claims to be “perfect for travel” has an agenda. Like the word “natural” appearing on packaged food, a phrase like “travel-ready” is a vague and enticing smokescreen that can signify any number of qualities at the heart of which lies the question: What makes this thing better for wearing in places other than the place where I live? Pose the inquiry to any given brand, and a response might mention a techy material or maybe a hidden pocket (or nothing unique whatsoever). It’s particularly true of pants. What makes a good pair of travel pants? Is it material? The number of pockets? It isn’t, no matter what anyone tells you, legs that zip-off at the knee. We tested pair after pair on day trips, weekend trips and overseas trips to find out.

686 Anything Multi Cargo Pant

“Cargo pant” might have you thinking about thigh-mounted square pockets with flapping lids, but for these pants, all it means is that they have room to carry a lot of stuff. There are the two front pockets that we’re all familiar with, but then there’s a card pocket, pen pocket, zippered leg pockets, phone pocket, belt loop stash pocket and, oh yeah, two back pockets (and probably some others that we’re missing). Even with all that storage though, the Anything Multi Cargo Pants don’t appear bulky and gawky. They’re made of a stretchy, water-resistant fabric that’s fine to hike in but doesn’t look overtly technical.

Topo Designs Tech Pants

The Tech Pants, like much of what Topo Designs produces, are a blend of outdoor lifestyle and performance. It’s hard to say which of the two takes a larger share, though. They’re fully capable before, during and after mountain adventures with a lightweight and stretchy nylon fabric. Topo Designs built them with a gusseted crotch and articulated knees for extra mobility and cinchable ankle cuffs to move the material out of the way when you need to (when you’re rock climbing, hiking or bike riding, for instance). The pants also have a water-repellant finish and plenty of pockets, and, like many of the others on this list, are stylish enough to wear in any cities you might visit.

Roark Revival Layover Pant

Roark Revival’s entire brand is travel; each of the company’s seasonal collections is inspired directly by trips to places like Jamaica, the Falkland Islands and Hong Kong. These guys spend a lot of time in airports, cars, rickshaws — whatever it takes to get there — so it’s no wonder that they built a pant that prioritizes comfort and functionality. The Layover Stretch Travel Pant is made of a blended nylon and cotton fabric that’s stretchy and fastens with a drawstring instead of a button for a slightly adjustable fit. Its front pockets have oversized, zip openings to accommodate larger essentials like travel documents or sunglasses, and there’s also a hidden rear pocket that’s the perfect size for a phone. The material is soft and not too technical, and the fit is slim, qualities that make these pants good-looking enough to wear in cities (or every day back home).

Foehn Nelson Pant

You’d never know that Foehn made the Nelson for rock climbing. With a somewhat workwear-inspired look and feel and a slightly stretchy, hard-wearing fabric, the pants are well-suited to anything that requires rugged clothing. Like other dungaree-style pants, they have a roomy fit but are also trimmed and look good enough to be an everyday work pant, whether your office is indoors or out. In our testing, we also found that the zippered thigh pocket, which Foehn made to provide access to items while wearing a climbing harness, is also the perfect place to carry a passport and boarding pass.

REI Craglands Pant

The Craglands might be the most technical of the pants on this list. They’re also the simplest and lightest. REI built them with a stretchy ripstop nylon fabric that repels water, wicks moisture and dries quickly, so they’re ideal for any trips that include outdoor activities like hiking and climbing. That fabric, and an elastic waist and cuffs, do give these pants more of a technical appearance, but they also make them supremely comfortable.

Western Rise Slim Rivet Pant

We’ve been fans of Colorado-based Western Rise’s versatile everyday pant for some time now. One of our staff members once wrote, “I own — and constantly wear — two pairs of these suckers. The fit is excellent, like modern chinos or jeans. The colors are just unique enough to stand out. But what I like most about them is how tough they are.” The recipe for that magical combination includes stretch nylon and air-texturized fibers that make the pants feel like regular pants (as opposed to technical outdoor pants). They repel water, dry quickly, are plenty comfortable and lean strongly into a style that’s appropriate for everyday, urban and office environments, perhaps more than any other pair on this list.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Everything You Need to Know for a Remote Trip to the Channel Islands

Editor’s Note: In this series, Off the Beaten Path, we’re telling the stories of outdoor guides and how they spend their time off, individually experiencing the very places they uncover for people every day. In this edition, we’re giving all the insights on how to get to California’s Channel Islands yourself and what to bring along for the trip.

What are the Channel Islands?
An archipelago of eight islands just off the coast of California constitute the Channel Islands. Only the five northernmost islands — Anacapa, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel — are part of Channel Islands National Park, established in 1980. (The other three, more southern, are San Clemente, San Nicolas and Santa Catalina.) The islands are close to the shoreline — you can see them from LA on a clear day — but you can only them by boat or, in some cases, a plane.

The islands are rugged, rimmed by steep sea cliffs and filled with grassy hillsides and rocky mountains. There are occasional stands of pine and oaks, but largely, the landscape is covered by grasses and wildflowers. Over 140 species are endemic to the islands. Onshore, the only mammal species are (very pesky) island foxes, skunks and deer mice; birds, reptiles and insects thrive. The sea also teems with life: many species of whales, dolphins, bountiful fish populations, plus sea lions, seals and dolphins.

The islands are almost entirely unpeopled and extremely undeveloped. This, combined with the difficulty of getting to them from the mainland, make them one of the least visited national parks. But visiting them can be done — and the rewards for a journey can be spectacular. It’s a prime — and recommended — place to reconnect. Here’s what you need to know.


How to Get There
Island Packers operates ferries to each of the islands; Channel Islands Aviation operates planes to Santa Rosa and San Miguel year-round, on demand. Boats run year-round to Anacapa and Santa Cruz islands (1-hour trip), April through November for Santa Rosa and San Miguel (3- and 4-hour trips, respectively), and spring through fall to Santa Barbara Island (4-hour trip).

What to Do
Anacapa Island, the nearest to shore, is beautiful but has no fresh water; primitive campsites, short hiking trails and minimal access to the ocean due to cliffs makes it a great spot for a day trip or short overnight stay. Similarly, there is no water, goods, or services on the more distant, relatively small islands of San Miguel, Santa Barbara, or Santa Rosa, making them best for a short visit. (Each does offer brilliant wildlife viewing, hiking, and ocean life.)


This makes Santa Cruz Island the most viable option for a prolonged stay. It is the largest island by far, at 60,000 acres, or roughly the size of Staten Island, with some 70 miles of coastline. More than half of its acreage is private land owned by the Nature Conservancy, but that still leaves plenty of area to explore on the eastern, National Park, side. Island Packers ferries operate 5-7 days of the week for drop-off and pickup. Scorpion Ranch campground, on its easternmost end, is the only place on any of the islands with drinking water and pit toilets; not to mention, the campground sits in a beautiful valley shaded by Eucalyptus trees. Nearby, Santa Barbara Adventure Company operates out of Scorpion Harbor, providing guides, gear, and tours for sea kayaking and snorkeling.

Both the Smugglers Cove trail (7.5 miles, out and back) and the Potato Harbor Trail (4.9 mile loop) begin and end near Scorpion Ranch campground, and lead through the interior and cliffs of the island for great views and wildlife viewing. Potato Harbor, on the northern side of the island, offers incredible sunset views; Smuggler’s Cove, on the southern side, is a great spot to explore.


Bring your own kayak and snorkel gear to explore the various kelp beds and over 250 sea caves along the island’s coast. Or, rent a guide and gear through Santa Barbara Adventure Company. The marine life off the coast is some of the most vibrant in the world—you’ll likely see fish of all kinds, sea lions, and maybe even dolphins and whales.

Rather than staying on the island, you can also outfit through SBAC to take a boat to the west side of the island and explore Painted Cave, the longest in North America, a cavernous delight on a kayak. Or, backcountry camp at Del Norte Campground, in the middle of the island, then hike back to Scorpion Ranch for more populated fun. (Just make sure you bring water—Del Norte doesn’t have any.)


What Gear to Bring
Because most of the Channel Islands are entirely undeveloped, you’ll need first to bring your own water and food (Can we recommend some Pad Thai?). It’s prettty essential, also, to note that Scorpion Ranch campground on Santa Cruz is the only place with potable water on the islands. For a day hike, be sure to dress in layers — temperatures swing wildly between chilly, windswept nights to blazing, cloudless days—and consider bringing along a down jacket, hat and gloves in the cooler months. Sturdy hiking boots and water shoes are a must. If you’re going in the water, don’t forget to bring or rent a wetsuit, since water temperatures are frigid three months out of the year. If you’re camping, don’t forget a lightweight stove — there are no open fires allowed on the island, so this won’t be an open-fire-grilling trip.

The Watch for the Journey

Montblanc’s 1858 collection was inspired by the adventures watches made by Minerva in the 1920s and ‘30s and the Automatic 40mm pays homage to the classic stylings of that brand — cathedral-shaped hands, railway minutes track — and capped with a khaki-green nubuck calf leather strap, it’s tough and ready for the wild.
Buy Now: $2,410

The Best Hair and Skincare Products for the Beach

A soothing, carefree day on the beach can turn south real quick. If you don’t take the right precautions against sun exposure and cancer-causing UV rays, then you can end up with burned, red skin with the potential for far more severe problems. And even if you temper the exposure or play chicken with each reapplication, you’re still susceptible to the sun’s photo-aging effects. That is to say, if you don’t properly prepare your skin against even the mildest of exposure, you increase the drying, roughing, wrinkling and discoloration of your skin.

It’s not just your skin that is at risk: Extended, direct sun exposure is also damaging and drying to the hair. It frustrates your hairstyle, leads to breakage and compromises any dye and bleach — it causes silver and blonde hair to turn dull and gray.

You’ve heard it from us a few times here, and you’ve heard it a few thousand times prior: You have to protect yourself from the sun, and promote healthy recovery after the fact. These products will do the trick, for hair, body and face.

Protection

For Hair (and Color-Dyed Hair): Sachajuan Hair in the Sun

You might not realize that your hair is as susceptible to sun damage as your skin. While you don’t feel the pain from the damage, you can see it, in the form of dehydration, fraying and breakage. Part styling cream, part UV shield, Sachajuan’s fantastic hair shield deploys its proprietary Ocean Silk technology to coat each strand and protect from such damage. It’s sturdy enough to withstand a rinse, too, should you need to freshen up midday. Reapply each day, as necessary.

For Bleached or Silver Hair: Christophe Robin Shade Variation Blonde Hair Mask

Paired with a blonde-toning hair care regimen (see below), a hair mask pumps all kinds of color-preserving ingredients into your silvers and blondes. It’s both preventative and reactive, and thus an essential part of your summer in the sun. Christophe Robin uses almond butter and buriti oil in this nourishing, soothing hair mask which has an acidic pH of 4.5 (that decreases porosity in the hair, and in turn, prevents discoloration or pigment fading). It helps keep brassy, dull and yellow tones at bay — all of which are a threat when you sit in the sun all day or soak in the sea for even a minute. Apply it to clean, towel-dried hair once every few days for five to 30 minutes, as needed.

For Heat-Proof Hair Styles: By Villain Sidekick

Working as both a heat shield and hair spray, By Villain’s Sidekick helps lock in your desired style — sea breeze and humidity be damned. You can add it first to towel-dried hair, combing through prior to applying your styling product, or as a final step for added hold, definition and texture.

For Body: Svens Mineral Broad-Spectrum Sunscreen SPF 33

New to the scene, Svens’ SPF 33 mineral sunscreen combines titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, and is reef friendly. It’s a strong debut from the skincare brand, as the sunscreen absorbs easily, wears light, and defends against both UVA and UVB rays. Like all other sunblocks, you need to reapply every two hours, or after swimming and sweating profusely.

For Face (and Beard!): Stubble + ‘Stache Broad Spectrum Moisturizer SPF 30

A 3-in-1 product, Stubble + ‘Stache’s newest product moisturizes your hair and whiskers with aloe, argan oil, vitamin C and green tea extract, among many other nourishing ingredients. It also protects against UVA and UVB rays, absorbs fast, and doesn’t leave a greasy, shiny residue on the skin. Keep it on hand for the non-beach days, too, for all its nourishing and anti-aging powers.

Recovery

For Hair: Fekkai Apres Soleil Crème

After a long, dehydrating day in the sun, your hair needs serious replenishment. (Just like how your body and skin feel dehydrated after the same.) Fekkai’s hair cream is infused with sunflower seed oil, and acts as a dual styler and leave-in conditioner to neutralize frizzing, restore shine and keep hair buoyant.

For Bleached or Silver Hair: Davines Alchemic Silver Shampoo and Conditioner

As your stylist should have told you, it’s imperative to use color-toning shampoo and conditioner on bleach-blonde hair, in order to prevent brassiness and yellowing. The same goes for naturally silver hair. There is no place more threatening to your hair than the beach or pool, because of the direct sun and exposure to chlorine or seawater. Davines’ Alchemic Silver lineup is an effective daily treatment; you can double stock the conditioner since you’ll need it on the daily while rotating in the shampoo every two to three days. Apply each product separately, always concluding with the conditioner, and let each one absorb and tone hair for one to two minutes before rinsing.

For Body: La Mer After Sun Enhancer

Even though you aren’t sunburnt, you still need to nourish and soothe your skin after sun exposure. That’s because it still took a beating, despite your best efforts to bounce the UV rays. (After all, our skin still absorbs color despite UV defenses.) La Mer’s body gel cools on contact with the brand’s signature Miracle Broth, rich in giant sea kelp. It’s also made with lime tea and algae ferment to help the skin look and feel radiant, rather than parched.

For Sunburn: COOLA ER+ Radical Recovery After-Sun Lotion

Packed with aloe, agave, nourishing oils, vitamins and antioxidants, Coola’s post-sun recovery helps sore, reddened skin recover quickly. It’s good for general sun recovery, too, if your skin is feeling dry and sensitive despite your sun-shielding measures. You can even apply this lotion to the face, and should do so frequently in the event of a sunburn. You’ll spare a few days of agonizing recovery.

Note: Purchasing products through our links may earn us a portion of the sale, which supports our editorial team’s mission. Learn more here.

Nike X Stranger Things Collection

We only have a little over a week left before the third season of Netflix’s hit science fiction horror series makes its debut. This highly-anticipated TV show franchise is already spawning merchandise that people are snapping up like crazy. Just recently, LEGO unveiled a 2,287-piece deluxe playset that fans will love to add to their collection. It’s no surprise that another company is preparing to join the fun. The Nike X Stranger Things collection looks like another hit the making when it drops in the coming weeks.

Everything about this collections just oozes pure classic cool. We’re referring to the old-school design each of the items is sporting that we can’t get enough of. Nike reveals that there will be two release for their Stranger Things collaboration. This first batch is dropping on June 27, while the second group will see action on July 1. Collectors everywhere will definitely be on their toes to grab these awesome products when they hit retailers. These limited edition items will likewise command a pretty penny in the resale market after all stocks are gone.

The fictional Hawkins High School livery is on full display as the Nike X Stranger Things collection draws near. Moreover, the tiger mascot also makes an appearance on a couple of items. All of the footwear and sports apparel of the first drop showcase an orange and green colorway for that retro aura. Nike is featuring three of its most popular footwear models: the Blazer Mid, Tailwind 79, and Cortez. Finally, the second drop, otherwise known as the OG collection flaunts a red, white, and blue colorway to celebrate US Independence Day.

Only from Nike

Images courtesy of Nike